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Encyclopedia > Ovid
Ovid

Ovid as imagined in the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493.
Born March 20, 43 BC
Sulmo
Died 17 AD
Tomis
Occupation Poet

Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on many topics, including love (he is the medieval magister amoris, "master of love"), abandoned women and mythological transformations. Traditionally ranked alongside Virgil and Horace as one of the three canonical poets of Latin literature, Ovid was generally considered a great master of the elegiac couplet. His poetry, much imitated during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, had a decisive influence on European art and literature for centuries. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 478 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1356 × 1700 pixel, file size: 982 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Publius Ovidius Naso in the Nuremberg Chronicle, also known as the Liber Chronicarum This image comes from page XCIIIv [1] The Morse Library of the... Page depicting Constantinople with added hand-colouring The Nuremberg Chronicle, written in Latin and German versions by Hartmann Schedel, is one of the best documented early printed books and, appearing in 1493, is an incunabulum. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC 40 BC... View of the citys center. ... Tomi (also called Tomi) was a Greek colony in the province of Scythia on the Black Seas shore, founded around 500 BC for commercial exchanges with local Dacian populations. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Dante redirects here. ... Chaucer redirects here. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC 40 BC... Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s - 10s - 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s Years: 12 13 14 15 16 - 17 - 18 19 20 21 22 Events Tiberius deposes Antiochus III of Kommagene and appoints Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso governor of... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... For other people named Horace, see Horace (disambiguation). ... Latin literature, the body of written works in the Latin language, remains an enduring legacy of the culture of ancient Rome. ... Elegiac couplets consist of alternating lines of dactylic hexameter and pentameter: two dactyls followed by a long syllable, a caesura, then two more dactyls followed by a long syllable. ... Late Antiquity is a rough periodization (c. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ...


Ovid made use of a wide range of meters: elegiac couplets in the Amores and in his two long didactic poems, the Ars Amatoria and Remedia Amoris; the two fragments of the lost tragedy Medea are in iambic trimeter and anapests, respectively; the Metamorphoses was written in dactylic hexameter. (Dactylic hexameter is the meter of Virgil's Aeneid and of Homer's epics.) Elegiac couplets consist of alternating lines of dactylic hexameter and pentameter: two dactyls followed by a long syllable, a caesura, then two more dactyls followed by a long syllable. ... Amores are Ovids first completed book, published somewhat after 18 BC. Amores was written in the elegiac dystic. ... The Didactic is facts based as opposed to the Dialectic which is feelings based. ... The Ars Amatoria (The Art of Love) is a series of three books by the Roman poet Ovid. ... Remedia Amoris (Loves Remedy, or The Cure for Love) is a 814 line poem in Latin, written by the Roman poet Ovid. ... This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ... Iambic trimeter is an ancient metre consisting of three iambic metra (each consisting of two iambi) used in the spoken verses of the Greek tragedy and comedy. ... An anapaest is a metrical foot used in formal poetry. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... Dactyllic hexameter (also known as heroic hexameter) is a form of meter in poetry or a rhythmic scheme. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ...

Contents

Life and work

Ovid was born in Sulmo (modern Sulmona), which lies in a valley within the Apennines, east of Rome. He was born into an equestrian ranked family and was educated in Rome. His father wished him to study rhetoric with the ultimate goal of practicing law. As stated by Pliny the Elder, Ovid leaned toward the emotional side of rhetoric as opposed to the argumentative. After the death of his father, Ovid renounced law and began his travels. He traveled to Athens, Asia Minor and Sicily. He also held some minor public posts, but quickly gave them up to pursue his poetry. He was part of the circle centered around the patron Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus. He was married three times and divorced twice by the age of 30. From one marriage, he had a daughter. [1] View of the citys center. ... The Apennine Mountains (Greek: Απεννινος; Latin: Appenninus--in both cases used in the singular; Italian: Appennini) is a mountain range stretching 1000 km from the north to the south of Italy along its east coast, traversing the entire peninsula, and forming, as it were, the backbone of the country. ... An equestrian (Latin eques, plural equites - also known as a vir egregius, lit. ... Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of oral, visual, or written language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus (64 BC - AD 8) was a Roman general, author and patron of literature and art. ...


