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Encyclopedia > Oswestry
Oswestry

Coordinates: 52°51′24″N 3°03′03″W / 52.8566, -3.0508 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Population Civil parish: 15,613
(2001 Census)
OS grid reference SJ292293
District Oswestry
Shire county Shropshire
Region West Midlands
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town OSWESTRY
Postcode district SY10, SY11
Dial code 01691
Police West Mercia
Fire Shropshire
Ambulance West Midlands
UK Parliament North Shropshire
European Parliament West Midlands
List of places: UKEnglandShropshire

Oswestry is a town in Shropshire, England, very close to the Welsh border. It is at the junction of the A5, A483, and A495 roads. The town is the administrative headquarters of the borough of Oswestry and is the third largest town in Shropshire with a population of 17,181 [1], after Telford and Shrewsbury. The former Marcher Lordship of Oswestry was annexed to Shropshire along with the Lordships of Whetington, Masbroke and Knoking to form the Hundred of Oswestry by section 11 of the Laws in Wales Acts 1535. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 11 KB) Summary Description: A blank map of the United Kingdom, with country outline and coastline; contact the author for help with modifications or add-ons Source: Reference map provided by Demis Mapper 6 Date: 2006-21-06 Author: User... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Oswestry is a small local government district with borough status in Shropshire, England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... Shropshire (alternatively Salop or abbreviated Shrops) is a county in the West Midlands of England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The West Midlands is a geographical term describing the western half of central England, known as the Midlands. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1] and European institutions such as the Council of Europe frequently use... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The SY postcode area, also known as the Shrewsbury postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Aberystwyth, Bishops Castle, Borth, Bow Street, Bucknell, Caersws, Church Stretton, Craven Arms, Ellesmere, Llanbrynmair, Llandinam, Llanfechain, Llanfyllin, Llanidloes, Llanon, Llanrhystud, Llansantffraid, Llanymynech, Ludlow, Lydbury North, Machynlleth, Malpas, Meifod, Montgomery, Newtown, Oswestry... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... West Mercia Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the counties of Shropshire (including Telford and Wrekin), Herefordshire and Worcestershire in England. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering Shropshire in the West Midlands region of England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The West Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in Herefordshire, Shropshire, Telford and Wrekin, Warwickshire, West Midlands, and Worcestershire in the West Midlands region. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Shropshire North is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... West Midlands is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Shropshire, England. ... Shropshire (alternatively Salop or abbreviated Shrops) is a county in the West Midlands of England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... This article is about the sub-division of the United Kingdom. ... The A5 is a major road in the United Kingdom. ... The A483 is a major road in the United Kingdom, running from Swansea in Wales to Chester in England. ... The numbering zones for A-roads in Great Britain List of A roads beginning with 4 in Great Britain starting north of the A4 and south/west of the A5. ... Oswestry is a small local government district with borough status in Shropshire, England. ... This article is about the town of Telford, Shropshire. ... Shrewsbury (pronounced either or ) is a town of 70,560 inhabitants [1] in Shropshire, England. ... In European history, marches are border regions between centres of power. ... A hundred is an administrative division, frequently used in Europe and New England, which historically was used to divide a larger region into smaller geographical units. ... The Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542 were a series of parliamentary measures by which the legal system of Wales was annexed to England and the norms of English administration introduced in order to create a single state and a single legal jurisdiction, which is frequently referred to as England...

Contents

History

The area has long been settled. Old Oswestry is the site of a large Iron Age hill fort with evidence for occupation dating back to the 550s BC. Old Oswestry is a large and impressive early Iron Age hill fort in the Welsh Marches near Oswestry. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... A hill fort is a fortified refuge or defended settlement, located to exploit a rise in elevation for military advantage. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 600s BC - 590s BC - 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC Events and Trends Carthage conquers Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica 559 BC - King Cambyses I of Anshan dies...


The Battle of Maserfield is thought to have been fought here in 642, between the Anglo-Saxon kings Penda and Oswald. Oswald was killed in this battle and was dismembered; according to a legend, one of his arms was carried to an ash tree by a bird, and miracles were subsequently attributed to the tree (as Oswald was considered a saint). Thus it is believed that the name of the site derived from a reference to "Oswald's Tree". The spring Oswald's Well is supposed to have originated where the bird dropped the arm from the tree. The Battle of Maserfield (or Maserfeld) was fought on August 5, 642, between the Anglo-Saxon kings Oswald of Northumbria and Penda of Mercia, ending in Oswalds defeat, death, and dismemberment. ... Events August 5 - In the Battle of Maserfield, Penda king of Mercia defeats and kills Oswald, king of Bernicia. ... The foremost of the kings of Anglo-Saxon England was Ælle of Sussex in 477, who was much later followed by Alfred the Great (who took the place of Ethelred) in 871. ... Stained glass window from the cloister of Worcester Cathedral showing the death of Penda of Mercia. ... Oswald (c. ...


