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Encyclopedia > Oxford

Coordinates: 51°45′7, N°1′15 Oxford may refer to many things. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Oxford
Skyline of the city of Oxford
Nickname: "The City of Dreaming Spires"
Motto: "Fortis est veritas" "Truth is strong"
Shown within Oxfordshire
Oxford
Oxford shown within United Kingdom
Coordinates: 51°45′7″N 1°15′28″W / 51.75194, -1.25778
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country England
Region South East England
Ceremonial county
Admin HQ Oxford City Centre
Founded 9th century
Town charter
City status 1542
Government
 - Type City
 - Governing body Oxford City Council
 - Lord Mayor Susanna Pressel
 - MPs: Evan Harris (LD)
Andrew Smith (L)
Area
 - Total 17.6 sq mi (45.59 km²)
Population (2006 est.)
 - Total 149,100 (Ranked 112th)
 - Density 8,469.3/sq mi (3,270/km²)
 - Ethnicity
(2005 Estimates
73.0% White British
9.1% Other White
5.7% South Asian
3.0% Black
2.9% Chinese
2.7% Mixed Race
1.9% Other
1.8% White Irish
Time zone Greenwich Mean Time (UTC+0)
Postcode OX
Area code(s) 01865
ISO 3166-2 GB-OXF
ONS code 38UC
OS grid reference SP513061
NUTS 3
Website: www.oxford.gov.uk

Oxford (pronounced /'ɒksfəd/, listen ) is a city, and the county town of Oxfordshire, in South East England. It has a population of 134,248 (2001 census). The River Thames runs through Oxford, where for a distance of some 10 miles (16 km) it is known as The Isis. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (999 × 749 pixel, file size: 152 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Oxford University Student... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... a district of Oxfordshire File links The following pages link to this file: Oxford Categories: GFDL images ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... Download high resolution version (1802x2589, 189 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Oxford Categories: GFDL images | GBdot ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Evan Harris Dr Evan Leslie Harris MP (born 21 October 1965) is a Liberal Democrat politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... For other persons named Andrew Smith, see Andrew Smith (disambiguation). ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... White British is an ethnic classification used in the United Kingdom Census 2001, 92. ... White Other is a term used in the UK census to describe white persons of non-British descent. ... The term British Asian is used to denote a person of Southern Asian ancestry or origin, or sometimes Western Asian origin, who was born in or was an immigrant to the United Kingdom. ... See also: British African-Caribbean community, Caribbean British, British Asian,Britsh Mixed Black British is term which has had different meanings and uses as a racial and political label. ... British Mixed is the term given to Britons of mixed race/ethnic descent. ... The 2001 UK Census ethnic groups include White British, White Other, Mixed Race, Asian British, Black British and Chinese or other ethnic group. ... Irish Britons are residents of Britain (England, Scotland and Wales) whose birth place and/or ancestry originates in the island of Ireland. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... GMT redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... The OX postcode area, also known as the Oxford postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Abingdon, Bampton, Banbury, Bicester, Burford, Carterton, Chinnor, Chipping Norton, Didcot, Kidlington, Oxford, Thame, Wallingford, Wantage, Watlington, Witney and Woodstock in England. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ... The Isis is the name given to the River Thames at Oxford, after the ancient Egyptian goddess Isis. ...


Oxford is home to the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world. The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Definitions of the Anglosphere vary: Countries in which English is the first language of a large fraction of the population are shown in blue. ...


Buildings in Oxford reflect every English architectural period since the arrival of the Saxons, including the mid-18th century Radcliffe Camera, the hub of the city. Oxford is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold in reference to the harmonious architecture of Oxford's university buildings. The architecture of the United Kingdom has a long and diverse history from beyond Stonehenge to the designs of Norman Foster and the present day. ... The History of Anglo-Saxon England covers the history of early medieval England from the end of Roman Britain and the establishment of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the 5th century until the Conquest by the Normans in 1066. ... The Radcliffe Camera in Oxford, England, was built by James Gibbs between 1737 and 1749 to house the Radcliffe Science Library. ... Matthew Arnold Caricature from Punch, 1881: Admit that Homer sometimes nods, That poets do write trash, Our Bard has written Balder Dead, And also Balder-dash Family tree Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was an English poet and cultural critic, who worked as an inspector of schools. ...

Contents

History

Oxford was first occupied in Saxon times, and was initially known as "Oxenaforda", meaning "Ford of the Ox"; fords being very important before the days of bridges.[1] It began with the foundation of St Frideswide's nunnery in the 8th century, and was first mentioned in written records in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle for the year 912. In the 10th century Oxford became an important military frontier town between the kingdoms of Mercia and Wessex and was on several occasions raided by Danes. St Frideswide is the patron saint of both the city and university. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 605 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2068 × 2048 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 605 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2068 × 2048 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Radcliffe Camera in Oxford, England, was built by James Gibbs between 1737 and 1749 to house the Radcliffe Science Library. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... A ford, with pedestrian footbridge, on a minor road near Weimar bei Kassel in Germany The ford at Brockenhurst, leading into the village centre, following heavy rain. ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... The priory of St Frideswide, Oxford was established as a priory of Augustinian regular canons, in 1122. ... The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle. ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... For the helicopter, see Westland Wessex. ... The Danish nation is a concept closely connected to 19th century ethnic nationalism. ... Saint Frideswide (c. ...


The prestige of Oxford is seen in the fact that it received a charter from King Henry II, granting its citizens the same privileges and exemptions as those enjoyed by the capital of the kingdom; and various important religious houses were founded in or near the city. A grandson of King John established Rewley Abbey for the Cistercian Order; and friars of various orders (Dominicans, Franciscans, Carmelites, Augustinians, and Trinitarians), all had houses at Oxford of varying importance. Parliaments were often held in the city during the thirteenth century. The Provisions of Oxford were installed by a group of barons led by Simon de Montfort; these documents are often regarded as England's first written constitution. Henry II of England (called Curtmantle; 25 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin Cistercenses), otherwise Gimey or White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which is worn a black scapular or apron) are a Catholic order of monks. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... Origin and early history Carmelites (in Latin Ordo fratrum Beatæ Virginis Mariæ de monte Carmelo) is the name of a Roman Catholic order founded in the 12th century by a certain Berthold (d. ... The Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (died AD 430), are several Roman Catholic monastic orders and congregations of both men and women living according to a guide to religious life known as the Rule of Saint Augustine. ... The adjective trinitarian is used in several senses: Ideas or things pertaining to the Holy Trinity A person or group adhering to the doctrine of Trinitarianism, which holds God to subsist in the form of the Holy Trinity The Trinitarian Order is a Catholic monastic order founded in 1198 by... In 1258 a group of barons, led by Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, forced King Henry III of England to accept a new form of government in which power was placed in the hands of a council of 15 members who were to supervise ministerial appointments, local administration... From the Chamber of the United States House of Representatives Simon V de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester (1208 – August 4, 1265) was the principal leader of the baronial opposition to King Henry III of England. ...


