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Encyclopedia > Padua
Comune di Padova

Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Veneto
Province Padua (PD)
Mayor Flavio Zanonato (since June 14, 2004)
Elevation 12 m
Area 92 km²
Population
 - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 210,821
 - Density 2267/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 45°25′N, 11°52′E
Gentilic Padovani or Patavini
Dialing code 049
Postal code 35100
Frazioni Altichiero, Arcella, Bassanello, Brusegana, Camin, Chiesanuova, Forcellini, Guizza, Mandria, Montà, Mortise, Paltana, Ponte di Brenta, Ponterotto, Pontevigodarzere, Sacra Famiglia, Salboro, Stanga, Terranegra, Volta Brusegana
Patron St. Anthony of Padua
 - Day June 13

Location of Padua in Italy
Website: www.comune.padova.it

Padua, Italy, (Italian: Padova IPA: ['padova], Latin: Patavium, Venetian: Padoa) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. The capital of Padova province, it stands on the Bacchiglione River, 40 km west of Venice and 29km southeast of Vicenza, with a population of 211,985 (2004). The city is included, with Venice (Italian Venezia), in the Padua-Venice Metropolitan Area, population 1,600,000. Its agricultural setting is the Pianura Padovana, the "Paduan plain," edged by the Euganaean Hills praised by Lucan and Martial, Petrarch, Ugo Foscolo, and Shelley. The city is picturesque, with a dense network of arcaded streets opening into large communal piazze, and many bridges crossing the various branches of the Bacchiglione, which once surrounded the ancient walls like a moat. Padua is the setting for most of the action in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew. Image File history File links Padova-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Veneto or Venetia, is one of the 20 regions of Italy. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Padua (It. ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... Saint Anthony of Padua Saint Anthony of Padua, also venerated as Anthony of Lisbon, particularly in Portugal (August 15, 1195 – June 13, 1231) is a Catholic saint who was born in Lisbon as Fernando de Bulhões, to a wealthy family. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Italy_Regions_220px_(including_Pelagie_Islands). ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Veneto or Venetia, is one of the 20 regions of Italy. ... Padua (It. ... - Length 145 km Elevation of the source  ? m Average discharge  ? m³/s Area watershed  ? km² Origin Alps Mouth Gulf of Venice Basin countries {{{10}}} The Bacchiglione is a river that flows through northern Italy. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia, Latin: Venetia) is a city in northern Italy, the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,251 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... Vicenza is a city in northern Italy, is the capital of the eponymous province in the Veneto region, at the northern base of the Monte Berico, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia, Latin: Venetia) is a city in northern Italy, the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,251 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... Colli Euganei (English: Euganean Hills) are located in the Veneto region of northern Italy, a few kilometers south of Padua. ... Marcus Annaeus Lucanus (November 3, AD 39-April 30, 65), better known in English as Lucan, was a Roman poet, and is one of the outstanding figures of the Silver Latin period. ... Marcus Valerius Martialis, known in English as Martial, was a Latin poet from Hispania (the Iberian Peninsula) best known for his twelve books of Epigrams, published in Rome between AD 86 and 103, during the reigns of the emperors Domitian, Nerva and Trajan. ... From the c. ... Ugo Foscolo (1778-1827), Italian writer, was born at Zakynthos in the Ionian Isles on 6 Febraury 1778. ... -1... - Length 145 km Elevation of the source  ? m Average discharge  ? m³/s Area watershed  ? km² Origin Alps Mouth Gulf of Venice Basin countries {{{10}}} The Bacchiglione is a river that flows through northern Italy. ... The moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire, England Moats (also known as a Fosse) were deep and wide water-filled trenches, excavated to provide a barrier against attack upon castle ramparts or other fortifications. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Taming of the Shrew by Augustus Egg The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ...

Contents

Economy

Padua's industry has greatly developed in modern times. Corn and saw mills, distilleries, chemical factories, breweries, candle-works, ink-works, foundries, agricultural machine and automobile works, and in last years high-tech and nanotechnologies, have been established and are flourishing. “Corn” redirects here. ... Distillation is a means of separating liquids through differences in their boiling points. ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... A factory (previously manufactory) is a large industrial building where goods or products are manufactured. ... A brewery is a facility that produces beer. ... The term foundry originally was a synonym for an ironworks or general metal works where metal casting operations were performed. ...


History

Antiquity

Padua claims to be the oldest city in north Italy, as, according to a tradition established by the medieval commune to glorify itself, it would be founded in 1183 BC by the Trojan prince Antenor, leading the people of Eneti or Veneti from the Balcanic region to Italy; Antenor's relics were recognized in a large stone sarcophagus exhumed in the year 1274. Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... Antenor was an Athenian sculptor, of the latter part of the 6th century BC. He was the creator of the joint statues of the tyrannicides Harmodius and Aristogeiton, set up by the Athenians on the expulsion of Hippias. ... Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ...


Patavium, as Padua was known by the Romans, was inhabited by (Adriatic) Veneti, who thrived thanks to its excellent breed of horses and the wool of its sheep. Its men fought for the Romans at Cannae, and the city (a Roman municipium since 45 BC (os 43) became so powerful that it was reported able to raise two hundred thousand fighting men. Abano, which is nearby, is the birthplace of the historian Livy, and Padua was the native place of Valerius Flaccus, Asconius Pedianus and Thrasea Paetus. Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus Roman provinces on the eve of the assassination of Julius Caesar, c. ... The Veneti (Enetoi in Greek) were an ancient people who inhabited todays northeastern Italy, in a area comprised in the modern-day region Veneto. ... Cannae (mod. ... A municipium was the second highest class of a Roman city, and was inferior in status to the colonia. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 50 BC 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC 40 BC... Abano Terme (the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica calls it Abano Bagni) is a town in the province of Padua, in the Veneto region, Italy, on the eastern slope of the Colli Euganei; it is 6 miles southwest by rail from Padua. ... A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ... Gaius Valerius Flaccus (late 1st century AD) was a Roman poet, who flourished under the emperors Vespasian and Titus. ... Quintus Asconius Pedianus (c. ... Publius Clodius Thrasea Paetus, Roman senator and Stoic philosopher, lived during the reign of Nero. ...


The area is said to have been Christianized by Saint Prosdocimus, who is venerated as the first bishop of the city. Saint Prosdocimus (Prosdecimus) of Padua ( Prosdocimo, Prosdozimus) (d. ...


