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Encyclopedia > Owen Hart
Owen Hart
An image of Owen Hart.
Statistics
Ring name(s) Owen Hart[1]
Owen James[1]
Blue Angel
The Blue Blazer[1]
The Rocket[1]
The King of Harts[1]
Billed height 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)[1]
Billed weight 227 lb (103 kg)[1]
Born May 7, 1965(1965-05-07)[1]
Calgary, Alberta[1]
Died May 23, 1999 (aged 34)[1]
Kansas City, Missouri
Trained by Stu Hart [1]
Debut May 30, 1986[1]

Owen James Hart (May 7, 1965May 23, 1999)[1] was a Canadian professional wrestler who was most known for his time in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). Hart was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada the youngest of 12 children to wrestling promoter Stu Hart and Helen Hart. He was the younger brother of professional wrestler Bret Hart. Among other accolades, Hart was the 1994 WWF King of the Ring. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Kg redirects here. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Stewart Edward Stu Hart, CM (May 3, 1915 – October 16, 2003) was a Canadian amateur wrestler, professional wrestler, promoter and trainer. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... Stewart Edward Stu Hart, CM (May 3, 1915 – October 16, 2003) was a Canadian amateur wrestler, professional wrestler, promoter and trainer. ... Helen Hart (nee Cooper) was a fictional character in the UK soap opera Family Affairs, played by Janice McKenzie. ... Bret Sergeant Hart (born July 2, 1957) is a retired Canadian professional wrestler and actor, and is a member of the Hart wrestling family. ... King of the Ring is an annual World Wrestling Entertainment tournament held from 1985 to 2002. ...

Contents

Career

Stampede Wrestling (1986-1987)

Hart entered wrestling by working for his father's Stampede Wrestling. Wrestling, however, was not his first choice for a career; as his widow Martha explained in her book Broken Harts, Owen tried numerous times to find a profitable living outside of wrestling.[2] As those attempts were unsuccessful, he decided to give wrestling a chance and see where it took him. Hart was trained in his father's legendary Hart Dungeon and made his professional debut in 1986 for his father’s federation, Stampede Wrestling. He remained with Stampede for the next couple of years while honing his skills. During 1986, Hart teamed with Ben Bassarab and won the Stampede Wrestling International Tag Team Championship.[3] The success of the team and Hart's in ring skills earned him the prestigious Pro Wrestling Illustrated Rookie of the Year Award in 1987 (coming out ahead of Ray Traylor and Shane Douglas in the fan voting). After he & Bassarab lost the tag-team titles,[3] he feuded with the likes of Johnny Smith and Dynamite Kid. Stampede Wrestling is a Canadian professional wrestling promotion based in Calgary, Alberta and was once one of the main promotions in western Canada and the Canadian Prairies for almost a half century. ... Martha Hart (born October 31, 1967) is the widow of the late professional wrestler Owen Hart, who died in May 1999. ... The Hart House is located in Calgary, Alberta, Canadas Patterson Heights. ... Stampede Wrestling is a Canadian professional wrestling promotion based in Calgary, Alberta and was once one of the main promotions in western Canada and the Canadian Prairies for almost a half century. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Ben Bassarab is a Canadian former professional wrestler, best known for his appearances with Stu Harts Stampede Wrestling promotion throughout the 1980s. ... Pro Wrestling Illustrated (PWI) is a professional wrestling magazine. ... The PWI Rookie of the Year Award, given yearly since 1972 by professional wrestling magazine Pro Wrestling Illustrated, recognizes the best professional wrestler of the year who, in that year, had their first year in the business, as voted by readers of the magazine. ... Raymond (Ray) Traylor (May 2, 1962 – September 22, 2004) was an American professional wrestler. ... Troy Shane Martin (born November 21, 1964) is an American semi-retired professional wrestler who is better known by his ring name, Shane Douglas. ... John Hindley a. ... Thomas Billington (born December 5, 1958 in Golborne, Lancashire) is a retired English professional wrestler who competed in the World Wrestling Federation, Stampede Wrestling, All Japan Pro Wrestling and New Japan Pro Wrestling in the mid- to late-1980s. ...


New Japan Pro Wrestling (1988)

In 1988, Owen Hart branched out to Japan where he wrestled for New Japan Pro Wrestling on several tours. In NJPW, he wrestled Keiichi Yamada both unmasked[4] and later under the legendary Jushin Liger gimmick. On May 27, 1988, Owen Hart defeated Hiroshi Hase for the IWGP Junior Heavyweight Championship.[3] Owen became the first westerner to hold that coveted title. He was also the first of only two Canadians to hold that title (the other being Chris Benoit). Despite holding the title just under a month, the fact that he held it at all was a testament to how much faith NJPW had in him and his ring skills. New Japan Pro Wrestling (新日本プロレス, shin nihon puroresu) is a major professional wrestling federation in Japan, founded by Antonio Inoki in 1972. ... Keiichi Yamada , born November 30, 1964), better known as Jushin Liger ) and later, Jushin Thunder Liger ) is a Japanese professional wrestler who invented the Shooting Star Press. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Hiroshi Hase (born on May 5, 1961 in Oyabe, Toyama, Japan) is a retired Japanese professional wrestler who worked for New Japan Pro Wrestling and All Japan Pro Wrestling, prior to transitioning to a position in the Japanese parliament. ... The IWGP (International Wrestling Grand Prix) Junior Heavyweight Championship is the top singles title in New Japan Pro Wrestlings Junior Heavyweight division. ... Christopher Michael Benoit (IPA: ) (May 21, 1967 – June 24, 2007) was a Canadian professional wrestler who wrestled for Extreme Championship Wrestling, World Championship Wrestling, and World Wrestling Entertainment. ...


