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Encyclopedia > Paint
Dried green paint
Dried green paint

Paint is any liquid, liquifiable, or mastic composition which after application to a substrate in a thin layer is converted to an opaque solid film. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Paint has the following meanings: Paint is a pigmented liquid or paste used by artists. ... Download high resolution version (616x820, 141 KB)bucket with dried up green paint, Rome, Italy. ... Download high resolution version (616x820, 141 KB)bucket with dried up green paint, Rome, Italy. ... For other uses, see Liquid (disambiguation). ... Substrate is a term used in materials science to describe the base material on which processing is conducted to produce new film or layers of material such as deposited coatings. ... This box:      For other uses, see Solid (disambiguation). ...


Paint is used to protect, decorate (such as adding color), or add functionality to an object or surface by covering it with a pigmented coating. An example of protection is to retard corrosion of metal. An example of decoration is to add festive trim to a room interior. An example of added functionality is to modify light reflection or heat radiation of a surface. Another example of functionality would be the use of color to identify hazards or function of equipment and pipelines. Color is an important part of the visual arts. ... For the hazard, see corrosive. ... This article is about metallic materials. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Thermal radiation is electromagnetic radiation emitted from the surface of an object which is due to the objects temperature. ...


As a verb, painting is the application of paint. Someone who paints artistically is usually called a painter or artist, while someone who paints commercially is often referred to as a painter and decorator, or house painter. For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... A modern painter and decorator. ... A painter and decorator is a tradesman responsible for the painting and decorating of buildings, and is also known as a decorator or house painter. ...


Paint can be applied to almost any kind of object. It is used, among many other uses, in the production of art, in industrial coating, as a driving aid (road surface marking), or as a barrier to prevent corrosion or water damage. Paint is a semifinished product, or intermediate good as the final product is the painted article itself. This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... An industrial coating is a paint or coating defined by its protective, rather than its aesthetic properties, although it can provide both. ... Road surface marking is any kind of device or material that is used on a road surface to convey official information. ... For the hazard, see corrosive. ... Intermediate goods or producer goods are goods used as inputs in the production of other goods, such as partly finished goods or raw materials. ...


Paint can also be mixed with glaze to create various textures and patterns. This process is referred to as faux finish and is quite popular with discerning homeowners, architects and interior designers. Glaze is a thin shiny coating, or the act of applying the coating. ... Faux painting or Faux finishing are terms used to describe a wide range of decorative painting techniques. ...

Contents

Pigment

Main article: Pigment

Pigments are granular solids incorporated into the paint to contribute colour, toughness or simply to reduce the cost of the paint. Alternatively, some paints contain dyes instead of or in combination with pigments. Other paints contain no pigment at all. Natural Ultramarine pigment in powdered form. ...


Pigments can be classified as either natural or synthetic types. Natural pigments include various clays, calcium carbonate, mica, silicas, and talcs. Synthetics would include engineered molecules, calcined clays, blanc fix, precipitated calcium carbonate, and synthetic silicas. For other uses, see Clay (disambiguation). ... Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound, with the chemical formula CaCO3. ... Rock with mica Mica sheet Mica flakes The mica group of sheet silicate minerals includes several closely related materials having highly perfect basal cleavage. ... The chemical compound silicon dioxide, also known as silica, is the oxide of silicon, chemical formula SiO2. ... Talc (derived from the Persian via Arabic talq) is a mineral composed of hydrated magnesium silicate with the chemical formula H2Mg3(SiO3)4 or Mg3Si4O10(OH)2. ...


Hiding pigments, in making paint opaque, also protect the substrate from the harmful effects of ultraviolet light. Hiding pigments include titanium dioxide, phthalo blue, red iron oxide, and many others.