Late Antiquity

Padua, in common with north-eastern Italy, suffered severely from the invasion of the Huns under Attila (452). It then passed under the Gothic kings Odoacer and Theodoric the Great, but during the Gothic War it made submission to the Greeks in 540. The city was seized again by the Goths under Totila, but was restored to the Eastern Empire by Narses in 568. Many historians consider the Huns (meaning person in Mongolian language) the first Mongolian and Turkic people mentioned in European history. ... For other uses, see Attila (disambiguation). ... Events Attila, king of the Huns, invades Italy Northern Wei Tai Wu Di is succeeded by Northern Wei Nan An Wang, then by Northern Wei Wen Cheng Di as ruler of the Northern Wei Dynasty in China. ... Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche, is a highly romanticized portrait of the Goths as cavalrymen. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Theodoric the Great (454 - August 30, 526), known to the Romans as Flavius Theodoricus, was king of the Ostrogoths (488-526), ruler of Italy (493-526), and regent of the Visigoths (511-526). ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Ostrogoths Franks Visigoths Commanders Belisarius Narses Mundalias Germanus Justinus Liberius Theodoric the Great Witigis Totila The Gothic War, was a war fought in Italy in 535-552. ... Events Byzantine general Belisarius conquers Milan and the Ostrogoth capital Ravenna. ... Totila, born in Treviso, was king of the Ostrogoths, chosen after the death of his uncle Ildibad, having engineered the assassination of Ildibads short-lived successor his cousin Eraric in 541. ... Narses (478-573) was, along with Belisarius, one of the two great generals in the service of the Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I. during the so-called Reconquest that took place during the Justinians reign. ... Events April 1 - King Alboin leads the Lombards into Italy; refugees fleeing from them go on to found Venice. ...


The history of Padua after Late Antiquity follows the course of events common to most cities of north-eastern Italy. Late Antiquity is a rough periodization (c. ...


Under the Lombards the city of Padua rose in revolt (601) against Agilulf, the Lombard king, and after suffering a long (12 years) and bloody siege was stormed and burned by him. The Padua of Antiquity was annihilated: the remains of an amphitheater (the Arena) and some bridge foundations are all that remain of Roman Padua today. The simple people fled to the hills and returned to eke out a living among the ruins; the ruling class abandoned the city for Laguna, according to a chronicle. The city did not easily recover from this blow, and Padua was still weak when the Franks succeeded the Lombards as masters of north Italy. The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... Events The future Archbishops of Canterbury, Mellitus, Justus, and Honorius, and the future Archbishop of York Paulinus, are sent to England by Pope Gregory I to aid Augustine in his missionary work. ... Agilulf was duke of Turin and Lombard king of Italy. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ...


Frankish and episcopal supremacy

At the Diet of Aix-la-Chapelle (828), the duchy and march of Friuli, in which Padua lay, was divided into four counties, one of which took its title from that city. Events Egbert became first King of England Alcamo was founded by the Muslim commander al-Kamuk. ... Mark or march (or various plural forms of these words) are derived from the Frankish word marka (boundary) and refer to a border region, e. ...


During the period of episcopal supremacy over the cities of northern Italy, Padua does not appear to have been either very important or very active. The general tendency of its policy throughout the war of investitures was Imperial and not Roman; and its bishops were, for the most part, Germans. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... The Investiture Controversy was the most significant conflict between secular and religious powers in medieval Europe. ...


The main event of the High Middle Ages was the sack of the city by the Magyars in 899. Padua subsequently needed many years to recover from that ravage. Total population c. ... Events Edward the Elder becomes King of England. ...


Emergence of the commune

Under the surface two important movements were taking place. At the beginning of the 11th century the citizens established a constitution, composed of a general council or legislative assembly and a credenza or executive body, and during the next century they were engaged in wars with Venice and Vicenza for the right of water-way on the Bacchiglione and the Brenta— so that, on the one hand, the city grew in power and self-reliance, while, on the other, the great families of Camposampiero, Este and Da Romano began to emerge and to divide the Paduan district among them. The citizens, in order to protect their liberties, were obliged to elect a podestà, and after a devastating fire in 1174 that required the virtual rebuilding of the city, their choice fell first on one of the Este family. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Camposampiero is a town in the province of Padua, Veneto, Italy. ... Ercole I dEste was one of the most important patrons of arts in the Italian Renaissance. ... The Palace of the Podestà in Florence, known as the Palazzo Vecchio or the Palazzo della Signoria Podestà is the name given to certain high officials in many Italian cities, since the later middle ages, mainly as Chief magistrate of a city state (like otherwise styled counterparts in other cities... Events Vietnam is given the official name of Annam by China. ...

The Cathedral of Padua
The Cathedral of Padua

The temporary success of the Lombard League helped to strengthen the towns; but their ineradicable civic jealousy soon reduced them to weakness again, so that in 1236 Frederick II found little difficulty in establishing his tyrannical vicar Ezzelino da Romano in Padua and the neighbouring cities, where he practised frightful cruelties on the inhabitants. When Ezzelino was unseated in June 1256 without civilian bloodshed, thanks to Pope Alexander IV, Padua enjoyed a period of rest and prosperity: the university flourished; the basilica of the saint was begun; the Paduans became masters of Vicenza. But this advance brought them into dangerous proximity to Can Grande della Scala, lord of Verona, to whom they had to yield in 1311. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 263 KB) Summary Kathedrale und Baptisterium in Padua Quelle: fotografiert am 4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 263 KB) Summary Kathedrale und Baptisterium in Padua Quelle: fotografiert am 4. ... The Lombard League was an alliance formed around 1167, which at its apex included most of the cities of northern Italy (although its membership changed in time), including, among others, Milan, Piacenza, Cremona, Mantua, Bergamo, Brescia, Bologna, Padua, Treviso, Vicenza, Verona, Lodi, and Parma, and even some lords, such as... // Events May 6 - Roger of Wendover, Benedictine monk and chronicler of St Albanss Abbey dies. ... Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was a pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212 and unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215. ... Ezzelino da Romano III (1194 - 1259) was an Italian conqueror, dictator, political figure and soldier. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Alexander IV, né Rinaldo Conti (Anagni, ca. ... Cangrande I della Scala, proper name Can Francesco della Scala (c. ... Events Bolingbroke Castle passes to the House of Lancaster. ...


