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Encyclopedia > Otto Klemperer
Otto Klemperer

Background information
Born May 14, 1885
Flag of the German Empire Breslau, German Empire
Died July 6, 1973 (age 88)
Zürich, Switzerland
Genre(s) Classical
Occupation(s) Composer, conductor
Years active 1910-1973
Associated
acts
Los Angeles Philharmonic
Montreal Symphony
Philharmonia Orchestra
Pittsburgh Symphony

Otto Klemperer (May 14, 1885July 6, 1973) was a German-born conductor and composer. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest conductors of the 20th century.[1][2] Above all, his fame rests on his interpretations of Germanic repertoire. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 360 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2206 × 3668 pixel, file size: 1. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_German_Empire. ... Wrocław. ... Motto Gott mit Uns (German: God with us”) Anthem Heil dir im Siegerkranz (unofficial) Territory of the German Empire in 1914, prior to World War I Capital Berlin Language(s) Official: German Unofficial minority languages: Danish, French, Frisian, Polish, Sorbian Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor  - 1871–1888 William I  - 1888 Frederick... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... View of the inner city with the four main churches visible, and the Albis in the backdrop Zürich (German: , Zürich German: Züri , French: , in English generally Zurich, Italian: ) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... The Los Angeles Philharmonic is an American orchestra based in Los Angeles, California. ... The Orchestre symphonique de Montreal (Montreal Symphony Orchestra) is a major Quebec orchestra. ... The Philharmonia is an orchestra based in London. ... The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra is one of the major orchestras in the United States. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...

Contents

Biography

Klemperer was born in Breslau, then in Prussia, now Wrocław, Poland. He took United States citizenship in 1937 and Israeli citizenship in 1970. He was the father of Hogan's Heroes actor Werner Klemperer and cousin to Victor Klemperer. Wrocław. ... Anthem Preußenlied, Heil dir im Siegerkranz (both unofficial) The Kingdom of Prussia at its greatest extent, at the time of the formation of the German Empire, 1871 Capital Berlin Government Monarchy King  - 1701 — 1713 Frederick I (first)  - 1888 — 1918 William II (last) Prime minister  - 1848 Adolf Heinrich von Arnim... Motto: Miasto spotkaÅ„ (the meeting place) Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Lower Silesian Powiat city county Gmina WrocÅ‚aw Established 10th century City Rights 1262 Government  - Mayor RafaÅ‚ Dutkiewicz Area  - City 292. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Hogans Heroes was an American television situation comedy that ran from September 17, 1965 to July 4, 1971 on the CBS network for 168 episodes. ... Klemperer as Colonel Klink on Hogans Heroes Werner Klemperer (March 22 1920Cologne – December 6, 2000) was an Emmy Award-winning comedic actor, best known for his role as Colonel Klink on the television sitcom, Hogans Heroes. ... Victor Klemperer (Landsberg (Prussia), now Gorzów Wielkopolski, Poland, October 9, 1881–February 11, 1960, Dresden, GDR), decorated veteran of World War I, businessman, journalist and eventually a Professor of Literature, specialising in the French Enlightenment at the Technical College of Dresden (now Technische Universität Dresden). He was the...


Klemperer studied music first at the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt, and later in Berlin under Hans Pfitzner. In 1905 he met Gustav Mahler while conducting the off-stage brass at a performance of Mahler's Symphony No. 2, 'Resurrection'. The two became friends, and Klemperer became conductor at the German Opera in Prague in 1907 on Mahler's recommendation. Mahler wrote a short testimonial, recommending Klemperer, on a small card which Klemperer kept for the rest of his life. Dr. Hoch’s Konservatorium - Musikakademie in Frankfurt am Main was founded September 22, 1878. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Hans Pfitzner (May 5, 1869 - May 22, 1949) was a German composer and self-described anti-modernist. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... The Symphony No. ... Nickname: Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: , Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ...


Later, in 1910, Klemperer assisted Mahler in the premiere of his Symphony No. 8, Symphony of a Thousand. Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Symphony No. ...


