FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Otello" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Otello
Operas by Giuseppe Verdi

Oberto, Conte di San Bonifacio (1839)
Un giorno di regno (1840)
Nabucco (1842)
I Lombardi alla prima crociata (1843)
Ernani (1844)
I due Foscari (1844)
Giovanna d'Arco (1845)
Alzira (1845)
Attila (1846)
Macbeth (1847)
I masnadieri (1847)
Jérusalem (1847)
Il corsaro (1848)
La battaglia di Legnano (1849)
Luisa Miller (1849)
Stiffelio (1850)
Rigoletto (1851)
Il trovatore (1853)
La traviata (1853)
Les vêpres siciliennes (1855)
Simon Boccanegra (1857)
Aroldo (1857)
Un ballo in maschera (1859)
La forza del destino (1862)
Don Carlos (1867)
Aida (1871)
Otello (1887)
Falstaff (1893)
Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (either October 9 or 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer, mainly of opera. ... Image File history File links GiuseppeVerdi. ... Oberto, Conte di San Bonifacio is an opera in two acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Temistocle Solera, based on a libretto by Antonio Piazza. ... Un giorno di regno, ossia il finto Stanislao (A One-Day Reign, or the false Stanislas) is an opera in two acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Felice Romani, based on the play Le faux Stanislas by Alexandre Vincent Pineu-Duval. ... Nabucco is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Temistocle Solera, based on the biblical story and the play by Anicet-Bourgeois and Francis Cornu. ... I Lombardi alla prima crociata (The Lombards on the First Crusade) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Temistocle Solera, based epic poem by Tommaso Grossi. ... Ernani is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on the play Hernani by Victor Hugo. ... I due Foscari (The Two Foscaris) is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on a historical play The Two Foscari by Lord Byron. ... Giovanna dArco (Joan of Arc) is an opera with a prelude and three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Temistocle Solera, based on the play Die Jungfrau von Orleans by Friedrich von Schiller. ... Alzira is an opera in a prologue and two acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play Alzire, ou les Américains by Voltaire. ... Attila is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Temistocle Solera, based on the play Attila, König der Hunnen by Zacharias Werner. ... Macbeth is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave with additions by Andrea Maffei, based on Shakespeares play of the same name. ... I masnadieri (The Bandits) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Andrei Maffei, based on Die Räuber by Friedrich von Schiller. ... Jérusalem is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to a French libretto by Alphonse Royer and Gustave Vaëz. ... Il corsaro (The Corsair) is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi, from a libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on Lord Byrons poem The Corsair. ... La battaglia di Legnano (The battle of Legnano) is an Opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi from Italian libretto by Salvatore Cammarano, based on play La Battaille de Toulouse by Joseph Méry. ... Luisa Miller is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play Kabale und Liebe by Friedrich von Schiller. ... Stiffelio is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi, from an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on the play Le Pasteur, ou lÉvangile et le Foyer by Émile Souvestre and Eugène Bourgeois. ... Giuseppe Verdi, by Giovanni Boldini, 1886 (National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome) Rigoletto is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi. ... Il trovatore (The Troubadour) is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Leone Emanuele Bardare and Salvatore Cammarano, based on the play El Trobador by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ... La traviata, an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, takes as its basis the novel La dame aux Camélias by Alexandre Dumas, fils, published in 1848. ... Les vêpres siciliennes (The Sicilian Vespers) is an opera in five acts by Giuseppe Verdi set to a French libretto by Charles Duveyrier and Eugène Scribe from their work Le duc dAlbe. ... Simon Boccanegra is an opera with a prologue and three acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on the play Simón Bocanegra by Antonio García Gutiérrez. ... Aroldo is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, based on their earlier colaboration, Stiffelio. ... Un ballo in maschera, or A Masked Ball, is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi with text by Antonio Somma. ... Cover of first bilingual edition of the libretto of La forza del destino, St. ... This article refers to the opera Don Carlos by Giuseppe Verdi (and its revised Italian version, known as Don Carlo). ... // Introduction This article is about the marketing term, AIDA. For other uses of the term, see Aida (disambiguation). ... Falstaff is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi, adapted by Arrigo Boito from Shakespeares play The Merry Wives of Windsor. ...

For the Rossini opera, see Otello (Rossini) or for the eurobeat artist see Gianni Coraini.

