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Encyclopedia > Otaku
The Akihabara neighborhood of Tokyo is a popular gathering place for otaku.
The Akihabara neighborhood of Tokyo is a popular gathering place for otaku.

Otaku (おたく or オタク?) is a term used to refer to people with obsessive interests, particularly anime and manga. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Akihabara_picture. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Akihabara_picture. ... Akihabara in 2007 Akihabara ), also known as Akihabara Electric Town ), is a neighborhood in Tokyo, Japan. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Animé redirects here. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ...

Contents

Etymology

As an honorific second-person pronoun

Otaku is derived from a Japanese term for another's house or family (お宅, 御宅 otaku) that is also used as an honorific second-person pronoun. The modern slang form, which is distinguished from the older usage by being written only in hiragana (おたく) or katakana (オタク or, less frequently, ヲタク), or rarely in rōmaji, appeared in the 1980s. In the anime Macross first aired in 1982, the term was used by Lin Ming Mei as an honourific term. It appears to have been coined by the humorist and essayist Akio Nakamori in his 1983 series An Investigation of "Otaku" (『おたく』の研究 "Otaku" no Kenkyū?), printed in the lolicon magazine Manga Burikko, who observed that this form of address was unusually common among geeks, nerds and most notably, animationist like Haruhiko Mikimoto and Shōji Kawamori.[1] It was apparently a reference to someone who communicates with their equals using (unnecessarily) the distant and formal pronoun, and spends most of their time at home. For other uses, see Slang (disambiguation). ... Hiragana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system, along with katakana and kanji; the Latin alphabet is also used in some cases. ... Katakana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system along with hiragana, kanji, and in some cases the Latin alphabet. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... The Super Dimension Fortress Macross (Japanese: 超時空要塞マクロス, Chou Jikuu Yousai Macross) is an anime television series. ... Akio Nakamori ), real name Ansaku Shibahara ), is a columnist and editor born on January 1, 1960 in Mie Prefecture, Japan. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... Lolicon art often depicts childlike characteristics with likely double meanings. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... For other uses, see Nerd (disambiguation). ... Haruhiko Mikimoto (美樹本 晴彦 Mikimoto Haruhiko, real name Haruhiko Satō (佐藤晴彦 Satō Haruhiko)) is a mangaka, illustrator, anime character designer. ... Shōji Kawamori , born February 2, 1960), is a renowned Japanese anime creator and designer, having created or co-created such notable series as The Vision of Escaflowne, Earth Girl Arjuna, Genesis of Aquarion, and nearly every chapter of the Macross series. ...


Nakamori's publication

The term entered general use in Japan around 1989, and may have been popularized by Nakamori's publication in that year of The Generation of M – We and Mr.Miyazaki (Mの世代-ぼくらとミヤザキ君 M no Sedai – Bokura to Miyazaki-kun?). It applied the term to the (then) recently caught serial killer Tsutomu Miyazaki (宮崎 勤), who turned out to be a recluse obsessed with pornographic anime and manga and who lived out his rape fantasies on young girls, thus attaching a huge taboo to a formerly innocuous term. Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... Tsutomu Miyazaki , born August 21, 1962), also known as The Otaku Murderer, The Little Girl Murderer, and Dracula, is a Japanese serial killer. ... For the town, see Recluse, Wyoming. ... See fantasy for an account of the literary genre involving the development of common or popular fantasies. ...


As pathological-techno-fetishist-with-social-deficit

The term was popularized in the English speaking world in William Gibson's 1996 novel Idoru, which has several references to otaku. In particular, the term was defined as 'pathological-techno-fetishist-with-social-deficit'. In an April 2001 edition of The Observer, William Gibson explained his view of the term: Definitions of the Anglosphere vary: Countries in which English is the first language of a large fraction of the population are shown in blue. ... For other persons named William Gibson, see William Gibson (disambiguation). ... William Gibsons Bridge trilogy is his second trilogy, after the successful Sprawl trilogy. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