Klemperer went on to hold a number of conductor posts, in Hamburg (1910-1912); in Barmen (1912-1913); the Strasbourg Opera (1914-1917); the Cologne Opera (1917-1924); and the State Opera in Wiesbaden (1924-1927). Location Coordinates Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE6 First Mayor Ole von Beust (CDU) Governing party CDU Votes in Bundesrat 3 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  755 km² (292 sq mi) Population 1,754,317 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 2,324 /km² (6,018... Barmen is a municipal subdivision of the German city of Wuppertal. ... City flag City coat of arms Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Alsace Department Bas-Rhin (67) Intercommunality Urban Community of Strasbourg Mayor Fabienne Keller  (UMP) City Statistics Land area¹ 78. ... For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ... Wiesbaden is a city in central Germany. ...


From 1927 to 1931, he was conductor at the Kroll Opera in Berlin. In this post he enhanced his reputation as a champion of new music, playing a number of new works, including Leoš Janáček's From the House of the Dead, Arnold Schönberg's Erwartung, Igor Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex, and Paul Hindemith's Cardillac. Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... LeoÅ¡ Janáček in 1928 LeoÅ¡ Janáček ( ; July 3, 1854 in Hukvaldy, Moravia, then Austrian empire – August 12, 1928 in Ostrava, then Czechoslovakia) was a Czech composer. ... From the House of the Dead (Z Mrtvého Domu in Czech), is an opera by Leoš Janáček. ... Schoenberg redirects here. ... Erwartung (translation: Expectation) is an opera, composed in 1909 by the Viennese composer Arnold Schoenberg. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ... Oedipus the King (also known as Oedipus Rex and Oedipus Tyrannos) is a Greek tragedy, written by Sophocles around 427 BC. The play was the second of Sophocles three Theban plays to be produced, but its events occur before those of Oedipus at Colonus or Antigone. ... Paul Hindemith aged 28. ... Cardillac is an opera by Paul Hindemith. ...


In 1933, once the Nazi Party had reached power, Klemperer, who was Jewish, left Germany and moved to the United States. Klemperer had previously converted to Catholicism, but eventually returned to Judaism. In the U.S. he was appointed conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra; there, also, he began to concentrate more on the standard works of the Germanic repertoire that would later bring him greatest acclaim, particularly the works of Beethoven, Brahms and Mahler. He also visited other countries, including England and Australia. 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Nazi Party (German: , or NSDAP, English: National Socialist German Workers Party), was a far-right, racist political party in Germany between 1920 and 1945. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... The Los Angeles Philharmonic is an orchestra based in Los Angeles, California, USA. From 1964-2003, the orchestra played its concerts in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Los Angeles Music Center. ... A portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler, 1820 Ludwig van Beethoven (IPA: ), (baptized December 17, 1770[1] – March 26, 1827) was a composer and one of the pillars of European classical music. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total...


Following the end of World War II, Klemperer returned to Continental Europe to work at the Budapest Opera (1947-1950). Finding Communist rule in Hungary increasingly irksome, he became an itinerant conductor, guest conducting the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, WDR Orchestra Koln, Concertgebouw Orchestra, and Philharmonia Orchestra of London. He settled in Switzerland and became the first principal conductor of the Philharmonia Orchestra in 1959. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Hungarian State Opera House (formerly the Budapest Royal Opera) was built in 1884 by Miklós Ybl. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... The Montreal Symphony Orchestra (MSO) (in French: Orchestre symphonique de Montréal (OSM)) is a major orchestra based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, with its home venue at Montreals Place des Arts. ... The Philharmonia is an orchestra based in London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Philharmonia is an orchestra based in London. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He also worked at the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, sometimes stage-directing as well as conducting, as in a 1963 production of Wagner's Lohengrin. The Floral Hall of the Royal Opera House The Royal Opera House is a performing arts venue in London. ... Covent Garden is a district in central London and within the easterly bounds of the City of Westminster. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Lohengrin is a romantic opera (or music drama) in three acts by Richard Wagner. ...


