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Encyclopedia > Oxford University
University of Oxford
Motto Dominus Illuminatio Mea
"The Lord is my Light"
(Psalm 27)
Established c. 12th century
Chancellor The Right Hon. The Lord Patten of Barnes
Vice-Chancellor Dr John Hood
Location Oxford, United Kingdom
Students 17,000 Total (5,600 Graduate)
University Colours Royal Blue
Member of Russell Group, Coimbra Group, Europaeum, EUA, LERU
Homepage http://www.ox.ac.uk

The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Lord Patten of Barnes Christopher Francis Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC (born 12 May 1944) is a prominent British Conservative politician. ... Dr John Hood is the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford as of 5th October 2004. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... The Russell Group of universities is a self-selected group of large research-led British universities; 18 of its 19 members are in the top 20 in terms of research funding. ... Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol, Louvain/Leuven, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... The Europaeum is a loose organisation of ten leading European universities. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... This is a list of the oldest extant universities in the world. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Oxford University and Cambridge University (which was founded by scholars who left Oxford) are sometimes referred to collectively as Oxbridge. The two universities have a long history of competition with each other, as they are the two oldest and most prestigious universities in England (see Oxbridge rivalry). The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Oxbridge is a portmanteau name for the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... The University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge, collectively known as Oxbridge, are the two oldest and most famous universities in England. ...


Oxford has recently topped some league tables, which rank universities in Britain. Although often contested, international league tables produced by the Times Higher Education Supplement rated Oxford second in the world for both science, and arts and humanities, as well as fifth in the world overall. Starting in the early 1990s, The Times newspaper started publishing league tables ranking British universities based on a number of criteria, such as the quality of their teaching and research (which were assessed by external inspectors), entry standards and dropout rates. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ...


Like Cambridge and others, Oxford is a member of the Russell Group of research-led British universities, the Coimbra Group (a network of leading European universities) and the LERU (League of European Research Universities). Oxford is also a core member of the Europaeum. The Russell Group of universities is a self-selected group of large research-led British universities; 18 of its 19 members are in the top 20 in terms of research funding. ... Most British universities can be classified into 5 main categories, Ancient universities - universities founded before the 19th century Red Brick universities - universities founded in the 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol, Louvain/Leuven, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The Europaeum is a loose organisation of ten leading European universities. ...

Contents

History

The date of the university's foundation is unknown, and indeed it may not have been a single event, but there is evidence of teaching there as early as 1096. When Henry II of England forbade English students to study at the University of Paris in 1167, Oxford began to grow very quickly. The foundation of the first halls of residence, which later became colleges, dates from this period and later. Following the murder of two students accused of rape in 1209, the University was disbanded (leading to the foundation of the University of Cambridge). On June 20, 1214, the University returned to Oxford with a charter negotiated by Nicholas de Romanis, a papal legate. The University's status was formally confirmed by an Act for the Incorporation of Both Universities in 1571, in which the University's formal title is given as The Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford. Events Bernhard becomes Bishop of Brandenburg First documented teaching at the University of Oxford Beginning of the Peoples Crusade, the German Crusade, and the First Crusade Vital I Michele is Doge of Venice Peter I, King of Aragon, conquers Huesca Phayao, now a province of Thailand, is founded as... Henry II of England, depicted in Cassells History of England, Century Edition, published circa 1902 Henry II (March 5, 1133 – July 6, 1189), ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... Events Taira no Kiyomori becomes the first samurai to be appointed Daijo Daijin, chief minister of the government of Japan Peter of Blois becomes the tutor of William II of Sicily Absalon, archbishop of Denmark, leads the first Danish synod at Lund Absalon fortifies Copenhagen William Marshal, the greatest knight... Events Albigensian Crusade against Cathars (1209-1218) the Franciscans are founded. ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... Events Simon Apulia becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... In 1207, Pope Innocent III (1198-1216) placed the kingdom of England under an Interdict as the result of actions taken by King John (1199-1215) culminating in a debate over the appointment for a successor to the Archbishopric of Canterbury. ... Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ...