Otello is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Arrigo Boito, based on Shakespeare's play Othello. It was first performed at the Teatro alla Scala, Milan, on February 5, 1887. Otello is an opera in three acts by Gioacchino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Berio di Salsi, based on Shakespeares play Othello. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (either October 9 or 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer, mainly of opera. ... A libretto is the complete body of words used in an extended musical work such as an opera, operetta, masque, sacred or secular oratorio and cantata, musical, and ballet. ... Arrigo Boito (February 24, 1842 – June 10, 1918) was an Italian poet, successful journalist, novelist and composer, best known today for his opera libretti and his own opera, Mefistofele. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Romeo and Juliet by Ford Madox Brown A play, written by a playwright, or dramatist, is a form of literature, almost always consisting of dialog between characters, and intended for performance rather than reading. ... Title page of the first quarto edition of Othello, published in 1622 The Tragœdy of Othello, The Moore of Venice is a tragedy by William Shakespeare written around 1603. ... La Scala The Teatro alla Scala (or La Scala for short), in Milan, Italy, is one of the worlds most famous opera houses. ... Milan (Italian: ; Lombard: Milán (listen)) is the main city of northern Italy, located in the plains of Lombardy. ... February 5 is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ...

Contents

Characters

  • Otello, a Moorish general (Tenor)
  • Desdemona, his wife (Soprano)
  • Iago, Otello's ensign (Baritone)
  • Emilia, wife of Iago and chambermaid of Desdemona (Soprano or Mezzo-soprano)
  • Cassio, Otello's captain (Tenor)
  • Roderigo, a gentleman of Venice (Tenor)
  • Lodovico, ambassador of the Venetian republic (Bass)
  • Montano, former Duke of Cyprus (Bass)
  • A herald (Bass)

Chorus of Venetian soldiers and sailors; and Cypriot townsfolk and children. In music, a tenor is a male singer with a high vocal range. ... Look up soprano in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... Baritone (French: baryton; Deutsch: Bariton; Italian: baritono) is most commonly the type of male voice that lies between bass and tenor. ... A mezzo-soprano (meaning medium soprano in Italian) is a female singer with a range usually extending from the A below middle C to the F an eleventh above middle C. Mezzo-sopranos generally have a darker (or lower) vocal tone than sopranos, and their vocal range is between that... Captain is a nautical term, an organizational title, and a rank in various uniformed organizations. ... A basso (or bass) is a male singer who sings in the lowest vocal range of the human voice. ...


Highlights

  • "Una vela!" -- "Esultate!" (opening chorus and entrance of Otello)
  • "Inaffia l'ugola!" (Iago and Cassio's drinking song)
  • "Già nella notte densa" -- "Already in the dense night" (Otello and Desdemona's Act I duet)
  • "Credo in un Dio crudel" -- "I believe in a cruel God" (Iago's second act aria)
  • "Sì, pel ciel marmoreo giuro" -- "Yes, by the marble heavens I swear" (Otello and Iago's vengeance duet)
  • "Dio, mi potevi scagliar!" (Othello's Act III aria)
  • "A terra!" (the concerted piece that ends Act III)
  • Willow Song and Ave Maria (Desdemona's extended Act IV solo scene)
  • "Niun mi tema" (Othello's death)

Plot

Time: The late 1400s.
Place: A coastal city on the island of Cyprus.

Act I

Scene: In front of the castle. A tavern is nearby. Thunder and lightning.


There is no prelude. The curtain rises upon a storm as the people of Cyprus await the return of the Venetian fleet from its battle with the Turks. Otello arrives safely and announces that the Turkish fleet has been destroyed, and the Cypriots cheer. Iago tells Roderigo that he knows Roderigo loves Desdemona and wants to help, for he hates Otello. (Iago is jealous because Otello has appointed Cassio his captain, a position that Iago hoped to have.) Taking Roderigo aside, Iago outlines a plan. The people of Cyprus celebrate the navy's safe return by lighting a bonfire. In the tavern, Iago offers Cassio wine, but Cassio says he does not drink any more. Iago pressures him, and when Iago offers a toast to Otello and Desdemona, Cassio gives in. Iago sings a drinking song and continues to pour Cassio wine. Montano enters and calls for Cassio to begin his watch, but he is surprised to find Cassio drunk and barely able to stand upright. To Montano's surprise, Iago explains that this is how Cassio spends every evening. Roderigo laughs at Cassio. Cassio asks who laughs; Roderigo says, "I laugh at drunkards!" and Cassio attacks him. Montano tells Cassio to refrain, but Cassio draws his sword and threatens to crack open Montano's head. Cassio and Montano begin to duel, and Iago sends Roderigo to attract attention. Cassio wounds Montano as Otello enters and orders them both to lower their swords. Otello asks "honest Iago" to explain how the duel began, but Iago says he does not know. Otello asks for Cassio's explanation, but he, embarrassed, cannot speak. When Otello discovers that Montano is wounded, he becomes enraged. Desdemona enters, and, upon seeing that his bride's rest has been disturbed, Otello declares that Cassio will no longer be his captain. Montano is helped away and the Cypriots leave Otello alone with Desdemona. Together Otello and Desdemona recall why they fell in love. Otello kisses Desdemona thrice and together they walk home to the castle.