Fillers are a special type of pigment that serve to thicken the film, support its structure and simply increase the volume of the paint. Fillers are usually comprised of cheap and inert materials, such as talc, lime, baryte, clay, etc. Floor paints that will be subjected to abrasion may even contain fine quartz sand as a filler. Not all paints include fillers. On the other hand some paints contain very large proportions of pigment/filler and binder. Talc (derived from the Persian via Arabic talq) is a mineral composed of hydrated magnesium silicate with the chemical formula H2Mg3(SiO3)4 or Mg3Si4O10(OH)2. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Baryte with Cerussite from Morocco Baryte with Galena and Hematite from Poland Barite (BaSO4) is a mineral consisting of barium sulfate. ...


A commercially important pigment is titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide was first discovered by a famous historian/ piano player named Joe Bortel used in paints in the 19th century. The titanium dioxide used in most paints today is often coated with silicon or aluminum oxides for various reasons such as better exterior durability, or better hiding performance (opacity) via better efficiency promoted by more optimal spacing within the paint film. Opacity is also improved by optimal sizing of the titanium dioxide particles. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Some pigments are toxic, such as the lead pigments that are used in lead paint. Paint manufacturers began replacing white lead pigments with the less toxic substitute, which can even be used to colour food, titanium white (titanium dioxide), even before lead was functionally banned in paint for residential use in 1978 by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series Post-transition metals or poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... Lead paint is paint containing lead, a heavy metal, that is used as pigment, with Lead(II) chromate (PbCrO4, chrome yellow) and lead(II) carbonate(PbCO3, white lead) being the most common. ... Flash point non-flammable Related Compounds Other cations Titanium(II) oxide Titanium(III) oxide Titanium(III,IV) oxide Zirconium dioxide Hafnium dioxide Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Titanium dioxide, also known as titanium...


Binder

The binder, or resin, is the actual film forming component of paint. It is the only component that must be present; other components listed below are included optionally, depending on the desired properties of the cured film. New Reaper McCormick Harvester and Binder A modern compact binder For other uses, see Binder (disambiguation). ...


The binder imparts adhesion, binds the pigments together, and strongly influences such properties as gloss potential, exterior durability, flexibility, and toughness. Dew drops adhering to a spider web For the medical condition see Adhesion (medicine) Adhesion is the molecular attraction exerted between bodies in contact. ...


Binders include synthetic or natural resins such as acrylics, polyurethanes, polyesters, melamine resins, epoxy, or oils. Acrylic resins are a group of related thermoplastic or thermosetting plastic substances derived from acrylic acid, methacrylic acid or other related compounds. ... A polyurethane is any polymer consisting of a chain of organic units joined by urethane links. ... SEM picture of a bend in a high surface area polyester fiber with a seven-lobed cross section Polyester (aka Terylene) is a category of polymers which contain the ester functional group in their main chain. ... Melamin resin or melamine formaldehyde (also incorrectly, melamine) is a plastic material made from melamine and formaldehyde by polymerization. ... In chemistry, epoxy or polyepoxide is a thermosetting epoxide polymer that cures (polymerizes and crosslinks) when mixed with a catalyzing agent or hardener. Most common epoxy resins are produced from a reaction between epichlorohydrin and bisphenol-A. The first commercial attempts to prepare resins from epichlorohydrin occurred in 1927 in... View of Delft in oil paint, by Johannes Vermeer. ...


Binders can be categorized according to drying, or curing mechanism. The four most common are simple solvent evaporation, oxidative crosslinking, catalyzed polymerization, and coalescence. There are others. For other uses, see Solvent (disambiguation). ... Vaporization redirects here. ... Vulcanization is an example of cross-linking. ... An example of alkene polymerisation, in which each Styrene monomer units double bond reforms as a single bond with another styrene monomer and forms polystyrene. ...


Note that drying and curing are two different processes. Drying generally refers to evaporation of vehicle, whereas curing refers to polymerization of the binder. Depending on chemistry and composition, any particular paint may undergo either, or both processes. Thus, there are paints that dry only, those that dry then cure, and those that do not depend on drying for curing.