The otaku, the passionate obsessive, the information age's embodiment of the connoisseur, more concerned with the accumulation of data than of objects, seems a natural crossover figure in today's interface of British and Japanese cultures. I see it in the eyes of the Portobello dealers, and in the eyes of the Japanese collectors: a perfectly calm train-spotter frenzy, murderous and sublime. Understanding otaku -hood, I think, is one of the keys to understanding the culture of the web. There is something profoundly post-national about it, extra-geographic. We are all curators, in the post-modern world, whether we want to be or not.[2] Portobello Road Portobello Road is a road in the Notting Hill district of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in west London. ... Railfans practicing their hobby at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. ... Postmodernism (sometimes abbreviated Po-mo[1]) is a term originating in architecture, literally after the modern, denoting a style that is more ornamental than modernism, and which borrows from previous architectural styles, often in a playful or ironic fashion. ...

From the May 2006 issue of EX Taishuu magazine

Another potential etymology for the term comes from the May 2006 issue of EX Taishuu magazine, which claims that use of the term started among the fanbase of the 1982 – 1983 TV series Super Dimension Fortress Macross, as the main character of the show had a habit of addressing others as "otaku", which fans started to emulate. The Super Dimension Fortress Macross (Japanese: 超時空要塞マクロス, Chou Jikuu Yousai Macross) is an anime television series. ...


From the works of science fiction author Motoko Arai

Another source for the term comes from the works of science fiction author Motoko Arai. In his book Wrong about Japan, Peter Carey interviews the novelist, artist and Gundam chronicler Yuka Minakawa. She reveals that Arai used the word in her novels as a second-person pronoun, and the readers adopted the term for themselves. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Wrong about Japan is a 2005 book by Peter Carey. ... Peter Philip Carey (born May 7, 1943) is an Australian novelist. ... This article is about the anime series. ...


In Japan

In modern Japanese slang, the term otaku refers to fan of, or is specialized in any particular theme, topic, or hobby. Common uses are anime otaku (a fan of anime ) and manga otaku (a fan of Japanese comic books or manga), pasokon otaku (personal computer geeks), gēmu otaku (playing video games), and wota (pronounced 'ota', previously referred to as "idol otaku") that are extreme fans of idols, heavily promoted singing girls. There are also tetsudō otaku or denshamania (metrophiles) or gunji otaku (military geeks). Computer and video games redirects here. ... Wota (ヲタ; oh-tah) is a kind of otaku, but while regular otaku seek out anime figurines and high-tech gizmos, a wota is devoted for female idols — the pop group Morning Musume is particularly notorious for having concentrated amounts of obsessed wota, especially in the case of Miki Fujimoto. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Railfans practicing their hobby at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. ...


While these are the most common uses of otaku, the word can be applied to anything (music otaku, martial arts otaku, cooking otaku, etc).


The loan-words maniakku or mania (from the English "maniac" and "mania") are sometimes used in relation to specialist hobbies and interests. They can indicate someone with otaku leanings, (for example- Gundam Mania would describe a person who is very interested in the anime series Gundam). They can also describe the focus of such interests (a maniakku gēmu would be a particularly underground or eccentric game appealing primarily to otaku). The nuance of maniakku in Japanese is softer and less likely to cause offense than otaku. This article is about the anime series. ...


Some of Japan's otaku use the term to describe themselves and their friends semi-humorously, accepting their position as fans, and some even use the term proudly, attempting to reclaim it from its negative connotations. In general colloquial usage however, most Japanese would consider it undesirable to be described in a serious fashion as "otaku"; many even consider it to be a genuine insult. To reclaim is to bring a word back to a more acceptable course. ...