The University of Oxford is first mentioned in 12th century records. Oxford's earliest colleges were University College (1249), Balliol (1263) and Merton (1264). These colleges were established at a time when Europeans were starting to translate the writings of Greek philosophers. These writings challenged European ideology – inspiring scientific discoveries and advancements in the arts – as society began seeing itself in a new way. These colleges at Oxford were supported by the Church in hopes to reconcile Greek Philosophy and Christian Theology. The relationship between "town and gown" has often been uneasy — as many as 93 students and townspeople were killed in the St Scholastica Day Riot of 1355. The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... College name University College Collegium Magnae Aulae Universitatis Named after Established 1249 Sister College Trinity Hall Master Lord Butler of Brockwell JCR President Peter Surr Undergraduates 420 MCR President Monte MacDiarmid Graduates 144 Homepage Boatclub Crest of University College, Oxford University College (in full, the The Master and Fellows of... and of the Balliol College College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister college St Johns College, Cambridge Master Andrew Graham JCR President Helen Lochead Undergraduates 403 MCR President Chelsea Payne Graduates 228 Location of Balliol College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Balliol College (pronounced... and of the Merton College College name The House of Scholars of Merton Named after Walter de Merton Established 1264 Sister college Peterhouse, Cambridge Warden Prof. ... Ancient Greek philosophy focused on the role of reason and inquiry. ... Christian doctrine redirects here. ... Town and gown is a term used to describe the two communities of a university town; town being the non-academic population and gown the university community, especially in traditional seats of learning such as Oxford and Cambridge. ... The St. ...


Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford is unique as a college chapel and cathedral in one foundation. Originally the Priory Church of St Frideswide, the building was extended and incorporated into the structure of the Cardinal's College shortly before its refounding as Christ Church in 1546, since which time it has functioned as the cathedral of the Diocese of Oxford. Christ Church (in full: The Cathedral Church of Christ in Oxford of the Foundation of King Henry VIII) is one of the largest and wealthiest of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ...


The Oxford Martyrs were tried for heresy in 1555 and subsequently burnt at the stake, on what is now Broad Street, for their religious beliefs and teachings. The three martyrs were the bishops Hugh Latimer and Nicholas Ridley, and the Archbishop Thomas Cranmer. The burning of Latimer and Ridley, from a book by John Foxe (1563). ... Hugh Latimer (d. ... There are two Nicholas Ridleys: Nicholas Ridley (martyr) Nicholas Ridley (politician) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and...


During the English Civil War, Oxford housed the court of Charles I in 1642, after the king was expelled from London, although there was strong support in the town for the Parliamentarian cause. The town yielded to Parliamentarian forces under General Fairfax in the Siege of Oxford of 1646. It later housed the court of Charles II during the Great Plague of London in 1665-66. Although reluctant to do so, he was forced to evacuate when the plague got too close. For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from March 27, 1625 until his execution. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Baron Fairfax of Cameron (January 17, 1612 - November 12, 1671), parliamentary general and commander-in-chief during the English Civil War, the eldest son of Ferdinando Fairfax, 2nd Baron Fairfax of Cameron, was born at Denton, near Otley, Yorkshire. ... The Siege of Oxford was a Parliamentarian victory late in the First English Civil War. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... A bill of mortality for the plague in 1665. ...


In 1790 the Oxford Canal connected the city with Coventry. The Duke's Cut was completed by the Duke of Marlborough in 1789 to link the new canal with the River Thames; and in 1796 the Oxford Canal company built their own link to the Thames, at Isis Lock. In the 1840s, the Great Western Railway and London and North Western Railway linked Oxford with London. For other uses, see Coventry (disambiguation). ... The Fourth Duke of Marlborough, painted by Joshua Reynolds George Spencer, 4th Duke of Marlborough (January 26, 1739) - (January 29, 1817) was a British nobleman. ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... The London and North Western Railway (LNWR) was formed in 1846 by the merger of three railway companies - the Grand Junction Railway, London and Birmingham and Manchester and Birmingham. ...


In the 19th century, the controversy surrounding the Oxford Movement in the Anglican Church drew attention to the city as a focus of theological thought. The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans, most of them members of the University of Oxford, who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ...

Map of Oxford (1904)

Oxford's Town Hall was built by Henry T. Hare, the foundation stone was laid on 6 July 1893 and opened by the future King Edward VII on 12 May 1897. The site has been the seat of local government since the Guild Hall of 1292 and though Oxford is a city and a Lord Mayoralty, it is still called by its traditional name of "Town Hall". Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1510x1384, 505 KB) Summary public domain image from http://fromoldbooks. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1510x1384, 505 KB) Summary public domain image from http://fromoldbooks. ... Oxford Town Hall on St Aldates. ... Henry Thomas Hare (1861–1921) was an Edwardian English architect, who was responsible for a trail of municipal buildings around Britain. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Local governments are administrative offices that are smaller than a state or province. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ... City Hall is a 1996 film directed by Harold Becker. ...