World Wrestling Federation (1988-1989)

Owen’s success in Japan and Stampede’s working relationship with the World Wrestling Federation lead to Owen Hart signing with the company in the fall of 1988. Owen debuted at the Los Angeles Sports Arena in August of 1988 under a mask called the Blue Angel. Instead of promoting Owen as Bret Hart’s younger brother, the WWF decided to create a masked “Super Hero" type gimmick for Owen Hart known as The Blue Blazer. The Blazer caught the attention of fans with his unique look and exciting aerial maneuvers, but he didn't achieve much success against upper-card talent, being eliminated at Survivor Series 1988,[5] losing to Ted DiBiase on the March 11, 1989 airing of Saturday Night's Main Event[6] and being defeated by Mr. Perfect at WrestleMania V.[7] World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... Bret Sergeant Hart (born July 2, 1957) is a retired Canadian professional wrestler and actor, and is a member of the Hart wrestling family. ... Survivor Series 1988 was the second annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event for the World Wrestling Federation. ... Theodore Marvin Ted DiBiase Sr. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of television-related events in 1989. ... Saturday Nights Main Event is a professional wrestling television program that aired occasionally from 1985 to 1991, under the World Wrestling Federation banner on NBC in place of Saturday Night Live. ... Curtis Michael Hennig (March 28, 1959 – February 10, 2003), also known by his ring name Mr. ... WrestleMania V was the fifth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ...


Independent circuit (1989-1991)

Shortly after WrestleMania V, Owen left the WWF to tour the world both with and without the Blue Blazer gimmick. In 1991, Owen lost the Blue Blazer mask in a mascara contra mascara match against Mexican icon Canek, thus bidding farewell to the Blue Blazer gimmick.[8] WrestleMania V was the fifth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ... One of the most well known Lucha Libre wrestlers (luchadores), Rey Mysterio. ... Canek is a Mexican professional wrestler currently performing part time for Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre. ...


World Championship Wrestling (1991)

In 1991, Owen Hart appeared sporadically on World Championship Wrestling shows, teaming with Ricky Morton and without much fanfare and no mentions of his WWF connections.[9] For the Australian professional wrestling promotion, see World Championship Wrestling (Australia). ...


World Wrestling Federation (1991-1999)

1991-1993

Owen had been engaged in contract discussions with WCW but the deal was never struck, as Owen was not willing to move himself and his family to the company's headquarters in Atlanta.[2] Instead, Owen signed with the WWF for a second time. In the WWF the popular Hart Foundation, comprised of his brother Bret and real-life brother-in-law Jim Neidhart, had split up; Bret set out on a singles career while Neidhart was used sparingly. Jim Neidhart was “injured" (kayfabe) by the Beverly Brothers and put out of action for a while. When Neidhart returned from his "injury" he joined Owen Hart to form a team known as The New Foundation, who became instantly recognizable for their bizarre attire - baggy pants and bright jackets. This article is about the Hart Foundation in professional wrestling. ... James Henry Jim Neidhart (born August 2, 1956)[1] is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s in the World Wrestling Federation as Jim The Anvil Neidhart. ... In professional wrestling, kayfabe (pronounced KAY-fayb) refers to the portrayal of events within the industry as real, that is, the portrayal of professional wrestling as unstaged or not worked. ... The Beverly Brothers were a professional wrestling tag team comprised of Mike Enos and Wayne Bloom in the World Wrestling Federation. ...


Owen and Neidhart first feuded with the Beverly Brothers and had only one PPV match at the 1992 Royal Rumble where they beat The Orient Express.[10] Jim Neidhart left the WWF shortly after the PPV, and Owen set out on a a very short run as a singles wrestler, including a match at WrestleMania VIII against Skinner.[11] Shortly after WrestleMania, Owen was teamed up with Koko B. Ware to form the duo known as High Energy. To show team unity, Koko also adopted the trademark brightly colored baggy pants and they’d add checkermarked suspenders to make the look even more distinct. While the team was exciting and certainly “kid friendly", it was never pushed as a serious threat to the tag team titles. This was illustrated by the fact that they had only one PPV as a team, at the 1992 Survivor Series where they lost to The Headshrinkers.[12] The team was quietly dropped at the start of 1993 with Owen Hart starting a singles career, ditching the baggy pants look. Royal Rumble 1992 was the fifth annual Royal Rumble professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... For the full article on Badd Company see Badd Company The Orient Express was a professional wrestling tag team in the World Wrestling Federation in the early 1990s comprised of Pat Tanaka and Akio Sato, who was later replaced by Kato // In early 1990 WWF Manager Mr. ... WrestleMania VIII was the eighth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Steve Keirn (born September 10, 1951) is a retired professional wrestler. ... Koko B. Ware & Frankie James Ware aka Koko B. Ware is former professional wrestler. ... Survivor Series 1992 was the sixth annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event for the World Wrestling Federation. ... The Headshrinkers were a professional wrestling tag team in the World Wrestling Federation that consisted of Fatu and Samu. ...


In the middle of 1993, when Bret Hart’s feud with Jerry Lawler ignited, Owen Hart stood by his brother’s side and fought against Jerry Lawler. The fight with Lawler did not take place on WWF television but mainly in the United States Wrestling Association where Bret, Owen, and most of the other WWF talent were considered the heels. Owen Hart won the USWA Unified World Heavyweight Championship from Papa Shango,[3] but it was never acknowledged on WWF television. Owen’s participation in the WWF vs. USWA feud was cut short when he suffered a knee injury in the summer of 1993 and was forced to take some time away from the ring. At the time, rumors circulated that Owen was on the verge of leaving the WWF due to a lack of success. Whether the knee injury was just a way for the WWF to explain his absence or not isn’t quite clear. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The United States Wrestling Association or USWA was a professional wrestling promotional organization based in Memphis, Tennessee. ... In professional wrestling, a heel is a villain character. ... The USWA Unified World Heavyweight Championship is a professional wrestling championship formed in 1988 when Jerry Lawler defeated Curt Hennig on the 9th May, 1988 for the American Wrestling Association World Heavyweight title and defeated Kerry Von Erich on the 13th December, 1988 for the World Class Championship Wrestling World... Charles Wright[1] (born May 16, 1961) is an American businessman and retired professional wrestler. ...


Owen returned to the WWF ring in the fall of 1993, at a time when Bret’s feud with Jerry Lawler was temporarily sidetracked. Bret, along with Owen and their brothers Bruce Hart and Keith Hart, were scheduled to face Jerry Lawler and his team at Survivor Series 1993. However, Jerry Lawler was unable to make it to the show, and as a result could not appear on WWF television. Lawler was replaced with Shawn Michaels. During the match Owen and Bret inadvertently crashed into each other, causing Owen to be eliminated from the team (the only Hart family member to be eliminated). While Bret, Keith, and Bruce celebrated, Owen looked on in anger.[13] The kayfabe tension between the two brothers had reared its ugly head for the first time. Bruce Ambrose Edwardious Hart (born January 13, 1950) is a Canadian retired professional wrestler. ... Keith William Hart (born 1952) is a Canadian retired firefighter and professional wrestler. ... Survivor Series 1993 was the seventh annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event for the World Wrestling Federation. ... Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ... In professional wrestling, kayfabe (pronounced KAY-fayb) refers to the portrayal of events within the industry as real, that is, the portrayal of professional wrestling as unstaged or not worked. ...