In 16 BC, the Amores were published. Book 1 of this collection of love elegy contains 15 poems, which look at the different areas of love poetry. Much of the Amores is tongue-in-cheek, and while Ovid initially appears to adhere to the standard content of his elegiac predecessors — the exclusus amator (left-out lover) and paraklausithyron (in front of a locked door) - he actually portrays himself as more than capable at love, and not particularly emotionally struck by it (unlike, for example, Propertius, who in his poems portrays himself as crushed under love's foot). He writes about adultery, which had been made illegal in Augustus's marriage reforms of 18 BC. Ovid's next poem, the Ars Amatoria, or the Art of Love, was a parody of didactic poetry and wittily focused on the arts of seduction and intrigue. It contains the first reference to the board game ludus duodecim scriptorum, a relative of modern backgammon. [2] This work is suspected to be the carmen, or song, that was one of the causes of Ovid's banishment. Amores are Ovids first completed book, published somewhat after 18 BC. Amores was written in the elegiac dystic. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Paraklausithyron. ... Sextus Aurelius Propertius was a Latin elegiac poet born between 57 BC and 46 BC in or near Mevania, who died in around 12 BC. Like Virgil and Ovid, Propertius was also a member of the poetic circle of neoteric poets which collected around Mæcenas. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... The Ars Amatoria (The Art of Love) is a series of three books by the Roman poet Ovid. ... XII scripta board in the museum at Ephesus Ludus duodecim scriptorum, or XII scripta, was a tables game popular during the time of the Roman Empire. ... Backgammon is a board game for two players in which the playing pieces[1] are moved according to the roll of dice. ...


By 8 AD, Ovid had completed his most famous work: Metamorphoses, an epic poem drawing on Greek mythology. The poem's subject, as the author indicates at the outset, is "forms changed into new bodies". From the emergence of the cosmos from formless mass into the organized material world to the deification of Julius Caesar many chapters later, the poem weaves tales of transformation. The stories are woven one after the other by the telling of humans transformed into new bodies — trees, rocks, animals, flowers, constellations and so forth. Many famous myths are recounted such as Apollo and Daphne, Orpheus and Eurydice and Pygmalion. It offers an explanation to many alluded myths in other works. It is also a valuable source for those attempting to piece together Roman religion, as many of the characters in the book are Olympian gods or their offspring. Disambiguation: This article is about the poem Metamorphoses written by the poet Ovid. ... In mathematics, see epic morphism. ... Apotheosis - the posthumous transformation of a Roman emperor into a god, Theosis - being unified with God in East Orthodox theology of salvation, Assigning divine qualities to any mortal and, usually, worshipping that person as if they were a supernatural being. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... This article is about the star grouping. ... Apollo and Daphne is a story from ancient Greek mythology, retold by Hellenistic and Roman authors in the form of an amorous vignette; Thomas Bulfinch drew on those late sources in the following manner: Daphne was Apollo’s first love. ... The head of Orpheus, from an 1865 painting by Gustave Moreau. ... Étienne Maurice Falconet: Pygmalion & Galatee (1763) Pygmalion is a legendary figure found in Ovids Metamorphoses. ... This article is about the Greek mountain. ...


Augustus banished Ovid in 8 AD to Tomis on the Black Sea for reasons that remain mysterious. Ovid himself wrote of his crime that it was carmen et error — "a poem and a mistake."[3] He claimed that this crime was worse than murder[4] and caused more harm than poetry.[5] The error Ovid made is believed to have been political in nature — possibly he had knowledge of a plot against Augustus, or stumbled into some sensitive state secret.[6] Augustus' grandchildren, Agrippa Postumus and Julia the Younger, had been banished around the same time as Ovid and Julia's husband, Lucius Aenilius Paullus, was executed after a conspiracy against Augustus. Ovid may have had knowledge about this conspiracy. Because Julia the Younger and Ovid were exiled in the same year, some suspect that he was somehow involved in her alleged affair with Decimus Silanus. Still, Ovid only moved on the perimeter of Julia's circle, suggesting that reports that he seduced Julia or facilitated her affairs is likely romantic hearsay.[7] The Julian Marriage Laws of 18 BC were still fresh in the minds of Romans; these laws promoted monogamous, marital sexual relations in Rome to increase the population, but Ovid's works concerned adultery, which was punishable by severe penalties, including banishment. For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Tomi (also called Tomi) was a Greek colony in the province of Scythia on the Black Seas shore, founded around 500 BC for commercial exchanges with local Dacian populations. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa Postumus, (12 BC-14 AD) also known as Agrippa Postumus or Postumus Agrippa, was a son of Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and Julia the Elder. ... Julia Minor or the Younger or Julilia (little Julia) (Classical Latin: IVLIA•MINOR,[1] 19 BC-28 or early 29) was the eldest daughter of Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and Julia the Elder and as such Emperor Augustus granddaughter through her mother). ... Lucius Aemilius Lepidus Paullus (d. ... In a political sense, conspiracy refers to a group of persons united in the goal of usurping or overthrowing an established political power. ... Decimus Silanus was an ancient Roman of the 2nd century BC. He was of noble family and was an expert in Punic language and literature. ... Faithfulness redirects here. ... This article is about the act of adultery. ...