By the early 20th century, Oxford was experiencing rapid industrial and population growth, with the printing and publishing industries becoming well established by the 1920s. Also during that decade, the economy and society of Oxford underwent a huge transformation as William Morris established the Morris Motor Company to mass produce cars in Cowley, on the south-eastern edge of the city. By the early 1970s over 20,000 people worked in Cowley at the huge Morris Motors and Pressed Steel Fisher plants. By this time Oxford was a city of two halves: the university city to the west of Magdalen Bridge (from where students traditionally jump into the River Cherwell every May Day morning) and the car town to the east. This led to the witticism that "Oxford is the left bank of Cowley". Cowley suffered major job losses in the 1980s and 1990s during the decline of British Leyland, but is now producing the successful New MINI for BMW on a smaller site. A large area of the original car manufacturing facility at Cowley was demolished in the 1990s and is now the site of a major business park.[2] William Richard Morris, 1st Viscount Nuffield GBE CH (10 October 1877–22 August 1963) was the founder of the Morris Motor Company and a philanthropist. ... Morris Motor logo, from a UK Royal Mail van 1927 Morris Cowley 1928 Morris Minor Saloon 1946 Morris Ten Series M 1953 Morris Minor Series 2 1971 Morris 1000 Traveller The Morris Motor Company was a former British car manufacturing company. ... Map sources for Cowley at grid reference SP5504 Cowley in Oxfordshire is a residential and industrial area within the city of Oxford, originating with the former villages of Cowley, Temple Cowley and Cowley St John (Also occasionally referred to as Church Cowley). The Cowley area underwent massive transformation from 1912... The Pressed Steel Company (PSC) was a British car body manufacturing company founded at Cowley near Oxford in 1926 as a joint venture between William Morris, the Budd Corporation and an American bank. ... Punting from the wrong end of the boat at Magdalen Bridge Magdalen Bridge spans the divided stream of the River Cherwell just to the east of the City of Oxford, and next to Magdalen College, whence it gets its name and pronunciation. ... The River Cherwell is a river which flows through the midlands of England. ... This article is about the holidays celebrated on May 1. ... The British Leyland Motor Corporation (often abbreviated to simply BL), was a Britain in 1968. ... The Mini is the name of a rather petite car produced from 1959 to 2000, and the name of a newer one known as New MINI launched in 2001. ... For other uses, see BMW (disambiguation). ...


The influx of migrant labour to the car plants and hospitals, recent immigration from south-east Asia, and a large student population, have given Oxford a notable cosmopolitan character, especially in the Headington and Cowley Road areas with their many bars, cafes, restaurants, clubs, ethnic shops and fast food outlets. Oxford is one of the most diverse small cities in Britain with the most recent population estimates for 2005.[3] showing that 27% of the population were from an ethnic minority group, including 16.2% from a non-white ethnic minority ethnic group (ONS). These figures do not take into account more recent international migration into the city, with over 10,000 people from overseas registering for National Insurance Numbers in Oxford between 2005/06 and 2006/07. [4]. The Headington Shark Headington is a residential suburb of Oxford, England, lying on top of a hill of the same name overlooking the city of Oxford in the river valley below. ... This article is in need of attention. ...


On 6 May 1954, Roger Bannister, as a 25 year old medical student, ran the first authenticated four-minute mile at the Iffley Road running track in Oxford. is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Bannister was chosen as the first Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year for his accomplishments in 1954. ... This article is about the running of a mile in under four minutes. ... Iffley Road is a major arterial road in Oxford, England. ...


Oxford's second university, Oxford Brookes University, formerly the Oxford School of Art, based on Headington Hill, was given its charter in 1991 and has been voted for the last five years the best new university in the UK. Oxford Brookes University is a public university in Oxford, England. ...


Governance

Many important and famous politicians and people in the political public eye were resident in Oxford, often due to their membership of the University. Most notably of recent times, this list includes Osama bin Laden[5] and Benazir Bhutto. Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ... Benazir Bhutto (Urdu: بینظیر بھٹو, IPA: ; Sindhi:بینظیر ڀُٽو ) (born 21 June 1953 in Karachi) is a Pakistani politician who became the first elected woman to lead a post-colonial Muslim state. ...


Oxford City Council

Despite stereotypes of Oxford being a conservative city, there are no elected Conservatives on the city council, although two Liberal Democrat councillors briefly sat as Conservatives during 2007-8. Since the 2004 local elections, the council has been in minority administration, first by councillors from the Labour Party, with the Liberal Democrats being the official opposition. In 2006 these roles were reversed, although two years later, the unpopularity of the Liberal Democrat administration led to the election once again of a minority Labour administration [2]. With seven city councillors and five county councillors, Oxford has one of the highest Green Party representation for a UK city. The Independent Working Class Association has two councillors, although their support is confined to a ward in the Blackbird Leys housing estate in the south east of the city. See Oxford Council election 2004 for further information. Half of Oxford Council is elected every two years. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The British local elections of 2004 were held on the tenth of June, as part of the 2004 set of elections along with the European elections and the London mayoral and Assembly elections. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ... Logo of the Independent Working Class Association The Independent Working Class Association (IWCA) is a small working class political party in Britain with the avowed aim of promoting the political and economic interests of the working class, regardless of the consequences to existing political and economic structures. ... Blackbird Leys is a ward located on the south-eastern outskirts of Oxford, England and is one of the largest council estates in Europe. ... A housing estate is a medium-to-low density residential area, usually part of a suburb of a town or city in a developed country. ... // Elections to Oxford City Council were held on 10 June 2004. ...


Since 2002, elections have been held for Oxford City Council in even years, with each councillor serving a term of four years. Each electoral ward within Oxford is represented by two councillors, thus all wards elect one councillor at each election. Prior to 2002, the City Council was elected by thirds. A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods, thoroughfares, parishes, landmarks, geographical...

Partisan Composition
Year Labour Lib Dem Green IWCA Independent Conservative Source
2000 21 21 7 1 0 1 [3]
2002 29 15 3 1 0 0 [4]
2004 20 18 7 3 0 0 [5]
2006 17 19 8 4 0 0 [6]
2008 23 16 7 2 0 0 [7]
Partisan control
  • 1974 – 1976: Labour
  • 1976 – 1980: Conservative
  • 1980 – 2000: Labour
  • 2000 – 2002: No overall control
  • 2002 – 2004: Labour
  • 2004 – Present: No overall control

The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...

