FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Outlaw" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Outlaw
Western American outlaw as depicted in the The Great Train Robbery (1903 film)
Western American outlaw as depicted in the The Great Train Robbery (1903 film)

An outlaw or bandit is a person living the lifestyle of outlawry; the word literally means "outside the law",[1] by folk-etymology from the original meaning "laid outside" of the Old Norse word útlagi, from which the word outlaw was borrowed into English.[2] In the common law of England, a judgment declaring someone an outlaw, known as a "Writ of Outlawry", was one of the harshest penalties in the legal system, since the outlaw could not use the legal system to protect himself if needed, such as from mob justice.[3] An outlaw is a person living outside the law. ... Great Train Robbery still, public domain film Public domain film, from [1] The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Great Train Robbery still, public domain film Public domain film, from [1] The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States. ... The Great Train Robbery is a 1903 western film. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... Ochlocracy (Greek: οχλοκρατια; Latin: ochlocratia) is government by mob or a disorganized mass of people. ...


Though the judgment of outlawry is now obsolete (even though it inspired the pro forma Outlawries Bill which is still to this day introduced in the British House of Commons during the State Opening of Parliament), romanticised outlaws became stock characters in several fictional settings, particularly in Western movies. Thus, "outlaw" is still commonly used to mean those violating the law[4] or, by extension, those living that lifestyle, whether actual criminals evading the law or those merely opposed to "law-and-order" notions of conformity and authority (such as the "outlaw country" music movement in the 1970s). The Outlawries Bill (or, by its long title, A Bill for the more effectual preventing clandestine Outlawries) is customarily introduced in the United Kingdoms House of Commons at the start of each session of Parliament. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... In the United Kingdom, the State Opening of Parliament is an annual event held usually in October or November that marks the commencement of a session of Parliament. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Broncho Billy Anderson, from The Great Train Robbery The Western movie is one of the classic American film genres. ... Willie Nelson Outlaw country was a significant trend in country music during the late 1960s and the 1970s (and even into the 1980s in some cases), commonly referred to as The Outlaw Movement (both by fans and by people in the music industry) or simply Outlaw music [1]. The focus...

Contents

A feature of older legal systems

In British common law, an outlaw was a person who had defied the laws of the realm, by such acts as ignoring a summons to court, or fleeing instead of appearing to plead when charged with a crime. In the earlier law of Anglo-Saxon England, outlawry was also declared when a person committed a homicide and could not pay the weregild, the blood-money, due to the victim's kin. Outlawry also existed in other legal codes of the time, such as the ancient Norse and Icelandic legal code. These societies did not have any police force or prisons and criminal sentences were therefore restricted to either fines or outlawry. This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... A summons is a legal document issued by a court (a judicial summons) or by an administrative agency of government (an administrative summons) for various purposes. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Homicide (Latin homicidium, homo human being + caedere to cut, kill) refers to the act of killing another human being. ... Look up wergeld in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Norse is an adjective relating things to Denmark, Norway, Iceland and Sweden. ...


To be declared an outlaw was to suffer a form of civil or social[5] death. The outlaw was debarred from all civilized society. No one was allowed to give him food, shelter, or any other sort of support — to do so was to commit the crime of aiding and abetting, and to be in danger of the ban oneself. An outlaw might be killed with impunity; and it was not only lawful but meritorious to kill a thief flying from justice — to do so was not murder. A man who slew a thief was expected to declare the fact without delay, otherwise the dead man’s kindred might clear his name by their oath and require the slayer to pay weregild as for a true man[6] Because the outlaw has defied civil society, that society was quit of any obligations to the outlaw —outlaws had no civil rights, could not sue in any court on any cause of action, though they were themselves personally liable. Civil death is a term that refers to the loss of all or almost all civil rights by a person due to a conviction for a felony or due to an act by the government of a country that results in the loss of civil rights. ... Social death is a term used to describe the condition of people not accepted as fully human by wider society. ... At law, an accomplice is a person who actively participates in the commission of a crime, even though they take no part in the actual criminal offence. ...


