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Encyclopedia > Paddington
Paddington
OS grid reference TQ267814
London borough Westminster
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region London
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town LONDON
Postcode district W2
Dialling code 020
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
UK Parliament Cities of London and Westminster
London Assembly West Central
European Parliament London
List of places: UKEnglandLondon

Coordinates: 51°31′02″N 0°10′23″W / 51.5172, -0.173 Paddington may refer to several things: Paddington is an area of London. ... Image File history File links Greater_london_outline_map_bw. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... The London postal districts are divisions of the London post town in England and are primarily used for the direction of mail. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The W (Western and Paddington) postcode area, also known as the London W postcode area[1] is a group of postcode districts in central and west London, England. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... 020 is the dial code for Greater London in the United Kingdom. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The London Fire Brigade (LFB) is the statutory fire and rescue service for London, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is the largest ambulance service in the world that does not directly charge its patients for its services. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Cities of London and Westminster is a constituency covering the area comprising the City of London and the City of Westminster in Central London. ... Greater London is divided into a number of constituencies for London Assembly elections. ... West Central is a constituency represented in the London Assembly. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... London is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a partial list of places in London, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Paddington is an area in the City of Westminster, London. Its name was first recorded as 'Padington' in the year 1056. Three important features in the Paddington district include; London Paddington station, designed by the British Engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel and opened in 1847; St Mary's Hospital and Paddington Green police station ( considered the most important high-security police station in the United Kingdom). The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Events Creation of the Crab Nebula observed by a Chinese astronomer Anselm of Canterbury leaves Italy. ... Paddington station, also known as London Paddington, is a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London, England. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS (9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859) (IPA: ), was a British engineer. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... St Marys Hospital QEQM building (above) and old section (below) (Photographs by username Hegster) Although there must be many hospitals named St Marys Hospital, the most famous is probably located in Paddington, West London, England. ... Paddington Green police station in the Paddington district of west central London, England is operated by the Metropolitan Police Service. ...


Early on the morning of October 10, 1992, The IRA detonated explosives hidden within a telephone box outside the police station. This was intended to act as a demonstration to the British security services. Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (IRA; also referred to as the PIRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA.[2]) is an Irish Republican, left wing[3] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern... This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... K2 red telephone boxes behind Enzo Plazzottas bronze, Young Dancer, on Broad Street, Covent Garden, London A K6 red telephone box in Oxford The red telephone box, a public telephone kiosk designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, was a once familiar sight on the streets of the United Kingdom. ...

St. Mary's Hospital.
St. Mary's Hospital.

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata StMarysOldSection. ... Image File history File linksMetadata StMarysOldSection. ...

Associated people

Paddington has had several famous sons, daughters and associated residents;

  • 'Seal; The British Grammy award winning soul singer, songwriter and musician. Seal's discoghraphy includes a trio of self-titles albums; Seal, Seal and Seal all of which met with both critical and commerical success.
Paddington Mainline.
Paddington Mainline.
Paddington Underground
Paddington Underground