It was during this period of exile — more properly known as a relegation — that Ovid wrote two more collections of poems, called Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto, which illustrate his sadness and desolation. Being far away from Rome, Ovid had no chance to research in libraries and thus was forced to abandon his work Fasti. Even though he was friendly with the natives of Tomis and may have wrote poems in their language, he still pined for Rome and his beloved third wife. Many of the poems are addressed to her, but also to Augustus, whom he calls Caesar and sometimes God, to himself, and even sometimes to the poems themselves, which expresses his heart-felt solitude. The famous first two lines of the Tristia demonstrate the poet's misery from the start: Tristia (Sorrows) is a work of poetry written by the Roman poet Ovid some time after 8AD, during his exile from Rome. ... Epistulae ex Ponto (Letters from the Black Sea) is a work of Ovid, in four books. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Caesar (plural Caesars), Latin: Cæsar (plural Cæsares), is a title of imperial character. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...

Parve – nec invideo – sine me, liber, ibis in urbem:
ei mihi, quod domino non licet ire tuo!
Little book – and I won't hinder you – go on to the city without me:
Alas for me, because your master is not allowed to go!

Ovid died at Tomis after nearly 10 years of banishment. He is commemorated today by a statue in the Romanian city of Constanţa (modern name of Tomis) and the 1930 renaming of the nearby town of Ovidiu, alleged location of his tomb. The Latin text on the statue says (Tr. 3.3.73-76): County ConstanÅ£a Mayor Radu Åžtefan Mazăre Area 124. ...

Hic ego qui iaceo tenerorum lusor amorum
Ingenio perii, Naso poeta, meo.
At tibi qui transis, ne sit grave, quisquis amasti,
Dicere: Nasonis molliter ossa cubent.
Here I lie, who played with tender loves,
Naso the poet, killed by my own talent.
O passerby, if you've ever been in love, let it not be too much for you
to say: May the bones of Naso lie gently.

(Ovid's nickname was Nasus, "The Nose" — a pun on his cognomen, Naso.) EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... The cognomen (name known by in English) was originally the third name of a Roman in the Roman naming convention. ...


Assessment

R. J. Tarrant offers the following assessment for the importance of Ovid:

From his own time until the end of Antiquity Ovid was among the most widely read and imitated of Latin poets; his greatest work, the Metamorphoses, also seems to have enjoyed the largest popularity. What place Ovid may have had in the curriculum of ancient schools is hard to determine: no body of antique scholia survives for any of his works, but it seems likely that the elegance of his style and his command of rhetorical technique would have commended him as a school author, perhaps at the elementary level.[8]

Works

Engraved frontispiece of George Sandys' 1632 London edition of Ovids Metamorphoses Englished.
Engraved frontispiece of George Sandys' 1632 London edition of Ovids Metamorphoses Englished.