In the context of criminal law, outlawry faded not so much by legal changes as by the greater population density of the country, which made it harder for wanted fugitives to evade capture; and by the international adoption of extradition pacts. In the civil context, outlawry became obsolescent in civil procedure by reforms that no longer required summoned defendants to appear and plead. Still, the possibility of being declared an outlaw for derelictions of civil duty continued to exist in English law until 1879 and in Scots law until the late 1940s. The Third Reich made extensive use of the concept.[7] Prior to the Nuremberg Trials, the British jurist Lord Chancellor Lord Simon attempted to resurrect the concept of outlawry in order to provide for summary executions of captured Nazi war criminals. Although Simon's point of view was supported by Winston Churchill, American and Soviet attorneys insisted on a trial, and he was thus overruled.. The term criminal law, sometimes called penal law, refers to any of various bodies of rules in different jurisdictions whose common characteristic is the potential for unique and often severe impositions as punishment for failure to comply. ... Extradition is the official process by which one nation or state requests and obtains from another nation or state the surrender of a suspected or convicted criminal. ... Civil procedure is the body of law that sets out the process that courts will follow when hearing cases of a civil nature (a civil action, as opposed to a criminal action). ... A defendant or defender is any party who is required to answer the complaint of a plaintiff or pursuer in a civil lawsuit before a court, or any party who has been formally charged or accused of violating a criminal statute. ... This article is about civil law within the common law legal system. ... Scots law is a unique legal system with an ancient basis in Roman law. ... For the 1947 Soviet film about the trials, see Nuremberg Trials (film). ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... John Allsebrook Simon, 1st Viscount Simon GCSI GCVO OBE PC (1873-1954) was a British politician and statesman. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Churchill redirects here. ...


Hobsbawm's Bandits

The colloquial sense of an outlaw as bandit or brigand is the subject of a colourful monograph by Eric Hobsbawm[8]. According to Hobsbawm Eric John Ernest Hobsbawm CH (born June 9, 1917) is a British Marxist historian and author. ...

The point about social bandits is that they are peasant outlaws whom the lord and state regard as criminals, but who remain within peasant society, and are considered by their people as heroes, as champions, avengers, fighters for justice, perhaps even leaders of liberation, and in any case as men to be admired, helped and supported. This relation between the ordinary peasant and the rebel, outlaw and robber is what makes social banditry interesting and significant...........Social banditry of this kind is one of the most universal social phenomena known to history.

Hobsbawm's book discusses the bandit as a symbol, and mediated idea, and many of the outlaws he refers to, such as Ned Kelly, Mr. Dick Turpin, and Billy the Kid, are also listed below..


Famous outlaws

The stereotype owes a great deal to English folklore precedents, in the tales of Robin Hood and of gallant highwaymen. But outlawry was once a term of art in the law, and one of the harshest judgments that could be pronounced on anyone's head. For other uses, see Stereotype (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people traveling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... Jargon redirects here. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... A judgment or judgement (see spelling note below), in a legal context, is synonymous with the formal decision made by a court following a lawsuit. ...


The outlaw is familiar to contemporary readers as an archetype in Western movies, depicting the lawless expansionism period of the United States in the late 19th century. The Western outlaw is typically a criminal who operates from a base in the wilderness, and opposes, attacks or disrupts the fragile institutions of new settlements. By the time of the Western frontier, many jurisdictions had abolished the process of outlawry, and the term was used in its more popular meaning. Broncho Billy Anderson, from The Great Train Robbery The Western movie is one of the classic American film genres. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... for other uses please see Crime (disambiguation) A crime is an act that violates a political or moral law. ... For other uses, see Wilderness (disambiguation). ...


American Western

See also: List of Western Outlaws

This is a list of known outlaws and others of the American frontier popularly known as the Wild West. Because many of those listed have been wanted by authorities at one time or another such as former horse thief Wyatt Earp or Marshal turned outlaw Burt Alvord they have been... Joaquin Murietta (sometimes spelled Murieta or Murrieta) (b. ... Categories: People stubs | 1870 births | 1957 deaths | Criminals ... William Clark Quantrill of Quantrills Raiders William Clarke Quantrill (July 31, 1837 – June 6, 1865), was a Confederate guerrilla leader during the American Civil War. ... Killer Jim Miller, far left, wearing black hat, hangs from a livery stable rafter after lynching in Ada, Oklahoma, 1909 James B. Killer Miller, (b. ... Sam Bass Sam Bass (21 July 1851–21 July 1878) was a nineteenth-century American train robber and western icon. ... Harvey Logan, alias Kid Curry. ... Butch Cassidy (13 April 1866 - c. ... For other uses, see Billy the Kid (disambiguation). ... Jesse Woodson James (September 5, 1847–April 3, 1882) was an American outlaw, the most famous member of the James-Younger gang. ... For other people named Frank James, see Frank James (disambiguation). ... A wounded Cole Younger, after his arrest in 1876 Cole Younger as a younger man Thomas Coleman Younger (January 15, 1844 – March 21, 1916) was a famous Confederate guerrilla and an outlaw after the American Civil War. ... Wood engraving from The National Police Gazette. ... Thomas Edward Ketchum Ketchum Thomas Edward Ketchum, (October 31, 1863 - April 26, 1901) also known as Black Jack was at first an ordinary cowboy and cattle driver who later turned to a life of crime. ... Charles E. Bolles, also known as Black Bart Charles Earl Bolles (1829–Disappeared 1888–1917?), alias Black Bart, was an American Old West outlaw noted for his poetic messages left after each robbery. ... John Daly (1839-February 1864) was a western outlaw and leader of the Daly Gang. ... Tiburcio Vasquez Tiburcio Vasquez (August 11, 1839–March 19, 1875) was a Mexican bandit who was active in California from as early as 1857 to his last capture in 1874. ...