Organisation

Oxford is a collegiate university, consisting of the university's central facilities, such as departments and faculties, libraries and science facilities, and 39 colleges and 7 permanent private halls (PPHs). All teaching staff and degree students must belong to one of the colleges (or PPHs). These colleges are not only houses of residence, but have substantial responsibility for the teaching of undergraduates and postgraduates. Some colleges only accept postgraduate students. Only one of the colleges, St Hilda's, remains single-sex, accepting only women (though several of the religious PPHs are male-only). In the United Kingdom, a collegiate university is a university whose functions are divided between the central departments of the university and a number of colleges. ... St Hildas College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...


Oxford's collegiate system springs from the fact that the University came into existence through the gradual agglomeration of independent institutions in the city of Oxford.


See also Colleges of Oxford University, and a list of Cambridge sister colleges. The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ...

Image:brasnose.JPG
Brasenose College in the 1670s

As well as the collegiate level of organisation, the university is subdivided into departments on a subject basis, much like most other universities. Departments take a major role in graduate education and an increasing role in undergraduate education, providing lectures and classes and organising examinations. Departments are also a centre of research, funded by outside bodies including major research councils; while colleges have an interest in research, most are not subject specialist in organisation. brasenose college, oxford, etching by david loggan in 1670s This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...


The main legislative body of the university is Congregation, the assembly of all academics who teach in the university. Another body, Convocation, encompassing all the graduates of Oxford, was formerly the main legislative body of the university, and until 1949 elected the two Members of Parliament for the University. Convocation now has very limited functions: the main one is to elect the (largely symbolic) Chancellor of the University, most recently in 2003 with the election of Christopher Patten. The executive body of the university is the University Council, which consists of the Vice-Chancellor, Dr John Hood (succeeding Sir Colin Lucas), heads of departments and other members elected by Congregation in addition to observers from the Student Union. Apart from the present House of Congregation, there is also an Ancient House of Congregation, which somehow survived the university reforms in the 19th century and is summoned today for the sole purpose of granting degrees. A congregation is a group of people gathered together. ... A Convocation is a group of people formally assembled for a special purpose. ... 1949 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... University constituencies existed from 1603 until 1950 to allow a University to be represented in the United Kingdom Parliament. ... Chancellor (Latin: cancellarius), an official title used by most of the peoples whose civilization has arisen directly or indirectly out of the Roman empire. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Right Honourable Christopher Francis Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC (born 12 May 1944) is a prominent British Conservative politician. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Dr John Hood is the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford as of 5th October 2004. ... Sir Colin Renshaw Lucas (1940- ) was the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University. ...


The academic year is divided into three terms, each of eight weeks' duration. Michaelmas Term lasts from early October to early December; Hilary Term (named after St Hilary of Poitiers whose feast day is 13 January) normally from January until before Easter; and Trinity Term normally from after Easter until June. These terms are among the shortest of any British university, and the workload during each term is therefore intense. An academic term is the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... In the Christian calendar, Michaelmas (pronounced /[email protected] ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... December is the twelfth and last month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Hilarius or Hilary (c. ... January is the first month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Easter is the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed in March, April, or May each year to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus from the dead after his death by crucifixion (see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year around AD 30-33. ... Trinity Sunday is the first Sunday after Pentecost in the Christian liturgical calendar. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ...


Admission

Admission to the University of Oxford is based on academic merit and potential. Admissions for undergraduates is undertaken by individual colleges, working with each other to ensure that the very best students gain a place at the university. Selection is based on school references, personal statements, achieved results, predicted results, written work, written tests and interviews.


For graduate students, admission is firstly by the university department in which each will study, and then secondarily with the college with which they are associated.


Oxford, like Cambridge, has traditionally been perceived to be a preserve of the wealthy, although today this is not the case. The cost of taking a course, in the days before student grants were available, was prohibitive unless one was a scholar (or in even earlier times, a servitor — one who had to serve his fellow undergraduates in exchange for tuition). Public schools and grammar schools prepared their pupils more specifically for the entrance examination, some even going so far as to encourage applicants to spend an extra year in the sixth form in order to study for it: pupils from other state schools rarely had this luxury. A public school, in common English and Welsh usage, is a (usually) prestigious school, for children usually between the ages of 11 or 13 and 18, which charges fees and is not financed by the state. ... The sixth form in the English education system is the term used to refer to the final two years of secondary schooling (when students are about sixteen to eighteen years of age), during which students normally prepare for their GCE A-level examinations. ...


In recent years, Oxford has made greater efforts to attract pupils from state schools, and admission to Oxford and Cambridge remains on academic merit and potential. Around half of the students in Oxford come from state school backgrounds. However, there is still much public debate in Britain about whether more could be done to attract those from poorer social backgrounds.


