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Encyclopedia > Oswald Mosley

Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet (November 16, 1896December 3, 1980), was a British politician known principally as the founder of the British Union of Fascists. He was also the sixth baronet of a title established in 1720. November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... The flag of the British Union of Fascists showing the Flash and Circle symbolic of action within unity The British Union of Fascists (BUF) was a political party of the 1930s in the United Kingdom. ... A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt), is the holder of an hereditary title awarded by the British Crown, known as a baronetcy. ... // Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ...

Contents

Family and early life

Mosley's family were Anglo-Irish but his branch were prosperous landowners in Staffordshire. When his parents separated, he was brought up by his mother and his paternal grandfather, Sir Oswald Mosley, 4th Baronet. Within the family and among intimate friends, he was always called 'Tom'. He lived at Apedale Manor for numerous years, near to Newcastle-under-Lyme. Anglo-Irish was a term used historically to describe a ruling class inhabitants of Ireland between 1570 and 1829, who were the descendants and successors of the Protestant Ascendancy[1], mostly belonging to the Anglican Church of Ireland or to a lesser extent one of the English dissenting churches, such... Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. ... Newcastle-under-Lyme, known simply as castle to many local people, is a busy market town/small city in Staffordshire, England, not to be confused with the larger city of Newcastle upon Tyne. ...


He was educated at Winchester College and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. During World War I, he was commissioned in the 16th Lancers and fought on the Western Front. He transferred to the Royal Flying Corps as an observer but a crash left him with a permanent limp. He returned to the trenches before the injury was fully healed and, at the Battle of Loos, he passed out at his post from the pain. He was assigned to desk jobs for the rest of the war. Winchester College is a boys independent school in the city of Winchester in Hampshire, in the south of England. ... New College, Royal Military Academy Sandhurst New Colours are presented to RMAS, June 2005. ... Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Paul... Western Front was a term used during the First and Second World Wars to describe the contested armed frontier between lands controlled by Germany to the East and the Allies to the West. ... The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of World War I. Origin and Early History Formed by Royal Warrant on May 13, 1912, the RFC superseded the Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers. ... Trench warfare is a form of war in which both opposing armies have static lines of defence. ... The Battle of Loos was one of the major British offensives mounted on the Western Front in 1915 during World War I. The battle was the British component of the combined Anglo-French offensive known as the Second Battle of Artois. ...


Elected MP

At the end of the war, Mosley decided to go into politics as a Conservative MP, although he was only 21 years old and had not fully developed his politics. Nonetheless he was driven by a passionate conviction to avoid any future war and this motivated his career. Largely because of his family background, he was considered by several constituencies; a vacancy near the family estates seemed to be the best prospect. Unexpectedly, he was selected for Harrow first. In the general election of 1918 he faced no serious opposition and was elected easily. He was the youngest member of the House of Commons to take his seat (there was an abstentionist Sinn Féin MP who was younger). He soon distinguished himself as an orator and political player, one marked by extreme self-confidence. He made a point of speaking in the House of Commons without notes. The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative & Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), and the largest in terms of public membership. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Harrow is the principal town in the London Borough of Harrow. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1918 held on 14th December 1918, after the Representation of the People Act 1918. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Abstentionism is the policy of seeking election to a body while refusing to take up the seats or even sitting in an alternative assembly. ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ...


In 1920, he married Lady Cynthia Curzon (known as 'Cimmie'), second daughter of George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Earl Curzon of Kedleston, Viceroy of India, and Lord Curzon's first wife, the American mercantile heiress, the former Mary Victoria Leiter. Lord Curzon had to be persuaded that Mosley was a suitable husband, as he suspected Mosley was largely motivated by social advancement and his new wife's inheritance. It turned out that Curzon was right to be suspicious. Nevertheless, the wedding was the social event of the year, attended by many branches of European royalty. Lady Cynthia Blanche Mosley (23 August 1898–16 May 1933) was a British politician, the second eldest of the Curzon sisters and the first wife of fascist Sir Oswald Mosley, Bt. ... George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, British statesman The Most Honourable George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston (January 11, 1859 – March 20, 1925), was a conservative British statesman who served as Viceroy of India. ... The Governor-General of India (or Governor-General and Viceroy of India) was the head of the British administration in India. ...