American Great Depression

For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... John Dillinger (June 22, 1903 – July 22, 1934) was an American bank robber, considered by some to be a dangerous criminal, while others idealized him as a latter-day Robin Hood. ... This article is about the outlaws. ... Kate Ma Barker (October 8, 1871 - January 16, 1935) was a legendary American criminal from the public enemy era, when the exploits of gangs of criminals in the Midwest gripped the American people and press. ...

Argentinian

See also: Rural Bandits
  • Juan Bautista Bailoretto
  • Butch Cassidy
  • Segundo David Peralta
  • Gaucho Gil

Butch Cassidy (13 April 1866 - c. ...

Australian

For other uses, see Ned Kelly (disambiguation). ... Martin Cash Martin Cash (c. ... For the actor, see Ben Hall (actor). ... Frank Gardiner (Born 1829, Rosshire Scotland - Died c. ... Frederick Ward Frederick Wordsworth Ward (aka Captain Thunderbolt) (1833–25 May 1870) was an Australian bushranger renowned for escaping from Cockatoo Island with the help of his wife Mary Ann Bugg, and for committing over 200 crimes over six and a half years across the northern section of the state... John Fuller (aka Dan Morgan) was an Australian bushranger. ... Jack the Rammer aka Billy the Rammer was a bushranger in the Monaro District near Cooma in New South Wales during the latter half of 1834. ... Mary Ann Bugg (1842? - November 11, 1867) was one of two notable female bushrangers, who lived during the early 1800s. ... Moondyne Joe Joseph Bolitho Johns (c. ... William Westwood (Jackey Jackey) (Born Manuden, Essex, England, 1 August 1821 - Hanged 1846, Norfolk Island) a noted Australian bushranger of the 19th century who was transported to Australia in 1837. ... William Westwood (Jackey Jackey) (Born Manuden, Essex, England, 1 August 1821 - Hanged 1846, Norfolk Island) a noted Australian bushranger of the 19th century who was transported to Australia in 1837. ...

British

John Nevison (1639 – 4 May 1684) (also known as William Nevison) was one of Britains most notorious highwaymen, a gentleman-rogue supposedly nicknamed Swift Nick by King Charles II after a renowned dash from Kent to York (often wrongly attributed to Dick Turpin, though there are suggestions that the... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people traveling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... For the British television series, see Dick Turpin (TV series). ... Captain James MacLaine (occasionally Maclean, MacLean, or Maclane) (1724 – 3 October 1750) was a notorious highwayman with his accomplice William Plunkett. ... Tom King (born ? - died circa 1737) was an English highwayman who opererated in the Essex and London areas. ... Alexander Sawney Bean (or Beane) was the legendary patron head of a cannibalistic family in Scotland in the 15th century. ... Edgar Ætheling[1], also known as Edgar the Outlaw, (c. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Folville Cross, said to mark the site of Sir Roger Belleres murder in 1326. ... Adam the Leper was the leader of a fourteenth-century robber band, operating in the south west of England in the 1330s and 1340s. ... For other persons named William Wallace, see William Wallace (disambiguation). ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Robert Roy MacGregor, usually known simply as Rob Roy, was a Scottish folk hero and outlaw of the 18th century. ... Twm Siôn Cati (Welsh form, anglicised as Twm Sion Cati, Twm Shon Catti, Twm Shon Catty and so on) is a figure in Welsh folklore, often described as the Welsh Robin Hood. ... The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ... Captain James Hind depicted in a painting now in the National portrait Gallery Captain James Hind (sometimes referred to as John Hind) (baptised 1616 - 1652) was a 17th century highwayman (who is said to have only robbed Parliamentarians) and Royalist rabble rouser during the English Civil War. ... Claude Duval (1643 – January 21, 1670) was a French-born gentleman highwayman in post-Restoration Britain. ...