Students successful in early examinations are rewarded with scholarships and exhibitions, normally the result of a long-standing endowment, although when tuition fees were first abolished the amounts of money available became purely nominal: much larger funded bursaries are available on the basis of need for current and prospective students. "Closed" scholarships, which were accessible only to candidates from specific schools, exist now only in name. Scholars, and exhibitioners in some colleges, are entitled to wear a more voluminous undergraduate gown; "commoners" (i.e. those who had to pay for their "commons", or food and lodging) being restricted to a short sleeveless garment. The term "scholar" in relation to Oxbridge, therefore, has a specific meaning as well as the more general meaning of someone of outstanding academic ability. In previous times, there were "noblemen commoners" and "gentlemen commoners", but these ranks were abolished in the 19th century. A scholarship is an award of access to an institution and/or a financial aid award for an individual for the purposes of furthering their education. ... Exhibition is a word with several meanings. ...


Until 1866 one had to belong to the Church of England to receive the BA degree from Oxford, and "dissenters" were only permitted to receive the MA in 1871. Knowledge of Ancient Greek was required until 1920, and Latin until 1960. Women were admitted to degrees in 1920. 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Greek language (Greek Ελληνικά, IPA // – Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of some 3,000 years. ... 1920 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... Latin is the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1920 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ...


Degrees

The system of academic degrees in the university is very confusing to those not familiar with it. This is not merely due to the fact that many degree titles date from the Middle Ages, but also because, in recent years, many changes have been haphazardly introduced. See also Degrees of Oxford University. A degree is any of a wide range of awards made by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... This article concerns the Degrees of Oxford University. ...


Famous Oxonians

Oxford has produced four British and more than five foreign Kings, 47 Nobel prize-winners, 25 British Prime Ministers, six saints, 86 Archbishops and 18 Cardinals. More complete information on famous senior and junior members of the University can be found in the individual college articles. Note that an individual may be associated with two or more colleges, as an undergraduate, postgraduate, and/or member of staff. Photographs of Nobel Prize Medals. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... General definition of saint In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official in the Roman Catholic Church, ranking just below the Pope and appointed by him as a member of the College of Cardinals, during a consistory. ... The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ...

See also: List of notable Oxford students.

The following persons attended the University of Oxford but did not necessarily complete a degree course there. ...

Other students in Oxford

There is a second university in Oxford - Oxford Brookes University [1] (http://www.brookes.ac.uk/), formerly known as Oxford Polytechnic - whose entrance requirements are less stringent than Oxford University's. Brookes is located on campuses largely in the eastern suburbs of the city. There are also a number of independent "colleges" which have nothing to do with either university but are popular, particularly with overseas students, perhaps because they allow their students to state truthfully that they have studied at Oxford; these institutions vary considerably in the standard of teaching they provide. Oxford Brookes is a university in Oxfordshire, England. ... The term polytechnic, from the Greek πολύ polú meaning many and τεχνικός tekhnikós meaning arts, is commonly used in many countries to describe an institution that delivers technical education, other countries do not use the term and use alternative terminology. ... Campus is Latin for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ...


Ruskin College, Oxford, an adult education college, though not part of the university, has close links with it. Ruskin College is an independent college in Oxford, founded in 1899 and named after John Ruskin. ...


Institutions

Events and organisations connected with the university include:

University Church of St Mary the Virgin

See also: Academic dress of Oxford University University Church of St Mary the Virgin, Oxford, 2004-01-24, Copyright Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... University Church of St Mary the Virgin, Oxford, 2004-01-24, Copyright Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Oxford Union Societys Victorian (new) debating chamber The Oxford Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Oxford Union, is a private debating society whose membership is drawn primarily from the University of Oxford. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... The Sackler Library holds a large portion of the classical, art history, and archaeological works belonging to the University of Oxford. ... The Taylor Institution is Oxford Universitys centre for the study of modern European languages and literatures. ... The Oxford University Student Union is the official student government of the University of Oxford. ... The Oxford University Museum of Natural History, sometimes known simply as the Oxford University Museum, is a museum displaying many of the University of Oxfords natural history specimens. ... Pitt Rivers Museum interior The Pitt Rivers Museum is a museum displaying the archaeological and anthropological collections of the University of Oxford. ... The Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, England is the worlds first university museum. ... A gaudy (from the Latin, gaudere, meaning to rejoice) is a kind of reunion, particularly associated with the colleges of Oxford and Cambridge. ... At Oxford University, Eights Week constitutes the main intercollegiate rowing event of the year, and happens in May. ... At Oxford University, Torpids is one of two bumping races held in the year, the other being Eights. ... Boat Race Logo Exhausted crews at the finish of the 2002 Boat Race The Boat Race is a rowing race between the rowing clubs of the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after Oxford). ... This page concerns the Academic dress of Oxford University. ...