Parliamentary representation

A pre-election husting at the Oxford West and Abingdon constituency
A pre-election husting at the Oxford West and Abingdon constituency

The two MPs are Andrew Smith from the Oxford East constituency, erstwhile Secretary of State for Work and Pensions in the Labour government; and Dr Evan Harris from the Oxford West and Abingdon constituency, Liberal Democrat science spokesman. At the 2005 general election, Oxford East became a marginal seat with a Labour majority over the Liberal Democrats of just 963. Oxford West and Abingdon is a safe seat for the Liberal Democrats with Dr Harris enjoying a majority of just under 8,000. Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 561 KB) A husting in the Oxford West and Abingdon constituency, 2005-02-04 File links The following pages link to this file: Election Oxford United Kingdom general elections Political campaign Elections in the United Kingdom Husting Pre-election day events of the United Kingdom... Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 561 KB) A husting in the Oxford West and Abingdon constituency, 2005-02-04 File links The following pages link to this file: Election Oxford United Kingdom general elections Political campaign Elections in the United Kingdom Husting Pre-election day events of the United Kingdom... A husting, or the hustings, was originally a physical platform from which representatives presented their views or cast votes before a parliamentary or other election body. ... Oxford West and Abingdon is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... For other persons named Andrew Smith, see Andrew Smith (disambiguation). ... Oxford East is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Evan Harris Dr Evan Leslie Harris MP (born 21 October 1965) is a Liberal Democrat politician in the United Kingdom. ... Oxford West and Abingdon is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... A safe seat is a seat in a legislature which is regarded as fully secured by a certain political party with very little chance of an election upset because of the nature of the electorate in the constituency concerned. ...


Parishes

Oxford has four civil parishes with parish councils – these are Blackbird Leys, Littlemore, Old Marston and Risinghurst and Sandhills. Note: Littlemore, Marston and Risinghurst and Sandhills have only recently been brought within the city boundary. A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Blackbird Leys is a ward located on the south-eastern outskirts of Oxford, England and is one of the largest council estates in Europe. ... Littlemore is a village with a parish council that also represents parts of Rose Hill. ... Marston is a village suburb of Oxford, lying to the NE of the city, within the A40 Northern Bypass. ... Risinghurst and Sandhills is a civil parish in the City of Oxford, Oxfordshire, England. ...


Geography

Oxford's latitude and longitude are 51°45′07″N, 1°15′28″WCoordinates: 51°45′07″N, 1°15′28″W (at Carfax Tower, which is usually considered the centre). Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Carfax Tower The Carfax Tower is located at the conjunction of St Aldates, Cornmarket Street, Queen Street, and the High Street in central Oxford. ...


Wards, neighbourhoods, and suburbs

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 401 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (790 × 1182 pixel, file size: 150 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 401 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (790 × 1182 pixel, file size: 150 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... The Headington Shark The Headington Shark is a sculpture situated at 2 New High Street, Headington, Oxford, England, depicting a shark embedded head-first in the roof of the house. ... , Abingdon (traditionally known as Abingdon-on-Thames) is a market town in Oxfordshire in Southern England. ... Barton is a suburb of Oxford, England on the citys eastern periphery. ... Binsey is a small village just to the West of Oxford, in modern times encompassed within the ring-road. ... Blackbird Leys is a ward located on the south-eastern outskirts of Oxford, England and is one of the largest council estates in Europe. ... Botley is a small suburb just west of the Oxford city boundary. ... Map sources for Cowley at grid reference SP5504 Cowley in Oxfordshire is a residential and industrial area within the city of Oxford, originating with the former villages of Cowley, Temple Cowley and Cowley St John (Also occasionally referred to as Church Cowley). The Cowley area underwent massive transformation from 1912... This article is in need of attention. ... Cutteslowe is a suburb of north Oxford, England, between Sunnymead and the northern bypass (the A40, completed in 1935), and a little beyond. ... Donnington is a small housing estate in England located adjacent to the River Thames in the post-war housing developments either side of Donnington bridge and around Boundary Brook Road. ... Grandpont is a residential area in south Oxford, England. ... The Headington Shark Headington is a residential suburb of Oxford, England, lying on top of a hill of the same name overlooking the city of Oxford in the river valley below. ... Iffley is a village in Oxfordshire, England, location 51° 43′ 38. ... Littlemore is a village with a parish council that also represents parts of Rose Hill. ... , Jericho, looking north down Walton Street from the southeast corner of the neighbourhood. ... Marston is a village suburb of Oxford, lying to the NE of the city, within the A40 Northern Bypass. ... North Oxford, especially central North Oxford between the city centre and Summertown, is considered by many to be the most desirable and famous suburb of Oxford, England. ... Osney, Osney Island, or Osney Town is a riverside community in the west of the city of Oxford, located off the Botley Road, just west of the citys main railway station. ... Rose Hill is a suburb of south-east Oxford, England. ... Risinghurst is a quiet outlying residential area of Oxford, England, situated just outside the Eastern Bypass road which forms part of the Oxford ring road. ... A hiking trail snakes through Weymouth Woods in the sandhills region of North Carolina. ... St Ebbes is a small housing estate south west of Oxford city centre close to the Ice Rink and the Westgate Shopping Centre on the river thames. ... Summertown shops on Banbury Road Summertown in North Oxford is a suburb of Oxford, England. ... Temple Cowley, its name recalling the long lost medieval house of the Knights Templar, is situated to the south-east of Oxford City centre. ... , The ruin of Godstow Nunnery. ... A waterway is any navigable body of water. ...

Climate

Broad Street in the Snow (February 2007)
Broad Street in the Snow (February 2007)

Oxford has a Maritime Temperate climate ("Cfb" by Köppen classification). Precipitation is uniformally distributed throughout the year and is provided mostly by weather systems that arrive from the Atlantic. The lowest temperature ever recorded in Oxford was -16.6°C (2°F) in January 1982. The highest temperature ever recorded in Oxford is 35.6°C (96°F) in August 2003 during the 2003 European heat wave. Köppen climate map The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... The 2003 European heat wave was one of the hottest summers on record in Europe. ...


There is a field of thought that due to Climate change, temperatures are increasing in Oxford, precipitation is decreasing in summer and increasing in winter. Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 450,000 years For current global climate change, see Global warming. ... Temperature is the physical property of a system which underlies the common notions of hot and cold; the material with the higher temperature is said to be hotter. ...


The average conditions below are from the Radcliffe Meteorological Station. It boasts the longest series of temperature and rainfall records for one site in Britain. These records are continuous from January, 1815. Irregular observations of rainfall, cloud and temperature exist from 1767[6].