Jacopo da Carrara was elected lord of Padua in 1318. and from that date till 1405, with the exception of a brief period of Scaligeri overlordship between 1328 and 1337 and two years (1388-1390) when Giangaleazzo Visconti held the town, nine members of the enlightened Carraresi family succeeded one another as lords of the city. In XIV century we have to notice the Battle of Castagnaro (1387), between Giovanni Ordelaffi, for Verona, and John Hawkwood, for Padova, who was the winner. Jacopo or Giacomo da Carrara, diminutive Jacopino, was the name of three historical figures of the Carraresi family: Jacopino da Carrara Jacopo I da Carrara Jacopo II da Carrara Category: ... Events 1 April: Berwick-upon-Tweed is captured by the Scottish from the English Emperor Go-Daigo ascends to the throne of Japan End of the reign of Emperor Hanazono, emperor of Japan Pope John XXII declares the doctrines of the Franciscans advocating ecclesiastical poverty erroneous Qalaun Mosque, Cairo... Events May 29 - Ralph Neville, Earl of Westmoreland, meets Archbishop Richard Scrope of York and Earl of Norfolk Thomas Mowbray in Shipton Moor, tricks them to send their rebellious army home and then imprisons them June 8 - Archbishop Richard Scrope of York and Thomas Mowbray, Earl of Norfolk, executed in... The noble family Scaliger (Scaligeri) were lords of Verona. ... Events Augustiner brew Munich May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ... // March 16 - Edward, the Black Prince is created Duke of Cornwall, becoming the first English Duke Beginning of the Hundred Years War (c. ... Events Beginning of prosecution of Lollards in England The Battle of Otterburn between England and Scotland A Chinese army under Xu Da sacks Karakorum Births September 14 - Claudius Claussön Swart, Danish geographer September 29 - Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, second son of Henry IV of England (d. ... Events Births December 27 - Anne de Mortimer, claimant to the English throne (died 1411) Domenico da Piacenza, Italian dancemaster (died 1470) John Dunstable, English composer (died 1453) Engelbrekt Engelbrektsson, Swedish statesman and rebel leader (died 1436) Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (died 1447) John VIII Palaeologus Byzantine Emperor (died 1448) Deaths... Giangaleazzo Visconti (1351-1406) was the first Duke of Milan and he ruled the city for much of the early Renaissance. ... The Carraresi (or da Carrara) were an important Italian family in the period 12th-15th centuries. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... The Battle of Castagnaro was fought on March 11, 1387 at Castagnaro (todays Veneto, northern Italy) between Verona and Padua. ... Events June 2 - John Holland, a maternal half-brother of Richard II of England, is created Earl of Huntingdon. ... Giovanni Ordelaffi (Forlì, 1355-1399) was a member of the noble family of Ordelaffi, the Lords of Forlì, in Italy, in the XIV century and in the XV century. ... Verona is a city and provincial capital in Veneto, Northern Italy. ... Sir John Hawkwood (1320-1394) was an English mercenary or condottiere in the 14th century Italy. ... Tronco Maestro Riviera: a pedestrian walk along a section of the inland waterway or naviglio interno of Padua The city of Padua (Lat. ...


Carraresi period was a long period of restlessness, for the Carraresi were constantly at war; they were finally extinguished between the growing power of the Visconti and of Venice. Padua prospered economically, and the university (the third in Italy) was founded in 1222, making it one of the oldest universities in continuous operation. The center of the university is founded around a rebuilt mediaeval inn of the "Bo" (the Ox), the mid-16th century Old Courtyard by Andrea Moroni. In the "Room of the Forty" remains the chair of Galileo, who taught in Padua from 1592 to 1610; the Aula Magna, rich with coats of arms and decorations; The famous Anatomy Theatre, where Vesalius taught through dissections, is the oldest in the world (1594). Gymnasivm Patavinum: The Universitys main Bo palace shown in a 1654 woodcut The University of Padua (Italian Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) located in Padua, Italy was founded in 1222. ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1170s 1180s 1190s 1200s 1210s - 1220s - 1230s 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s Years: 1217 1218 1219 1220 1221 1222 1223 1224 1225 1226 1227 See also: 1222 state leaders Events Foundation of the University of Padua Completion of the Cistercian convent in Alcobaca... Map of medieval European universities This is a list of the oldest extant universities in the world. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Galileo Galilei (15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who is closely associated with the scientific revolution. ... Year 1592 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... Andreas Vesalius (portrait from the Fabrica). ... Dissected rat showing major organs. ... Events February 27 - Henry IV is crowned King of France at Rheims. ...


The botanical garden Orto Botanico di Padova was founded in 1545 as the garden of curative herbs attached to the University's faculty of medicine. It is the oldest botanical garden in the world and still contains an important collection of rare plants. The Botanical Garden of Padova (or Garden of the Simples) in a 16th century print; in the background, the Basilica of SantAntonio. ... Events February 27 - Battle of Ancrum Moor - Scots victory over superior English forces December 13 - Official opening of the Council of Trent (closed 1563) Battle of Kawagoe - between two branches of Uesugi families and the late Hojo clan in Japan. ...


Venetian rule

Padua passed under Venetian rule in 1405, and so remained; with a brief interval (sometime after 1509 Apr 15 to 1509 July 17) during the wars of the League of Cambray, when it was taken for just a few weeks by Imperial supporters, but immediately taken back by Venetian troops, then successfully defended during siege by Imperial troops in 1509; till the fall of the Republic in 1797. The city was governed by two Venetian nobles, a podestà for civil and a captain for military affairs; each of these was elected for sixteen months. Under these governors the great and small councils continued to discharge municipal business and to administer the Paduan law, contained in the statutes of 1276 and 1362. The treasury was managed by two chamberlains; and every five years the Paduans sent one of their nobles to reside as nuncio in Venice, and to watch the interests of his native town. Events May 29 - Ralph Neville, Earl of Westmoreland, meets Archbishop Richard Scrope of York and Earl of Norfolk Thomas Mowbray in Shipton Moor, tricks them to send their rebellious army home and then imprisons them June 8 - Archbishop Richard Scrope of York and Thomas Mowbray, Earl of Norfolk, executed in... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The League of Cambrai was a league against Venice formed in 1508 under the leadership of Pope Julius II. It included, besides the Pope, Louis XII of France, Emperor Maximilian I, and Ferdinand of Aragon. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... January 21 - Pope Innocent V succeeds Pope Gregory X as the 185th pope. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1357 1358 1359 1360 1361 - 1362 - 1363 1364 1365 1366 1367 See also: 1362 state leaders Events Under Edward III, English replaces French as Englands national language, for the... Nuncio is an ecclesiastical diplomatic title, derived from the ancient Latin Nuntius, meaning any envoy. ...