Although stereotypically male, there are also many female otaku or fujoshi. A small alleyway of Tokyo's Higashi Ikebukuro district is known as "Otome Road" ("Maiden's road"). A feature of the area is that there are so many bookstores devoted to Manga and books filled with stories about homosexual men, in a genre called Yaoi or Shōnen-ai. Dōjinshi, manga produced by amateur fans, dominate the shelves along Otome Road, with a significant chunk of Manga' stories about more famous anime that imitate, parody or develop on characters who are usually household names in Japan. Fujoshi ) is a pejorative Japanese term for female fans of manga and novels that feature romantic relationships between men. ... Cover of Selfish Love by Naduki Koujima. ... “Boys Love” redirects here. ... Dōjinshi ) are self-published Japanese or English works, usually manga or novels. ...


An interesting modern look into the otaku culture has surfaced with an allegedly true story surfacing on the largest internet bulletin board 2channel: "Densha Otoko" or "Train Man", a love story about a geek and a beautiful woman who meet on a train. The story has enjoyed a compilation in novel form, several comic book adaptations, a movie released in June 2005, a theme song Love Parade for this movie by a popular Japanese band named Orange Range and a television series that aired on Fuji TV from June to September 2005. The drama has become another hot topic in Japan, and the novel, film and television series give a closer look into the otaku culture. In Japan its popularity and positive portrayal of the main character has helped to reduce negative stereotypes about otaku, and increase the acceptability of some otaku hobbies. Perhaps encouraged by this reduction in stigma, a few famous Japanese celebrities, actors and models have come out about their otaku hobbies.[citation needed] “DQN” redirects here. ... Densha Otoko translated as Train Man) is a Japanese movie, television series, manga, novel, and other media, all based on the purportedly true story of a twenty-three year old otaku, who intervened when a drunk man was harassing several women on a train, and who himself ultimately begins dating... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... For a mountain range in Indonesia, see Jayawijaya Mountains. ... Fuji Television Network, Inc. ...


A subset of otaku are the Akiba-kei, men who spend a lot of time in Akihabara in Tokyo and who are mainly obsessive about anime, idols and games. Sometimes the term is used to describe something pertaining to the subculture that surrounds anime, idols and games in Japan. This subculture places an emphasis on certain services (see fanservice) and has its own system for judgment of anime, dating simulations and/or role-playing games and some manga (often dōjinshi) based upon the level of fanservice in the work. Another popular criterion — how ideal the female protagonist of the show is — is often characterized by a level of stylized cuteness and child-like behavior (see moe). In addition, this subculture places great emphasis on knowledge of individual key animators and directors and of minute details within works. The international subculture is influenced by the Japanese one, but differs in many areas often based upon region. (See also: Superflat, Hiroki Azuma.) Akiba-kei are people who frequent Akihabara in Tokyo where many kinds of electronics can be bought. ... Akihabara in 2007 Akihabara ), also known as Akihabara Electric Town ), is a neighborhood in Tokyo, Japan. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Fanservice or fan service (Japanese simply saabisu, service), is a vaguely defined term used in visual media — particularly in anime fandom —to refer to elements in a story that are superfluous to a storyline, but designed to amuse or excite the audience. ... Dating simulations (dating sims) are a genre of computer and video games, usually Japanese, with romantic elements. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Dōjinshi (; also romanized as doujinshi) are self-published Japanese works, including but not limited to comic books (manga), novels, fan guides, art collections, and games. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... The properties that make a character moe are often difficult to define but easy to recognize. ... Superflat is a postmodern art movement influenced by manga and anime. ... Hiroki Azuma (東浩紀 Azuma Hiroki) is a Japanese cultural critic. ...


