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Encyclopedia > Oxbridge

Oxbridge was originally a fictional composite of the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge in England, and the term is now used to refer to them collectively, often with implications of their superior intellectual and social status.[1] The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Meaning

The term 'Oxbridge' has arisen partly from the many characteristics that the two universities share. They are the two oldest universities in England. Both were founded more than 750 years ago,[2][3] and between them have produced a large number of Britain's most prominent scientists, writers, and politicians,[4] as well as noted figures in many other fields.[5] Moreover they both share a similar collegiate system, whereby the University is a 'cooperative' of its constituent colleges. The competition between Oxford and Cambridge also has a long history, dating back to the days when Cambridge was founded by dissident scholars from Oxford. Map of medieval European universities This is a list of the oldest extant universities in the world. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A scientist, in the broadest sense, refers to any person that engages in a systematic activity to acquire knowledge or an individual that engages in such practices and traditions that are linked to schools of thought or philosophy. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... In the United Kingdom, a collegiate university is a university whose functions are divided between the central departments of the university and a number of colleges. ... The University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge, collectively known as Oxbridge, are the two oldest and most famous universities in Britain. ...


The word Oxbridge may also be used as a descriptor of social class; i.e. the upper social classes who have in the past dominated the intake of these two universities. Social class refers to the hierarchical distinctions between individuals or groups in societies or cultures. ...


Origins

Although both universities were founded more than seven centuries ago, the term 'Oxbridge' is relatively young. In William Thackeray's bildungsroman, Pendennis, published in 1849, the main character attends (the fictional) Boniface College, Oxbridge. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, this is the first recorded instance of the word, but it did not enter common usage until the middle of the 20th century. This is possibly because until 1832, Oxford and Cambridge were the only universities in England, and the terms "University" or "Varsity" would have sufficed to encompass both universities. William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 – December 24, 1863) was a British novelist of the 19th century. ... A Bildungsroman (IPA: /, German: novel of self-cultivation) is a novelistic variation of the monomyth that concentrates on the spiritual, moral, psychological, or social development and growth of the protagonist usually from childhood to maturity. ... Pendennis (1848–1850) is a novel by the English author William Makepeace Thackeray. ... This is a list of fictional colleges of either: either of the universities making up Oxbridge, but where the specific university is not specified or known; fictional institutions spanning both of the Oxbridge universities; or a fictional Oxbridge University Footlights College, Oxbridge - from which came a team of participants in... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of...


Pendennis also introduces the term Camford as another combination of the university names; "he was a Camford man and very nearly got the English Prize Poem"; although this term has never achieved the same degree of usage as Oxbridge. Virginia Woolf used the term Oxbridge critically in her essay A Room of One's Own. (Adeline) Virginia Woolf (née Stephen; 25 January 1882 – 28 March 1941) was an English novelist and essayist regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century. ... Virginia Woolf, the author of A Room of Ones Own. ...


Social critics in the United Kingdom, such as Carole Cadwalladr, also sometimes use "Oxbridge" or "Oxbridge Club" as shorthand for the "old boy network".[6] An old boy network or society can refer to social and business associations among former pupils of top male-only public schools (independent secondary schools) in the United Kingdom, such as Eton, Harrow, Winchester and Charterhouse, private schools in Canada, and, to a lesser degree, to university students (notably Oxbridge...


Related terms

Other portmanteau words are occasionally derived from the term "Oxbridge", such as "Doxbridge" an annual inter-collegiate sports tournament between the colleges of Durham, Oxford, and Cambridge.[7] The term "Loxbridge" (referring to London, Oxford, and Cambridge) is sometimes used,[8] and was also used as the name of a history conference now referred to as AMPAH.[9] However, such terms are only used for specific groups, and none has achieved widespread use.[citation needed] In the United States, the Ivy League forms an analogous group of colleges with a reputation for selectivity and academic excellence, but the relationship is more formally organized. Affiliations 1994 Group European University Association Association of MBAs EQUIS Universities UK N8 Group Association of Commonwealth Universities Website http://www. ... Website http://www. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...


References

  1. ^ (2002)) Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. “Originally: a fictional university, esp. regarded as a composite of Oxford and Cambridge. Subsequently also (now esp.): the universities of Oxford and Cambridge regarded together, esp. in contrast to other British universities. adj Of, relating to, characteristic of, or reminiscent of Oxbridge (freq. with implication of superior social or intellectual status” 
  2. ^ A brief history of the University. Retrieved on 2008-03-29.
  3. ^ A Brief History - Early Records. Retrieved on 2008-03-29.
  4. ^ Famous alumni and students of Cambridge University
  5. ^ Carole Cadwalladr on the Oxbridge elite | higher news | EducationGuardian.co.uk
  6. ^ Carole Cadwalladr (16 March 2008), Oxbridge Blues, The Guardian, <http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/carole_cadwalladr/2008/03/oxbridge_blues.html> 
  7. ^ The University Sports Tour for Easter 2008. Retrieved on 2008-04-13.
  8. ^ Morgan, K. J. (2004). "The research assessment exercise in English universities, 2001". Higher Education 48: 461–482. doi:10.1023/B:HIGH.0000046717.11717.06. 
  9. ^ AMPAH 2003: Annual Meeting of Postgraduates in Ancient History (formerly also known as LOxBridge). Retrieved on 2008-04-13.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

This is a list of fictional colleges of either: either of the universities making up Oxbridge, but where the specific university is not specified or known; fictional institutions spanning both of the Oxbridge universities; or a fictional Oxbridge University Footlights College, Oxbridge - from which came a team of participants in...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Oxbridge - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia (489 words)
Oxbridge, once a small town in England, was home to the World's first ever and most pretentious University.
This is due primarily to the fact that it has long since ceased interviewing potential students, instead telepathically screening all 17 year olds on October 12th, Cewster's Friday, and selecting those who show the greatest attraction to the stale, wizened tutors and possessed of the silliest accents.
New students are subject to hazing rituals that include being dangled from Flitterby College being annexed to the sewers, or being beaten to a bloody and early death, these pursuits being considered a valuable part of student tradition.
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The professional team at Oxbridge is well-versed in all aspects of land development and construction.
Oxbridge professionals have been involved in placing over $500 million of acquisition, development, construction, and permanent loans in a wide variety of property types.
Oxbridge properties can be found in Montgomery, Charles, Prince George's, Frederick, Washington and Baltimore Counties in Maryland and in Prince William, Loudoun, Frederick and Fairfax Counties in Virginia, as well as in the City of Alexandria and the Town of Culpeper and beyond.
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