Venice fortified Padua with new walls, built between 1507 and 1544, with a series of monumental gates. 1507 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April 11 - Battle of Ceresole - French forces under the Comte dEnghien defeat Imperial forces under the Marques Del Vasto near Turin. ...

Tronco Maestro Riviera: a pedestrian walk along a section of the "inland waterway" or naviglio interno of Padua.
Palazzo della Ragione.
This tempera, Two Christians before the Judges, hangs in the city's cathedral.
Façade of the church of San Gaetano Thiene, (1574-86) by Vincenzo Scamozzi
The apse area of Santa Sofia.

Download high resolution version (1734x1128, 624 KB)Padua This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1734x1128, 624 KB)Padua This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (904 × 600 pixel, file size: 227 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (904 × 600 pixel, file size: 227 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (830x728, 183 KB)A tempera named Two Christians before the Judges. ... Download high resolution version (830x728, 183 KB)A tempera named Two Christians before the Judges. ... A 1367 tempera on wood by Niccolò Semitecolo. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 569 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (578 × 609 pixel, file size: 85 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Padua, Italy ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 569 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (578 × 609 pixel, file size: 85 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Padua, Italy ... Vincenzo Scamozzi Vincenzo Scamozzi (September 2, 1548 - August 7, 1616) born in Vicenza, Italy, was an architect and a writer on architecture, active mainly in Vicenza and Venice area in the second half of the 16th century. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (708x724, 353 KB) G.C. Argan, Storia dellArte, Sansoni, 1981 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (708x724, 353 KB) G.C. Argan, Storia dellArte, Sansoni, 1981 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Austrian rule

In 1797 the Venetian Republic was wiped off the map by the Treaty of Campo Formio, and Padua was ceded to the Austrian Empire. After the fall of Napoleon, in 1814, the city became part of the Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia. 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Treaty of Campo Formio was signed on October 17, 1797 (26 Vendémiaire, Year VI of the French Republic) by Napoleon Bonaparte and Count Ludwig von Cobenzl as representatives of France and Austria. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia (Italian: ; German: ) (1815 - 1866) was established after the defeat of Napoleon, according to the decisions of the Congress of Vienna (9 June 1815). ...


The Austrians were unpopular with progressive circles in northern Italy. In Padua, the year of revolutions of 1848 saw a student revolt which on February 8 turned the University and the Caffè Pedrocchi into battlegrounds in which students and ordinary Paduans fought side by side. —Alexis de Tocqueville, Recollections The European Revolutions of 1848, in some countries known as the Spring of Nations, were the bloody consequences of a variety of changes that had been taking place in Europe in the first half of the 19th century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pedrocchi Café is one of the biggest cafés in the world. ...


Under Austrian rule, Padua began its industrial development; one of the first Italian rail tracks, Padua-Venice, was built in 1845.


In 1866 the battle of Koniggratz gave Italy the opportunity to push the Austrians out of the old Venetian republic as Padua and the rest of the Veneto were annexed to the recently united Kingdom of Italy. 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... painting of the battle by Georg Bleibtreu (1869) In the Battle of Königgrätz or Battle of Sadowa of July 3, 1866, the Austro-Prussian War was decided in favor of Prussia. ... Veneto or Venetia, is one of the 20 regions of Italy. ... Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy...


Italian rule

Annexed to Italy during 1866, Padua was at the centre of the poorest area of Northern Italy, as Veneto was until 1960ies. Despite this, the city flourished in the following decades both economically and socially, developing its industry, being an important agricultural market and having a very important cultural and technological centre as the University. The city hosted also a major military command and many regiments. 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Northern Italy encompasses nine of the countrys 20 autonomous regions: Emilia-Romagna Friuli-Venezia Giulia Liguria Lombardia Piemonte Toscana Trentino-Alto Adige Valle dAosta Veneto Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige and Valle dAosta are regions with a special statute. ... Veneto or Venetia, is one of the 20 regions of Italy. ...


When Italy entered the Great War on 24th May 1915, Padua was chosen as the main command of the Italian Army. The King Vittorio Emanuele III himself and the commander in chief Cadorna went to live in Padua for the war period. After the defeat of Caporetto in Autumn 1917, the front line came on the river Piave, just 50-60km from the city, but the military command did not withdraw, while a new commander was appointed, Diaz; but the city was now in the range of Austrian bombers, and thus it was bombed several times (about 100 civilian deads). From the nearby San Pelagio Castle air field, Gabriele D'Annunzio flew on Vienna. In late October, the Italian Army won the decisive battle of Vittorio Veneto (exactly a year after Caporetto), and the Austrian forces collapsed. The armistice was signed in Padua, at Villa Giusti, on 3rd November 1918, with Austria-Hungary surrendering to Italy. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Coat of Arms of the Italian Army Dardo IFV on exercise in Capo Teulada Soldiers of the 33rd Field Artillery Regiment Acqui on parade The Italian Army (Esercito Italiano) is the ground defense force of the Italian Republic. ... Area: 192. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Gabriele dAnnunzio (12 March 1863, Pescara – 1 March 1938, Gardone Riviera, province of Brescia) was an Italian poet, writer, novelist, dramatist and daredevil, who went on to have a controversial role in politics as a precursor of the fascist movement. ... “Wien” redirects here. ... Vittorio Veneto is a city situated in Italy, in the region of Veneto, north-east of the Italian peninsula. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...