Act II

Scene: The castle, by the garden.


Iago tells Roderigo that if he does as Iago says, Desdemona will return his love and, because she controls Otello, she will have Cassio reinstated as captain. Cassio goes to wait for Desdemona while Iago hides in the garden. Iago, in a monologue known as his Credo, tells the audience that he is evil. Desdemona and Emilia enter, and Cassio begins to plead with Desdemona. As they enter the garden, Iago slips back into the castle. Pretending not to notice Otello, who is walking by, Iago says that he is deeply wounded. Otello asks what's wrong. Iago, by giving half-answers and asking vague questions, makes Otello demand to know what it is that Iago is thinking of. Iago intimates that Cassio and Desdemona are in love. Otello feels himself becoming jealous, but he wants proof of Desdemona's betrayal first.


A crowd of children, sailors, and Cypriots encircles Desdemona, praising her beauty and purity. They leave her gifts and wish her happiness before leaving. Desdemona carries Cassio's request for reinstatement to Otello. She says that it makes her very sad, and she prays that he will pardon Cassio. Otello sourly tells her to ask him another time, but she insists. Otello says that he has a headache. Desdemona wraps his head in a handkerchief Otello once gave her, linen and embroidered with strawberries. Otello throws it to the ground and says he doesn't need it. Emilia picks up the handkerchief. Desdemona asks for Otello's forgiveness. Aside, Iago demands that Emilia give him the handkerchief. When she refuses, Iago takes it from her. Otello asks to be alone. Desdemona and Emilia leave. Iago pretends to leave, but comes back. Otello, filled with jealousy, demands that Iago prove Desdemona's infidelity, or else Otello will kill him. Iago says that once, when he and Cassio were sleeping in the same room, he heard Cassio talking to Desdemona in a dream. In the dream, says Iago, Cassio told Desdemona that they must be careful to conceal their love. Iago continues that it was only a dream and does not prove anything—but then asks if Otello remembers the handkerchief that Desdemona was embroidering? Otello says yes, it was the first gift he gave to her. Iago says that he saw it just yesterday with Cassio. Otello calls for blood, and kneeling down, prays for vengeance. Iago kneels with him, and together they swear vengeance on Desdemona.


Act III

Scene: The great hall of the castle. Columns.


A herald announces the present arrival of the Venetian ambassador. Otello dismisses him. Iago explains his plan: He will draw Cassio here while Otello watches, hidden. Before he goes, he reminds Otello of the handkerchief. Desdemona enters and reminds Otello of Cassio's request. Otello says that he still has a headache, and asks her to wrap her handkerchief around his head. When Desdemona produces a different handkerchief, Otello demands the one he gave her. When she says she does not have it, Otello says that it was a talisman, and troubles will befall her if she loses it. Desdemona says that he is trying to distract her from Cassio. "The handkerchief!" he demands. Desdemona reminds him how close a friend Cassio was to him. "The handkerchief!" he demands again. Desdemona asks that he pardon Cassio. "The handkerchief!" he demands a third time. Desdemona cries out in fear. Otello says that the handkerchief is damning her to Hell. Desdemona protests that she is faithful. Otello, angry, motions for her to leave.


Otello laments his fate when suddenly Iago calls out, "Cassio is here!" Iago enters and quickly motions for Otello to hide. Cassio follows and says he had hoped to see Desdemona here, for he wanted to know whether she had been successful with Otello. Iago, leading Cassio towards Otello's hiding place, asks him to tell of his adventures with that woman. Cassio asks which woman, and, softly, Iago says, "Bianca." Iago and Cassio laugh, and Iago leads Cassio away from Otello's hiding place. Soon Iago motions Otello to come closer, and as he does, Iago holds up the handkerchief so that Otello can see it clearly.