On the matter, in recent years "idol otaku" are naming themselves simply as Wota (ヲタ?) as a way to differentiate from traditional otaku. The word was derived by dropping the last morae, leaving ota (オタ?) and then substituting o (?) with the identically sounding character wo (?), leaving the pronunciation unchanged.[3] Wota (ヲタ; oh-tah) is a kind of otaku, but while regular otaku seek out anime figurines and high-tech gizmos, a wota is devoted for female idols — the pop group Morning Musume is particularly notorious for having concentrated amounts of obsessed wota, especially in the case of Miki Fujimoto. ... Wota (ヲタ; oh-tah) is a kind of otaku, but while regular otaku seek out anime figurines and high-tech gizmos, a wota is devoted for female idols — the pop group Morning Musume is particularly notorious for having concentrated amounts of obsessed wota, especially in the case of Miki Fujimoto. ... Mora (plural moras or morae) is a unit of sound used in phonology that determines syllable weight (which in turn determines stress or timing) in some languages. ... In Japanese writing, the kana お (hiragana) and オ (katakana) occupy the fifth place, between え and か, in the modern GojÅ«on (五十音) system of collating kana. ... In Japanese writing, the kana お (hiragana) and オ (katakana) occupy the fifth place, between え and か, in the modern GojÅ«on (五十音) system of collating kana. ... ã‚’, in hiragana, or ヲ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which each represent one mora. ... ã‚’, in hiragana, or ヲ in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, which each represent one mora. ...


In Japan, anime is not as widely accepted and mainstream as manga. Because of this the otaku subculture has much influence over the mainstream anime industry in Japan. The area where otaku have the most influence in manga tends to be with dōjinshi. Manga published in the United States are more influenced by their respective otaku subculture than they are in Japan. This is because most people who read manga have some ties to the subculture in the US, whereas in Japan manga reading is more widespread.


In English/Internationally

The term is a loanword from the Japanese language. In English, it is used to refer specifically to any kind of "geek", though it can sometimes refer to a fan of anime and/or manga. It also is used to refer to people who appear to be obsessed with Japan and its culture. The term serves as a label not unlike Trekkie or fanboy. However, use of the label can be a source of contention among some anime fans, particularly those who are aware of the negative connotations the term has in Japan. Unpleasant stereotypes about otaku prevail in worldwide fan communities, and some anime fans express concern about the effect these more extreme fans can have on the reputation of their hobby (not unlike sentiments in the comic book and science fiction fandoms). A loanword (or loan word) is a word directly taken into one language from another with little or no translation. ... Not to be confused with the Javanese language. ... Animé redirects here. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... Trekker redirects here. ... Fanboy is a term used to describe an individual (usually male, though the feminine version fangirl may be used for females) who is utterly devoted to a single fannish subject, or to a single point of view within that subject, often to the point where it is considered an obsession. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


It should be noted that the English term geek is not a precise translation of the Japanese otaku. Otaku has a significantly greater negative connotation than geek does in the West, especially as the term geek has become less derogatory. The term otaku in Japanese occasionally suggests a creepy, obsessive loner who rarely leaves the house. However this is not always the case, and in general use it shares more of a similarity with the English term "enthusiast". In English, geek can possibly suggest a person who may be socially awkward but who is also intelligent and may be fairly "normal" aside from their interest in certain typically 'geekish' pursuits (video games, comic books, computers, etc.). Otaku is closer in connotation to the English nerd, but the closest English-language analogue to otaku is probably the British English term anorak. Both of these English-language terms have more emphatically negative connotations of poor social skills and obsessive interest in a topic that seems strange or boring to others. For other uses, see Nerd (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


While otaku in English-speaking contexts is generally understood to mean geek or even fan, this usage is not widely known in Japan. Casual use of this term may confuse or offend native Japanese speakers.


The most common case in the use of the word Otaku is not only refering to a Geek but also to a Person who likes/loves watching anime.(Or a person who likes/loves 'Galge' Games or 'Bishoujo Games)


To indicate that one is talking about the Japanese definition rather than the English loanword, the spelling wotaku (ヲタク) is sometimes used. On Japanese forums such as 2channel, however, otaku (オタク) and wotaku (ヲタク) are used interchangeably, depending on the mood and personal style of the poster. “DQN” redirects here. ...