During the war, industry had a great development, development which continued in the following years. But social turmoil led to strikes, factories and fields occupations, clashes mainly by socialist then comunist activists, while war veterans struggled to come back in the civilian life, mainly supporting a new political way: Fascism. The fascist party soonly became the defender of property and order against revolution, as in other parts of Italy, and Mussolini was named Premier following the March on Rome, on 28th October 1922. The Fascist Era has now begun, even if the dictatorship began only in 1925. During this period, Padua developed outside the historical town, enlarging and growing in population. The city was also theatre of one of the largest fascist mass rallies, with 300,000 people come to listen to Mussolini speech. New buildings, in the tipycal fascist architecture, were made in the city, like the buildings surrounding Piazza Spalato (today Piazza Insurrezione), the train station, the new part of City Hall and a part of the Bo Palace hosting the University. Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Communism is a term that can refer to one of several things: a social and economic system, an ideology which supports that system, or a political movement that wishes to implement that system. ... Fascism is an authoritarian political ideology (generally tied to a mass movement) that considers individual and other societal interests subordinate to the needs of the state, and seeks to forge a type of national unity, usually based on, but not limited to, ethnic, cultural, or racial attributes. ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... For the movie by Dino Risi, see March on Rome (film) The March on Rome was a pseudo-coup détat by which Mussolinis National Fascist Party came to power in Italy. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A type of Italian architecture from the 1930s used to celebrate the XXth year of the fascist regime in Rome. ...


Italy entered the Second World War on 10th June 1940. Following Italian defeat on 8th September 1943, Padua became part of the Italian Social Republic, puppet state of the German occupier. The city hosted the Ministry of Public Instruction of the new state, as well as military and militia commands and a military airport. The Resistenza, Italian partisans, was very active against both the new fascist rule and the German invader, and one of the main leaders was the University vice-chancellor Concetto Marchesi. Padua was bombed several times by Allied planes, and the worst hit areas were the train station and the northern district of Arcella; during one of these bombings, the beautiful Eremitani church, with Mantegna frescoes, was destroyed. The city was finally liberated by partisans and British troops on 28th April 1945. A small Commonwealth War Cemetery is in the west part of the city, to remember the sacrifice of these troops. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthem Giovinezza (The Youth)¹ Capital Salò Language(s) Italian Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic Head of State Benito Mussolini Historical era World War II  - Established September 23, 1943  - Disestablished April 25, 1945 ¹ External link The Italian Social Republic (Repubblica Sociale Italiana or RSI) was a Nazi puppet state led by... The Lamentation over the Dead Christ (c. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


After the war, the city developed to the city we know today, while Veneto passed from being one of the poorest to be one of the richest and most active regions of Italy. It counts today about 210,000 inhabitants, with a rising immigrants population (overall from Romania, Moldova, Morocco, Ukraine, Nigeria, China and Albania). The University has about 60,000 alumni, and it is among the largest of Italy; it was named as the best one since four consecutive years (then since 2003).


Main sights

  • The Scrovegni Chapel (Italian: Cappella degli Scrovegni) is one of Padua's most famous sites. It houses a cycle of frescoes completed in 1305 by Giotto. Commissioned by Enrico degli Scrovegni, a wealthy banker, as a private chapel once attached to his family's palazzo, it is also called the "Arena Chapel" because it stands on the site of a Roman-era arena. The fresco cycle details the life of the Virgin Mary and has been acknowledged by many to be one of the most important fresco cycles in the world. Entrance to the chapel is an elaborate ordeal, as it involves spending 15 minutes prior to entrance in a climate-controlled, airlocked vault, used to stabilize the temperature between the outside world and the inside of the chapel. This is a part of restoration and preservation efforts.
  • The Palazzo della Ragione, with its great hall on the upper floor, is reputed to have the largest roof unsupported by columns in Europe; the hall is nearly rectangular, its length 815 m, its breadth 27 m, and its height 24 m; the walls are covered with allegorical frescoes; the building stands upon arches, and the upper storey is surrounded by an open loggia, not unlike that which surrounds the basilica of Vicenza. The Palazzo was begun in 1172 and finished in 1219; in 1306 Fra Giovanni, an Augustinian friar, covered the whole with one roof; originally there were three roofs, spanning the three chambers into which the hall was at first divided; the internal partition walls remained till the fire of 1420, when the Venetian architects who undertook the restoration removed them, throwing all three spaces into one and forming the present great hall, the Salone. The new space was refrescoed by Nicolo' Miretto and Stefano da Ferrara, working from 1425 to 1440. Beneath the great hall, a centuries-old market.
  • In the Piazza dei Signori is the beautiful loggia called the Gran Guardia, (1493 - 1526), and close by is the Palazzo del Capitanio, the residence of the Venetian governors, with its great door, the work of Giovanni Maria Falconetto, the Veronese architect-sculptor who introduced Renaissance architecture to Padua and who completed the door in 1532. Falconetto was the architect of Alvise Cornaro's garden loggia, (Loggia Cornaro), the first fully Renaissance building in Padua [1]. Nearby, the Cathedral, remodelled in 1552 after a design of Michelangelo, contains works by Nicolò Semitecolo, Francesco Bassano and Giorgio Schiavone. The nearby Baptistry, consecrated in 1281, houses the most important frescoes cycle by Giusto de' Menabuoi.
The Basilica of Saint Anthony of Padua.
The Basilica of St. Giustina, facing the great piazza of Prato della Valle.
The Basilica of St. Giustina, facing the great piazza of Prato della Valle.
  • The most famous of the Paduan churches is the Basilica di Sant'Antonio da Padova, locally simply known as "Il Santo". The bones of the saint rest in a chapel richly ornamented with carved marbles, the work of various artists, among them of Sansovino and Falconetto; the basilica was begun about the year 1230 and completed in the following century; tradition says that the building was designed by Nicola Pisano; it is covered by seven cupolas, two of them pyramidal. On the piazza in front of the church is Donatello's magnificent equestrian statue of the Venetian general Gattamelata (Erasmo da Narni), which was cast in 1453, the first full-size equestrian bronze cast since antiquity; it was inspired by the Marcus Aurelius equestrian sculpture at the Capitoline Hill in Rome. There are also four beautiful cloisters to visit. To be known, Sant'Antonio is Vatican territory.[citation needed]
  • Not far from the Gattamelata statue are the St. George Oratory (13th century), with frescoes by Altichiero, and the Scuola di S. Antonio (16th century), with frescoes by Tiziano (Titian).
  • One of the best known symbols of Padua is the Prato della Valle, a 90,000 m² elliptical square believed to be the biggest in Europe, after Red Square in Moscow. In the centre is a wide garden surrounded by a ditch, which is lined by 78 statues portraying famous citizens. Not far are the abbey and the basilica of Santa Giustina, which is home to important art works, including the Martyrdom of St. Justine by Paolo Veronese. The complex was founded in the 5th century on the tomb of the namesake saint, Justine of Padua, and in the 15th century became one of the most important monasteries in the area, until it was suppressed by Napoleon in 1810. In 1919 it was reopened. The tombs of several saints are housed in the interior, including those of Justine, St. Prosdocimus, St. Maximus, St. Urius, St. Felicita, St. Julianus, as well as relics of the Apostle St. Matthias and the Evangelist St. Luke.
  • The Church of the Eremitani is an Augustinian church of the 13th century, distinguished as containing the tombs of Jacopo (1324) and Ubertinello (1345) da Carrara, lords of Padua, and for the chapel of SS James and Christopher, formerly illustrated by Mantegna's frescoes, largely destroyed by the Allies in World War II, because it was next to a German headquarter. The old monastery of the church now houses the municipal art gallery. Close by the Eremitani, in the site of an old Roman arena, is the small Scrovegni Chapel, Padua's most eminent attraction, whose inner walls are entirely covered with paintings by Giotto.
  • Santa Sofia is most likely Padova's most ancient church, the crypt being initiated in the late 10th century by Venetian craftsmen. It has a basilica plan with Romanesque-Gothic interior and Byzantine elements. The apse was built in the 12th century. The edifice appears to be tilting slightly due to the soft terrain.
  • The church of San Gaetano (1574-1586) was designed by Vincenzo Scamozzi, on an unusual octagonal plan. The interior, decorated with polychrome marbles, houses a precious Madonna and Child by Andrea Briosco, in Nanto stone.
  • At the centre of the historical city, the buildings of Palazzo del Bò, centre of the University; the City Hall, which wall is covered by the names of the Paduan deads in the different wars of Italy and which is attached to Palazzo della Ragione; and the Caffé Pedrocchi, built in 1831 by architect Giuseppe Jappelli in neoclassical style with Egyptian influence, a little jewel of history and art for a café open since 176 years, which hosts also the Risorgimento museum, and the near building of the Pedrocchino ("little Pedrocchi") in neogothic style.
  • The city centre is surrounded by the 11km-long city walls, built during the early sixteenth century, by architects that included Michele Sanmicheli; there are only a few ruins, together with two gates, of the smaller and inner thirteenth-century walls; there is also a castle, the Castello, which main tower was transformed between 1767 and 1777 in an astronomical observatory known as Specola, but which main buildings were used as prisons during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and they are now being restored.