Robert Browning (May 7, 1812 – December 12, 1889) was a British poet and playwright whose mastery of dramatic verse, especially dramatic monologues, made him one of the foremost Victorian poets. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Little Venice is an area of central London, situated north-west of Paddington station. ... Victorian can refer to: people from or attributes of places called Victoria (disambiguation page), including Victoria, Australia, people who lived during the British Victorian era of the 19th century, and aspects of the Victorian era, for example: Victorian architecture Victorian fashion Victorian morality Victorian literature This is a disambiguation page... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... St Marys Hospital QEQM building (above) and old section (below) (Photographs by username Hegster) Although there must be many hospitals named St Marys Hospital, the most famous is probably located in Paddington, West London, England. ... Praed Street (pronounced prayd, rhymes with laid) is a street in Londons Paddington district (now part of the City of Westminster, most notable for the fact that Paddington Station is situated on it. ... Edward A. Wilson Dr. Edward Adrian Wilson (Uncle Bill) (July 23, 1872 – March 29, 1912) was a notable English polar explorer, physician, naturalist, painter and ornithologist. ... See also explorations, sea explorers, astronaut, conquistador, travelogue, the History of Science and Technology and Biography. ... For other uses, see Doctor. ... -1... Ornithology (from the Greek ornitha = chicken and logos = word/science) is the branch of biology concerned with the scientific study of birds. ... “Scott of the Antarctic” redirects here. ... Lawrence Edward Grace Oates (March 17, 1880 – March 17, 1912) was a British Antarctic explorer. ... Lieutenant Henry Robertson (Birdie) Bowers (July 29, 1883 - March 29, 1912) was one of Robert Falcon Scotts polar party on the ill-fated Terra Nova expedition in 1910-1912 who all died during their return from the South Pole. ... Petty Officer Edgar Evans (1876 - February 17, 1912) was one of Robert Falcon Scotts companions on his ill-fated expedition to the South Pole in 1911-1912. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Terra Nova Expedition (1910–1913) was a British expedition led by Robert Falcon Scott with the purpose of undertaking scientific research and exploration along the coast and interior of Antarctica. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Alexander Fleming (6 August 1881 – 11 March 1955) was a Scottish biologist and pharmacologist. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Japanese rock band, see Penicillin (band). ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... St Marys Hospital QEQM building (above) and old section (below) (Photographs by username Hegster) Although there must be many hospitals named St Marys Hospital, the most famous is probably located in Paddington, West London, England. ... Praed Street (pronounced prayd, rhymes with laid) is a street in Londons Paddington district (now part of the City of Westminster, most notable for the fact that Paddington Station is situated on it. ... Sir Alec Guinness CH, CBE (April 2, 1914 – August 5, 2000) was an Academy Award and Tony Award-winning English actor who became one of the most versatile and best-loved performers of his generation. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Great Expectations is a 1946 British film directed by David Lean and based on the novel by Charles Dickens. ... Oliver Twist (1948) is the second of David Leans two film adaptations of Charles Dickens novels. ... The Ladykillers is a 1955 British film. ... The Bridge on the River Kwai is an Academy Award-winning 1957 World War II war film based on the novel Le Pont de la Rivière Kwaï by French writer Pierre Boulle. ... Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ... Doctor Zhivago (Russian: Доктор Живаго) is a 1965 film directed by David Lean and loosely based on the famous novel of the same name by Boris Pasternak. ... Cromwell is a 1970 film, based on the life of Oliver Cromwell, the Lord Protector of Great Britain. ... Scrooge was a 1970 musical film adaptation of Charles Dickens classic 1843 story, A Christmas Carol. ... A Passage to India is a 1984 film directed by David Lean, based on the novel of the same name by E. M. Forster. ... Emma Thompson (born 15 April 1959) is an Emmy-, BAFTA- and Academy Award-winning English actress, comedian, and screenwriter. ... An Emmy Award. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Henry reads of the French dead after the battle of Agincourt Henry V is a 1989 film directed by Kenneth Branagh, and based upon the Shakespeare play. ... Howards End is a 1991 (released in 1992) film adaptation of E.M. Forsters 1910 novel Howards End, a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-20th-century England. ... The Remains of the Day (1993) is a Merchant Ivory Film adapted by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala from the novel by Kazuo Ishiguro. ... In the Name of the Father is a 1993 film directed by Jim Sheridan based on the true life story of the Guildford Four, four people falsely convicted of the IRAs Guildford pub bombing. ... Jane Austens novel Sense and Sensibility (1811) was adapted into a 1995 film by Emma Thompson, for which she received general acclaim as well as the 1996 Academy Award. ... Love Actually is a romantic comedy first released in cinemas in October and November 2003. ... Starring Daniel Radcliffe Rupert Grint Emma Watson Produced by Michael Barnathan et al. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ... Seal Henry Olusegun Olumide Adeola Samuel (born February 19, 1963 in Paddington, London, England) is a three-time Grammy Award-winning British soul vocalist and songwriter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Seal was Seals eponymous 1991 debut album and contained the UK singles: Killer (originally performed with Adamski), Crazy (both reaching number one in the UK) and Future Love Paradise. Confusingly, Seals next album, released in 1994, would also be named Seal - usually referred to as Seal II. The... Seal is Seals second self-titled album which was released in 1994. ... Seal (2003) is the fourth album (and third self-titled album) by Seal. ... Kiefer William Frederick Dempsey George Rufus Sutherland (born December 21, 1966) is an Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian television and film actor, well known for his role of Jack Bauer on the television series 24. ... An Emmy Award. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Stand by Me is a 1986 drama film directed by Rob Reiner. ... ‹ The template below (article) is being considered for deletion. ... Young Guns is a 1988 action/western film directed by Christopher Cain and written by John Fusco. ... A Few Good Men, a play by Aaron Sorkin, was acclaimed on Broadway and was subsequently made into a successful film in 1992. ... Phone Booth is a 2003 morality thriller about a man who is trapped in a telephone booth by a sniper. ... For other uses, see 24 (disambiguation). ... Zara Anne Elizabeth Phillips, BSc (Exon), MBE (born 15 May 1981) is the second child and only daughter of Princess Anne, the Princess Royal and her first husband, Captain Mark Phillips. ... The European Eventing Championship, like most other European Championships, is held every two years. ... The Eventing World Championship, or the eventing competition in the World Equestrian Games (WEG), began in 1966. ... Look up equestrian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... HRH The Prince of Wales, the Heir Apparent. ... Generally, patronage is the act of supporting or favoring some person, group, or institution. ... The Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children was founded in London in 1852 as the first hospital specifically for children in the English-speaking world. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Paddington station from pixelquelle. ... Paddington station from pixelquelle. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 568 KB) The Circle and District Line platforms of Paddington London Underground station. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 568 KB) The Circle and District Line platforms of Paddington London Underground station. ...