East Asian

Zhang Xianzhong or Chang Hsien-chung (張獻忠) (1606 – 2nd January 1647), nicknamed Yellow Tiger, was a Chinese rebel leader, who conquered Sichuan Province in the middle of the 17th century. ... Sichuan (Chinese: 四川; pinyin: Sìchuān; Wade-Giles: Ssu-ch`uan; non-standard transliteration: Szechwan) is a province in central-western China with its capital at Chengdu. ... Song Jiang (宋江) was the leader of a bandit group in the 12th century, during the Song Dynasty. ... It has been suggested that Guo Shiguang be merged into this article or section. ... Hong Gildong is a fictitious character in an old Korean novel, The story of Hong Gildong (홍길동전; 洪吉童傳; Hong Gil-dong-jeon), written in the Joseon Dynasty. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nezumi Kozō (鼠小僧) was the nickname of one Jirokichi (次郎吉 d. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Wong. ...

Irish

Gráinne Ní Mháille (c. ... Redmond OHanlon (c. ... Naoise OHaughan (also known as Neesy, Ness and Nessie) was a well-known highwayman in County Antrim, Northern Ireland in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. ... Tiger Roche, (1729 – ?[1]) was a celebrated soldier, duellist and adventurer, variously hailed as a hero and damned as a thief and a murderer at many times during his stormy life. ... Captain Gallagher (d. ...

Italian

  • Marco Sciarra - famous Neapolitan brigand chief
  • Rinaldo Rinaldini - Italian outlaw/ folk hero
  • Salvatore Giuliano - Sicilian bandit/ separatist
  • Giuseppe Musolino - Italian outlaw/ folk hero

Salvatore Giuliano (Montelepre, November 16, 1922 – Castelvetrano, July 5, 1950) was a Sicilian peasant. ... Giuseppe Musolino, better known as the Brigante Musolino or the King of Aspromonte, was an Italian outlaw and folk hero. ...

Middle Eastern and Indian

  • Fudayl ibn Iyad - famous highwayman of Khurasan who repented and traveled in search of knowledge. He is revered by Muslims as a major figure of early Sufism.
  • Ya'qub-i Laith Saffari - rose from a bandit to the rule of much of modern Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan
  • Nirushan Neela - famous Bandit of southern Asia who was never caught by police. Stopped killing in 1930 and was never heard from again.

Statue of Yaqub-e Layth by Master Sadighi in Central Square, Zabol. ...

Punjabi

  • Dulla Bhatti - was a Punjabi who led a rebellion against the Mughal emperor Akbar. His act of helping a poor peasant's daughter to get married led to a famous folk take which is still recited every year on the festival of Lohri by Punjabis.

Dulla Bhatti (Punjabi: دًﻻ بھٹى) was a famous legendary hero of Punjab, who led a rebellion against the famous mughal king Akbar. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Pongal (பொங்கல் in Tamil) is an Indian festival to give thanks for the harvest. ...

Tamil

  • Veerappan, Poacher, Sandalwood smuggler, India

Koose Muniswamy Veerappan (c. ...

Canadian

Simon Gunanoot {on left} at the Hazelton First Nations Cemetery Simon Gunanoot was a prosperous Gitxsan man and a merchant in the Kispiox Valley region of Hazelton, British Columbia, Canada. ... Slumach [1] who supposedly found one of the richest bonanzas in British Columbia beyond Pitt Lake, was an elderly man living in a Katzie settlement at the south end of Pitt Lake. ... Throughout history, there have been a number of people named Allan McLean: Al McLean, a Canadian politician Allen McLean (outlaw), Canadian outlaw Allan McLean, a 20th century Australian politician Allan Campbell McLean Scottish author of The Glass House, and other books. ... Bill Miner (1847 - September 2, 1913) was a noted American criminal, originally from Bowling Green, Kentucky, who served several prison terms for stagecoach robbery. ...