Weather averages for Oxford, UK
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 6.8 (44) 7.4 (45) 10.1 (50) 13.0 (55) 16.7 (62) 19.8 (68) 21.7 (71) 21.2 (70) 18.5 (65) 14.2 (58) 9.8 (50) 7.4 (45) 13.9 (57)
Average low °C (°F) 1.4 (35) 1.4 (35) 2.5 (37) 4.3 (40) 7.2 (45) 10.2 (50) 12.2 (54) 11.9 (53) 9.8 (50) 6.8 (44) 3.8 (39) 2.1 (36) 6.1 (43)
Precipitation mm (inches) 52.6 (2.1) 41.0 (1.6) 41.1 (1.6) 43.9 (1.7) 50.6 (2) 53.3 (2.1) 59.5 (2.3) 58.3 (2.3) 60.3 (2.4) 65.3 (2.6) 61.8 (2.4) 55.8 (2.2) 643.5 (25.3)
Source: Radcliffe Meteorological Station (NB: Data from the period 1881-2004)[7] Mar 2008

Nota bene is a Latin phrase meaning Note Well, coming from notâre—to note. ...

Economy

The Oxford suburb of Cowley has a long history of carmaking and now produces the BMW MINI. Map sources for Cowley at grid reference SP5504 Cowley in Oxfordshire is a residential and industrial area within the city of Oxford, originating with the former villages of Cowley, Temple Cowley and Cowley St John (Also occasionally referred to as Church Cowley). The Cowley area underwent massive transformation from 1912... The BMW or New MINI is a car produced by BMW since 2001. ...


Brewing

Morrells, the Oxford based regional brewery was founded in 1743 by Richard Tawney. He formed a partnership in 1782 with Mark and James Morrell, who eventually became the owners.[8] The brewery building, known as the "Lion Brewery", was located in St Thomas Street. It closed in 1998,[9] the beer brand names being taken over by the Thomas Hardy Burtonwood brewery.[10], while the 132 tied pubs were bought by "Morrells of Oxford"[11], who sold the bulk of them on to Greene King in 2002[12]. The Lion Brewery was converted into luxury apartments in 2002.[13] Regional brewery is a term used in the UK to decribe a long established brewery that supplied beer to tied pubs in a fixed geographical location such as South Wales, The Midlands or the Isle of Man. ... For other uses, see Brand (disambiguation). ... Greene King is a brewery in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, UK. There is a visitor centre next door to the brewery. ...


Commercial areas

Outside the City Centre: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cornmarket Street, Oxford, is the street that leads north from Carfax Tower towards St Giles. Cornmarket seen from the north Located there is a variety of shops and businesses, including: Boots Burger King The Clarendon Centre Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) Starbucks Cornmarket seen from the south, 2004; notice the newly... Carfax Tower at the eastern end of Queen Street, Oxford. ... Carfax, at the west end of the High Street, Oxford. ... Turl Street is a street in Oxford, England near the centre of the town. ... Little Clarendon Street, looking East. ... Historical view of Broad Street looking east towards (left to right) the Clarendon Building, and the Sheldonian Theatre and the Old Ashmolean Building. ... Inside the Covered Market. ... George Street is a street in central Oxford, England. ... The Clarendon Shopping Centre is a shopping centre in central Oxford, England. ... Westgate Shopping Centre is a shopping centre in central Oxford, England. ... Golden Cross is a shopping arcade in central Oxford, England. ...

Iffley Road is a major arterial road in Oxford, England. ... Cowley Road is an arterial road in the city of Oxford, England, following a south-easterly route from the city centre at The Plain roundabout near Magdalen Bridge, through the inner city area of East Oxford, and into the industrial suburb of Cowley. ... St Clements is a street in Oxford, England. ... London Road is a common name for many roads in the United Kingdom that go towards London. ... Banbury Road is a major road in Oxford, England, running from St Giles to the south, north towards Banbury through the leafy suburb of North Oxford and Summertown. ... Botley Road is the main arterial road into Oxford, England from the west. ... North Parade Avenue (or North Parade) is a short shopping street in north Oxford, England. ...

Theatres and cinemas

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Ashmolean Museum main entrance in Beaumont Street. ... The New Theatre Oxford (also previous know as the Apollo Theatre Oxford) is the main commercial theatre in Oxford, England. ... George Street is a street in central Oxford, England. ... The Burton Taylor Theatre (The BT) is a 50-seater studio theatre situated on Gloucester Street in Oxford, United Kingdom near its parent organisation The Oxford Playhouse. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... George Street may refer to: George Edmund Street (1824–1881), British architect. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Looking north along Walton Street with the Oxford University Press on the left hand side. ... Odeon Cinemas is the largest chain of cinemas in the United Kingdom. ... George Street may refer to: George Edmund Street (1824–1881), British architect. ... Odeon Cinemas is the largest chain of cinemas in the United Kingdom. ... Magdalen Street is a short shopping street in central Oxford, England. ... Vue company logo Vue Entertainment is one of the UK’s leading multiplex developers and operators of state-of-the-art multiplex cinemas. ...

Landmarks

Main article: List of attractions in Oxford
The Oxford skyline facing Christ Church to the south (Christ Church Cathedral on the left and Tom Tower on the right)
The Oxford skyline facing Christ Church to the south (Christ Church Cathedral on the left and Tom Tower on the right)

Oxford has numerous major tourist attractions, many belonging to the university and colleges. As well as several famous institutions, the town centre is home to Carfax Tower and the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, both of which offer views over the spires of the city. Many tourists shop at the historic Covered Market. In the summer, punting on the Thames/Isis and the Cherwell is popular. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (6646x1830, 1680 KB) Oxford skyline from St Marys Church. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (6646x1830, 1680 KB) Oxford skyline from St Marys Church. ... Carfax Tower The Carfax Tower is located at the conjunction of St Aldates, Cornmarket Street, Queen Street, and the High Street in central Oxford. ... The University Church of St Mary the Virgin (St Marys or SMV for short) is the largest of Oxfords parish churches and the centre from which the University of Oxford grew. ... Inside the Covered Market. ... Punting while dressed for Cambridge graduation This article concentrates on the history and development of punts and punting in England, for other usages see the disambiguation pages at punt and punter. ... The Isis is the name given to the River Thames at Oxford, after the ancient Egyptian goddess Isis. ... The River Cherwell is a river which flows through the midlands of England. ...


Transport

Buses

A Stagecoach bus behind a Oxford Bus Company park-and-ride bus in Oxford.
A Stagecoach bus behind a Oxford Bus Company park-and-ride bus in Oxford.

Oxford has 5 park and ride sites that service the city centre; ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 593 KB) a park and ride bus in Oxford, 2005-01-29. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 593 KB) a park and ride bus in Oxford, 2005-01-29. ... a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ...