Oxford in literature and other media

Oxford University is the setting for numerous works of fiction. As of 1989, more than 533 Oxford-based novels had been identified, and the number has steadily risen ever since. Fictional works include:

Fictional universities based on Oxford include Terry Pratchett's Unseen University and "Christminster" in Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure. Gaudy Night is a 1935 Lord Peter Wimsey detective story by Dorothy L. Sayers. ... Lord Peter Death Bredon Wimsey is a fictional character in a series of detective novels and short stories by Dorothy L. Sayers. ... Dorothy Leigh Sayers (Oxford, 13 June 1893 - Witham, 17 December 1957) was a British author, translator, student of classical and modern languages, and Christian humanist. ... Full name Somerville College Motto Donec rursus impleat orbem Named after Mary Somerville Previous Names Somerville Hall Established 1879 Sister College Girton College Principal Dame Fiona Caldicott JCR President Nicholas Bell MCR President Allen Middlebro Location Woodstock Road, Oxford Undergraduates 396 Graduates 88 Homepage Boat Club Somerville College is one... Brideshead Revisited is a novel by Evelyn Waugh, first published in 1945. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Evelyn Arthur St. ... A Staircase in Surrey is a sequence of five novels by Scottish novelist and academic J. I. M. Stewart (1906–1994), and published between 1974 and 1978. ... John Innes Mackintosh Stewart (1906–1994) was a Scottish novelist and academic. ... A whodunit or whodunnit (for Who done it? and sometimes referred to as a Golden Age Mystery novel) is a complex, plot-driven variety of the detective story in which the puzzle is paramount. ... The three volumes (left to right) of the trilogy His Dark Materials is a trilogy of novels by the fantasy fiction author Philip Pullman, comprising Northern Lights (Released as The Golden Compass in the United States), The Subtle Knife and The Amber Spyglass. ... Philip Pullman Philip Pullman, (born October 19, 1946) is an English writer, educated at Exeter College, Oxford, who is the bestselling author of the His Dark Materials trilogy of fantasy novels and a number of other books, purportedly for children, but attracting increasing attention by adult readers. ... Spoiler warning: Detective Chief Inspector Endeavour Morse is a fictional character, who features in a series of thirteen detective novels by British author Colin Dexter. ... (Norman) Colin Dexter is the British author of the Inspector Morse novels. ... John Wain (born John Barrington Wain, March 14, 1925 - May 24, 1994) was an English poet, novelist, and critic, associated with the literary group The Movement. ... A statue of Thomas Hughes at Rugby School For the recipient of the Victoria Cross see Thomas Hughes, VC Thomas Hughes (October 20, 1822 – March 22, 1896) was an English lawyer and author. ... Zuleika Dobson is a 1911 novel by Max Beerbohm, a satire of undergraduate life at Oxford. ... Max Beerbohm by William Rothenstein, 1893 Sir Henry Maximilian Beerbohm (August 24, 1872 - May 20, 1956) was an English satirist and caricaturist. ... Jill may refer to Nakajima B6N Jill, a girls name Jill, a novel by Philip Larkin Jill, a pet dog of Betty Spaghetty Jill Kelly - Porn Star This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Philip Larkin (August 9, 1922 – December 2, 1985) was an English poet, novelist and jazz critic. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (known to some fans as Pterry – following the convention he used in his book Pyramids where characters were given names such as Ptraci and Pteppic) is an English fantasy author (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Bucks), best known for his Discworld series. ... Unseen University (UU) is a school of wizardry in the fictional Discworld city of Ankh-Morpork. ... Photograph of Hardy Thomas Hardy (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was a novelist and poet, generally regarded as one of the greatest figures in English literature. ... Jude the Obscure is the last of Thomas Hardys novels, first published in 1895. ...