Paints that dry by simple solvent evaporation contain a solid binder dissolved in a solvent; this forms a solid film when the solvent evaporates, and the film can re-dissolve in the solvent again. Classic nitrocellulose lacquers fall into this category, as do non-grain raising stains composed of dyes dissolved in solvent. Skeletal formula of nitrocellulose Ball-and-stick model of a section of nitrocellulose Nitrocellulose (also: cellulose nitrate, flash paper) is a highly flammable compound formed by nitrating cellulose through, for example, exposure to nitric acid or another powerful nitrating agent. ... A dye can generally be described as a coloured substance that has an affinity to the substrate to which it is being applied. ...


Latex paint is a water-based dispersion of sub-micron polymer particles. The term "latex" in the context of paint simply means an aqueous dispersion; latex rubber (the sap of the rubber tree that has historically been called latex) is not an ingredient. These dispersions are prepared by emulsion polymerization. Latex paints cure by a process called coalescence where first the water, and then the trace, or coalescing, solvent, evaporate and draw together and soften the latex binder particles together and fuse them together into irreversibly bound networked structures, so that the paint will not redissolve in the solvent/water that originally carried it. Residual surfactants in the paint as well as hydrolytic effects with some polymers cause the paint to remain susceptible to softening and, over time, degradation by water. Emulsion polymerization is a type of polymerization that takes place in an emulsion typically incorporating water, monomer, and surfactant. ... Latex is a name collectively given to a group of similar preparations consisting of stable dispersions of polymer microparticles in a liquid matrix (usually water). ... Surfactants, also known as tensides, are wetting agents that lower the surface tension of a liquid, allowing easier spreading, and lower the interfacial tension between two liquids. ... Hydrolysis is a chemical process in which a molecule is cleaved into two parts by the addition of a molecule of water. ...


Paints that cure by oxidative crosslinking are generally single package coatings that when applied, the exposure to oxygen in the air starts a process that crosslinks and polymerizes the binder component. Classic alkyd enamels would fall into this category. General Name, symbol, number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, period, block 16, 2, p Appearance colourless (gas) colourless (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ... Alkyd coatings are a class of polyester coatings derived from the reaction of an alcohol (alkohol) and an acid or acid anhydride hence the term alk-yd from alcohol and acid or anhydride] and are the dominant resin or binder in most oil-based coatings sold to the consumer market. ...


Paints that cure by catalyzed polymerization are generally two package coatings that polymerize by way of a chemical reaction initiated by mixing resin and hardener, and which cure by forming a hard plastic structure. Depending on composition they may need to dry first, by evaporation of solvent. Classic two package epoxies or polyurethanes would fall into this category. For other uses, see Plastic (disambiguation). ... In chemistry, epoxy or polyepoxide is a thermosetting epoxide polymer that cures (polymerizes and crosslinks) when mixed with a catalyzing agent or hardener. Most common epoxy resins are produced from a reaction between epichlorohydrin and bisphenol-A. The first commercial attempts to prepare resins from epichlorohydrin occurred in 1927 in... A polyurethane is any polymer consisting of a chain of organic units joined by urethane links. ...


Still other films are formed by cooling of the binder. For example, encaustic or wax paints are liquid when warm, and harden upon cooling. In many cases, they will resoften or liquify if reheated. Encaustic painting, also called hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. ... candle wax This page is about the substance. ...


Recent environmental requirements restrict the use of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and alternative means of curing have been developed, particularly for industrial purposes. In UV curing paints, the solvent is evaporated first, and hardening is then initiated by ultraviolet light. In powder coatings there is little or no solvent, and flow and cure are produced by heating of the substrate after application of the dry powder. This article describes a highly specialized aspect of its subject in the Terminology and legal definitions section. ... Powder coating is a type of dry coating, which is applied as a free-flowing, dry powder. ...


Vehicle or solvent

The main purpose of the vehicle is to adjust the viscosity of the paint. It is volatile and does not become part of the paint film. It can also control flow and application properties, and affect the stability of the paint while in liquid state. Its main function is as the carrier for the non volatile components. For other uses, see Viscosity (disambiguation). ...


Water is the main vehicle for water based paints. Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ...