Download high resolution version (678x942, 298 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (678x942, 298 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... George Sandys (March 2, 1578 - 1644), English traveller, colonist and poet, the seventh and youngest son of Edwin Sandys, archbishop of York. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

Extant works generally considered authentic (with approximate dates of publication)

  • Amores ("The Loves"), five books, published 10 BC and revised into three books ca. 1 AD.
  • Metamorphoses, ("Transformations"), 15 books. Published ca. AD 8.
  • Medicamina Faciei Feminae ("Women's Facial Cosmetics"), also known as The Art of Beauty, 100 lines surviving. Published ca. 5 BC.
  • Remedia Amoris ("The Cure for Love"), 1 book. Published 5 BC.
  • Heroides ("The Heroines"), also known as Epistulae Heroidum ("Letters of Heroines"), 21 letters. Letters 1–5 published 5 BC; letters 16–21 were composed ca. AD 4–8.
  • Ars Amatoria ("The Art of Love"), three books. First two books published 2 BC, the third somewhat later.
  • Fasti ("The Festivals"), 6 books extant which cover the first 6 months of the year, providing unique information on the Roman calendar. Finished by AD 8, possibly published in AD 15.
  • Ibis, a single poem. Written ca. 9 AD.
  • Tristia ("Sorrows"), five books. Published 10 AD.
  • Epistulae ex Ponto ("Letters from the Black Sea"), four books. Published 10 AD.

Amores are Ovids first completed book, published somewhat after 18 BC. Amores was written in the elegiac dystic. ... Disambiguation: This article is about the poem Metamorphoses written by the poet Ovid. ... Remedia Amoris (Loves Remedy, or The Cure for Love) is a 814 line poem in Latin, written by the Roman poet Ovid. ... Heroides (The Heroines) or Epistulae Heroidum (Letters of Heroines) was a work composed by Ovid in 5 BC. It is composed of fifteen fictional letters as if written by mythological heroines of antiquity grieving over their lovers mistreatment or neglect. ... The Ars Amatoria (The Art of Love) is a series of three books by the Roman poet Ovid. ... Ovids Fasti is a long, unfinished Latin poem by the Roman poet Ovid. ... The Roman calendar changed its form several times in the time between the foundation of Rome and the fall of the Roman Empire. ... Ibis is a single extant poem written in hexameter by the Roman poet Ovid. ... Tristia (Sorrows) is a work of poetry written by the Roman poet Ovid some time after 8AD, during his exile from Rome. ... Epistulae ex Ponto (Letters from the Black Sea) is a work of Ovid, in four books. ...

Lost works, or works generally considered spurious

  • Consolatio ad Liviam ("Consolation to Livia")
  • Halieutica ("On Fishing") — generally considered spurious, a poem that some have identified with the otherwise lost poem of the same name written by Ovid.
  • Medea, a lost tragedy about Medea
  • Nux ("The Walnut Tree")
  • A volume of poems in Getic, the language of Dacia where Ovid lived in exile, not extant (and possibly fictional).

This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ... Getae (singular Geton) was the name by which ancient Greek writers referred to the tribes later known as the Dacians. ... For other uses, see Dacia (disambiguation). ...

Works and artists inspired by Ovid

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:

See the website "Ovid illustrated: the Renaissance reception of Ovid in image and Text" for many more Renaissance examples. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...


Dante mentions him twice: For other uses, see Troubadour (disambiguation). ... Court of Love in Provence in the 14th Century (after a manuscript in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris). ... Mirth and Gladness lead a Dance in this miniature from a manuscript of the Roman de la Rose in the Bodleian Library (MS Douce 364, folio 8r). ... From the c. ... Chaucer redirects here. ... Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi, better known as Sandro Botticelli (little barrel) (March 1, 1445 – May 17, 1510) was an Italian painter of the Florentine school during the Early Renaissance (Quattrocento). ... This article is about the English dramatist. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... John Marston (October 7, 1576 - June 25, 1634) was an English poet, playwright and satirist during the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini (Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini; December 7, 1598 – November 28, 1680) was a pre-eminent Baroque sculptor and architect of 17th century Rome. ... Poussin redirects here. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... The ODESSA, which stands for the German phrase Organisation der ehemaligen SS-Angehörigen, which phrase in turn translates as “Organization of Former Members of the SS,” is the name commonly given to an international Nazi network alleged to have been set up towards the end of World War II... Pushkin redirects here. ... An epistle (Greek επιστολη, epistolē, letter) is a writing directed or sent to a person or group of persons, usually a letter and a very formal, often didactic and elegant one. ... For other uses of Moldavia or Moldova, see Moldova (disambiguation). ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a semi-autobiographical novel by James Joyce, first serialized in The Egoist from 1914 to 1915 and published in book form in 1916. ... Stephen Dedalus was James Joyces early pen name and the name of the main character of his early novel Stephen Hero. ... Stephen Hero is part of the now mostly-lost first draft of James Joyces first novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... Osip Mandelstam Osip Emilyevich Mandelstam (also spelled Mandelshtam) (Russian: ) (January 15 [O.S. January 3] 1891 – December 27, 1938) was a Jewish Russian poet and essayist, one of the foremost members of the Acmeist school of poets. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For other uses, see October Revolution (disambiguation). ... Britten redirects here. ... For other uses, see Oboe (disambiguation). ... David Malouf David Malouf (born March 20, 1934) in Brisbane is an Australian writer whose themes encompass Australian history and the Australian landscape. ... An Imaginary Life is a 1978 novella written by David Malouf. ... Tomi (also called Tomi) was a Greek colony in the province of Scythia on the Black Seas shore, founded around 500 BC for commercial exchanges with local Dacian populations. ... Anne Rice (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ... Gaius Marius (Latin: C·MARIVS·C·F·C·N)¹ (157 BC - January 13, 86 BC) was a Roman general and politician elected Consul an unprecedented seven times during his career. ... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ...