References in fiction

  • Possibly the most famous fictional reference to Paddington comes from Michael Bond's Paddington Bear books. The title character is named after the station.
  • In the BBC mini-series of John le Carré's Smiley's People, the General lives off Westbourne Terrace, and Smiley later visits, with scenes also filmed around Paddington Station and Craven Terrace.
  • In the Sherlock Holmes short story The Stockbroker's Clerk, Dr. Watson mentioned that he purchased a practice in the Paddington district.

Michael Bond is a british childrens author. ... Paddington Station-Bronze of Paddington Bear Paddington Bear is a fictional character in childrens literature. ... John le Carr̩ is the pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell (born October 19, 1931 in Poole, Dorset, England), an English writer of espionage novels. ... For the article by Neal Stephenson, see Smileys people. ... Map showing the railways on the fictional Island of Sodor (click to enlarge). ... The Reverend W. V. Awdry OBE (15 June 1911 Р21 March 1997) was a clergyman, railway enthusiast and childrens author, best known as the creator of Thomas the Tank Engine. ... Duck the Great Western Engine as portrayed in the TV series. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ...

Paddington station

Paddington has a main-line railway station, Paddington station, with commuter service to the west of London (e.g. Slough, Maidenhead, Reading, Swindon) and main-line service to Oxford, Bristol, Bath, Taunton, Exeter, Plymouth, Cornwall and South Wales (including Cardiff and Swansea). There is also the Heathrow Express service to Heathrow Airport. Paddington station, also known as London Paddington, is a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London, England. ... Paddington station, also known as London Paddington, is a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London, England. ... Slough (pronounced ) is a town and unitary authority (Borough of Slough) in England. ... Statistics Population: 58,848 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SU889811 Administration District: Windsor and Maidenhead Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Berkshire Historic county: Berkshire Services Police force: Thames Valley Ambulance service: South Central Post office and telephone Post town: MAIDENHEAD... Reading station from the station car park at the north (rear) side of the station Reading (formerly Reading General) is a railway station in the large town of Reading in south central England. ... , For other places with the same name, see Swindon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... This article is about the English city. ... For alternate meanings see Bath (disambiguation) Palladian Pulteney Bridge and the weir at Bath Bath is a city in south-west England, most famous for its baths fed by three hot springs. ... Taunton is the county town of Somerset, England. ... A number of other places have taken their names from Exeter The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in England, UK. It is located at 50° 43 25 N, 3° 31 39 W. In the 2001 census its population was recorded at 111,066. ... , Plymouth (Cornish: ) is a city of 243,795 inhabitants (2001 census) in the south-west of England, or alternatively the West Country, and is situated within the traditional and ceremonial county of Devon at the mouths of the rivers Plym and Tamar and at the head of one of the... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Heathrow Express is a train service from Heathrow Airport to Paddington in central London operated by the Heathrow Express Operating Authority—a wholly owned subsidiary of BAA. The service is not part of the National Rail system, despite part of its journey sharing track with National Rail trains and terminating... London Heathrow Airport (IATA airport code: LHR, ICAO airport code: EGLL, and often simply Heathrow) is the United Kingdoms busiest and best-connected airport. ...


The station has a statue of Paddington Bear, a character in children's fiction who was discovered at this station and, hence, named after it. Paddington Station-Bronze of Paddington Bear Paddington Bear is a fictional character in childrens literature. ...


Education

For education in Paddington see the main City of Westminster article.

The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Paddington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (277 words)
Paddington is an place in the City of Westminster.
Paddington has several famous sons, notably Alexander Fleming — the scientist who discovered Penicillin (a plaque commemorating this is placed outside his laboratory at St Mary's Hospital on Praed Street) — and Alan Turing (mathematician; there is a plaque on the Hotel where he was born: The Colonnade in Warrington Crescent).
In Paddington Station there is a display case showing Paddington Bear, a character of children's fiction who, in the book, is first discovered at this station and hence named after it.
Paddington station - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (846 words)
Paddington station or London Paddington is the name of a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London.
The National Rail station at Paddington is the London terminus for long distance trains to the West Country, Bristol, Bath and South Wales operated by First Great Western, and for commuter services to West London and the Thames Valley, operated by First Great Western Link.
The mystery novel 4.50 from Paddington by Agatha Christie begins with a murder witnessed by a passenger on a train from Paddington station on a parallel line.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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