Solvent based, sometimes called oil based, paints can have various combinations of solvents as the vehicle, including aliphatics, aromatics, alcohols, and ketones. These include organic solvents such as petroleum distillate, alcohols, ketones, esters, glycol ethers, and the like. Sometimes volatile low-molecular weight synthetic resins also serve as diluents. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Turpentine substitute is a mineral based replacement for the vegetable based organic solvent turpentine. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ketone group A ketone (pronounced as key tone) is either the functional group characterized by a carbonyl group (O=C) linked to two other carbon atoms or a chemical compound that contains this functional group. ... For other uses, see Ester (disambiguation). ... Ethylene glycol (IUPAC name:ethane-1,2-diol) is a chemical compound widely used as an automotive antifreeze (coolant). ...


This component is optional: some paints have no diluent.


Also note that the term "vehicle" is industrial jargon. In some companies the term is used to refer to the solvent and in others, it is used to refer to the binder.


Additives

Besides the three main categories of ingredients, paint can have a wide variety of miscellaneous additives, which are usually added in very small amounts and yet give a very significant effect on the product. Some examples include additives to modify surface tension, improve flow properties, improve the finished appearance, increase wet edge, improve pigment stability, impart antifreeze properties, control foaming, control skinning, etc. Other types of additives include catalysts, thickeners, stabilizers, emulsifiers, texturizers, adhesion promoters, UV stabilizers, flatteners (de-glossing agents), biocides to fight bacterial growth, and the like. This box:      Surface tension is an effect within the surface layer of a liquid that causes that layer to behave as an elastic sheet. ... For other uses, see Antifreeze (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Catalysis. ... An emulsion is a mixture of two immiscible substances. ... Phyla Actinobacteria Aquificae Chlamydiae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Verrucomicrobia Bacteria (singular: bacterium) are unicellular microorganisms. ...


Color changing paint technology

Paint can change its color with help of electricity with "paramagnetic" technology. A car that is coated with iron oxide as a primer before it is painted will be able to change its color later. A special paint is applied. This paint requires an electrical current to change color. The electric current creates special crystals at the surface that can change their color depending on voltage. It only works on metal because a conductive material is required. When power is removed from the paint, the car becomes the base color it was at the beginning. This technology can create every color the human eye can differentiate, with the simple flip of a switch.[1]


Electrochromic paints can be applied to plastic substrates as well, using a different coating chemistry. The technology involves using special dyes that change conformation when an electric current is applied across the film. Recently, this new technology has been used to achieve glare protection at the touch of a button in passenger airplane windows.


Similarly, thermochromic paints and coatings contain dyes that change conformation when heat is applied, and so they change color. These materials have been used in temperature-sensing tape such as the type that is used on a fishtank. Photochromic paints and coatings contain dyes that change conformation when the film is exposed to UV light, and so they change color. These materials are used to make eyeglasses.


Art

Main article: Painting
Watercolors as applied with a brush.
Watercolors as applied with a brush.