1994-1995

See also: Owen Hart and Yokozuna

Bret tried to make amends with Owen, teaming with him on a regular basis. Bret even secured the two a shot at the WWF Tag Team Championship. They faced the Quebecers for the titles at the 1994 Royal Rumble. Initially everything was fine between the brothers, but when Bret hurt his knee (kayfabe) and was unable to tag Owen in for a long period of time the younger Hart got frustrated. When the referee stopped the match due to Bret's damaged knee, Owen snapped; he kicked his brother in the knee and then walked off, starting his run as a heel.[14] Owen Hart and Yokozuna were a professional wrestling tag team that wrestled in World Wrestling Federation. ... This article is about the tag team championship that is currently defended on the RAW brand of WWE. For SmackDown!s tag team championship, see WWE Tag Team Championship. ... The Quebecers were a tag team in the WWE (then WWF) from late 1993 to mid-1994. ... Promotional poster of Royal Rumble 1994 Royal Rumble 1994 was the seventh annual Royal Rumble professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ...


The two brothers faced off for the first time at WrestleMania X, where Owen Hart shocked the world by cleanly pinning his older brother. Later in the evening, Bret Hart won the WWF Title while Owen Hart stood by and watched in jealousy as Bret celebrated in the ring.[15] Owen won the King of the Ring Tournament with Jim Neidhart’s help (turning Neidhart heel in the process).[16] After the victory, Owen took the nickname “The King of Harts." WrestleMania X was the tenth annual WrestleMania professional wrestling pay-per-view event produced by the World Wrestling Federation. ... King of the Ring 1994 was the second annual King of the Ring professional wrestling pay-per-view (PPV) event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ...


Owen and Bret feuded throughout the summer of 1994, clashing many times both in singles and later in tag-team matches (with Bret joined by the returning British Bulldog). Two matches stand out in this feud: first, their Steel Cage match at SummerSlam 1994 which Bret won after a hard fought match.[17] The second was a lumberjack match on August 17, 1994 that Owen Hart initially won and was announced as World champion but then reversed due to interference.[18] At the 1994 Survivor Series, Owen struck the most damaging blow against his brother as he conned his own mother Helen Hart to throw in the towel for Bret. Owen was at his most manipulative and insincere as he pleaded with her to think of his brother's well-being. The ploy cost Bret the world title to Bob Backlund.[19] David Boy (Davey Boy) Smith (November 28, 1962 – May 18, 2002) was an English professional wrestler. ... A bloodied Kane inside a current style WWE cage. ... SummerSlam 1994 was the seventh annual SummerSlam professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Survivor Series 1994 was the eighth annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Robert Louis Backlund (b. ...


Owen also prevented Bret from regaining the title at the 1995 Royal Rumble when he interfered in the match between Bret and new champion Diesel.[20] In the weeks after the Rumble, Bret and Owen clashed again with Bret soundly defeating his brother, thus putting an end to their feud for the time being. Royal Rumble 1995 was the eighth annual Royal Rumble professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ... Kevin Scott Nash (born July 9, 1959[2] in Detroit, Michigan) is an American professional wrestler and actor. ...


Owen rebounded from the loss to Bret Hart by winning the WWF tag-team titles from The Smokin' Gunns at WrestleMania XI.[3] Owen, who was joined by a "Mystery Partner", had challenged the Gunns to a title match; the partner turned out to be former world champion Yokozuna.[21][22] After the victory Owen Hart took Jim Cornette as his manager, who already managed Yokozuna. The team defended the tag team titles for 5 months until they lost them back to the Smoking Gunns.[3] Owen Hart and Yokozuna would continue to team off and on until the end of the year, winning the titles a second time.[23] The Smokin Gunns were a professional wrestling tag team of brothers Billy Gunn and Bart Gunn. ... WrestleMania XI, was the eleventh annual WrestleMania pay-per-view event held by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) in Hartford, Connecticut on April 2, 1995. ... Rodney Anoai (October 2, 1966 – October 23, 2000) was a Samoan-American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Yokozuna. ... James (Jim) Cornette (born September 17, 1961) is an American professional wrestling manager, commentator, promoter, and booker. ...


1996-1997

Main article: Owen Hart and British Bulldog

In 1996, Owen had a running feud on WWF TV with interviewer Raymond Rougeau, which was done largely for the Montreal market to promote upcoming house shows there. During one such match, where Rougeau was a guest ring announcer for Owen's match, Hart attacked him after the match. This set up a boxing match between the two at the next show. It was Rougeau's cornerman at the next show, local boxing great George Chuvalo that knocked Hart out. Owen Hart and British Bulldog were a professional wrestling tag team in World Wrestling Federation. ... Raymond Rougeau (born February 18, 1955 in St. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... George Chuvalo, CM (born September 12, 1937) is a Canadian heavyweight boxer who was never knocked down in ninety-three professional fights between 1956 and 1979. ...


In 1995, Owen's brother-in-law Davey Boy Smith turned heel and joined Camp Cornette. During the summer of 1996 the two brothers in law started to team up more and more, sometimes alongside Vader who was also a member of Camp Cornette.[24] Owen was also a colour commentator for the 1996 King of the Ring PPV (exhibiting clear partisan support for Vader and Smith) and during this time wore a cast on his right forearm for several months, feigning a nagging injury to subsequently use his cast as a weapon during his matches (much as Bob Orton did in the mid 1980's). For the football player of the same name see Leon White (football player). ... King of the Ring is an annual World Wrestling Entertainment tournament held from 1985 to 2002. ... cast A cast is a shell, frequently made from plaster, encasing a limb (or, in some cases, large portions of the body) to hold a broken bone (or bones) in place until it has healed. ... Robert Keith Orton, Jr. ...


