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Encyclopedia > Oval
This oval, with only one axis of symmetry, resembles a chicken egg.
This oval, with only one axis of symmetry, resembles a chicken egg.
An oval with two axes of symmetry.
An oval with two axes of symmetry.

In geometry, an oval or ovoid (from Latin ovum, 'egg') is any curve resembling an egg or an ellipse. Unlike other curves, the term 'oval' is not well-defined and many distinct curves are commonly called ovals. These curves have in common that: Image File history File links Oval1. ... Image File history File links Oval1. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... In mathematics, the concept of a curve tries to capture the intuitive idea of a geometrical one-dimensional and continuous object. ... An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... For other uses, see Ellipse (disambiguation). ...

The word ovoidal refers to the characteristic of being an ovoid. In mathematics, the concept of a curve tries to capture the intuitive idea of a geometrical one-dimensional and continuous object. ... In mathematics, the concept of a curve tries to capture the intuitive idea of a geometrical one-dimensional and continuous object. ... Look up Convex set in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In mathematics, the concept of a curve tries to capture the intuitive idea of a geometrical one-dimensional and continuous object. ... In mathematics, the concept of a curve tries to capture our intuitive idea of a geometrical one-dimensional and continuous object. ... Shape (OE. sceap Eng. ... Circle illustration This article is about the shape and mathematical concept of circle. ... For other uses, see Ellipse (disambiguation). ... The axis of symmetry of a two-dimensional figure is a line such that, if a perpendicular is constructed, any two points lying on the perpendicular at equal distances from the axis of symmetry are identical. ...


Other examples of ovals described elsewhere include:

A track is known as a stadium, and is actually not a rounded rectangle. In mathematics, a Cassini oval is a set of points in the plane such that each point p on the oval bears a special relation to two other, fixed points q1 and q2, namely that the product is constant. ... In mathematics, an elliptic curve is a plane curve defined by an equation of the form y2 = x3 + a x + b, which is non-singular; that is, its graph has no cusps or self-intersections. ... Squircle, the superellipse for n = 4, a = b = 1, approximates a chamfered square. ...


Egg shape

The shape of an egg is approximately that of half each a prolate (long) and roughly spherical (potentially even minorly oblate/short) ellipsoid joined at the equator, sharing a principal axis of rotational symmetry, as illustrated above. Although the term egg-shaped usually implies a lack of reflection symmetry across the equatorial plane, it may also refer to true prolate ellipsoids. It can also be used to describe the 2-dimensional figure that, revolved around its major axis, produces the 3-dimensional surface. An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... A spheroid is a quadric surface in three dimensions obtained by rotating an ellipse about one of its principal axes. ... An oblate spheroid is ellipsoid having a shorter axis and two equal longer axes. ... 3D rendering of an ellipsoid In mathematics, an ellipsoid is a type of quadric that is a higher dimensional analogue of an ellipse. ... In mathematics, particularly linear algebra and functional analysis, the spectral theorem is a collection of results about linear operators or about matrices. ... The triskelion appearing on the Isle of Man flag. ... Figures with the axes of symmetry drawn in. ... In geometry, the semi-major axis (also semimajor axis) a applies to ellipses and hyperbolas. ...


Projective planes

In the theory of projective planes, oval is used to mean a set of q + 1 non-collinear points in PG(2,q), the projective plane over the finite field with q elements. See oval (projective plane). Projective plane - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A line, or straight line, is, roughly speaking, an (infinitely) thin, (infinitely) long, straight geometrical object, i. ... In abstract algebra, a finite field or Galois field (so named in honor of Évariste Galois) is a field that contains only finitely many elements. ... In PG(2,q), with q a prime power, an oval is a set of points, no three of which are collinear. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Inside the Oval Office (335 words)
The Oval Office is the president's formal workspace, where he confers with heads of state, diplomats, his staff, and other dignitaries; where he often addresses the American public and the world on television or radio; and where he deals with the issues of the day.
The first Oval Office was built in 1909 in the center of the south side of the West Wing; in 1934 it was moved to its current location on the southeast corner, overlooking the Rose Garden.
Among the features that remain constant are the white marble mantel from the original 1909 Oval Office, the presidential seal in the ceiling, and the two flags behind the president's desk--the U.S. flag and the President's flag.
Life in the Oval Office (426 words)
The Oval Office was different from the office of President Theodore Roosevelt, who built the West Wing in 1902.
Taft intended to be the center of his administration, and by creating the Oval Office in the center of the West Wing, he was more involved with the day-to-day operation of his presidency than were his recent predecessors.
The Oval Office became a symbol of strength and reassurance the evening of September 11, 2001, when President George W. Bush delivered comforting words through a televised address from the Oval Office.
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