Since the time of the Renaissance, siccative (drying) oil paints, primarily linseed oil, have been the most commonly used kind of paints in fine art applications; oil paint is still common today. However, in the 20th century, water-based paints, including watercolors and acrylic paints, became very popular with the development of acrylic and other latex paints. Milk paints (also called casein), where the medium is derived from the natural emulsion that is milk, were popular in the 19th century and are still available today. Egg tempera (where the medium is an emulsion of egg yolk mixed with oil) is still in use as well, as are encaustic wax-based paints. Gouache is a variety of watercolor paint which was also used in the Middle Ages and Renaissance for manuscript illumination. The pigment was often made from ground semiprecious stones such as lapis lazuli and the binder made from either gum arabic or egg white. Gouache is commercially available today. For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... For other uses, see Brush (disambiguation). ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... A drying oil is an oil which hardens to a tough, solid film after a period of exposure to air. ... Flax oil (in bottles) and coconut oil (in jars in the middle) Linseed oil, also known as flax seed oil, is a yellowish drying oil derived from the dried ripe seeds of the flax plant (Linum usitatissimum, Linaceae). ... View of Delft in oil paint, by Johannes Vermeer. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... A Bigger Splash, 1967. ... The acryl group is one of the functional groups sorted in the chemical class of acryl where one of four hydrogen atoms in ethene is replaced with a different functional group. ... Casein (from Latin caseus cheese) is the most predominant phosphoprotein found in milk and cheese. ... A glass of cows milk. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Egg tempera is a type of paint used by artists. ... A. Two immiscible liquids, not emulsified; B. An emulsion of Phase II dispersed in Phase I; C. The unstable emulsion progressively separates; D. The surfactant (purple outline) positions itself on the interfaces between Phase A and Phase B, stabilizing the emulsion An emulsion is a mixture of two immiscible (unblendable... An egg yolk surrounded by the egg white An egg yolk is the part of an egg which serves as the food source for the developing embryo inside. ... candle wax This page is about the substance. ... Corridor in the Asylum, black chalk and gouache on pink paper by Van Gogh Gouache (from the Italian guazzo, water paint, splash) or Bodycolour (or Bodycolor, the terms preferred by Art historians) is a type of paint consisting of pigment suspended in water. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A block of lapis lazuli Lapis lazuli is one of the oldest of all gems, with a history of use stretching back 7,000 years. ... Acacia senegal plant from Koehlers Medicinal-Plants 1887 Gum arabic, a natural gum also called gum acacia, is a substance that is taken from two sub-Saharan species of the acacia tree, Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal. ... Albumen redirects here. ...


Poster paint has been used primarily in the creation of student works, or by children. Gouache (from the Italian guazzo, water paint, splash) is a type of watercolor paint, made heavier and more opaque by the addition of a white pigment (chalk, Chinese white, etc. ...


Application

Paint can be applied as a solid, a gaseous suspension (aerosol) or a liquid. Techniques vary depending on the practical or artistic results desired. Aerosol, is a term derived from the fact that matter floating in air is a suspension (a mixture in which solid or liquid or combined solid-liquid particles are suspended in a fluid). ...


As a solid (usually used in industrial and automotive applications), the paint is applied as a very fine powder, then baked at high temperature. This melts the powder and causes it to adhere (stick) to the surface. The reasons for doing this involve the chemistries of the paint, the surface itself, and perhaps even the chemistry of the substrate (the overall object being painted). This is commonly referred to as "powder coating" an object. Powder coating is a type of dry coating, which is applied as a free-flowing, dry powder. ...


As a gas or as a gaseous suspension, the paint is suspended in solid or liquid form in a gas that is sprayed on an object. The paint sticks to the object. This is commonly referred to as "spray painting" an object. The reasons for doing this include: Spray painting is painting using a device that sprays the paint. ...

  • The application mechanism is air and thus no solid object ever touches the object being painted;
  • The distribution of the paint is very uniform so there are no sharp lines
  • It is possible to deliver very small amounts of paint or to paint very slowly;
  • Stylistic reasons
  • A chemical (typically a solvent) can be sprayed along with the paint to dissolve together both the delivered paint and the chemicals on the surface of the object being painted;
  • Some chemical reactions in paint involve the orientation of the paint molecules.

In the liquid application, paint can be applied by direct application using brushes, paint rollers, blades, other instruments, or body parts. Examples of body parts include fingerpainting, where the paint is applied by hand, whole-body painting (popular in the 1960s avant-garde movement), and cave painting, in which a pigment (usually finely-ground charcoal) is held in the mouth and spat at a wall (Note: some paints are toxic and might cause death or permanent injury). For other uses, see Solvent (disambiguation). ... In science, a molecule is the smallest particle of a pure chemical substance that still retains its chemical composition and properties. ... For other uses, see Brush (disambiguation). ... A paint roller is a paint application tool useful for rapidly painting large flat surfaces efficiently. ... A common palette knife A palette knife is a blunt knife with a very flexible steel blade and no sharpened cutting edge. ... Fingerpaint is a kind of paint intended, as the name suggests, to be applied with the fingers; it typically comes in pots and is used by small children, though it has very occasionally been used by adults either in teaching art to children, or independently. ... Whole body painting is an art movement started in the 1950s or 1960s. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Cave or Rock Paintings are paintings on cave or rock walls and ceilings, usually dating to prehistoric times. ... Natural Ultramarine pigment in powdered form. ... Charcoal is the blackish residue consisting of impure carbon obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. ... Toxic redirects here, but this is also the name of a song by Britney Spears; see Toxic (song) Look up toxic and toxicity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation), Dead (disambiguation), or Death (band). ...