In September 1996, Bulldog & Owen Hart finally earned a PPV shot at the tag team titles at In Your House 10.[25] Owen and Bulldog left with the gold after defeating the Smoking Gunns.[3][26] They also left with a new manager as Clarence Mason had conned Jim Cornette into signing over the contracts of the new champions. The duo reigned supreme over a relatively weak tag team division but everything was not well with the two. Signs of kayfabe dissension slowly started to show between the two. For the song In Your House by The Cure, see Seventeen Seconds In Your House Logo In Your House was a pay-per-view series created by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Clarence Mason was a professional wrestling manager in the mid-1990s for the World Wrestling Federation. ... In professional wrestling, kayfabe (pronounced KAY-fayb) refers to the portrayal of events within the industry as real, that is, the portrayal of professional wrestling as unstaged or not worked. ...


One occasion of the dissension was the 1997 Royal Rumble when Owen accidentally eliminated Bulldog and Owen generally tended to try to steal the spotlight.[27] After the Rumble, Bulldog fired Clarence Mason, something which did not sit well with Owen Hart. Another bone of contention between the two was the newly created WWF European Championship; both men had fought their way to the finals to crown the first champion with Bulldog coming out as the victor after a long, hard fought match.[3] Promotional poster of Royal Rumble 1997, featuring Shawn Michaels Royal Rumble 1997 was the tenth annual Royal Rumble professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ... The WWE European Championship is an inactive title competed for in World Wrestling Entertainment. ...


After retaining the tag team titles against the Headbangers by disqualification on Monday Night Raw (March 24, 1997) the tension between the two bubbled over. An incensed Owen Hart demanded a shot at Bulldog’s European title the next week.[28] The match was booked for March 31; on the night, the two went at it with such intensity that many thought the tag team champions had finally gone their separate ways. Then in a shocking moment, the recently turned heel Bret Hart appeared at ringside and stopped the match. Bret appealed to both Owen and Bulldog, talking about the importance of family.[29] Bret got through to both of them and they agreed to put their differences aside and join with Bret to form the new Hart Foundation, an anti-American stable that also included Hart in-law Jim Neidhart and Hart Family friend Brian Pillman | This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... WWE Raw is the Monday night professional wrestling television program for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and is the primary broadcast of the RAW brand. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of television-related events in 1997. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Hart Foundation in professional wrestling. ... Brian William Pillman (May 22, 1962 – October 5, 1997) was an American football player and professional wrestler best known for his appearances in the World Wrestling Federation, Extreme Championship Wrestling and World Championship Wrestling. ...


After forming the Hart Foundation, Owen Hart quickly gained singles gold of his own as he pinned Rocky Maivia to win his first WWF Intercontinental title.[3][30] This meant that the Hart Foundation held every WWF title except the World title, cementing their dominance over the federation. It was not all success for Owen, though, as he and the British Bulldog lost their tag team titles to "Stone Cold" Steve Austin and Shawn Michaels.[3] The team also failed to regain them when Michaels got injured and was replaced by Dude Love. At SummerSlam 1997 the Owen Hart/Steve Austin feud took a nasty turn as a botched piledriver ended up injuring Steve Austin’s neck.[31][32] The injury was so bad that Austin’s neck never fully recovered and was part of the reason Austin was forced to retire in 2003. Owen also lost his Intercontinental title to Steve Austin that night.[3] Because of the neck injury, Austin was not allowed to compete and was stripped of the title. Although it was an accident, the WWF decided to make it part of the storyline as Owen Hart began wearing a t-shirt patterned after Austin's that read "Owen 3:16/I Just Broke Your Neck". Dwayne Douglas Johnson[6] (born May 2, 1972)[4], better known by his former ring name The Rock, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Intercontinental Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Steven James Williams (born Steven Anderson on December 18, 1964)[2] better known by his ring name Stone Cold Steve Austin, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ... Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ... Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ... SummerSlam 1997 was the tenth annual SummerSlam professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ...


Owen Hart fought his way to the finals of the tournament to crown the next Intercontinental champion and was set to face Faarooq at In Your House: Badd Blood. Owen went on to beat Faarooq, surprisingly with Steve Austin’s help.[33] Afterwards, Austin explained that he wanted to beat Owen Hart for the title when he returned and wouldn't allow Faarooq or anyone else to beat him. His wish came true when Austin returned to action at Survivor Series 1997 from Montreal.[34] On the undercard, Owen lost his title to Austin once again,[3] and then he watched in shock as the infamous Montreal Screwjob took place. Ron Simmons[2] (born May 15, 1958) is an American semi-retired professional wrestler and retired American football player. ... WWE Bad Blood is a World Wrestling Entertainment-produced pay-per-view event that takes place, usually, in June and is the successor of the King of the Ring pay-per-view. ... Survivor Series 1997 was the eleventh annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event for the World Wrestling Federation. ... The screwjob - Earl Hebner calls for the bell as Shawn Michaels holds Bret Hart in the Sharpshooter. ...


1998-1999

Bret Hart left the Federation after the Montreal Screwjob and both the British Bulldog and Jim Neidhart were granted quick releases from their contracts to jump to WCW. This left Owen Hart as the only Hart family member remaining in the WWF, due to his contractual obligations. Unlike Bulldog & Anvil, Vince McMahon did not grant Owen a release from his contract and Owen remained with the company. However, in a later interview, Bulldog claimed that Owen voluntarily stayed with the WWF as he didn't want to pay a huge sum of money to get out of his contract. Vincent Kennedy McMahon (born August 25, 1945) is an American wrestling promoter, occasional professional wrestler, on-screen personality, former play-by-play announcer, and film producer. ...