For a list of fictional colleges of Oxford University, see fictional Oxford colleges. A list of some of the fictional colleges of the University of Oxford. ...


Many poets have also been inspired by the university:

Films set in the university include: In the twentieth century anthologies became an important part of poetry publishing, for a number of reasons. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Warton (January 9, 1728 - May 21, 1790) was an English academic and poet, holder of the title of Poet Laureate from 1785. ... Gerard Manley Hopkins (July 28, 1844 - June 8, 1889) was a British Victorian poet and Jesuit priest, whose verse has been widely admired for the vividness of its expression. ...

This does not include movies where university buildings were used as a backdrop but not depicted as Oxford University, such as the Harry Potter movies. There are many people known as Robert Taylor, including: Robert Taylor (actor) Robert Taylor (aviation artist) Robert Taylor (composer) Robert Taylor (computer scientist) Sir Robert Taylor (architect) Robert Taylor (athlete) Robert Taylor (UK politician) Robert Love Taylor (US politician) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other... Vivien Leigh (1913-1967) Vivien Leigh (November 5, 1913 – July 7, 1967) was an English actress who was born Vivian Mary Hartley in Darjeeling, India. ... 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Stan Laurel Stan Laurel (June 16, 1890 – February 23, 1965), born Arthur Stanley Jefferson, was a comedian and member of the comedy team Laurel and Hardy. ... Oliver Norvell Hardy (January 18, 1892 - August 7, 1957) was an American film actor. ... Oxford Blues is a 1984 film. ... Rob Lowe (born March 17, 1964 in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA) is an American actor who was a member of the Brat Pack. ... Alexandra Elizabeth Sheedy (born June 13, 1962 in New York City), is an American screen and stage actor, possibly best known for her roles in the Brat Pack films The Breakfast Club and St. ... Amanda Pays (born 1959) is an English actress. ... Michael Palin as Pilate in Monty Pythons Life of Brian Michael Edward Palin (born May 5, 1943 in Sheffield, Yorkshire) is a British comedian and television presenter. ... Iris is a movie that tells the story of British novelist Iris Murdoch and her relationship with John Bayley. ... Judi Dench as M in GoldenEye Dame Judi Olivia Dench, DBE, (born December 9, 1934) is a renowned British stage, film and television actress. ... Jim Broadbent (born May 24, 1949) is an English television and film actor. ... Kate Winslet Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born October 5, 1975) is an English actress most famous for her role of Rose DeWitt Bukater in the 1997 blockbuster movie Titanic. ... Iris Murdoch Dame Jean Iris Murdoch (July 15, 1919 - February 8, 1999) was an Anglo-Irish novelist and philosopher, famed for her series of novels that combine rich characterization and compelling plotlines usually involving ethical or sexual themes. ... Shadowlands is a play by William Nicholson, first shown as a television play in 1985, starring Joss Ackland and Claire Bloom. ... Anthony Hopkins A separate article is about composer Antony Hopkins. ... Debra Winger (born May 16, 1955) is an American actress. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... Young Sherlock Holmes (1985), directed by Barry Levinson and written by Chris Columbus, depicts a young Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson meeting and solving a mystery together at a boarding school. ... Nicholas James Sebastian Rowe (b. ... True Blue is a patriotic folk song written by Australian singer-songwriter John Williamson and often performed at sporting events. ... Boat Race Logo Exhausted crews at the finish of the 2002 Boat Race The Boat Race is a rowing race between the rowing clubs of the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Saint refers to the fictional character created by Leslie Charteris in one of the following contexts: Simon Templar, the character also known as The Saint (main Wikipedia article about this subject). ... Val Kilmer Val Edward Kilmer (born December 31, 1959, Los Angeles, California, USA) is an American actor considered by fans to be one of the most talented and underappreciated actors currently working in film and television. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover of the original novel in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone - This original edition was distributed throughout the English-speaking world outside of the United States (within the U.S., it was distributed as Harry Potter and the Sorcerors Stone. ...


See also

Shortcut: UK topics This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... Town and gown is a term used to describe the two communities of a university town; town being the non-academic population and gown the university community. ... The Bullingdon Club is a socially-exclusive student dining society based at Christ Church, Oxford, famous for its members wealth and destructive binges. ...