Bugles sound, announcing the arrival of the Venetian ambassador. Iago warns Cassio that he should leave unless he wants to meet Otello. Cassio exits, and Otello resolves to kill Desdemona. Lodovico, Desdemona, Emilia, Roderigo, and other dignitaries enter. Cassio hides at the back. Lodovico comments that he does not see Cassio. Iago tells him that Cassio is out of favor, and Desdemona says that he will soon be restored. Otello, as he reads the letter from the Doge, asks, "Are you sure?" Iago explains to the puzzled Lodovico that perhaps Cassio's restoration is her wish. Desdemona says that it is, for she has quite an affection for him. Otello commands her to be silent. Desdemona asks for his pardon. Infuriated, Otello calls her a demon and strikes her. Lodovico holds Otello back as the onlookers gasp. Otello calls for Cassio, who comes forward. As Otello begins to read the decree of the Doge, he tells Desdemona to be quiet. Otello announces that the Doge has recalled him to Venice and has installed Cassio as the new Duke of Cyprus. Enraged, Otello throws Desdemona to the ground. The crowd cries for mercy. Aside, Iago tells Otello that tonight is the night to take revenge. Iago says that he will deal with Cassio. Iago then secretly tells Roderigo that the only way to prevent Desdemona from leaving is for the new Duke to die, and arranges for Roderigo to kill Cassio tonight. Otello orders everyone to leave. Desdemona goes to comfort him, but Lodovico drags her away as Otello curses her. All except Otello and Iago leave. Otello, raving about the handkerchief, collapses in a fit. Iago presses Otello's forehead with his heel, then walks away. Outside the crowd of Cypriots calls out victory and glory for Otello. Grand Procession of the Doge, 16th century For some thousand years, the chief magistrate and leader of the Most Serene Republic of Venice was styled the Doge, a rare but not unique Italian title derived from the Latin Dux, as the major Italian parallel Duce and the English Duke. ...


Act IV

Scene: Desdemona's bedchamber. Nighttime. A lit lamp in front of an image of the Madonna. Saint Mary and Saint Mary the Virgin both redirect here. ...


Desdemona and Emilia are preparing for bed. Desdemona asks Emilia to put out the sheets she used on her wedding night, and asks that if she dies, she be buried with them. Emilia asks her not to talk about such things. Desdemona recalls how her mother had a servant named Barbara, who fell in love with a man but went mad when he left her. She sings the Willow Song. As Emilia goes to leave, Desdemona embraces her and cries. Alone, Desdemona prays to the Virgin Mary, then falls on her bed and goes to sleep. Silently, Otello enters. He lays a scimitar on the nightstand, blows out the lamp, and stands watching Desdemona. He kisses Desdemona thrice. Desdemona awakes. Otello asks her if she has prayed tonight. She asks why. He says he does not want to kill her soul. She asks God for mercy, both for her and for Otello. Otello accuses her of sin, saying that he must kill her because she loves Cassio. Desdemona denies it and asks that he summon Cassio on her behalf. Otello says that Cassio is already dead. Desdemona pleads for mercy, but Otello tells her it's too late for that and strangles her.


Emilia knocks at the door. Otello delays for a moment before he lets her in. She announces that Cassio has killed Roderigo. "And Cassio?" asks Otello. "Lives," says Emilia. Desdemona softly calls out that she has been unjustly accused. Emilia sees her lying on the bed and cries out in horror. As Desdemona says again that she is innocent, she dies. Otello calls her a whore. Emilia calls Otello a murderer. Otello says that Iago proved she loved Cassio. Emilia calls Otello a fool, and as he begins to menace her, she calls for help. Iago, Cassio, and Lodovico enter. Emilia demands that Iago deny Otello's accusation. Iago says it is the truth. Otello says that the handkerchief she gave to Cassio proved it to him. Emilia, horrified, explains that Iago stole the handkerchief from her, as Cassio reveals that he found the handkerchief in his dwelling. Montano enters and says that Roderigo, with his dying breath, has revealed Iago's plan. Iago, brandishing his sword, runs away. Otello, lamenting Desdemona's death, draws a dagger and kills himself. As he dies he kisses Desdemona thrice.


Critical Evaluation of the Opera

Many critics consider "Otello" Verdi's greatest and most mature tragic opera. In it, he tried to do away with the traditional recitative-aria structure of opera, much as Richard Wagner had done, except that in some cases, the distinction between recitative and aria is more clearcut in "Otello" than in any of Wagner's operas. Verdi's librettist, Arrigo Boito, was extremely faithful to Shakespeare's original play, except for the omission of Act I of the drama (everything having to do with Brabantio, Desdemona's father). The roles of Otello (Othello) and Iago (Jago) are among the most fully developed in all of opera, almost as much so as in Shakespeare's original drama - especially the character of Otello himself (Iago is more of an out-and-out villain in the opera). Verdi raises his orchestral writing to new heights in this opera, using the orchestra almost as a participant in the story, instead of merely as accompaniment. For example, the orchestral writing helps reveal the depth of evil in Iago - an evil possibly rivaled by only one other character in Italian opera: Scarpia in Puccini's Tosca. Recitative, a form of composition often used in operas, oratorios, and cantatas (and occasionally in operettas and even musicals), is melodic speech set to music, or a descriptive narrative song in which the music follows the words. ... This article is about the musical term aria. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (Leipzig, May 22, 1813 – Venice, February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Arrigo Boito (February 24, 1842 – June 10, 1918) was an Italian poet, successful journalist, novelist and composer, best known today for his opera libretti and his own opera, Mefistofele. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Brabantio is a character in the play Othello by William Shakespeare. ... Desdemona may refer to: Desdemona (Othello), is a fictional character in William Shakespeares play (Othello) Desdemona (moon), a moon of Uranus 666 Desdemona, an asteroid Desdemona, Texas Desdemona Music Festival, 2006 music festival in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (December 22, 1858 – November 29, 1924) was an Italian composer whose operas, including La bohème, Tosca, and Madama Butterfly, are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire. ... Original poster Tosca is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on Victorien Sardous drama, La Tosca. ...