Owen was kept off the air for a while. He was not seen or mentioned on WWF programming until he made a surprise appearance after Shawn Michaels successfully defended his title at In Your House: D-Generation X where he attacked Michaels.[35] Initially, Owen was known as “the Black Hart" as he fought against Shawn Michaels and Hunter Hearst Helmsley but was soon after changed to “The Lone Hart" as a reflection of his “lone wolf" status. Owen had a very heated, very emotional feud with DX and won the European title from HHH, although not directly.[36] Goldust dressed up as HHH in an attempt to swerve Owen, but Commissioner Slaughter considered him to be a legitimate replacement.[3][36] Owen later suffered a kayfabe ankle injury during a match involving Triple H. When Hart joined the commentary at ringside, Triple H managed to draw Owen into an impromptu title match and regained the title in a controversial fashion.[3] With time the Owen Hart/DX feud turned into Owen vs. HHH. For the song In Your House by The Cure, see Seventeen Seconds In Your House Logo In Your House was a pay-per-view series created by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Paul Michael Levesque[4] (born July 27, 1969)[4] is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Triple H, an abbreviation of his former Hunter Hearst Helmsley moniker. ... Virgil Riley Runnels III, also known as Dustin Runnels and Dustin Rhodes (born April 11, 1969), is an American professional wrestler, currently working for Total Nonstop Action Wrestling under the ring name Black Reign // Rhodes received his first national exposure in the National Wrestling Alliance in December 1988, where he... // This is a list of authority figures, people who have (kayfabe) power, in selective professional wrestling promotions or brands within North America. ... In professional wrestling, kayfabe (pronounced KAY-fayb) refers to the portrayal of events within the industry as real, that is, the portrayal of professional wrestling as unstaged or not worked. ...


Four weeks after WrestleMania, during a tag team match with Ken Shamrock against D'Lo Brown and Rocky Maivia (later known as The Rock), Owen Hart turned on Shamrock, "snapping" his ankle and "biting his ear" in the process.[37] After the attack on Shamrock, Owen joined the Nation of Domination, claiming that “Enough is enough and it’s time for a change". Ken Shamrock (born Kenneth Wayne Kilpatrick on February 11, 1964 in Macon, Georgia) is an American mixed martial arts fighter. ... DLo Brown (also written D-Lo Brown) [2][1] (born Accie A.C. Connor on October 22, 1972 in Burlington, New Jersey), is an American professional wrestler. ... Dwayne Douglas Johnson[6] (born May 2, 1972)[4], better known by his former ring name The Rock, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ... The Nation of Domination is a former professional wrestling stable in the World Wrestling Federation. ...


The Nation’s first big feud after Owen joined was against the freshly turned DX, a feud that was a natural for Owen. It was during this feud that one of D-GenerationX’s most famous skits occurred as DX parodied the Nation of Domination. The imitation was complete with Jason Sensation dressing up as Owen Hart and coining the phrase “I am not a nugget"; this was in response to Shawn Michaels referring to Owen as a nugget of feces sticking to the side of a toilet bowl, and no matter how many times Shawn Michaels flushed, it kept sticking around and was unable to get rid of. "Nugget" became a derisive term that followed Owen for the rest of his career. Owen’s participation in the DX feud was sidetracked when Ken Shamrock returned from injuries dead set on getting revenge on Owen. The two split a pair of specialty matches on PPV,[38][39] but nothing was ever conclusively settled between them.


Owen Hart remained with the Nation of Domination throughout the year until the stable slowly dissolved, leaving Owen without much direction in the WWF. Owen was seldom seen after SummerSlam 1998 until he teamed with Jeff Jarrett. Owen and Jeff were long time traveling companions and real life friends, a fact that was reflected in their teamwork as they gelled from day one. The two had Jeff’s manager Debra in their corner. During this time a storyline was proposed that Owen Hart was supposed to have an on-screen affair with Debra, something which Owen turned down,[2] most likely because Owen was such a family man. 1998 The theme song was Highway to Hell, by AC/DC. European Champion DLo Brown defeated Val Venis by Disqualification The Oddities defeated Kaientai X-Pac pinned Jeff Jarrett in a Hair vs. ... For the former Assistant Secretary of Energy for Fossil Energy, see Jeffrey D. Jarrett. ... Debra Gale Marshall (born March 2, 1960[1] in Tuscaloosa, Alabama) is an American real estate agent and former professional wrestling manager and WWE Diva. ...


After a match in which Owen “accidentally injured" Dan Severn, Owen seemingly quit the WWF.[40] Playing off the legit injury Owen had inflicted on Steve Austin about two years before, the angle blurred the lines between reality and “storyline" enough to make people notice. Yet as soon as Owen “quit", the Blue Blazer appeared in the WWF claiming to in no way be Owen Hart despite it being very obvious who was under the mask. Unlike the first run of the character, the Blazer was now an overbearing heel. The gimmick was seen by many as punishment for Owen refusing the love-triangle storyline proposal but Owen and Jeff made it work in such a comical fashion that it was turning both of them face in the process. To prove that Owen was not the Blazer, he showed up besides the Blue Blazer, figuring that’d put an end to it, until someone asked where Jeff Jarrett was (he was under the mask). In a later attempt to prove that neither Owen nor Jeff was the Blazer, they both appeared next to a man in the Blue Blazer mask; however, it was obvious that a black man was under the mask (Owen’s former partner Koko B. Ware wore the Blazer mask that night). Daniel The Beast Severn (born June 8, 1958 in Coldwater, Michigan) is an American mixed martial artist and professional wrestler, notable for his success in the early years of Ultimate Fighting Championship tournaments. ...


On January 25, 1999, in the midst of the Blue Blazer angle Owen and Jeff defeated Ken Shamrock and The Big Boss Man for the tag-team titles.[3][41] is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Raymond (Ray) Traylor (May 2, 1962 – September 22, 2004) was an American professional wrestler. ...


Death

On May 23, 1999, Hart fell to his death in Kansas City, Missouri during the Over the Edge pay-per-view event.[42] is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ...