Paint application by spray is the most popular method in industry. In this, paint is atomized by the force of compressed air or by the action of high pressure compression of the paint itself, which results in the paint being turned into small droplets which travel to the article which is to be painted.


Rollers generally have a handle that allows for different lengths of poles which can be attached to allow for painting at different heights. Generally, roller application takes two coats for even color. A roller with a thicker nap is used to apply paint on uneven surfaces. Edges are often finished with an angled brush. Look up nap in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


After liquid paint is applied, there is an interval during which it can be blended with additional painted regions (at the "wet edge") called "open time." The open time of an oil or alkyd-based emulsion paint can be extended by adding white spirit, similar glycols such as Dowanol™ (propylene glycol ether) or commercial open time prolongers. This can also facilitate the mixing of different wet paint layers for aesthetic effect. Latex and acrylic emulsions require the use of drying retardants suitable for water-based coatings. White spirit, also known as Stoddard solvent, is a paraffin-derived clear, transparent liquid which is a common organic solvent used in painting and decorating. ...


Paint may also be applied by flipping the paint, dripping, or by dipping an object in paint.


Interior/exterior house paint tends to separate when stored, the heavier components settling to the bottom. It should be mixed before use, with a flat wooden stick or a paint mixing accessory; pouring it back and forth between two containers is also an effective manual mixing method. Paint stores have machines for mixing the paint by shaking it vigorously in the can for a few minutes.


Water-based paints tend to be the safest, and easiest to clean up after using—the brushes and rollers can be cleaned with soap and water.


It is difficult to reseal the paint container and store the paint well for a long period of time. Store upside down, for a good seal, in a cool dry place. Protect from freezing.


Proper disposal of paint is a challenge. Avoid acquiring excess paint. Look for suitable recycled paint before buying more. Try to find recycled uses for your left over paint. Paints of similar chemistry can be mixed to make a larger amount of a uniform color. Old paint may be usable for a primer coat or an intermediate coat.


If you must dispose of paint, small quantities of water based paint can be carefully dried by leaving the lid off until it solidifies, and then disposing with normal trash. But oil based paint should be treated as hazardous waste, and disposed of according to local regulations.

  • http://muextension.missouri.edu/xplor/wasteman/wm6001.htm "Safe Use, Storage and Disposal of Paint"
  • http://www.epa.state.oh.us/pic/facts/hhwpaint.html "Storage and Disposal of Paint Facts"