In the neighbourhood of Padua are numerous noble villas. These include: Cappella degli Scrovegni The Cappella degli Scrovegni in Padua (also known as the Arena Chapel) is regarded as one of the masterpieces of Western Art. ... There are several things that have been named Giotto: Giotto di Bondone an Italian painter. ... Enrico degli Scrovegni was a Paduan nobleman who lived in the early 1300s around the time of Giotto and Dante. ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: Mary, the mother of Jesus, the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary Blessed Virgin Mary, the Roman Catholic theological and doctrinal concept of Mary Marian apparitions shrines to the Virgin Mary Virgin Mary in Islam, the Islamic theological and doctrinal concept... The Palazzo della Ragione is a town hall building in Vicenza, Italy. ... Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Fresco by Dionisius representing Saint Nicholas. ... Vicenza is a city in northern Italy, is the capital of the eponymous province in the Veneto region, at the northern base of the Monte Berico, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... Events Duke Richard of Aquitaine becomes Duke of Poitiers. ... // Events Saint Francis of Assisi introduces Catholicism into Egypt, during the Fifth Crusade The Flag of Denmark fell from the sky during the Battle of Lyndanisse Ongoing events Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Births Christopher I of Denmark (died 1259) Frederick II of Austria (died 1246) Guillaume de Gisors, supposedly the... Events March 25 - Robert the Bruce becomes King of Scotland June 19 - Forces of Earl of Pembroke defeat Bruces Scottish rebels at the Battle of Methven Philip IV of France exiles all the Jews from France and confiscates their property In London, a city ordinance degrees that heating with... Events May 21 - Treaty of Troyes. ... Events Foundation of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium Births John II, Duke of Lorraine (died 1470) Edmund Sutton, English nobleman (died 1483) Deaths January 18 - Edmund Mortimer, 5th Earl of March, English politician (born 1391) March 17 - Ashikaga Yoshikazu, Japanese shogun (born 1407) May 24 - Murdoch Stewart, 2nd Duke of... For alternative meanings, see number 1440. ... 1493 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 14 - Treaty of Madrid. ... Giovanni Maria Falconetto (Verona ca 1468–Padua 1535) was the artist and architect who designed the first fully Renaissance building in Padua, the Loggia Cornaro, a garden loggia for Alvise Cornaro built as a Roman doric arcade. ... The Italian Renaissance began the opening phase of the Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement in Europe that spanned the period from the end of the 14th century to about 1600, marking the transition between Medieval and Early Modern Europe. ... Events May 16 - Sir Thomas More resigns as Lord Chancellor of England. ... Alvise Cornaro (1484–May 8, 1566) of Padua is remembered for his four books of Discorsi (published 1583–95), the secrets to living long and well with measure and sobriety, often translated and reprinted. ... Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (March 6, 1475 – February 18, 1564), commonly known as Michelangelo, was an Italian Renaissance painter, sculptor, architect, poet and engineer. ... Two Italian painters, grandfather and grandson, are named Francesco Bassano: Francesco Bassano the Elder (c. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 427 pixelsFull resolution (850 × 454 pixel, file size: 378 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 427 pixelsFull resolution (850 × 454 pixel, file size: 378 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 799 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (850 × 638 pixel, file size: 328 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 799 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (850 × 638 pixel, file size: 328 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Basilica of SantAntonio da Padova. ... Jacopo d’Antonio Sansovino (1486 - November 27, 1570) was an Italian sculptor and architect. ... Events Kingdom of Leon unites with the Kingdom of Castile. ... Nicola Pisano (c. ... Statue of Habacuc (popularly known as Zuccone) for the Giottos Bell Tower. ... Erasmo of Narni aka Gattamelata was born in Narni. ... Detail of Donatellos equestrian statue of Gattamelata. ... April 2 - Mehmed II begins his siege of Constantinople (Ä°stanbul). ... The equestrian Marcus Aurelius on Capitoline Hill displayed uninterruptedly for eighteen centuries was the prototype of Renaissance equestrian sculptures An equestrian sculpture (from the Latin equus meaning horse) is a statue of a mounted rider. ... Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus (April 26, 121[1] – March 17, 180) was Roman Emperor from 161 to his death. ... The replica of the statue on Capitoline Hill. ... The Capitoline Hill (Capitolinus Mons), between the Forum and the Campus Martius, is one of the most famous and smallest of the seven hills of Rome. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Altichiero (around 1330 - around 1390) was an Italian painter. ... Titian. ... Tiziano Vecelli or Tiziano Vecellio (c. ... Padova - Prato della Valle - Engraving by F. Piranesi (circa 1785) Prato della Valle is a 90,000 square meter elliptical square in Padova, Italy. ... The Feast in the House of Levi (1573), one of the largest canvases of the 16th century. ... Europe in 450 The 5th century is the period from 401 to 500 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Saint Justina (Justine) of Padua ( Santa Giustina) is a Christian saint who was said to have been martyred in 304 AD. Justina was said to have been a young woman who took private vows of chastity and was killed during the persecutions of Diocletian. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Saint Prosdocimus (Prosdecimus) of Padua ( Prosdocimo, Prosdozimus) (d. ... Luke the Evangelist (Greek Λουκας Loukas) is said by tradition to be the author of both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, the third and fifth books of the New Testament. ... Façade of the church The Church of the Eremitani (Italian: Chiesa degli Eremitani) is an Augustinian church of the 13th century in Padua, northern Italy. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Events Publication of Defensor pacis by Marsilius of Padua Mansa Kankan Musa I, ruler of the Mali Empire arrives in Cairo on his hajj or pilgrimage to Mecca. ... Uberto II da Carrara (also Ubertino; died 29 March 1345), called Novello and better known as Ubertinello, was the Lord of Padua from 1338 until his death. ... Events Miracle of the Host Births October 31 - King Fernando I of Portugal (died 1383) Agnès of Valois, daughter of John II of France (died 1349) Eleanor Maltravers, English noblewoman (died 1405) Deaths April 14 - Richard Aungerville, English writer and bishop (born 1287) September 16 - John IV, Duke of... The Lamentation over the Dead Christ (c. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Cappella degli Scrovegni in Padua (also known as the Arena Chapel) is regarded as one of the masterpieces of Western Art. ... Giotto di Bondone (c. ... Year 1574 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... 1586 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Vincenzo Scamozzi Vincenzo Scamozzi (September 2, 1548 - August 7, 1616) born in Vicenza, Italy, was an architect and a writer on architecture, active mainly in Vicenza and Venice area in the second half of the 16th century. ... Andrea Broscio (c. ... The Pedrocchi Café is one of the biggest cafés in the world. ... Giuseppe Jappelli (May 14, 1783 – May 8, 1852) was an Italian neoclassic architect and engineer who was born and died in Venice. ... The neoclassical movement that produced Neoclassical architecture began in the mid-18th century, both as a reaction against the Rococo style of anti-tectonic naturalistic ornament, and an outgrowth of some classicizing features of Late Baroque. ... Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