Many Western otaku are frequently perceived as "Wapanese", a portmanteau which may be based on the similar term Wigger. Such individuals are typically White and worship an idealized version of Japan and its culture based mostly on what is seen in anime and manga. This worship may extend to emulating external aspects of Japanese culture, such as eating sushi and instant ramen or using chopsticks. It also may extend to attempting to use Japanese words in a normal english conversation, usually incorrectly and based on words pulled from anime dialogue. Many Wapanese males may also be perceived as having a perverted interest in Japanese females possibly due to Lolicon or the comparative lack of feminism in Asian culture and the assumption that Asian females are more submissive. Wigger (often spelled wigga or whigger or whigga) is a slang term that refers to a white person who emulates mannerisms, slangs and fashions stereotypically associated with urban African American; especially in relation to hip hop culture. ... Lolicon art often depicts childlike characteristics with likely double meanings. ...


Otakon

Named after the label Otaku, "Otakon" (short for "otaku convention") is a convention known for focusing on anime, manga, East Asian culture, and its fandom. The second largest convention of this type in the US and the largest on the east coast, it began in State College, PA in 1994 and has been held in Baltimore, Maryland since 1999. Last Year, Otakon was the largest convention of its kind in the US. Konami (the company which created the Metal Gear series) was given permission by Otakorp, Inc. to use the name "Otacon" for any title of the series.[4] Otakon is a fan convention focusing on the art of anime and manga, East Asian culture, and its fandom. ... State College redirects here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more Motto: Get In On It (formerly The City That Reads and The Greatest City in America; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Location Location of Baltimore in Maryland Coordinates , Government Country State County United... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ...


Fictional works about otaku

As otaku make up a good portion of the creative forces behind anime and manga, it is only natural that several works of manga and anime on otaku culture have appeared, often as a light-hearted pastiche. Some of the more famous works include: The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ...

  • 1 LOVE: In the video for the Ayumi Hamasaki song '1 LOVE', a clown man is auctioning off people, and among them are a prostitute, singer, beast, aerial hooper, and even an otaku, among others.
  • Akihabara@DEEP: Page, Box, Akira, Taiko, Daruma, and Izumu are six otaku, each with his/her own troubles, who seek relief through a website called "Yui’s Lifeguard." When site owner Yui dies of a mysterious death, the six, who are each experts in their own fields, gather to form "Akihabara@DEEP", a "troubleshooter" group that vows to protect Akihabara and solve the problems of its inhabitants.
  • Comic Party: Originally a series of dating sims which was then adapted into various anime and manga series, Comic Party follows a rejected art student as he is enthusiastically thrust into the dōjinshi scene by a crazed otaku friend. He then creates several of his own dōjinshi works while interacting with other artists and dealing with his girlfriend who is at first less than enthusiastic about his new passion.
  • Densha Otoko: Densha Otoko (電車男, literally "Train Man") is the allegedly true story of a Japanese geek in his early 20s who saves a beautiful woman ("office lady"), code-named Hermès by the geek in his online chats, from a drunken groper on a train, and then chronicles his subsequent dates with the woman and requests for help on the Japanese mega-BBS 2channel (in the TV series referred to and remodeled into the semi-fictitious "Aladdin Channel").
  • Genshiken: A manga, later adapted into an anime series, which follows a "catch-all" otaku university club and the various activities they undertake. Much of the story is told from the perspectives of two characters: a freshman who grows into his otaku identity; and the "normal" girlfriend of another member, who disapproves of the passions of her attractive otaku boyfriend.
  • Groove On Fight: The fourth entry in the Atlus fighting game series Power Instinct. In the roster, there are two characters who make references to otaku culture: Popura Hananokoji, a magical girl who transforms her outfit in different costumes, resembling Cosplay in various attacks. The other one is Hizumi Yukinoue, an otaku obsessed with ninjas and is also a fan of manga and anime.
  • Hot Gimmick: Subaru is an avid fan of Gundam and gets made fun of for being an otaku on a number of occasions by Akane, who later develops a crush on him despite his love for Gundam and reading manga all day.
  • Lucky Star: The main character, Konata Izumi is a very avid fan of anime, manga, gaming and cosplaying. Throughout the show there would be puns or jokes about other anime and other otaku hobbies. Lucky Star also shows a lot about the life of the everyday otaku in Japan.
  • Metal Gear: A recurring character in the Metal Gear video game series is a man named Dr. Hal "Otacon" Emmerich. He is a lover of Japanese anime and entered into the field of engineering and technology because of it (namely because of the mecha genre.) His nickname "Otacon" is inspired by the Anime Convention Otakon.
  • No More Heroes : A video game made by Suda 51 about an Otaku hitman by the name of Travis Touchdown climbing the ranks of the UAA, a group of competing assassins.
  • Ouran High School Host Club: Ouran contains a character named Renge who is an avid fan of Dating Sims and doujinshi. She is usually seen in some form of cosplay through the anime.
  • Otaku no Video: A pair of films that follow a young college student as he is introduced into the world of the otaku by a high school friend and soon spends the next several years trying to become the greatest otaku, the Otaking. The work also serves as a semi-autobiographical account of the formation of Gainax, and is inter-cut with several live-action mock interviews with several different types of otaku.
  • Welcome to the NHK!: A novel that was adapted into a manga and later an anime series, Welcome to the NHK! is a black comedy that follows a delusional hikikomori, a girl that wishes to help him, and an otaku neighbor who is also an old high school friend (of convenience). The series lampoons many otaku themes such as lolicon, moe, and dojin soft.
  • World War Z; Max Brooks' "Oral history of the Zombie War" includes passages from Kondo Tatsumi, an "otaku" (although he fits the personality of a Hikikomori)who is nearly killed after staying in front of his computer until the last minute during a worldwide zombie epidemic, nearly getting killed in his apartment building.