Product variants

A collection of cans of paint and variants.
A collection of cans of paint and variants.
  • Primer is a preparatory coating put on materials before painting. Priming ensures better adhesion of paint to the surface, increases paint durability, and provides additional protection for the material being painted.
  • Varnish and shellac provide a protective coating without changing the color. They are paints without pigment.
  • Wood stain is a type of paint that is very "thin," that is, low in viscosity, and formulated so that the pigment penetrates the surface rather than remaining in a film on top of the surface. Stain is predominantly pigment or dye and solvent with little binder, designed primarily to add color without providing a surface coating.
  • Lacquer is usually a fast-drying solvent-based paint or varnish that produces an especially hard, durable finish.
  • An enamel paint is a paint that dries to an especially hard, usually glossy, finish. Enamel can be made by adding varnish to oil-based paint.
  • A Glaze is an additive used with paint to slow drying time and increase translucency, as in Faux Painting and Art Painting.
  • A Roof coating is a fluid applied membrane which has elastic properties that allows it to stretch and return to their original shape without damage. It provides UV protection to polyurethane foam and is widely used as part of a roof restoration system.
  • Fingerpaint
  • Inks are similar to paints, except they are typically made using dyes exclusively (no pigments), and are designed so as not to leave a thick film of binder.
  • Titanium dioxide is extensively used for both house paint and artist's paint, because it is permanent and has good covering power. Titanium oxide pigment accounts for the largest use of the element. Titanium paint is an excellent reflector of infrared, and is extensively used in solar observatories where heat causes poor seeing conditions.
  • Anti-Graffiti paints are used to defeat the marking of surfaces by graffiti artists. There are two categories, sacrificial and non-bonding. Sacrificial coatings are clear coatings that allow the removal of graffiti, usually by pressure washing the surface with high-pressure water, removing the graffiti, and the coating (hence, sacrificed.) They must be re-applied afterward for continued protection. This is most commonly used on natural-looking masonry surfaces, such as statuary and marble walls, and on rougher surfaces that are difficult to clean. Non-bonding coatings are clear, high-performance coatings, usually catalyzed polyurethanes, that allow the graffiti very little to bond to. After the graffiti is discovered, it can be removed with the use of a solvent wash, without damaging the underlying substrate or protective coating. These work best when used on smoother surfaces, and especially over other painted surfaces, including murals.
  • Anti-climb paint is a non-drying paint that appears normal while still being extremely slippery. It is usually used on drainpipes and ledges to deter burglars and vandals from climbing them, and is found in many public places. When a person attempts to climb objects coated with the paint, it rubs off onto the climber, as well as making it hard for them to climb.
  • No-VOC paints, which are solvent-free paints that do not contain volatile organic compounds, have been available since the late 1980s. Low VOC paints, which typically contain anywhere between 0.3%-5.0% VOCs as coalescent, or coalescing solvent have been available since the 1960s.

A bucket of primer. ... Dew drops adhering to a spider web For the medical condition see Adhesion (medicine) Adhesion is the molecular attraction exerted between bodies in contact. ... Varnish is a transparent, hard, protective finish or film primarily used in wood finishing but also for other materials. ... For the post-punk band, see Shellac (band). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Natural Ultramarine pigment in powdered form. ... Look up dye in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In a general sense, lacquer is a clear or coloured coating, that dries by solvent evaporation only and that produces a hard, durable finish that can be polished to a very high gloss, and gives the illusion of depth. ... This sign at Leytonstone tube station is a typical enamel-painted metal sign An enamel paint is a paint that dries to an especially hard, usually glossy, finish. ... Glaze is a thin shiny coating, or the act of applying the coating. ... Faux Painting or Faux Finishing are terms used to describe a wide range of Decorative Painting techniques. ... A roof coating is a monolithic, fully adhered, fluid applied roofing membrane. ... Fingerpaint is a kind of paint intended to be applied with the fingers; it typically comes in pots and is used by small children, though it has very occasionally been used by adults either to teach art to children, or for their own independent use (As in Farrah Fawcetts... An ink is a liquid containing various pigments and/or dyes used for colouring a surface to render an image or text. ... Flash point non-flammable Related Compounds Other cations Titanium(II) oxide Titanium(III) oxide Titanium(III,IV) oxide Zirconium dioxide Hafnium dioxide Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Titanium dioxide, also known as titanium... For other uses, see Graffiti (disambiguation). ... A polyurethane is any polymer consisting of a chain of organic units joined by urethane links. ... Anti-Climb Paint is the term for a class of paint which is highly thixotropic and is often used to prevent climbing of objects such as lampposts or fences. ... This article describes a highly specialized aspect of its subject in the Terminology and legal definitions section. ...

History

Cave paintings drawn with red and yellow ochre, hematite, manganese oxide and charcoal may have been made by early homo sapiens as long as 40, 000 years ago. Cave, or rock, paintings are paintings painted on cave or rock walls and ceilings, usually dating to pre_historic times. ... This article is about the color. ... Hematite, also spelled haematite, is the mineral form of Iron(III) oxide, (Fe2O3), one of several iron oxides. ... Manganese(IV) oxide (MnO2) is a chemical compound also known as manganese dioxide or manganese oxide. ... Charcoal is the blackish residue consisting of impure carbon obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. ... Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man) is the scientific name for the human species. ...