Klemperer is less well known as a composer, but he wrote a number of pieces, including six symphonies, a Mass, nine string quartets and the opera Das Ziel. He seldom performed any of these himself and they have been almost entirely forgotten since his death. A symphony is an extended piece of music for orchestra, especially one in the form of a sonata. ... The Mass, a form of sacred musical composition, is a choral composition that sets the fixed portions of the Eucharistic liturgy (principally that of the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Church, generally known in the US as the Episcopal Church, and also the Lutheran Church) to music. ... The resident string quartet of the Library of Congress in 1963 A string quartet is a musical ensemble of four string instruments—usually two violins, a viola and cello—or a piece written to be performed by such a group. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ...


Klemperer suffered from partial paralysis which had largely been brought on as a result of surgery in 1939 to remove a tumor on his brain. (The surgery paralyzed half of his face.) He also suffered from severe cyclothymic bipolar disorder. During a manic episode in 1941 he was imprisoned in New York. His erratic behavior during manic episodes made him an undesirable guest to US orchestras, and the late flowering of his career centered in other countries. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Surgeon” redirects here. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tumor (American English) or tumour (British English) originally means swelling, and is sometimes still used with that meaning. ... In animals, the brain or encephalon (Greek for in the head), is the control center of the central nervous system, responsible for behaviour. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Bipolar. ...


A severe fall during a visit to Montreal forced Klemperer subsequently to conduct seated in a chair. A severe burning accident further paralyzed him; it was caused by his smoking in bed with a glass of whisky. Despite this, he continued conducting until his retirement in 1971. His career was turned around in 1954 by London-based producer Walter Legge, who recorded Klemperer in Beethoven, Brahms and much else with his hand-picked orchestra, the Philharmonia, for the premium EMI label. Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


The tireless and unwavering support and assistance of Klemperer's daughter Lotte was crucial to the maestro's success. His son, Werner Klemperer, was an actor and became known for his portrayal of Colonel Klink on Hogan's Heroes. Klemperer as Colonel Klink on Hogans Heroes Werner Klemperer (March 22 1920Cologne – December 6, 2000) was an Emmy Award-winning comedic actor, best known for his role as Colonel Klink on the television sitcom, Hogans Heroes. ... Hogans Heroes was an American television situation comedy that ran from September 17, 1965 to July 4, 1971 on the CBS network for 168 episodes. ...


Klemperer died in Zürich, Switzerland in 1973, aged 88, and was buried in the Israelitischer Friedhof-Oberer Friesenberg in that city. View of the inner city with the four main churches visible, and the Albis in the backdrop Zürich (German: , Zürich German: Züri , French: , in English generally Zurich, Italian: ) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and...


Klemperer's "Eroica" and his tempos in later years

Many listeners associate Klemperer with slow tempi, but recorded evidence now available on compact disc shows that in earlier years his tempi could be quite a bit faster; the late recordings give a misleading impression. For example, one of Klemperer's most noted performances was of Beethoven's Symphony No. 3, the "Eroica." Eric Grunin's "Eroica Project" contains tempo data on 363 recordings of the work from 1924-2007, and includes 10 by Klemperer - some recorded in the studio, most from broadcasts of live concerts. The earliest Klemperer performance on tape was recorded in concert in Köln in 1954 (when he was 69 years old); the last was in London with the New Philharmonia Orchestra in 1970 (when he was 85). The passing years show a clear trend with respect to tempo: as Klemperer aged, he took slower tempi. In 1954, his first movement lasts 15:18 from beginning to end; in 1970 it lasts 18:41. In 1954 the main tempo of the first movement was about 135 beats per minute, in 1970 it had slowed to about 110 beats per minute. In 1954, the Eroica second movement (or "Funeral March") had a timing of 14:35; in 1970, it had slowed to 18:51. Similar slowings took place in the other movements. Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Eroica Symphony Title Page The Symphony No. ... The name Eroica (Italian: heroic) could refer to: the Eroica Symphony, by Ludwig van Beethoven the Eroica Variations for piano, by Beethoven the Eroica Piano Trio, an American chamber ensemble Franz Liszts 7th Transcendental Etude Eroica Classical Recordings, a record label Eroica, a film by Andrzej Munk Eroica, an... Köln may refer to: Cologne (German: Köln), the fourth largest city in Germany and largest city of the North Rhine-Westphalia state German Cruiser Köln that served from 1930-1945 mostly for the Kriegsmarine German Frigate Köln (1961-1982), a F120 Köln class frigate of... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Philharmonia is an orchestra based in London. ...