  • Pear Tree (Link to city centre with bus 300)
  • Water Eaton (Link to city centre with bus 500)
  • Thornhill (Link to city centre with bus 400)
  • Redbridge (Link to city centre with bus 400)
  • Seacourt (Link to city centre with bus 300)

A service also runs to The John Radcliffe Hospital (from Thornhill/Water Eaton) as well as the Churchill and Nuffield Hospitals (from Thornhill).


Standard bus services are provided by the Oxford Bus Company and Stagecoach Oxfordshire. Both companies also operate regular services to London. Oxford Bus Company is a bus operator serving the city and surrounding area of Oxford, England and is the trading name of City of Oxford Motor Services Ltd . ... Stagecoach Oxfordshire is the name given to Stagecoach Group bus operations in the counties of Oxfordshire and Warwickshire, England until March 2004. ...


Rail

Oxford railway station
Oxford railway station

Oxford railway station is placed out of the city centre. The station is served by numerous routes, including CrossCountry services as far afield as Manchester and Edinburgh, First Great Western (who operate the station) services to London and other destinations and occasional Chiltern Railways services to Birmingham. The present station opened in 1852. , Oxford is a mainline railway station serving the city of Oxford, England. ... This article is about CrossCountry trains. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... First Great Western is the operating name of First Greater Western Ltd,[1] a British train operating company owned by FirstGroup, which operates services in the west and south west of England and South Wales. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Chiltern Railways is a train operating company in England. ... This article is about the British city. ...


Roads

A Roads

The city has a ring road that consists of the A34, the A40 and the A4142. It is mostly dual carriageway and was completed in 1966. The main roads that lead out of Oxford are: The Oxford ring road is a ring road around the city of Oxford, England. ... The A34 is a major road in England. ... The A40 is a major trunk road connecting London to Fishguard, Wales. ... The Oxford ring road is a ring road around the city of Oxford, England. ...

The A40 is a major trunk road connecting London to Fishguard, Wales. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... // The world renound retard, jack milner, has been said to be living in the retarded town just west of high wycombe known as down syndromly. ... The M40 motorway is a motorway in the English transport network that connects London to Birmingham. ... For other places with the same name, see Cheltenham (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Gloucester in England; for other uses see Gloucester (disambiguation). ... Approximate extent of South East Wales. ... The A34 is a major road in England. ... , Bicester ( ; IPA ) is a town in the Cherwell district of north-eastern Oxfordshire in England, with a population of 28,672 (2001 census). ... This article is about the British city. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... , Didcot is a town in the Thames Valley, in the English county of Oxfordshire (although formerly in Berkshire). ... Newbury is the name of several places: Canada Newbury, Ontario (village) Newbury Station, Ontario (Southwest Middlesex Township, Middlesex County, Ontario) England Newbury, Berkshire United States of America Newbury, Massachusetts Newbury, New Hampshire Newbury, Ohio also: Newbury Park, California Newburyport, Massachusetts The place name was bestowed on Newbury in England late... Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ... An example of a four-level stack interchange in the Netherlands. ... The A44 is a major road in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the city of Worcester in England. ... For other uses, see Hereford (disambiguation). ... , Aberystwyth (IPA: , South Welsh: ) (in English: Mouth of the Ystwyth) is a historic market town, administrative centre and holiday resort within Ceredigion, Wales. ... The A420 is a road between Bristol and Oxford in England. ... This article is about the English city. ... , For other places with the same name, see Swindon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chippenham (disambiguation). ...

Motorways

The M40 Extension
The M40 Extension

The city is served by the M40 motorway, which connects London to Birmingham. The original M40 opened in 1974 went from London to Waterstock where the A40 continued to Oxford. However, when the M40 was extended to Birmingham in 1991, a mile of the old motorway became a spur and the new section bended away sharply north. Now the M40 does a large arc around Oxford (staying around 10 miles away from the centre) due to the woodland that the motorway had to avoid. The M40 meets the A34 a junction later, the latter now being in two parts, the A34 restarting in Birmingham. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The M40 motorway is a motorway in the English transport network that connects London to Birmingham. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British city. ... Waterstock is small sleepy village in Oxfordshire, England. ... The A40 is a major trunk road connecting London to Fishguard, Wales. ... The A34 is a major road in England. ... This article is about the British city. ...


Education

There are two universities in Oxford; the University of Oxford and Oxford Brookes University as well as Ruskin College, a normal university. The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Oxford Brookes University is a public university in Oxford, England. ... Ruskin College is an independent educational institution in Oxford, England, but is not part of the University of Oxford. ... A normal school is a institution for training teachers. ...


Oxford is home to wide range of schools many of which receive pupils from around the world. Three are University choral foundations, established to educate the boy choristers of the chapel choirs, and have kept the tradition of single sex education. Examination results in state-run Oxford schools are consistently below the national average and regional average however results in the city are improving with 44% of pupils gaining 5 grades A*-C in 2006.[14]


Media

As well as the BBC national radio stations, Oxford and the surrounding area has several local stations, including BBC Radio Oxford, Fox FM, Oxford's FM 107.9,[15] and new station JACK fm on 106.8 along with Oxide: Oxford Student Radio[16] (which went on terrestrial radio at 87.7 MHz FM in late May 2005). A local TV station, Six TV: The Oxford Channel is also available. The city is home to a BBC TV newsroom which produces an opt-out from the main South Today programme broadcast from Southampton. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... BBC Radio Oxford is a BBC Local Radio station, which opened on October 29, 1970. ... Fox FM is an independent local radio station broadcasting to Oxfordshire, United Kingdom on the frequencies 102. ... Oxfords FM 107. ... Six TV is a free-to-air television channel broadcast from Oxford and Southampton in the UK. It is broadcast on UHF channel 47 (679. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... South Today is the BBCs regional television news programme for Dorset, Hampshire, The Isle of Wight and West Sussex; it also covers parts of Berkshire, Oxfordshire, Surrey and Wiltshire. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ...


Popular local papers include The Oxford Times (compact; weekly), its sister papers The Oxford Mail (tabloid; daily) and The Oxford Star (tabloid; free and delivered), and Oxford Journal (tabloid; weekly free pick-up). Oxford is also home to several advertising agencies. The Oxford Times is a weekly broadsheet newspaper, published in Oxford every Friday. ...