This article is about the Ayumi Hamasaki album. ... Ayumi Hamasaki ), born October 2, 1978, is a Japanese singer-songwriter and former actress. ... Akihabara@DEEP a Japanese manga by Ira Ishida. ... Comic Party (1999), sometimes abbreviated ComiPa, is a visual novel by the Japanese game studio Leaf. ... Dating simulations (dating sims) are a video game subgenre of simulation games, usually Japanese, with romantic elements. ... Densha Otoko translated as Train Man) is a Japanese movie, television series, manga, novel, and other media, all based on the purportedly true story of a twenty-three year old otaku, who intervened when a drunk man was harassing several women on a train, and who himself ultimately begins dating... “DQN” redirects here. ... Genshiken ) is a manga series by Kio Shimoku about a college club for otaku (extremely devoted fans of various media) and the lifestyle its members pursue. ... Ingame screenshot from Power Instinct Power Instinct ) is a fighting game series created by Atlus released in 1993. ... Atlus ) is a Japanese computer and video game developer and publisher. ... Screenshot of The King of Fighters XI (2005, SNK Playmore). ... Popura Hananokouji (花小路ポプラ) is a fictional character designed for the Power Instinct game series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cosplayers Cosplay ), a portmanteau of the English words costume and play, is a Japanese subculture centered on dressing as characters from manga, anime, tokusatsu, and video games, and, less commonly, Japanese live action television shows, fantasy movies, Japanese pop music bands, Visual Kei, fantasy music stories (such as stories by... Hizumi Yukinoue Hizumi Yukinoue (雪上 火澄 ) is a fictional character designed for the Power Instinct game series. ... Jiraiya, ninja and title character of the Japanese folktale Jiraiya Goketsu Monogatari. ... Serialized in Betsucomi Original run December 2000 – August 2005 Volumes 12 Hot Gimmick ) is a 12-volume shōjo manga by Miki Aihara that was serialized in the Japanese manga anthology Betsucomi from December 2000 to July 2005. ... Original run April 8, 2007 – September 16, 2007 Episodes 24 Game: Shin Lucky Star Moe Drill: Tabidachi Developer Kadokawa Shoten Publisher Kadokawa Shoten Genre Adventure, Puzzle, Educational Rating CERO: All ages Platform Nintendo DS Released May 24, 2007 Game: Lucky Star: Ryōō Gakuen ÅŒtōsai Developer Vridge Publisher Kadokawa Shoten... For the original video game titled Metal Gear, see Metal Gear. ... This is a list of recurring characters appearing in the Metal Gear series. ... This article is about the term used in science fiction, anime, and manga. ... Otakon is a fan convention focusing on the art of anime and manga, East Asian culture, and its fandom. ... No More Heroes ) is an action video game for the Wii video game system. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... Goichi Suda, aka Suda 51, works as a video game designer for Grasshopper Studios. ... Serialized in LaLa Original run August 5, 2003 – Ongoing Volumes 11 (ongoing) TV anime Director Takuya Igarashi Studio Bones Licensor VAP FUNimation Entertainment OnMedia Network Animax, NTV Tooniverse Original run April 5, 2006 – September 26, 2006 Episodes 26 Ouran High School Host Club ) is a manga series by Bisco Hatori... DVD cover of North American release of Otaku no Video. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by flesh-and-blood actors, as opposed to animation. ... Welcome to the N.H.K. ) is a light novel series by Tatsuhiko Takimoto, which since then has been adapted into a manga and an anime. ... This article is about a tone of comedy. ... Hikikomori , lit. ... Lolicon art often depicts childlike characteristics with likely double meanings. ... The properties that make a character moe are often difficult to define but easy to recognize. ... Dōjin soft (short for software) are video games created by Japanese hobbyists, more for fun than for profit; essentially, the Japanese equivalent of shareware video games. ... World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (abbreviated WWZ) is a novel by Max Brooks which chronicles a theoretical zombie apocalypse, specifically the titular Zombie World War, as a series of after-the-fact oral history interviews with prominent survivors. ... Hikikomori , lit. ...