Further reading

  • Batson, Judy G., Oxford in Fiction, Garland (New York, 1989).
  • Betjeman, John, An Oxford University Chest, Miles (London, 1938).
  • Brooke, Christopher and Roger Highfield, Oxford and Cambridge, Cambridge University Press (Cambridge, 1988).
  • Casson, Hugh, Hugh Casson's Oxford, Phaidon (London, 1988).
  • Catto, J. (ed.), The History of the University of Oxford, Oxford University Press (Oxford, 1994).
  • De-la-Noy, Michael, Exploring Oxford, Headline (London, 1991).
  • Dougill, John, Oxford in English Literature, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, 1998).
  • Feiler, Bruce, Looking for Class: Days and Nights at Oxford and Cambridge, Perennial (New York, 2004).
  • Hibbert, Christopher, The Encyclopaedia of Oxford, Macmillan (Basingstoke, 1988).
  • Horan, David, Cities of the Imagination: Oxford, Signal (Oxford, 2002).
  • Miles, Jebb, The Colleges of Oxford, Constable (London, 1992).
  • Morris, Jan, Oxford, Faber and Faber/OUP (London, 1965/2001).
  • Morris, Jan, The Oxford Book of Oxford, Oxford Univ. Press (Oxford, 2002).
  • Pursglove, G. and A. Ricketts (eds.), Oxford in Verse, Perpetua (Oxford, 1999).
  • Snow, Peter, Oxford Observed, John Murray (London, 1991).
  • Tames, Richard, A Traveller's History of Oxford, Interlink (New York, 2002).
  • Thomas, Edward, Oxford, Black (London, 1902).
  • Tyack, Geoffrey, Blue Guide: Oxford and Cambridge, Black (New York, 2004).
  • Tyack, Geoffrey, Oxford: An Architectural Guide, Oxford Univ. Press (Oxford, 1998).

External links

  • University of Oxford website (http://www.ox.ac.uk)
  • Oxford University Press (http://www.oup.co.uk/)


Colleges of the University of Oxford Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ...

All Souls | Balliol | Brasenose | Christ Church | Corpus Christi | Exeter | Green | Harris Manchester | Hertford | Jesus | Keble | Kellogg | Lady Margaret Hall | Linacre | Lincoln | Magdalen | Mansfield | Merton | New College | Nuffield | Oriel | Pembroke | Queen's | St Anne's | St Antony's | St Catherine's | St Cross | St Edmund Hall | St Hilda's | St Hugh's | St John's | St Peter's | Somerville | Templeton | Trinity | University | Wadham | Wolfson | Worcester
  All Souls College (in full: The College of All Souls of the Faithful Departed, of Oxford) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Full name Balliol College Motto - Named after John de Balliol Previous names - Established 1263 Sister College St Johns College, Cambridge Master Andrew Graham JCR President {{{JCR President}}} MCR President {{{MCR President}}} Location Broad Street Undergraduates 403 Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the... Brasenose College (in full: The Kings Hall and College of Brasenose) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Christ Church, Oxford - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Corpus Christi College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Exeter College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Green College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Harris Manchester College, formerly Manchester College, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom; it has the emphasis on students who are more advanced in age. ... Hertford College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Jesus College (in full: Jesus College in the University of Oxford of Queen Elizabeths Foundation) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Keble College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Kellogg College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Lady Margaret Hall is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Linacre College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, currently offering graduate entry only. ... Full name Lincoln College Motto - - Named after Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln Previous names - Established 1427 Sister College Downing College Rector Prof. ... Magdalen College (pronounced ) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Mansfield College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Merton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... New College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Nuffield College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Oriel College (in full: The House of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford commonly called Oriel College, of the Foundation of Edward the Second of famous memory, sometime King of England) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Pembroke College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... The Queens College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Annes College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Antonys College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Catherines College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Cross College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Edmund Hall is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Hildas College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Hughs College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Johns College, Oxford - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... St Peters College is a relatively young college of the University_of_Oxford, Oxford, England. ... Full name Somerville College Motto Donec rursus impleat orbem Named after Mary Somerville Previous Names Somerville Hall Established 1879 Sister College Girton College Principal Dame Fiona Caldicott JCR President Nicholas Bell MCR President Allen Middlebro Location Woodstock Road, Oxford Undergraduates 396 Graduates 88 Homepage Boat Club Somerville College is one... Templeton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Trinity College (in full: The College of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity and Sir Thomas Pope (Knight)) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... University College (in full, the College of the Great Hall of the University, commonly known as University College in the University of Oxford, usually known by its derivative, Univ), is the oldest of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, and is amongst the largest... Wadham College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Wolfson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Worcester College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...