Daily Information (known locally as Daily Info) is an events and advertising news sheet which has been published since 1964 and now provides a connected website. Daily Information (or Daily Info for short) is a printed information sheet in Oxford, England, displayed especially around the University colleges and departments, but also in local businesses. ...


Recently (2003) DIY grassroots non-corporate media has begun to spread.[17] Independent and community newspapers include the Jericho Echo[18] and Oxford Prospect.[19]


Culture

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Literature and film

Main articles: Literature in Oxford and List of films shot in Oxford

Well-known Oxford-based authors include: Title page from The Adventures of Mr Verdant Green by Cuthbert Bede. ...

Oxford appears in the following works: Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... Susan Mary Cooper (born May 23, 1935) in Burnham, Buckinghamshire, England is a British author. ... For the 2007 film based on the second book in the series, see The Seeker: The Dark is Rising. ... The Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... and of the Christ Church College name Christ Church Latin name Ædes Christi Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister college Trinity College, Cambridge Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR president Laura Ellis Undergraduates 426 GCR president Tim Benjamin Graduates 154 Location of Christ Church within central Oxford... and of the Christ Church College name Christ Church Latin name Ædes Christi Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister college Trinity College, Cambridge Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR president Laura Ellis Undergraduates 426 GCR president Tim Benjamin Graduates 154 Location of Christ Church within central Oxford... Norman Colin Dexter, OBE, (born 29 September 1930 in Stamford, Lincolnshire) is the English author of the Inspector Morse novels. ... Morse (left) as played by John Thaw in the television adaption (with Kevin Whately as Lewis (right)). Detective Chief Inspector Morse is a fictional character, who features in a series of thirteen detective novels by British author Colin Dexter, though he is better known for the 33 episode TV series... Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centres upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... Jon Donaldson, c. ... Siobhan Dowd (b. ... Star Trek Long-term Medical Hologram, see Emergency Medical Hologram. ... Kenneth Grahame (March 8, 1859 – July 6, 1932) was a British writer, mainly of the sort of fiction and fantasy written for children but enjoyed equally if not more by adults. ... John Innes Mackintosh Stewart (September 30, 1906 Edinburgh–November 12, 1994 Coulsdon) was a Scottish novelist and academic. ... and of the Christ Church College name Christ Church Latin name Ædes Christi Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister college Trinity College, Cambridge Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR president Laura Ellis Undergraduates 426 GCR president Tim Benjamin Graduates 154 Location of Christ Church within central Oxford... Phyllis Dorothy James, Baroness James of Holland Park OBE (born 3 August 1920) is an English writer of crime fiction and member of the House of Lords, who writes as P. D. James. ... Lawrence of Arabia redirects here. ... and of the Jesus College College name Jesus College in the University of Oxford of Queen Elizabeths Foundation Named after Jesus Christ Established 1571 Sister college Jesus College, Cambridge Principal The Lord Krebs JCR President Paolo Wyatt Undergraduates 340 MCR President Jahan Zahid Graduates 160 Location Turl Street, Oxford... College name Magdalen College Latin name Collegium Beatae Mariae Magdalenae Named after Mary Magdalene Established 1458 Sister college Magdalene College, Cambridge President Professor David Clary FRS JCR President Jessica Jones Undergraduates 395 MCR President Eloise Scotford Graduates 230 Location of Magdalen College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Magdalen College (pronounced... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... College name Magdalen College Latin name Collegium Beatae Mariae Magdalenae Named after Mary Magdalene Established 1458 Sister college Magdalene College, Cambridge President Professor David Clary FRS JCR President Jessica Jones Undergraduates 395 MCR President Eloise Scotford Graduates 230 Location of Magdalen College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Magdalen College (pronounced... Ian McEwan CBE (born June 21, 1948) is a British novelist. ... Dame Jean Iris Murdoch DBE (July 15, 1919 – February 8, 1999) was an Irish-born British writer and philosopher, best known for her novels, which combine rich characterization and compelling plotlines, usually involving ethical or sexual themes. ... and of the St Annes College College name St Annes College Named after St Anne Established 1879 Sister college New Hall, Cambridge Principal Tim Gardam JCR President Kui-Sang Sze Undergraduates 437 Graduates 187 Location of St Annes College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub St Annes... Iain Pears (born in 1955) is an English mystery writer. ... Wadham College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... An Instance of the Fingerport is a 1997 novel by Iain Pears. ... Philip Pullman CBE (born October 19, 1946) is a British writer. ... and of the Exeter College College name Exeter College Latin name Collegium Exoniense Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister college Emmanuel College, Cambridge Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR president Edward Moores Undergraduates 299 MCR president Sara Adams Graduates 150 Location of Exeter College within central... Dorothy Leigh Sayers (Oxford, 13 June 1893 – Witham, 17 December 1957) was a renowned British author, translator, student of classical and modern languages, and Christian humanist. ... Full name Somerville College Motto Donec rursus impleat orbem Named after Mary Somerville Previous Names Somerville Hall Established 1879 Sister College Girton College Principal Dame Fiona Caldicott JCR President Simon Bruegger MCR President Allen Middlebro Location Woodstock Road, Oxford Undergraduates 396 Graduates 88 Homepage Boat Club Somerville College is one... Tolkien redirects here. ... and of the Exeter College College name Exeter College Latin name Collegium Exoniense Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister college Emmanuel College, Cambridge Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR president Edward Moores Undergraduates 299 MCR president Sara Adams Graduates 150 Location of Exeter College within central... and of the Merton College College name The House of Scholars of Merton Named after Walter de Merton Established 1264 Sister college Peterhouse, Cambridge Warden Prof. ...