See also

Look up Otaku in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cosplay restaurants ), are theme restaurants and pubs that originated in Akihabara, Tokyo, Japan around the year 2000. ... Figure moe zoku () (literally figure budding tribe, or, closer to the true meaning, Action Figure Gang of Budding Fetishists) is a coinage made by Japanese journalist Akihiro Otani who claims otaku (or Geeks) are potential criminals, based on the 2004 Nara 1st grade girls murder involving Kaede Ariyama. ... Fujoshi ) is a pejorative Japanese term for female fans of manga and novels that feature romantic relationships between men. ... Stephanie Pakrul, or StephTheGeek, a blogger. ... Lafcadio Hearn, aka Koizumi Yakumo, a notable scholar and author well known for his strong interest in Japanese culture and books on Japan. ... The properties that make a character moe are often difficult to define but easy to recognize. ...

References

  1. ^ オタク市場の研究(Otaku Shijou no Kenkyuu), 野村總合研究所(Nomura Research Institude), ISBN:978-986-124-768-7
  2. ^ Modern boys and mobile girls, 2001-04-01
  3. ^ Eric Prideaux. Wota lota love. Out on the town with grown men who adore girl idols. The Japan Times, 16 January 2005.
  4. ^ Otakon clock to come with select MGS titles - PSP News at GameSpot

This article is about the year. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wired is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ...

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Otaku - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1812 words)
Otaku is a term originally from Japanese which means a variety of geek or fanboy/fangirl, particularly one obsessed with such hobbies as anime and manga.
Otaku is increasingly being used outside of Japan to refer to an individual who is obsessed with technology, a pre-occupation stereotypically assigned to Japanese teens in the early 1980s.
Otaku no Video: A pair of films that follow a young college student as he is introduced into the world of the otaku by a high school friend and soon spends the next several years trying to become the greatest otaku, the Otaking.
Otaku - Encyclopedia Dramatica (200 words)
Otaku is to anime as a Trekkie is to Star Trek, only more annoying, and infinitely more deserving of a shiv betweent he shoulderblades.
An otaku can be identified on livejournal by their numerous posts full of anime-related quiz results and/or rants about (insert anime-related subject here).
Otaku, おたく, means "your house", or "you" (depending on context), which has an implicit insulting tone in Japanese due to the cultural preference for calling people by their names instead of using pronouns.
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