Permanent Private Halls at the University of Oxford A Permanent Private Hall at the University of Oxford is an educational institution affiliated to the University — not as a full College, but able to award Oxford University degrees. ...

Blackfriars | Campion Hall | Greyfriars | Regent's Park College | St Benet's Hall | St Stephen's House | Wycliffe Hall The English Dominican House of Blackfriars Hall in Oxford, commonly known simply as Blackfriars, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Campion Hall is one of the constituent colleges of the United Kingdom. ... Greyfriars is one of the smallest constituent Halls of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Regents Park College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Benets Hall, Oxford - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... St Stephens House is a Permanent Private Hall affiliated to the University of Oxford. ... Wycliffe Hall is a Church of England theological college, and one of the constituent institutions of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...


Coimbra Group
(of European research universities)
Aarhus | Barcelona | Bergen | Bologna | Bristol | Budapest | Cambridge | Coimbra | Dublin | Edinburgh | Galway | Geneva | Göttingen | Granada | Graz | Groningen | Heidelberg | Jena | Kraków | Leiden | Leuven | Louvain | Lyon | Montpellier | Oxford | Padua | Pavia | Poitiers | Prague | Salamanca | Siena | Tartu | Thessaloniki | Turku I | Turku II | Uppsala | Würzburg


Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol, Louvain/Leuven, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... logo of the Coimbra Group. ... University of Aarhus The University of Aarhus is a university based in Århus, Denmark. ... The University of Barcelona (Catalan Universitat de Barcelona) is a university located in the city of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The University of Bergen (Universitetet i Bergen) is located in Bergen, Norway. ... The University of Bologna (Università di Bologna, UNIBO) is a university in Bologna, Italy. ... The University of Bristol is a university in Bristol in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about Eötvös Loránd University, which is often referred to as University of Budapest. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Coimbra (Universidade de Coimbra) is a Portuguese state university in Coimbra, a city in central Portugal. ... The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin or more commonly Trinity College, Dublin (TCD) was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, is the only constituent college of the University of Dublin, Irelands oldest university. ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI, Galway) (Irish: Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh) can trace its existence to 1845 as Queens College, Galway and was known until recently as University College, Galway (UCG) and is located in Galway, Ireland. ... The University of Geneva (Université de Genève) is one of the oldest universities in the world. ... The Georg-August University of Göttingen (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, often called the Georgia Augusta) was founded in 1734 by George II, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover, and opened in 1737. ... The University of Granada is a university at Granada, Spain Categories: Stub | Universities and colleges in Spain ... The University of Graz (founded 1585), a university located in Graz, Austria, is the second-largest university in Austria. ... Front of the main building of the University of Groningen The University of Groningen (Dutch: Rijksuniversiteit Groningen or RUG) is a university in Groningen, Netherlands. ... The Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg (German Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; also known as simply University of Heidelberg) was established in the town of Heidelberg in the Rhineland in 1386. ... Friedrich Schiller University of Jena (FSU) is located in Jena, Thuringia in Germany and was named for the German writer Friedrich Schiller. ... Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet Jagielloński) is a university in Krakow, Poland. ... Leiden University in the city of Leiden, is the oldest still existing and most famous university in the Netherlands. ... The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (or K.U.Leuven, or in English Catholic University of Leuven - also the translated name of its French-speaking sister university) is a Flemish university, located in the town of Leuven in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking (northern) region of Belgium. ... The Université catholique de Louvain, sometimes known as UCL, is Belgiums largest French-speaking university. ... The University of Lyon is a university in Lyon, France Categories: Substubs ... The University of Montpellier, France, is considerably older than its formal founding date, associated with a bull issued by Pope Nicholas IV in 1289, combining all the long-existing schools into a university. ... Gymnasivm Patavinum: The University shown in a 1654 woodcut The University of Padua (Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) is one of the most well-renowned universities in Italy. ... The University of Pavia is a university in Pavia, Italy. ... University of Poitiers is a university located in Poitiers, France, founded in 1431 by Pope Eugenius IV and chartered by King Charles VII of France. ... The Charles University of Prague (also simply University of Prague; Czech: Univerzita Karlova; Latin: Universitas Carolina) is the oldest and most prestigious Czech university and among the oldest universities in Europe, being founded in 1340s (for the exact year, see below). ... The University of Salamanca (Spanish Universidad de Salamanca), located in the town of Salamanca, west-northwest of Madrid, is the oldest university in Spain, and one of the oldest in Europe. ... The University of Siena (Università di Siena, UNISI) in Tuscany is one of the older universities of Italy, founded in the 13th century, initially as a Studium. ... The University of Tartu (Estonian: Tartu Ülikool, German: Universität Dorpat) is the national university of Estonia, and the one classical university in Estonia, located in the city of Tartu. ... The Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, named after the philosopher Aristotle, is the largest university of Greece. ... The University of Turku, located in Turku in southwestern Finland, is the second largest university in the country as measured by student enrolment. ... The Åbo Akademi University is a Swedish language university, founded in 1918 in Turku (Åbo in Swedish), Finland. ... Uppsala University Uppsala University (Swedish Uppsala universitet) is a public university in Uppsala, Sweden. ... The University of Würzburg is a university in Würzburg, Germany, founded in 1402. ...