Hart was in the process of being lowered via harness and rappel line into the ring from the rafters of Kemper Arena for a booked Intercontinental Championship match against The Godfather. In keeping with the Blazer's new 'buffoonish superhero' character, he was to begin a dramatic entrance, being lowered to just above ring level, at which time he would act "entangled", then release himself from the safety harness and fall flat on his face for comedic effect -- this necessitated the use of a quick release mechanism. It was an elaboration on a Blue Blazer stunt done previously on the Sunday Night Heat before Survivor Series 1998.[43] This time, something went wrong with the stunt harness, apparently triggering the release mechanism early as he was being lowered. Hart fell 78 feet (24 meters) into the ring, landing chest-first on the top rope, approximately a foot from the turn buckle, throwing him into the ring.[44] In Mick Foley's autobiography Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks, he claims that following the fall, Owen attempted to sit up and did so before falling back. In British English, abseiling (from the German abseilen, to rope down) is the process of descending on a fixed rope. ... Kemper Arena American Royal Center is an 19,500 seat indoor arena in Kansas City, Missouri that has hosted NCAA Final Four basketball games, professional basketball and hockey teams, the 1976 Republican Convention, and is the ongoing host of the American Royal livestock show. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Intercontinental Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... Charles Wright[1] (born May 16, 1961) is an American businessman and retired professional wrestler. ... Physical comedy is comedic performance relying mostly on the use of the body to convey humor. ... A quick release skewer is a cam operated lever system used with a hollow axle for securing the wheels on a bicycle. ... WWE Heat (formerly known as WWE Sunday Night Heat and capitalized as WWE HEAT) is a professional wrestling show for World Wrestling Entertainment, showcasing talent from the Raw roster with lower-card matches. ... Survivor Series 1998 was the twelfth annual Survivor Series pay-per-view professional wrestling event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ...


Owen had performed the stunt only a few times before and was worried about performing the stunt at Kemper Arena due to the height involved (Owen had a fear of heights). Owen's wife Martha has suggested that, by moving around to get comfortable with both the harness and his cape on, Owen unintentionally triggered an early release. View through the glass floor of the CN Tower in Toronto, Canada. ...


TV viewers at home did not see the incident or its aftermath -- at the moment of the fall, a pre-taped vignette was being shown on the pay-per-view broadcast as well as on the monitors in the darkened arena. After, while Owen was being worked on by medical personnel inside the ring, the live event's broadcast showed only the audience. Meanwhile, WWF television announcer Jim Ross repeatedly told those watching live on pay-per-view that what had just transpired was not a wrestling angle or storyline and that Hart was hurt badly, emphasizing the seriousness of the situation.[45] Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ...


Hart was transported to the Truman Medical Center in Kansas City, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. Owen had actually died while still being tended to in the ring. The cause was later revealed to be internal bleeding from blunt chest trauma. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In medical terminology, blunt trauma, blunt injury, non-penetrating trauma or blunt force trauma refers to a type of physical trauma caused to a bodypart, either by impact, injury or physical attack; the latter usually being referred to as blunt force trauma. ...


Controversy and lawsuit

The WWF management controversially chose to continue the event[46], though they were unaware of the severity of Hart's injury at that time. Later, Jim Ross announced the death of Owen Hart to the home viewers during the pay-per-view, but not to the crowd in the arena.[47] While the show did go on, it has never been released commercially by WWF Home Video, and to this date no footage of Owen Hart's fall has never been officially released. In the weeks that followed, much attention was focused on the harness Owen used that night, especially on the "quick release" trigger and safety latches. When someone is lowered from the rafters in a harness, there are backup latches that must be latched for safety purposes. These backups may take some time to unlatch, which would have made Owen's stunt difficult to perform smoothly. Therefore, it was apparently decided that it was more important not to have the safety backups, because it would be easier for Owen to unlatch himself.[citation needed]


Owen left behind a widow, Martha, and two children, Oje Edward and Athena Christy. Three weeks after the event, the Hart family sued the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) over how dangerous and poorly planned the stunt was, and that the harness system was defective.[48] After over a year and a half into the case, a settlement was reached on November 2, 2000, which saw the WWF give the Hart family $18 million dollars that was distributed among the Hart family.[49][50][51] The manufacturer of the harness system was also a defendant against the Hart family, but they were dismissed from the case after the settlement was reached.[48][49] Martha used the funds to establish the Owen Hart Foundation.[52] Martha wrote a book about Owen's life in 2002 called Broken Harts: The Life and Death of Owen Hart.[2] Martha Hart (born October 31, 1967) is the widow of the late professional wrestler Owen Hart, who died in May 1999. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... USD redirects here. ...


In his DVD set Bret Hart: The Best There Is, The Best There Was, And The Best There Ever Will Be, Bret comments that, despite the bad blood between himself and Vince McMahon, he wishes he had been with the WWF the night Owen's accident happened.[53] Vincent Kennedy McMahon (born August 25, 1945) is an American wrestling promoter, occasional professional wrestler, on-screen personality, former play-by-play announcer, and film producer. ...


Raw is Owen

Raw is Owen is the name given to a special live episode of WWF Raw is WAR that aired on May 24, 1999, the night after Owen's death at Over the Edge. It was broadcast live from the Kiel Center in St. Louis.[54] It featured interviews from his fellow wrestlers.[54][55] WWE Raw is the Monday night professional wrestling television program for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and is the primary broadcast of the RAW brand. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1999 in television involved some significant events. ... Scottrade Center Scottrade Center (formerly Kiel Center and Savvis Center) is an arena located in downtown St. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... In professional wrestling, a promo is short for promotional interview, a dialogue or monologue used to advance a storyline. ...


According to Raw Exposed (a special that aired before the first WWE Raw airing on its return to USA Network on October 3, 2005), WWF management gave all wrestlers on the roster the option of working or not. Nevertheless, ten matches were booked with no angles. WWE Raw is the Monday night professional wrestling television program for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) and is the primary broadcast of the RAW brand. ... USA Network is a popular American cable television network with about 89 million household subscribers as of 2005. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 2005 in television involved some significant events. ... Professional wrestling has accrued a considerable amount of slang, in-references and jargon. ... Professional wrestling has accrued a considerable amount of slang, in-references and jargon. ...


The show began with all the wrestlers of the WWF standing on the entrance ramp (with the exception of The Undertaker). Vince McMahon, Linda McMahon, and Stephanie McMahon were at the front of the ramp. Howard Finkel called for a ten-bell salute. Owen's former Nation of Domination comrades were emotional, most notably Mark Henry, who read a poem that he wrote in memory of Owen. A tribute video narrated by Vince then played on the TitanTron.[56] For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ... Vincent Kennedy McMahon (born August 25, 1945) is an American wrestling promoter, occasional professional wrestler, on-screen personality, former play-by-play announcer, and film producer. ... Linda Marie Edwards-McMahon (born October 4, 1948 in New Bern, North Carolina) is the CEO of World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... Stephanie Marie McMahon-Levesque[1] (born September 24, 1976) better known by her maiden name Stephanie McMahon, is World Wrestling Entertainments Executive Vice President of Talent and Creative Writing. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In professional wrestling, a ten-bell salute is given to honor a wrestler that has died, especially when that wrestler is a current member of the promotion or a distinguished former member of the promotion. ... The Nation of Domination is a former professional wrestling stable in the World Wrestling Federation. ... Mark Gordon Henry[1] (born June 12, 1971 in Silsbee, Texas) is an American professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment performing on its SmackDown! brand. ...