Offa's Dyke runs nearby to the west. The town, being very close to Wales, has many Welsh street and place names and the town's name in Welsh is Croesoswallt, meaning Oswald's Cross. Offas Dyke (in Welsh, Clawdd Offa) is a massive earthwork, ostensibly between England and Wales, running from the estuary of the River Dee in the north to the River Wye in the south (approximately 150 miles, or 240 km). ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...


The Domesday Book records a castle being built by Rainald, a Norman Sheriff of Shropshire: "L'oeuvre" (meaning "the work" in French) (which was reduced to a pile of rocks during the English Civil War), and the town changed hands between English and Welsh a number of times during the Middle Ages. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... Rainald, Abbot of Abingdon. ... Norman conquests in red. ... The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


In 1190 the town was granted the right to hold a market each Wednesday[1]. After the foot and mouth outbreak in the late 1960s the animal market was moved out of town and a statue of a shepherd and shep installed in the market square. With the weekly influx of Welsh farmers the town folk were often bilingual. Events March 16 - Massacre and mass-suicide of the Jews of York, England prompted by Crusaders and Richard Malebys kill 150-500 Jews in Cliffords Tower June 10 - Third Crusade: Frederick I Barbarossa drowned in the Saleph River while leading an army to Jerusalem. ... Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), sometimes called hoof-and-mouth disease, is a highly contagious but non-fatal viral disease of cattle and pigs. ...


The town built walls for protection, but these were torn down by the Parliamentarians after they took the town after a brief siege on 22 June 1644, leaving only the Newgate Pillar visible today. is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events February to August - Explorer Abel Tasmans second expedition for the Dutch East India Company maps the north coast of Australia. ...


Attractions of Oswestry include Whittington Castle (in nearby Whittington),Shelf Bank and the Cambrian Railways Museum and the Old Station Visitor Centre. As well as numerous primary schools in or just outside Oswestry, there are two private schools, Oswestry School and Moreton Hall, and a comprehensive, The Marches School and Technology College. In addition, post-16 education is provided by North Shropshire and Walford College. The town also has a noted specialist orthopaedic hospital the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt[2]. , This photograph of Whittington Castle before its recent renovation was published in Thos D. Murphys work In Unfamiliar England (1910). ... Whittington is a village in Shropshire, England. ... This large hill in the centre of Oswestry was apparently donated to the children of Oswestry by a long-forgotton landlord and as a result of its disputed ownership has proved very difficult to redevelop, despite occupying valuable land just outside the town centre. ... Oswestry School is a British independent school for both boys and girls. ...


The town is famous for its high number of public houses per head of population. There are around 30 in the town today, although many have closed over the past 100 years (or been subject to poor modernisations which have removed much of their character e.g. The Butcher's Arms on Willow Street). That said, many still offer excellent real ales, real fires and a warm welcomes. A story incorporating the names of all of the pubs once open in Oswestry can be found hanging on the walls of The Oak on Church Street.[citation needed]


The parish church is almost a 1000 years old with the Norman tower dating from 1085. There is also 12 other churches in the town including a Welsh Presbyterian in Victoria Road.[3] Norman may refer to: M.E. Norman, a steamboat that capsized in Memphis in 1925 Normans, a people who colonized Normandy and conquered England Norman architecture, styles of Romanesque architecture developed by the Normans Norman dynasty, a series of monarchs who ruled England and/or Normandy Norman language, a Romance... April 2 - Emperor Zhezong became emperor of Song Dynasty. ...


The former local football club, Oswestry Town F.C., was one of the few English teams to compete in the League of Wales. Oswestry Town folded due to financial difficulties in 2003 and merged with Total Network Solutions F.C. of Llansantffraid, a village eight miles (13 km) away on the Welsh side of the border. Following the takeover of the club's sponsor in 2006, the club renamed itself as The New Saints They are planning to build a new ground in Oswestry, but will probably not break ground until at least 2007. Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... The Welsh Premiership is the national football league for Wales and is at the top of the Welsh football league system. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain is a village in Powys, Wales about 8 miles to the north of Welshpool. ... The New Saints F.C., often known as TNS, is a Welsh football club representing Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain in Wales and Oswestry in England (the two places are only 8 miles/13 km apart). ...


Oswestry does not have an active railway station itself, although the buildings of the long-disused former railway station occupy a prominent place in the town, and the still mostly intact railway runs right through the middle, just past the town centre. The nearest active station is at Gobowen. Gobowen railway station is a railway station serving the village of Gobowen, Shropshire, England. ...