Europaeum

Bologna | Bonn | HEI, Geneva | Helsinki | Krakow (Jagiellonian) | Leiden | Madrid (Complutense) | Oxford | Paris I: Panthéon-Sorbonne | Prague The Europaeum is a loose organisation of ten leading European universities. ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The University of Bologna (Università di Bologna, UNIBO) is a university in Bologna, Italy. ... The main building, viewed from the Hofgarten. ... Graduate Institute of International Studies (HEI), based in Geneva in Switzerland, is one of the worlds leading graduate schools devoted to the study of international studies, most notably of an historic, judicial, economic, political and social nature. ... The University of Helsinki is a university located in Helsinki, Finland. ... Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet Jagielloński) is a university in Krakow, Poland. ... Leiden University in the city of Leiden, is the oldest still existing and most famous university in the Netherlands. ... The Complutense University of Madrid, in Spanish Universidad Complutense de Madrid, is a prestigious Spanish university, located in Madrid. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... The Charles University of Prague (also simply University of Prague; Czech: Univerzita Karlova; Latin: Universitas Carolina) is the oldest and most prestigious Czech university and among the oldest universities in Europe, being founded in 1340s (for the exact year, see below). ...


League of European Research Universities

Cambridge | Edinburgh | Geneva | Heidelberg | Helsinki | Karolinska (Stockholm) | Leiden | Leuven | | Milan | Munich | Oxford | Strasbourg I (Louis Pasteur) According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The University of Geneva (Université de Genève) is one of the oldest universities in the world. ... The Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg (German Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; also known as simply University of Heidelberg) was established in the town of Heidelberg in the Rhineland in 1386. ... The University of Helsinki is a university located in Helsinki, Finland. ... The Karolinska Institute or Karolinska institutet is a medical university in Stockholm, Sweden. ... Leiden University in the city of Leiden, is the oldest still existing and most famous university in the Netherlands. ... The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (or K.U.Leuven, or in English Catholic University of Leuven - also the translated name of its French-speaking sister university) is a Flemish university, located in the town of Leuven in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking (northern) region of Belgium. ... The University of Milan (Università degli Studi di Milano, UNIMI) is one the larger universities in Italy, with about 60,000 students, a teaching and research staff of 2,500 and a non-teaching staff of 2,000. ... With approximately 48,000 students, the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (German: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München or LMU) is one of the largest universities in Germany. ... The Université Louis Pasteur, also known as Strasbourg I or ULP is a large university in Strasbourg, Alsace, France. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Oxford University Press: About Us (1006 words)
Oxford University Press had its origins in the information technology revolution of the late fifteenth century, which began with the invention of printing from movable type.
As a department of the University, and one of its major assets, the Press has an obligation beyond its scholarly and educational mission to provide the rest of the University with a financial return.
It is all applied in the pursuit of the educational and scholarly objectives of the University and its Press, either through reinvesting in publishing or transferring funds to the rest of the University.
Homepage - University of Oxford (1297 words)
Oxford is home to the second largest library in the UK, the first museum ever opened to the public and the oldest botanical garden in Britain.
Oxford is one of Europe's most innovative and entrepreneurial universities drawing on an 800-year tradition of discovery and invention.
Oxford University has a world-class reputation for academic excellence and the MBA is ranked among the top global MBA programmes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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