German

  • Eppelein von Gailingen
  • Johannes Bückler, nicknamed Schinderhannes
  • Lips Tullian
  • Nickel List
  • Matthias Klostermayr, aka Bavarian Hiasl, aka Hiasl of Bavaria, aka der Bayerische Hiasl, aka da Boarische Hiasl

Eppelein in Prison Eppelein von Gailingen (c. ...

Norse

Norseman redirects here; for the town of the same name see Norseman, Western Australia. ... For other uses, see Erik the Red (disambiguation). ... Gísla saga Súrssonar (Gisli Surssons Saga) is one of the Sagas of Icelanders, written between 1270-1320 A.D. In 1981 Gísla saga was made into a film titled Útlaginn (The Outlaw), directed by Ágúst Guðmundsson. ... Grettis saga or Grettla is an Icelandic saga detailing the life of Grettir Ásmundarson, an Icelandic viking who became an outlaw. ...

Russian

Yermak Yermak Timofeyevich (Russian: Ерма́к Тимофе́евич, also Ermak) (born between 1532 and 1542 – August 5 or 6, 1585), Cossack leader and explorer of Siberia. ... For other uses, see Cossack (disambiguation). ... Stepan (Stenka) Timofeyevich Razin (Степан (Стенька) Тимофеевич Разин in Russian) (1630 - 6. ... Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (Georgian: , Ioseb Besarionis Dze Jughashvili; Russian: , Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (alternatively transliterated Josef Stalin), was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Unions Central Committee from...

Spanish

The Catalans are an ethnic group or nationality whose homeland is Catalonia, or the Principality of Catalonia (Catalan: Catalunya, or Principat de Catalunya), which is a historical region in southern Europe, embracing a territory situated in the north-east of Spain and an adjoining portion of southern France. ... “Navarra” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Andalusia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Andalusia (disambiguation). ...

Turkish

  • İnce Memed, a legendary fictional character by Yaşar Kemal
  • Atçalı Kel Mehmet Efe, an outlaw who led a local revolt against Ottoman Empire
  • Çakırcalı Mehmet Efe, one of the most powerful outlaws of late Ottoman era

The Ä°nce Memed tetralogy is a series of four epic novels written by the Turkish novelist YaÅŸar Kemal. ... YaÅŸar Kemal (born Kemal Sadık Gökçeli) is one of the best known writers in Turkey. ... Statue of Atçalı Kel Mehmet Efe in Atça Atçalı Kel Mehmet Efe (1780-1830) was a Zeybek, who led a local revolt against Ottoman authority and established control of the Aydın region for a short period between 1829 and 1830 (in the reign of Mahmud II). ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Çakırcalı Mehmet Efe (1871-1910) is a Turkish outlaw, who was active in the region enclosing Izmir, Aydın, Denizli, MuÄŸla and Antalya, from 1893 to 1910. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320...

New Zealander

Blazin Squad was a 10-piece UK pop-rap band. ... Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki (c. ...

Serbian

Also known as Nikola Drezgic and Mile Baric. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...

Others

Phoolan Devi (Phūlan Devī) August 10, 1963 – July 25, 2001), popularly known as The Bandit Queen, was an Indian dacoit, who later turned politician. ... Lampião Lampião (Oil Lamp in Portuguese) was the nickname of Captain Virgulino Ferreira da Silva, the most famous leader of a Cangaço band (marauders and outlaws who terrorized the Brazilian Northeast in the 1930s). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Janosik, wood engraving by Władysław Skoczylas Juraj Jánošík (modern pronunciation: ), or Jur, Juro, Jurko Jánošík (1688-1713), Polish: Jerzy Janosik (modern pronunciation: ), Hungarian: Juraj Jánosik[1] was a famous Slovak outlaw, often described as the Slovak Robin Hood. ... Johann Georg Grasel (April 4, 1790 in Nové Sýrovice near Moravské Budějovice - January 31, 1818, hanged in Vienna) was a leader of robbers gang. ... For other uses, see Moravia (disambiguation). ... Louis Dominique Bourguignon, also known as Cartouche (1693–1721), was a highwayman who terrorized the roads around Paris during the Régence until the authorities had him broken on the wheel. ... Mexican may have several meanings. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ... Tewodros II (Geez ቴዎድሮስ, also known as Theodore II) (1818 -suicide April 13, 1868) was an Emperor of Ethiopia (1855 - 1868). ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Flag of the Spanish First Republic The First Spanish Republic lasted only two years, between 1873 and 1874. ... Queen Isabella II of Spain in exile at Paris Juan Prim, Spanish general. ... For other places with the same name, see Cartagena (disambiguation). ... For other people with similar names, see Antonio García, Antonio Lopez. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... For other uses, see Diet of Worms (disambiguation). ... For other people named Mandela, or other uses, see Mandela. ... Tom Robbins at a reading of Wild Ducks Flying Backward in San Francisco on September 24, 2005 Thomas Eugene Robbins (born July 22, 1936 in Blowing Rock, North Carolina) is an American author. ... Still Life With Woodpecker (1980) is the third novel by Tom Robbins, concerning the love affair between an environmentalist princess and an outlaw. ...