Throughout the broadcast, personal thoughts on Owen in the form of interviews with various WWF Superstars were played. Before the first commercial break, such thoughts were aired from Mick Foley and Bradshaw. Foley noted that Hart was his son's favorite wrestler and had proudly gotten a haircut like Owen's, although he also said his son didn't quite understand that "nugget" was not a term of endearment.[57] Bradshaw talked about how Owen spent less money on the road than most wrestlers because he wanted to retire early and spend time with his family. In professional wrestling, a promo is short for promotional interview, a dialogue or monologue used to advance a storyline. ... Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ... “John Hawk” redirects here. ...


The broadcast ended with Stone Cold Steve Austin coming out for a special salute to Owen by climbing the turnbuckle and performing his famous beer guzzling routine, and leaving one beer in the ring 'for Owen'. Steven James Williams (born Steven Anderson on December 18, 1964)[2] better known by his ring name Stone Cold Steve Austin, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ...


Shawn Michaels, in his Heartbreak and Triumph autobiography, notes that "Owen is the only guy you could have a 2-hour show for, and no-one would say a bad word about him."


The next day, WWF taped the episode of Raw for May 31, 1999. During that show, Jeff Jarrett defeated The Godfather to win the WWF Intercontinental Championship,[3] the title Owen was booked to win at Over the Edge for the third time. Jarrett screamed Owen's name as the belt was handed to him. is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1999 in television involved some significant events. ...


In wrestling

  • Finishing and signature moves
  • Rocket Launcher
  • Managers

Bret Hart applying the Sharpshooter on Shawn Michaels. ... A piledriver is a professional wrestling driver move in which the wrestler grabs his opponent, turns him upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the opponents head into the mat. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show off the speed and agility of a wrestler. ... Shawn Michaels performing a Moonsault on Chris Jericho. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show off the speed and agility of a wrestler. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show off the speed and agility of a wrestler. ... lion tamer used by chris jericho you do tjis by going into a high angle boston crab and place your knee in their back applying pressure high angle boston crab used by chris jericho do this by applying a regular boston crab but scooting backwards until standing then pull their... lion tamer used by chris jericho you do tjis by going into a high angle boston crab and place your knee in their back applying pressure high angle boston crab used by chris jericho do this by applying a regular boston crab but scooting backwards until standing then pull their... Body Slam redirects here. ... Hulk Hogan performing the Atomic Leg Drop on Mr. ... James Henry Jim Neidhart (born August 2, 1956)[1] is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s in the World Wrestling Federation as Jim The Anvil Neidhart. ... The double-team manuvers in professional wrestling are executed by two wrestlers instead of one and typicaly are used by tag teams in tag team matches. ... James (Jim) Cornette (born September 17, 1961) is an American professional wrestling manager, commentator, promoter, and booker. ... Clarence Mason was a professional wrestling manager in the mid-1990s for the World Wrestling Federation. ... Debra Gale Marshall (born March 2, 1960[1] in Tuscaloosa, Alabama) is an American real estate agent and former professional wrestling manager and WWE Diva. ... Bret Sergeant Hart (born July 2, 1957) is a retired Canadian professional wrestler and actor, and is a member of the Hart wrestling family. ...