De vulgari eloquentia (On Vernacular Speech) is the title of an important essay by Dante Alighieri, written in Latin and initially meant to consist in four books, but aborted after the second. ... Marcus Annaeus Lucanus (November 3, AD 39-April 30, 65), better known in English as Lucan, was a Roman poet, and is one of the outstanding figures of the Silver Latin period. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Publius Papinius Statius, (c. ... Dante shown holding a copy of the Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelinos fresco. ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... For other people named Horace, see Horace (disambiguation). ... Marcus Annaeus Lucanus (November 3, AD 39-April 30, 65), better known in English as Lucan, was a Roman poet, and is one of the outstanding figures of the Silver Latin period. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ...

Retellings, adaptations and translations of his actual works

Apollo et Hyacinthus is an opera, K.38, written in 1767 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who was 11 years old at the time. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Oboe (disambiguation). ... Britten redirects here. ... Orphée (also known as Orpheus) is a 1949 movie directed by Jean Cocteau starring Jean Marais. ... Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (5 July 1889 – 11 October 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ... For other uses, see Orpheus (disambiguation). ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... Christoph Ransmayr (born 20 March 1954) is an Austrian writer. ... Naomi Iizuka is a playwright. ... Michael Hofmann (born 1957, Freiburg, West Germany) is a German poet and award-winning translator. ... James Lasdun (born 1958 in London) is a writer and academic who currently lives in upstate New York. ... This article or section should include material from Tristia For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Portrait of the poet Ovid Publius Ovidius Naso, (March 20, 43 BC – AD 17) Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women, and mythological transformations. ... 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, West Yorkshire, where Ted Hughes was born. ... Mary Zimmerman is a member of the Lookingglass Theatre Company and is an Artistic Associate of the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, Illinois. ... Patricia Barber Patricia Barber, born in 1956, is an American jazz singer, pianist, and bandleader. ... Mythologies is the title of a book by Roland Barthes (ISBN 0374521506), published in 1957. ...