Similar, if less extreme, reductions in tempos can be noted in many other works for which Klemperer left multiple recordings, at least in recordings from when he was in his late 70s and his 80s. For example:


(a) the Symphony No. 38 ("Prague") of Mozart, another Klemperer specialty. In his concert recording from December 1950 (when he was 65 years old) with the RIAS Berlin Orchestra the timings are I. 9:45 (with repeat timing omitted; the performance actually does take the repeat); II. 7:45; and III. 5.24. In his studio March, 1962 recording of the same work with the Philharmonia Orchestra (recorded when he was 77 years old), the timings are notably slower: I. 10:53 (no repeat was taken); II. 8.58; III. 6:01. Unlike the late "Eroica," the 1962 "Prague" latter is not slow; rather, the 1950 recording is much faster than most recordings of the work, even by "historically informed" conductors.


(b) The Bruckner Fourth Symphony (Haas edition with emendations). A 1947 concert recording with the Concertgebouw Orchestra has timings of I. 14:03; II. 12:58; III. 10:11; and IV. 17.48. The studio recording with the Philharmonia from 1963 has timings of I. 16:09; II; 14:00; III. 11.48; IV. 19:01. Again, the 1963 is not a notably slow performance (outside of the third movement), but the 1947 was quick.


Regardless of tempo, Klemperer's performances often maintain great intensity. Eric Grunin, in a commentary on the "opinions" page of his Eroica Project, notes: "....The massiveness of the first movement of the 'Eroica' is real, but is not its main claim on our attention. That honor goes to its astonishing 'story' (aka 'structure'), and what is to me most unique about Klemperer is that his understanding of the structure remains unchanged no matter what his tempo... "


Discography

Klemperer made many recordings, and many have become classics. Worthy of note are:

Klemperer's last recording was Mozart: Serenade in E-Flat, K.375, recorded Sept. 28, 1971. That recording session was the last time he ever led an orchestra. Bachs St. ... The German baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (born May 28, 1925) is regarded by many as the finest Lieder singer of his generation, if not of the last century. ... Sir Peter Neville Luard Pears (June 22, 1910 – April 3, 1986) was an English tenor and life-long partner of the composer Benjamin Britten. ... Elisabeth Schwarzkopf Dame Elisabeth Schwarzkopf DBE (b. ... Christa Ludwig (born March 16, 1928) is a distinguished German mezzo-soprano, known both for her opera performances and her singing of Lieder. ... Walter Berry (April 8, 1929 - October 27, 2000) was an Austrian bass-baritone. ... The Mass in B Minor (BWV 232) is a musical setting of the Latin Mass by Johann Sebastian Bach. ... Composer Ludwig van Beethoven The Symphony No. ... Fidelio (Op. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Missa Solemnis in D Major, Op. ... Claudio Arrau Claudio Arrau León (February 6, 1903 – June 9, 1991) was a Chilean pianist of world fame for his deep interpretations of a huge, vast repertoire spanning from the baroque to 20th-century composers. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Ein deutsches Requiem For the short story by Jorge Luis Borges, see Ein deutsches Requiem (short story). ... Anton Bruckners Symphony No. ... The Piano Concerto No. ... Claudio Arrau Claudio Arrau León (February 6, 1903 – June 9, 1991) was a Chilean pianist of world fame for his deep interpretations of a huge, vast repertoire spanning from the baroque to 20th-century composers. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Arabic: ,  ; Aramaic:  ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth) is particularly interesting among Gustav Mahlers symphonic works. ... Fritz Wunderlich (September 26, 1930 - September 17, 1966) was a German tenor, born in Kusel, Rhineland-Palatinate. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... Don Giovanni (K.527; complete title: Il dissoluto punito, ossia il Don Giovanni, literally The Rake Punishd, or Don Giovanni) is an opera in two acts with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte. ... Die Zauberflöte (en: The Magic Flute) is an opera in two acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. ... The Swedish tenor Nicolai Gedda (born July 11, 1925) is a famous opera singer and recitalist. ... Gundula Janowitz (born August 2, 1937 in Berlin, Germany) was one of the greatest lyric sopranos in modern history, renowned for her magnificent tone -- often described as creamy or silvery -- and her vocal control at the top of her range. ... Lucia Popp (Lucia Poppova) (November 12, 1939–November 16, 1993) was a popular operatic soprano from Slovakia. ... Pétrouchka (English: Petrushka; Russian: петрушка) is a ballet with music by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. ... Pulcinella, often called Punch in English, is a classical character that originated in the Commedia dellarte of the 17th century and became a stock character in Neapolitan puppetry. ... The Flying Dutchman (original German title: Der fliegende Holländer) is an opera, music and libretto by Richard Wagner, in three acts. ... Anja Silja, German soprano, born April 17, 1940 in Berlin. ... Die Dreigroschenoper, original German poster from Berlin, 1928. ...