Championships and accomplishments

New Japan Pro Wrestling (新日本プロレス, shin nihon puroresu) is a major professional wrestling federation in Japan, founded by Antonio Inoki in 1972. ... The IWGP (International Wrestling Grand Prix) Junior Heavyweight Championship is the top singles title in New Japan Pro Wrestlings Junior Heavyweight division. ... The IWGP (International Wrestling Grand Prix) Junior Heavyweight Championship is the top singles title in New Japan Pro Wrestlings Junior Heavyweight division. ... Stampede Wrestling is a Canadian professional wrestling promotion based in Calgary, Alberta and was once one of the main promotions in western Canada and the Canadian Prairies for almost a half century. ... The Stampede British Commonwealth Mid-Heavyweight Championship is a professional wrestling title for lighter wrestlers in the Canadian promotion, Stampede Wrestling. ... The Stampede British Commonwealth Mid-Heavyweight Championship is a professional wrestling title for lighter wrestlers in the Canadian promotion, Stampede Wrestling. ... The Stampede North American Heavyweight Championship is the major title in the Canadian professional wrestling promotion Stampede Wrestling. ... The Stampede North American Heavyweight Championship is the major title in the Canadian professional wrestling promotion Stampede Wrestling. ... The Stampede International Tag Team Championship is the main tag-team title Canadian professional wrestling promotion Stampede Wrestling. ... The Stampede International Tag Team Championship is the main tag-team title Canadian professional wrestling promotion Stampede Wrestling. ... Ben Bassarab is a Canadian former professional wrestler, best known for his appearances with Stu Harts Stampede Wrestling promotion throughout the 1980s. ... Stampede Wrestling is a Canadian professional wrestling promotion based in Calgary, Alberta and was once one of the main promotions in western Canada and the Canadian Prairies for almost a half century. ... The United States Wrestling Association or USWA was a professional wrestling promotional organization based in Memphis, Tennessee. ... The USWA Unified World Heavyweight Championship is a professional wrestling championship formed in 1988 when Jerry Lawler defeated Curt Hennig on the 9th May, 1988 for the American Wrestling Association World Heavyweight title and defeated Kerry Von Erich on the 13th December, 1988 for the World Class Championship Wrestling World... The USWA Unified World Heavyweight Championship is a professional wrestling championship formed in 1988 when Jerry Lawler defeated Curt Hennig on the 9th May, 1988 for the American Wrestling Association World Heavyweight title and defeated Kerry Von Erich on the 13th December, 1988 for the World Class Championship Wrestling World... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... The WWE European Championship is an inactive title competed for in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... The WWE European Championship is a former professional wrestling title competed for in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... The World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) Intercontinental Championship is a professional wrestling championship in World Wrestling Entertainment. ... The WWE Intercontinental Championship is a professional wrestling title. ... This article is about the tag team championship that is currently defended on the RAW brand of WWE. For SmackDown!s tag team championship, see WWE Tag Team Championship. ... The World Tag Team Championship is a professional wrestling tag team title. ... Rodney Anoai (October 2, 1966 – October 23, 2000) was a Samoan-American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Yokozuna. ... David Boy (Davey Boy) Smith (November 28, 1962 – May 18, 2002) was an English professional wrestler. ... For the former Assistant Secretary of Energy for Fossil Energy, see Jeffrey D. Jarrett. ... King of the Ring is an annual World Wrestling Entertainment tournament held from 1985 to 2002. ... King of the Ring 1994 was the second annual King of the Ring professional wrestling pay-per-view (PPV) event produced by the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ... Pro Wrestling Illustrated (PWI) is a professional wrestling magazine. ... The PWI Rookie of the Year Award, given yearly since 1972 by professional wrestling magazine Pro Wrestling Illustrated, recognizes the best professional wrestler of the year who, in that year, had their first year in the business, as voted by readers of the magazine. ... The PWI Rookie of the Year Award, given yearly since 1972 by professional wrestling magazine Pro Wrestling Illustrated, recognizes the best professional wrestler of the year who, in that year, had their first year in the business, as voted by readers of the magazine. ... The PWI Feud of the Year Award, given yearly since 1986 by professional wrestling magazine Pro Wrestling Illustrated, recognizes the best feud of the year in professional wrestling as voted by readers of the magazine. ... The PWI Feud of the Year Award, given yearly since 1986 by professional wrestling magazine Pro Wrestling Illustrated, recognizes the best feud of the year in professional wrestling as voted by readers of the magazine. ... Bret Sergeant Hart (born July 2, 1957) is a retired Canadian professional wrestler and actor, and is a member of the Hart wrestling family. ... The PWI Stanley Weston Award, given yearly since 1981 by professional wrestling magazine Pro Wrestling Illustrated, recognizes lifetime achievement by a professional wrestling personality as decided by the editors of the magazine. ... The PWI Stanley Weston Award, given yearly since 1981 by professional wrestling magazine Pro Wrestling Illustrated, recognizes lifetime achievement by a professional wrestling personality as decided by the editors of the magazine. ... 1. ... David Boy (Davey Boy) Smith (November 28, 1962 – May 18, 2002) was an English professional wrestler. ... This is a list of Wrestling Observer Newsletter awards, current and defunct. ... James Henry Jim Neidhart (born August 2, 1956)[1] is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s in the World Wrestling Federation as Jim The Anvil Neidhart. ... Brian William Pillman (May 22, 1962 – October 5, 1997) was an American football player and professional wrestler best known for his appearances in the World Wrestling Federation, Extreme Championship Wrestling and World Championship Wrestling. ... Steven James Williams (born Steven Anderson on December 18, 1964)[2] better known by his ring name Stone Cold Steve Austin, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ...

See also

Professional wrestling
Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... This is a list of players who have died during their playing career. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Owen Hart Porfile. Online World Of Wrestling. Retrieved on 2008-04-27.
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  31. ^ Owen Hart gives Steve Austin a stinger.
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  42. ^ Over the Edge 1999 results. Hoffco. Retrieved on 2008-01-05.
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  57. ^ Mick Foley (1999). Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks. Regan Books. ISBN 0-06-039299-1. 
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  61. ^ Stampede Wrestling International Tag Team Title history At wrestling-titles.com
  62. ^ Stampede Wrestling Hall of Fame (1948-1990). Puroresu Dojo (2003).
  63. ^ USWA Unified World Heavyweight Title history At wrestling-titles.com

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ...

External links

Persondata
NAME Hart, Owen James
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Professional wrestler
DATE OF BIRTH May 7, 1965
PLACE OF BIRTH Calgary, Alberta, Canada
DATE OF DEATH May 23, 1999
PLACE OF DEATH Kansas City, Missouri
This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stewart Edward Stu Hart, CM (May 3, 1915 – October 16, 2003) was a Canadian amateur wrestler, professional wrestler, promoter and trainer. ... Smith Hart was a professional wrestler. ... Bruce Ambrose Edwardious Hart (born January 13, 1950) is a Canadian retired professional wrestler. ... Keith William Hart (born 1952) is a Canadian retired firefighter and professional wrestler. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dean Hart was a professional wrestler. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bret Sergeant Hart (born July 2, 1957) is a retired Canadian professional wrestler and actor, and is a member of the Hart wrestling family. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Diana Hart ( born in 1963 in Calgary, Alberta) is the youngest daughter of Canadian wrestling promoter Stu Hart and now she is the youngest living child. ... James Henry Jim Neidhart (born August 2, 1956)[1] is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s in the World Wrestling Federation as Jim The Anvil Neidhart. ... Ben Bassarab is a Canadian former professional wrestler, best known for his appearances with Stu Harts Stampede Wrestling promotion throughout the 1980s. ... David Boy (Davey Boy) Smith (November 28, 1962 – May 18, 2002) was an English professional wrestler. ... Martha Hart (born October 31, 1967) is the widow of the late professional wrestler Owen Hart, who died in May 1999. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Natalie Katherine Nattie Neidhart[1] (born May 27, 1982 in Calgary, Alberta) is a Canadian professional wrestler who is currently signed with World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE). ... Harry Smith (born August 2, 1985 His birthdate either appears to be 1985 or 1986 but accoording to his myspace profile he is 22 which would make him born in 1985. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Calgary is a city in the province of Alberta, Canada. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Owen Hart (1586 words)
Owen, the youngest son of the legendary Hart wrestling family, was probably destined to be a pro wrestler from the start....
Owen was given CPR in the ring and taken to hospital, where he was declared dead due to cardiac arrest.
Owen Hart was about to be lowered down from the ceiling to the ring for his appearance as the super hero-like Blue Blazer.
Owen Hart (3929 words)
Owen was badly beaten by Lawler as means to further dramatize his feud with the Hitman, and while Bret beat him senseless at the 1993 Summer Slam their feud continued well into the fall.
Owen was livid that Bret did not tag him when he had the chance, and he began to attack his brother’s injured knee.
Owen used his cast as a weapon for the next few months and the smell of it became a running gag in the locker room.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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