See also

Literature Portal

// Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... Latin literature, the body of written works in the Latin language, remains an enduring legacy of the culture of ancient Rome. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.jstor.org/view/00173835/ap020138/02a00070/0
  2. ^ http://www.jstor.org/view/00173835/ap020010/02a00040/6?frame=frame&[email protected]/01c0a8346900501d717b8&dpi=3&config=jstor
  3. ^ Ovid, Tristia 2.207
  4. ^ Ovid, Epistulae ex Ponto 2.9.72
  5. ^ Ovid, Epistulae ex Ponto 3.3.72
  6. ^ Norwood, Frances, "The Riddle of Ovid's Relegatio", Classical Philogy (1963) p. 158
  7. ^ Alan H.F. Griffin, Ovid's 'Metamorphoses', Greece & Rome, 2nd Ser., Vol. 24, No. 1. (Apr., 1977), p. 58.
  8. ^ R. J. Tarrant, "Ovid" in Texts and Transmission: A Survey of the Latin Classics (Oxford, 1983), p. 257.
  9. ^ Talkin' Broadway Review: Metamorphoses
  • Ovid Renewed: Ovidian Influences on Literature and Art from the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century. Ed. Charles Martindale. Cambridge, 1988.
  • Federica Bessone. P. Ovidii Nasonis Heroidum Epistula XII: Medea Iasoni. Florence: Felice Le Monnier, 1997. Pp. 324.
  • Theodor Heinze. P. Ovidius Naso. Der XII. Heroidenbrief: Medea an Jason. Mit einer Beilage: Die Fragmente der Tragodie Medea. Einleitung, Text & Kommentar. Mnemosyne Supplement 170 Leiden: Brill, 1997. Pp. xi + 288.
  • R. A. Smith. Poetic Allusion and Poetic Embrace in Ovid and Virgil. Ann Arbor; The University of Michigan Press, 1997. Pp.ix+ 226.
  • Michael Simpson, The Metamorphoses of Ovid. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2001. Pp. 498.
  • Philip Hardie (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ovid. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Pp. xvi, 408.
  • Ovid's Fasti: Historical Readings at its Bimillennium. Edited by Geraldine Herbert-Brown. Oxford, OUP, 2002, 327 pp.
  • Susanne Gippert, Joseph Addison's Ovid: An Adaptation of the Metamorphoses in the Augustan Age of English Literature. Die Antike und ihr Weiterleben, Band 5. Remscheid: Gardez! Verlag, 2003. Pp. 304.
  • Heather van Tress, Poetic Memory. Allusion in the Poetry of Callimachus and the Metamorphoses of Ovid. Mnemosyne, Supplementa 258. Leiden: Brill, 2004. Pp. ix, 215.
  • Ziolkowski, Theodore, Ovid and the Moderns. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005. Pp. 262.
  • Desmond, Marilynn, Ovid's Art and the Wife of Bath: The Ethics of Erotic Violence. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2006. Pp. 232.
  • Rimell, Victoria, Ovid's Lovers: Desire, Difference, and the Poetic Imagination. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Pp. 235.
  • Pugh, Syrithe, Spenser and Ovid. Burlington: Ashgate, 2005. Pp. 302.
  • Pasco-Pranger, Molly, Founding the Year: Ovid's Fasti and the Poetics of the Roman Calendar. Mnemosyne Suppl., 276. Leiden: Brill, 2006. Pp. 326.
  • Martin Amann, Komik in den Tristien Ovids. (Schweizerische Beitra+ge zur Altertumswissenschaft, 31). Basel: Schwabe Verlag, 2006. Pp. 296.
  • P. J. Davis, Ovid & Augustus: A political reading of Ovid's erotic poems. London: Duckworth, 2006. Pp. 183.
  • Peter E. Knox (ed.), Oxford Readings in Ovid. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Pp. 541.
  • Andreas N. Michalopoulos, Ovid Heroides 16 and 17. Introduction, text and commentary. (ARCA: Classical and Medieval Texts, Papers and Monographs, 47). Cambridge: Francis Cairns, 2006. Pp. x, 409.
  • R. Gibson, S. Green, S. Sharrock, The Art of Love: Bimillennial Essays on Ovid's Ars Amatoria and Remedia Amoris. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Pp. 375.
  • Desmond, Marilynn. Ovid's Art and the Wife of Bath: The Ethics of Erotic Violence. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2006. Pp. xiii, 206.
  • Montuschi, Claudia, Il tempo in Ovidio. Funzioni, meccanismi, strutture. Accademia la colombaria studi, 226. Firenze: Leo S. Olschki, 2005. Pp. 463.
  • Johnson, Patricia J. Ovid before Exile: Art and Punishment in the Metamorphoses. (Wisconsin Studies in Classics). Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press, 2008. Pp. x, 184.

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Ovid
Persondata
NAME Ovid
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Roman poet
DATE OF BIRTH March 20, 43 BC
PLACE OF BIRTH Sulmo
DATE OF DEATH 17 AD
PLACE OF DEATH Tomis

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Metamorphoses - Ovid's Mythological Transformations or Metamorphoses (320 words)
Ovid's history of the world tells the stories of mythological figures who have undergone transformations; hence the title, Metamorphoses.
In the Metamorphoses (of Transformations) if Ovid, one of Midusmmer Night's Dream-like stories within a story is about the fulfillment of the transgendered blind seer Tiresias' prophecies.
Shakespeare owed a debt to Ovid's Metamorphoses in his Midsummer Night's Dream.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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