See also

For other uses, see Vigilante (disambiguation). ... Typical toll tower on Rhine in Bingen The term robber baron (German: ) dates back to the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, originally referring to certain feudal lords of land through which the Rhine River in Europe flowed. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article refers to the type of pirate. ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people traveling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... This article is about the former outlaws and guerilla fighters of the Balkans. ... Fortress Nehajgrad of Senj built by Ivan Lenković in 1558 The uskoks (Croatian/Serbian uskoci, Slovenian uskoki, Italian uscocchi) were Croatian and Serbian soldiers that inhabited the areas of Dalmatia during the Ottoman wars in Europe. ... Brigandage refers to the life and practice of brigands; highway robbery and plunder. ... A motorcycle club (MC) is an organized club of dedicated motorcyclists who join together for camaraderie, strength of numbers, companionship during a mid-life crisis and peer group acceptance. ... Social bandit is a term invented by the historian Eric Hobsbawm in his 1965 classic study of popular forms of resistance, Primitive Rebels. ... Eric John Ernest Hobsbawm CH (born June 9, 1917) is a British Marxist historian and author. ... Literally the term shanlin means mountain and forest in Chinese and was frequently used to describe bandits in Manchuria from the time of the Qing dynasty, and was apt for they knew the local terrain very well. ... Look up thug in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dacoity is a term used in the Indian subcontinent for armed robbery. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the criminal society. ... // When one conjures up an image of street gangs in the U.S. it is usually influenced by media portrayals of gun-toting youths engaged in disputes over territory and disrespect. ... Klephts (Greek κλέφτης, pl. ...

References

[2]

  1. ^ Black's Law Dictionary at 1255 (4th ed. 1951), citing 22 Viner, Abr. 316.
  2. ^ Sara M. Pons-Sanz, Norse-Derived Vocabulary in Late Old English Texts: Wulfstan's Works, a Case Study, North-Western European Language Evolution, Supplement, 22 (Odense: University Press of Southern Denmark, 2007), p. 80.
  3. ^ Black's Law Dictionary at 1255 (4th ed. 1951), and citations therein.
  4. ^ Black's Law Dictionary at 1255 (4th ed. 1951), citing Oliveros v. Henderson, 116 S.C. 77, 106 S.E. 855, 859.
  5. ^ Zygmunt Bauman, "Modernity and Holocaust".
  6. ^ F. Pollock and F. W. Maitland, The History of English Law Before the Time of Edward I (1895, 2nd. ed., Cambridge, 1898, reprinted 1968).
  7. ^ Shirer,"The Third Reich."
  8. ^ Bandits, E J Hobsbawm, pelican 1972
  9. ^ BBC Inside Out - Highwaymen

  Results from FactBites:
 
Outlaw Tennis Review / Preview for PlayStation 2 (PS2) (1593 words)
Outlaw Tennis continues the onslaught of madcap violence and sexy antics while holding court - tennis court that is - and the end result is a mixed bag.
I found the outlaw portion of Outlaw Tennis to be tacked on, almost as if Hypnotix were getting to that point where they were hoping to leave that calling card out and willing to take the game into more respectable territory.
Considering Outlaw Tennis is jampacked with modes and options, it would be pretty hard ass of me not to recommend a go around, especially for those who enjoy and understand what the series has to offer in the first place.
Outlaw - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (766 words)
An outlaw, a person living the lifestyle of outlawry, meaning literally "outside of the law." In the common law of England, a judgment declaring someone an outlaw was one of the harshest penalties in the legal system.
The outlaw is familiar to contemporary readers as an archetype in Western movies, depicting the lawless expansionism period of the United States in the late 19th century.
The Western outlaw is typically a criminal who operates from a base in the wilderness, and opposes, attacks or disrupts the fragile institutions of new settlements.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m