Original title page of Jude the Obscure Jude the Obscure is the last of Thomas Hardys novels, begun as a magazine serial and first published in book form in 1895. ... Thomas Hardy redirects here. ... Christminster is a fictional town and university, modelled on Oxford, that appears in Thomas Hardys novel Jude the Obscure. ... Zuleika Dobson is a 1911 novel by Max Beerbohm, a satire of undergraduate life at Oxford. ... Max Beerbohm by William Rothenstein, 1893 Sir Henry Maximilian Beerbohm (August 24, 1872 - May 20, 1956) was an English parodist and caricaturist. ... Gaudy Night is a 1935 Lord Peter Wimsey detective story by Dorothy L. Sayers. ... Dorothy Leigh Sayers (Oxford, 13 June 1893 – Witham, 17 December 1957) was a renowned British author, translator, student of classical and modern languages, and Christian humanist. ... Brideshead Revisited, The Sacred & Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder is a novel by the English writer Evelyn Waugh, first published in 1945. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... A Question of Upbringing is the opening novel in Anthony Powells famous 12-novel series A Dance to the Music of Time. ... Anthony Dymoke Powell, CH (December 21, 1905 - March 28, 2000) was a British novelist best known for his A Dance to the Music of Time duodecalogy published between 1951 and 1975. ... Second Generation is a 1964 novel by Raymond Williams, set in the 1960s. ... Raymond Henry Williams (31 August 1921 - 26 January 1988) was a Welsh academic, novelist and critic. ... For the 2006 film adaptation of the novel, see Children of Men. ... Phyllis Dorothy James, Baroness James of Holland Park OBE (born 3 August 1920) is an English writer of crime fiction and member of the House of Lords, who writes as P. D. James. ... The trilogy (U.K versions), in order of succession from left to right. ... Philip Pullman CBE (born October 19, 1946) is a British writer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Sport

Oxford is considered to be an important centre of the sport of swimming in England.[citation needed] The Amateur Swimming Association was founded in 1869 in England, but it was much later, in 1909, that Oxford Swimming Club came into existence. In 1939, Oxford had its first major public indoor pool at Temple Cowley in the whole of England. After the pool was installed, swimming began to take off and soon Oxford Swimming Club became Oxford City Swimming Club, and Temple Cowley Pool was its home. Swimmer redirects here. ... British Swimming is the governing body for swimming, diving, synchronised swimming, water polo and open water in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Speedway racing has been staged on and off in Oxford since 1939 at Cowley Stadium. Most recently, it held Elite League Speedway and Conference League Speedway until 2007, when landlords Greyhound Racing Association apparently doubled the rent.[citation needed] Speedway, for the time being, is not running in Oxford. Details of the 1949 and 1950 seasons at Cowley can be viewed on Oxford Speedway website.


Oxford is also home to Oxford United, who are currently in the Conference National, the highest tier of non-league football, but have seen great success in the past, mainly in winning the League Cup in the 80's and being one of the highest teams in the football league. For the Northern Irish football club, see Oxford United Stars F.C. Oxford United Football Club are an English football team who are currently playing in the fifth tier of English football for the 2007–08 season. ... Conference National (currently billed as the Blue Square Premier for sponsorship reasons) [1] is the top division of the Football Conference. ... The Carling Cup Trophy The Football League Cup, commonly known as the League Cup, is an English football competition. ...


Twinning

Oxford's twin cities are: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

All of these are university towns, except for Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Bonn is the 19th largest city in Germany. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Grenoble (Franco-Provençal: Grenoblo) is a city and commune in south-east France situated at the foot of the Alps where the Drac joins the Isère River. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nicaragua. ... Cathedral of San Pedro, c. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Coordinates: , Country Province Area (2006)  - Municipality 23. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Location Position of Perm in Russia Government Country Federal district Federal subject Russia Volga Federal District Perm Krai Mayor Igor Nikolayevich Shubin Geographical characteristics Area  - City    - Land    - Water 799. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... UmeÃ¥ (IPA:  ) is a city and municipality in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. ...

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Oxford is a village in Oakland County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ...

See also

The Bishop of Oxford is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Oxford in the Province of Canterbury. ... Quainton Road station in 2006, showing the platform used by the Brill trams The Brill Tramway (or Brill branch), originally known as the Wotton Tramway, was the common name for a far-flung and little used section of the Metropolitan Railway in Buckinghamshire, England. ... Earl of Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Oxfam International logo Oxfam International is a confederation of 13 organizations working with over 3,000 partners in more than 100 countries to find lasting solutions to poverty and injustice. ... The Oxford Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Oxford Union, is a prestigious debating society in the city of Oxford, UK, whose membership is drawn primarily but not exclusively from the University of Oxford. ... For the Northern Irish football club, see Oxford United Stars F.C. Oxford United Football Club are an English football team who are currently playing in the fifth tier of English football for the 2007–08 season. ... Oxford City Football Club is an English football club, currently playing in the Southern League Division One South and West. ... Oxford Brookes University is a public university in Oxford, England. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Oxford bags were a loose-fitting baggy form of trousers favoured by members of the University of Oxford, especially undergraduates, in England during the early 20th century from the 1920s to around the 1950s. ...

Further reading

  • Isolarion: A Different Oxford Journey, James Attlee, 2007. ISBN 978-0226030937
  • Oxford, Jan Morris, 2001. ISBN 978-0192801364

Jan Morris CBE (born James Humphrey Morris on 2 October 1926, in Clevedon, Somerset, England, but by heritage and adoption Welsh) is a British historian and travel writer. ...

References

  1. ^ A Handy Guide to Oxford, ch. 2
  2. ^ Oxford City Council.
  3. ^ [ONS Population Estimates 2005 http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk/dissemination/instanceSelection.do?JSAllowed=true&Function=&%24ph=60_61&CurrentPageId=61&step=2&datasetFamilyId=1809&instanceSelection=121810&Next.x=4&Next.y=4].
  4. ^ [Department for Work and Pensions http://www.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/niall/nino_allocation.asp].
  5. ^ Although Bin Laden was resident to attend a language course, rather than the University, see "Bin Laden's Oxford days", BBC News Online [1]
  6. ^ Radcliffe Meteorological Station. Retrieved on Mar 17, 2008.
  7. ^ {{cite web | url=http://www.geog.ox.ac.uk/research/climate/rms/summary.html|title=Summary of Long Period of Obsevations | accessmonthday = Mar 17 |accessyear =2008
  8. ^ History of Headington, Oxford
  9. ^ Morrells Brewery up for sale
  10. ^ Morrells Brewery Ltd
  11. ^ Jericho Echo
  12. ^ BBC NEWS | England | Brewer buys pub chain for £67m
  13. ^ Brewery site plan nears final hurdle
  14. ^ Source: DfES Pupil Annual School Level Census 2006 see Neighbourhood Renewal Unit floor target results http://www.fti.neighbourhood.gov.uk/document.asp?id=123.
  15. ^ Oxford's FM1079 - The Way I Are
  16. ^ Oxide Radio - Your Sound Education | Home
  17. ^ UK Indymedia - Oxford indymedia
  18. ^ Jericho Echo
  19. ^ Home

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... This article is about the country. ... , Bangor, in north Wales, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ...

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