  • Villa Molin, in the Mandria fraction, designed by Vincenzo Scamozzi in 1597.
  • Villa Pacchierotti-Trieste (17th century), at Limena
  • Villa Cittadella-Vigodarzere (19th century), at Saonara
  • Villa Selvatico da Porto (15th-18th century), at Vigonza
  • Villa Loredan, at Sant'Urbano.
  • Villa Contarini, at Piazzola sul Brenta, built in 1546 by Palladio and enlarged in the following centuries, is the most important.

Villa Molin The Villa Molin at Mandria, next to Ponte della Cagna, south of Padua, was designed for Nicolò Molin, noble of Venice,[1] by Vincenzo Scamozzi and completed in 1597. ... Vincenzo Scamozzi Vincenzo Scamozzi (September 2, 1548 - August 7, 1616) born in Vicenza, Italy, was an architect and a writer on architecture, active mainly in Vicenza and Venice area in the second half of the 16th century. ... For other uses, see: 1597 (number). ... Vigonza is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Padua in the Italian region Veneto, located about 25 km west of Venice and about 10 km northeast of Padua. ... Villa Contarini is a patrician villa in Piazzola sul Brenta, Veneto, northern Italy. ... Illustration from a 1736 English edition of I Quattro Libri dellArchitettura. ...

Culture

Antonianum. From its windows students could see St. Giustina.
Villa Molin at Mandria.

Padua has long been famous for its university, founded in 1222. Under the rule of Venice the university was governed by a board of three patricians, called the Riformatori dello Studio di Padova. The list of professors and alumni is long and illustrious, containing, among others, the names of Bembo, Sperone Speroni, the anatomist Vesalius, Copernicus, Fallopius, Fabrizio d'Acquapendente, Galileo Galilei, Pietro Pomponazzi, Reginald, later Cardinal Pole, Scaliger, Tasso and Sobieski. The university hosts the oldest anatomy theatre (built in 1594) and the oldest botanical garden (1545) in the world. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Villa_Molin_a_Mandria_(Padova). ... Image File history File links Villa_Molin_a_Mandria_(Padova). ... Gymnasivm Patavinum: The Universitys main Bo palace shown in a 1654 woodcut The University of Padua (Italian Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) located in Padua, Italy was founded in 1222. ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1170s 1180s 1190s 1200s 1210s - 1220s - 1230s 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s Years: 1217 1218 1219 1220 1221 1222 1223 1224 1225 1226 1227 See also: 1222 state leaders Events Foundation of the University of Padua Completion of the Cistercian convent in Alcobaca... Pietro Bembo (May 20, 1470 - 18 January 1547), Italian cardinal and scholar. ... Sperone Speroni degli Alvarotti (1500-1588) was an Italian Renaissance humanist, scholar, and dramatist. ... Andreas Vesalius (portrait from the Fabrica). ... Nicolaus Copernicus (in Latin; Polish Mikołaj Kopernik, German Nikolaus Kopernikus - February 19, 1473 – May 24, 1543) was a Polish astronomer, mathematician and economist who developed a heliocentric (Sun-centered) theory of the solar system in a form detailed enough to make it scientifically useful. ... Gabriele Falloppio (1523- October 9, 1562), often known by his Latin name of Fallopius, was one of the founders of the study of human anatomy. ... Galileo Galilei (15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who is closely associated with the scientific revolution. ... Pietro Pomponazzi (also known by his Latin name, Petrus Pomionatius) (16 September 1462 - 18 May 1525) was an Italian philosopher born in Mantua and died in Bologna. ... Reginald Pole, cardinal Reginald Pole (1500 - 1558) Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, was the son of Margaret Pole who was the daughter of George, Duke of Clarence. ... Joseph Justus Scaliger (1540-1609) was the tenth child and third son of Julius Caesar Scaliger and Andiette de Roques Lobejac. ... “Tasso” redirects here. ... Clan Janina coat-of-arms Sobieski (singular masculine; singular feminine Sobieska, plural: Sobiescy is a Polish noble family name, and may refer to: John III Sobieski, King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1674 to 1696 Jakub Sobieski (1590-1646), father of King John III Sobieski Jakub Ludwik Sobieski (James... Events February 27 - Henry IV is crowned King of France at Rheims. ... Events February 27 - Battle of Ancrum Moor - Scots victory over superior English forces December 13 - Official opening of the Council of Trent (closed 1563) Battle of Kawagoe - between two branches of Uesugi families and the late Hojo clan in Japan. ...