Ancient painted walls at Dendera, Egypt, which were exposed for many ages to the open air, still possess a perfect brilliancy of color, as vivid as when they were painted about 2000 years ago. The Egyptians mixed their colors with some gummy substance, and applied them detached from each other without any blending or mixture. They appeared to have used six colors: white, black, blue, red, yellow, and green. They first covered the field entirely with white, upon which they traced the design in black, leaving out the lights of the ground color. They used minium for red, and generally of a dark tinge. Dendera (Arabic: دندرة) (also spelled Denderah/Dandarah), is a little town in Egypt on the west bank of the Nile, about 5 km south from Qina, on the opposite side of the Nile. ... Red lead is a bright red pigment, in Latin minium after the Minius River in northwest Spain where it was first mined. ...


Pliny mentions some painted ceilings in his day in the town of Ardea, which had been executed at a date prior to the foundation of Rome. He expresses great surprise and admiration at their freshness, after the lapse of so many centuries. Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Heron (disambiguation) Genera Ardea Zebrilus Philherodias Tigrisoma Ardeola Bubulcus Egretta Agamia Butorides Tigriornis Tigrisoma Gorsachius Syrigma Zonerodius Nycticorax see also: Bittern Herons are medium to large long-legged, long-necked wading birds of the family Ardeidae, which also includes the egrets and bitterns. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ...


Paint was made with the yolk of eggs and therefore, the substance would harden and stick onto the surface applied.


See also

A bucket of primer. ... In a general sense, lacquer is a clear or coloured coating, that dries by solvent evaporation only and that produces a hard, durable finish that can be polished to a very high gloss, and gives the illusion of depth. ... Varnish is a transparent, hard, protective finish or film primarily used in wood finishing but also for other materials. ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... Faux Painting or Faux Finishing are terms used to describe a wide range of Decorative Painting techniques. ... For other uses, see Brush (disambiguation). ... For the band, see Adhesive (band). ... A roof coating is a monolithic, fully adhered, fluid applied roofing membrane. ... The Society for Protective Coatings (SSPC) was founded in 1950 as the Steel Structures Painting Council, a non-profit professional society concerned with the use of coatings to protect industrial steel structures. ... NACE International is a professional organization for the corrosion control industry. ...

References

  1. ^ Color changing paint
  • Bently, J. (Author) and Turner, G.P.A. (Author) (1997). Introduction to Paint Chemistry and Principles of Paint Technology. ISBN 0412723204. 
  • Talbert, Rodger (2007). Paint Technology Handbook. ISBN 1574447033. 
  • Woodbridge, Paul R. (Editor) (1991). Principles of Paint Formulation. ISBN 0412029510. 

External links

Look up paint in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • History of Paint
  • 20 recipes for homemade paint
  • Homemade Paint Recipes for Children
  • DIYinfo.org's All About Painting - A lot of information on paint, finishes, preparation, etc.
  • All About Painting -מידע על עבודות צבע, צביעה תעשייתית
Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Painting - MSN Encarta (636 words)
Painting, branch of the visual arts in which color, derived from any of numerous organic or synthetic substances, is applied to various surfaces to create a representational or abstract picture or design.
Oil painting, which largely supplanted the use of fresco and tempera during the Renaissance, was traditionally thought to have been developed in the late Middle Ages by the Flemish brothers Jan van Eyck and Hubert van Eyck; it is now believed to have been invented much earlier.
In a cave painting at Lascaux, France, for example, a man is depicted among the animals, and several dark dots are included; the purpose of the design remains obscure, but shows the cave dwellers' ability to record their thoughts with images, signs, and symbols.
Painting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4004 words)
Painting taken literally is the practice of applying pigment suspended in a carrier (or medium) and a binding agent (a glue) to a surface (support) such as paper, canvas or a wall.
Caravaggio is an heir of the humanist painting of the Renaissance.
Mughal painting is a particular style of Indian painting, generally confined to illustrations on the book and done in miniatures, and which emerged, developed and took shape during the period of the Mughal Empire 16th -19th centuries).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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