See also

This is a list of notable tall men, starting at 198 cm (6 ft 6 in). ...

References

  1. ^ Keller, Hans (1957), "Otto Klemperer", in Cosman, Milein, Musical Sketchbook, Cassirer: "After Furtwangler's death, Klemperer (born 1885) has become the last of the few really great conductors of his generation"
  2. ^ The Times said of him (Bernard Levin, January 1972) he 'has towered over music throughout this century.'

Hans Keller (1919-1985) was an Austrian-born British musician and writer who made significant contributions to musicology and music criticism, and invented the method of Wordless Functional Analysis (in which a work is analysed in musical sound alone, without any words being heard or read). ... Furtwängler is the name of a prominent German family whose members include: Adolf Furtwängler (1853-1907), archaeologist and art historian Maria Furtwängler (born 1966), physician and actress Philipp Furtwängler (1869-1940), mathematician Wilhelm Furtwängler (1886-1954), conductor and composer Category: ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... (Henry) Bernard Levin CBE (August 19, 1928 - August 7, 2004) was an English journalist, author and broadcaster. ...

Bibliography

  • Heyworth, Peter (1996). Otto Klemperer: His Life and Times. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521565383. 
  • Holden, Raymond (2005). The Virtuoso Conductors: The Central European Tradition from Wagner to Karajan. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. ISBN 0300093268. 
  • Cosman, Milein (1957). Musical Sketchbook. Oxford: Bruno Cassirer. OCLC 3225493. 

OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Otto Klemperer - definition of Otto Klemperer in Encyclopedia (522 words)
Otto Klemperer (May 14, 1885 – July 6, 1973) was a German-born conductor and composer.
Klemperer went on to hold a number of posts, including conductorships at the Municipal Theatre in Hamburg (1910andndash12); in Barmen (1912–13); the Strasbourg Opera (1914–17); the Cologne Opera (1917–24); and the State Opera in Wiesbaden (1924–27).
Klemperer is less well known as a composer, but he wrote a number of pieces, including six symphonies, a Mass, nine string quartets, and an opera called Das Ziel.
Victor Klemperer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (428 words)
He was the son of a rabbi, cousin to the famous conductor Otto Klemperer and brother to the surgeon Georg Klemperer, who was a personal physician to Lenin.
Klemperer kept a diary, which from 1933 through the end of the war, provides a unique day-to-day account of life under tyranny and the struggle for survival among Jews in the Third Reich.
Klemperer went on to become a significant post-war cultural figure in East Germany, lecturing at the universities of Greifswald, Berlin and Halle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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