Park Hall, a mile east of the town was one of the most impressive Tudor buildings in the country. It was taken over by the Army in 1915 and used as a training camp. On 26 December 1918 it burnt to the ground following an electrical fault. The ruined hall and camp remained derelict between the wars.[4] For decades following World War 2, Oswestry was a prominent military centre for Canadian troops, later British Royal Artillery and latterly, a very successful training centre for 16-18 year old Infantry Junior Leaders. This long and proud military connection came to an ignominious end in the mid-1970s, shortly after some local licensed wildfowlers were shot by the young military guard one winter's night, mistaken for an attacking IRA force, as the locals discharged their shotguns at some passing ducks. Tudor usually relates to the Tudor period in English history, which refers to the period of time between 1485 and 1558/1603 when the Tudor dynasty held the English throne. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 361st in leap years. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Artillery The Royal Regiment of Artillery, generally known as the Royal Artillery (RA), is, despite its name, a corps of the British Army. ... Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish name: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA) is an Irish Republican left-wing paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern Ireland...


Notable Oswestrians

Jesse Armstrong is one of the co-creators (along with Sam Bain) of Channel 4s Peep Show. ... Frank Bough (IPA pronunciation of his last name: ) (born Fenton, Stoke-on-Trent, England, January 15th 1933) is a British television presenter who specialised in sports programmes. ... Thomas Bray (1656 - 15 February 1730) was an English clergyman born in Marton, Shropshire in 1656, and educated at All Souls College, Oxford University. ... Sir Henry Walford Davies (September 6, 1869 - March 11, 1941) was a British composer, who held the title Master of the Kings Music from 1934 until 1941. ... Ian Hunter (born Ian Hunter Patterson on June 3, 1939 in Oswestry, Shropshire, England) was the lead singer of the band Mott the Hoople from 1969 until the band broke up in 1974. ... Mott the Hoople was a 1970s British rock and roll and glam rock band with strong R&B roots. ... Per Lindstrand (right) with Richard Branson and the Virgin Pacific Flyer capsule in Miyakonojo, Japan Per Lindstrand (born August 8, 1948, Sweden) is an aeronautical engineer, pilot and adventurer who has lived in Oswestry, England, since 1978. ... Alexander Daniel Alan Macmillan, 2nd Earl of Stockton (born October 10, 1943) is a Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... Wilfred Edward Salter Owen, MC (March 18, 1893 – November 4, 1918) was an English poet and soldier, regarded by many as the leading poet of the First World War. ... Barbara Mary Crampton Pym (June 2, 1913 - January 11, 1980) was an English novelist. ... Trevor Rees-Jones (also known as Trevor Rees; born 1968) is the former bodyguard for Dodi Al-Fayed and was badly injured in the car accident that killed his charge; Diana, Princess of Wales; and chauffeur Henri Paul. ... Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances;[2] née Spencer; 1 July 1961 – 31 August 1997) was the first wife of Charles, Prince of Wales. ... William Archibald Spooner (July 22, 1844–August 29, 1930) was educated at Oswestry School and New College, Oxford, the first non-Wykehamist to be so, and became an Anglican priest and a scholar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... William Henry Griffith Thomas (1861-1924) was an Anglican clergyman and scholar from Owestry, Shropshire, England. ... George Williams (24 September 1869 - ) was born in Oswestry, which has at various times in history been part of either Wales or Shropshire. ... The cover of Ian Woosnams 2003 autobiography. ... Timothy Andrew Lloyd (born November 5, 1956, Oswestry, Shropshire) is a former English cricketer who played in one Test and 3 ODIs in 1984. ... Warwickshire County Cricket Club is a cricket club (team) based at the County Ground, Edgbaston, Birmingham, England (Birmingham historically being part of Warwickshire). ...

References

  1. ^ Oswestry Market. Shropshire Tourism.
  2. ^ History of Oswestry Orthopedic Hospital. NHS.
  3. ^ Churches in Oswestry. Oswestry Borough Council.
  4. ^ Shropshire Routes to Roots. Introduction to Park Hall. Shropshire County Library Service.

External links



  Results from FactBites:
 
Oswestry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (495 words)
Oswestry (Welsh: Croesoswallt) is a town in Shropshire, England, close to the Welsh border.
The town is the administrative headquarters of the borough of Oswestry and is the third largest town in Shropshire with a population of 17,110 [1], after Telford and Shrewsbury.
The former Marcher Lordship of Oswestry was annexed to Shropshire along with the Lordships of Whetington, Masbroke and Knoking to form the Hundred of Oswestry by section 11 of the Laws in Wales Acts 1535.
Oswestry (borough) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (145 words)
Oswestry is a small local government district with borough status in Shropshire, England.
It is the smallest of the five districts of Shropshire in terms of both population and land area.
Its council is based in Oswestry, the only town and largest settlement in the borough.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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