The three leading roles in the opera are among Verdi's most demanding, both as singing and as acting roles. Some of the world's greatest tenors have sung the role of Otello, among them Giovanni Martinelli, Leo Slezak, Ramón Vinay, Mario del Monaco, James McCracken, Jon Vickers, and in our time, Plácido Domingo, who has appeared in more video productions of the opera than any other tenor. Many consider Domingo the definitive Otello, though the great singer–actor José Cura is in demand around the world for his interpretation of the Moor, not only musically but also dramatically. Many great baritones, such as Robert Merrill, Tito Gobbi, and Sherrill Milnes have sung the role of Iago. Conductor Arturo Toscanini's 1947 radio broadcast of the opera, starring Ramón Vinay, Giuseppe Valdengo, and Herva Nelli, is considered one of the Maestro's greatest performances and has been released on LP and CD. Giovanni Martinelli (born Montagnana 22 October 1885 - died New York, 2 February 1969) was an Italian tenor opera singer. ... Leo Slezak, (* August 18, 1873 in Mährisch-Schönberg; † Juni, 1 1946 in Rottach-Egern) was a popular opera singer and actor/comedian. ... Ramón Vinay (August 31, 1912 – January 4, 1996) was a famous opera tenor. ... Mario del Monaco (Florence July 27, 1915 - October 16, 1982 in Mestre) was an Italian tenor. ... James McCracken (December 16, 1926 – April 29, 1988) was an American tenor. ... Jon S. Vickers, CC , D.Mus. ... José Plácido Domingo Embil (born January 21, 1941[1]), better known as Plácido Domingo, is a world-famous Spanish operatic tenor. ... José Cura, tenor and conductor José Cura (born December 5, 1962 in Rosario, Argentina) a world-famous opera tenor singer known for his intense and original interpretations of his characters, notably Verdi’s Otello and Saint-Saëns’ Samson, as well as for his unconventional and innovative concert performances. ... Robert Merrill (June 4, 1917 – October 23, 2004) was an American opera baritone. ... Tito Gobbi (October 24, 1913 – March 5, 1984) was an Italian baritone. ... Milnes as Scarpia in Tosca Sherrill Milnes (born January 10, 1935) is an American baritone famous for his Verdi roles. ... Arturo Toscanini listening to playbacks at RCA Victor (BMG Music) Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Note: broadcasting is also a term for hand sowing. ... Herva Nelli, was an Italian opera singer. ... The Beatles Magical Mystery Tour as a 33 â…“ LP vinyl record A gramophone record (also phonograph record, or simply record) is an analogue sound recording medium consisting of a flat disc with an inscribed modulated spiral groove starting near the periphery and ending near the center of the disc. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit ÄŒeské Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s...


External links

  • Libretto

  Results from FactBites:
 
Otello - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1590 words)
Otello is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi to an Italian libretto by Arrigo Boito, based on Shakespeare's play Othello.
Otello says that he still has a headache, and asks her to wrap her handkerchief around his head.
Otello, as he reads the letter from the Doge, asks, "Are you sure?" Jago explains to the puzzled Lodovico that perhaps Cassio's restoration is her wish.
Otello: History (1594 words)
It was decided that, "Otello proved a puzzlement, being not Italian enough for the emerging Italian audience and too Italian for the Germans; nor was it a novelty." (Mayer 1983, 69).
Signor Tamagno's Otello was made known to this public in 1890 as a vivid and powerful interpretation which justly entitled the tenor to the name of artist.
This is very high praise, for while Signor Tamagno's Otello has lost some of the dignity that the severe restraint of the master [Verdi] imposed upon it in earlier years, it has lost none of its tremendous power, its sweeping expression of fierce, over-mastering passion, and its superb vitality of declamation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m