The place of Padua in the history of art is nearly as important as its place in the history of learning. The presence of the university attracted many distinguished artists, as Giotto, Fra Filippo Lippi and Donatello; and for native art there was the school of Francesco Squarcione, whence issued the great Mantegna. Madonna and Child 1440-45, tempera on panel National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC Fra Filippo Lippi (1406 - October 8?, 1469), commonly called Lippo Lippi, one of the most renowned painters of the Italian quattrocento, was born in Florence; his father, Tommaso, was a butcher. ... Statue of Habacuc (popularly known as Zuccone) for the Giottos Bell Tower. ... Virgin and Child (c. ... The Lamentation over the Dead Christ (c. ...


Padua is also the birth place of the famous architect Andrea Palladio, whose XVIth century "ville" (country-houses) in the area of Padua, Venice, Vicenza and Treviso are among the most beautiful of Italy, and they were often copied during XVIIIth and XIXth centuries. Andrea Palladio (November 30, 1508 – August 19, 1580), was an Italian architect, widely considered the most influential person in the history of Western architecture. ...


The famous sculptor Antonio Canova made his first work in Padua, one among the statues of Prato della Valle (now a copy stays at open air, while the original is in the Musei Civici, Civic Museums). Self-portrait by Canova, 1792. ...


One the most relevant places in the life of the city has certainly been The Antonianum. Settled among Prato della Valle, the Saint Anthony church and the botanic Garden it has been built in 1897 by the Jesuit fathers, and kept alive until 2002. During WWII, under the lead of P.Messori Roncaglia SJ, it became the center of the resistance war against the Nazism. Indeed, it briefly survived P.Messori's death, and it was sold by the Jesuits in 2004. Some sites are trying to collect what can still be found of the college: (1) a no-profit pixel site is collecting links to whatever is available on the web; (2) a student association created in the college is still operating and connecting Alumni.


Demographics

The commerce and jobs attract many immigrants into the city. Many of the labourers are those of eastern European origin, and North African origin. Eastern Europe is, by convention, a region defined geographically as that part of Europe covering the eastern part of the continent. ... Categories: Africa geography stubs | North Africa ...


The racial makeup of the city is 94.5% Italian, 1.3% Romanian, 0.5% Albanian, and 0.5% Moldovan. Other ethnicities include very small numbers of Filipinos, Croats, Serbs, and Moroccans. Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ...


Sport

Padua is the home of Calcio Padova, a football team that plays in Italy's Serie C1 division, and who played 16 Serie A championships (last 2 in 1995 and 1996, but the previous 14 between 1929 and 1962); the Petrarca Padova rugby union team, winner of 11 national championships between 1970 and 1987; and a volleyball club, once called Petrarca Padova too, which plays in the Italian first division, and who won a CEV cup. Basketball, cycling, rowing, horse-riding and swimming are popular sports too. Calcio Padova is an Italian football club, based in Padua, Veneto. ... Petrarca Padova is a Italian rugby union club currently competing in Super 10. ... A rugby union scrum. ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ...


The venues of these teams are: Stadio Euganeo for football and athletic, about 32,000 seats; Stadio Plebiscito for rugby union, about 9,000 seats; Palazzetto dello Sport San Lazzaro for volleyball and basketball, about 5,000 seats; Ippodromo Breda - Le Padovanelle for horse races. The old and glorious Stadio Appiani, which hosted up to 25,000 people, reduced to 10,000 ones for security reasons twenty years ago, and near to Prato della Valle in a central area, is almost abandoned and is to be restored. A small ice stadium for skating and hockey and a new 10,000 places venue for volleyball and basketball are to be built between 2007 and 2008. Stadio Euganeo is a football stadium in Padua, Italy. ...


Sister cities

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nancy (IPA pronounciation ; archaic German: ; Luxembourgish: Nanzeg) is a city and commune in the Lorraine région of northeastern France. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Freiburg im Breisgau is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, in the Breisgau region, on the western edge of the southern Black Forest (German: Schwarzwald) with about 214,000 inhabitants. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Handan (Simplified: 邯郸; Traditional: 邯鄲; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city located in the southwestern part of Hebei Province of China. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... County Status Municipality Mayor Gheorghe Nichita, Social Democratic Party, since 2003 Area 93. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mozambique. ... Beira is the second largest city in Mozambique. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... Location    - Country Portugal    - Region Centro  - Subregion Baixo Mondego  - District or A.R. Coimbra Mayor Carlos Encarnação  - Party PSD Area 319. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Cagliari City Hall Cagliari (Greek: ; Latin: Carales and Caralis[1]; Catalan: Càller; Sardinian: Casteddu) is the capital of the island of Sardinia, a region of Italy. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

The Via Anelli Wall is a three metre high wall built of steel with a length of eighty four metres, which encircles the Via Anelli quarter of Padua, northern Italy. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Padua - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2157 words)
Padua claims to be the oldest city in north Italy; the early medieval commune justified itself by a fabled founder in the Trojan Antenor, whose relics the commune recognized in a large stone sarcophagus exhumed in the year 1274.
Padua prospered economically, and the university (the third in Italy) was founded in 1222, making it one of the oldest universities in continuous operation.
Padua passed under Venetian rule in 1405, and so remained, with a brief interval during the wars of the League of Cambray, till the fall of the republic in 1797.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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