Crossing the floor

Mosley was at this time falling out with the Conservatives over the issue of Irish policy, and the use of the Black and Tans to suppress the Irish population. Eventually he 'crossed the floor' and sat as an Independent MP on the opposition side of the House of Commons. Having built up a following in his constituency, he retained it against a Conservative challenge in the general elections of 1922 and 1923. By 1924 he was growing increasingly attracted to the Labour Party, which had just formed a government, and in March he joined. He immediately joined the Independent Labour Party (ILP) as well and allied himself with the left. This article deals with the RIC Reserve Force of the Anglo-Irish War. ... In politics, crossing the floor is to vote against party lines. ... Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... The Independent Labour Party (ILP) was a former political party in the United Kingdom. ...


When the government fell in October, Mosley had to choose a new seat as he believed that Harrow would not re-elect him as a Labour candidate. He therefore decided to oppose Neville Chamberlain in his constituency of Birmingham Ladywood. An energetic campaign led to a knife-edge result but Mosley was defeated by 77 votes. His period outside Parliament was used to develop a new economic policy for the ILP, which eventually became known as the Birmingham Proposals; they continued to form the basis of Mosley's economics until the end of his political career. In 1926, a Labour seat in Smethwick fell vacant and Mosley returned to Parliament. Arthur Neville Chamberlain (18 March 1869 – 9 November 1940) was a Conservative British politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1937 to 1940. ... Birmingham Ladywood is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Smethwick was a parliamentary constituency, centred on the town of Smethwick in West Midlands. ...


Office

Mosley then made a bold bid for political advancement within the Labour Party. He was close to Ramsay MacDonald and hoped for one of the great offices of state, but when Labour won the 1929 general election he was only appointed to the post of Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (a defacto Minister without Portfolio), outside the Cabinet. He was given responsibility for solving the unemployment problem, but found that his radical proposals were blocked either by his superior James Henry Thomas or by the Cabinet. Mosley was always impatient and eventually put forward a whole scheme in the 'Mosley Memorandum' to find it rejected by the Cabinet; he then resigned in May 1930. He attempted to persuade the Labour Party Conference in October, but was defeated again. The memorandum called for high tariffs to protect British industries from international finance, for state nationalisation of industry and a programme of public works to solve unemployment. James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866–9 November 1937) was a British politician and twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... A Minister without Portfolio is a government minister with no specific responsibilities. ... A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... James (Jimmy) Henry Thomas, (October 3, 1874 - January 21, 1949) was a British trade unionist and Labour politician. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... The Labour Party Conference, or annual national conference of the Labour Party, is formally the supreme decision-making body of the Party. ... A tariff is a tax on foreign goods. ... Look up Public works in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


New Party

Determined that the Labour Party was no longer suitable, Mosley quickly founded the New Party. Its early parliamentary contests, in by-elections, were successful only in splitting the vote and allowing the Conservative candidate to win. Despite this, the organization gained support among many Labour and Conservative MPs, who agreed with his corporatist economic policy. Among those who agreed with Mosley's economic ideas were Aneurin Bevan and Harold Macmillan. It also gained the endorsement of the Daily Mail, a British newspaper. The New Party increasingly inclined to fascist policies, but Mosley was denied the opportunity to get his party established when the 1931 election was suddenly called. All of its candidates, including Mosley himself, lost their seats. As the New Party gradually became more radical and right-wing, many previous supporters defected from it. The New Party were a political party briefly active in the United Kingdom in the early 1930s. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... The term corporatism has different meanings in different contexts. ... A statue of Bevan in Cardiff. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, a tabloid, first published in 1896. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ...


Fascism

After failure in 1931 Mosley went on a study tour of the 'new movements' of Mussolini and other Fascists, and returned convinced that it was the way forward for him and for Britain. He determined to unite the existing fascist movements and created the British Union of Fascists (BUF) in 1932. The BUF was anti-Communist and protectionist. It claimed membership as high as 50,000, and had the Daily Mail and Daily Mirror among its earliest supporters. Among his followers were the novelist Henry Williamson and military theorist J.F.C. Fuller. Mosley had found problems with disruption of New Party meetings and instituted a corps of black-uniformed paramilitary stewards, who were nicknamed blackshirts. The party was frequently involved in violent confrontations, particularly with Communist and Jewish groups and especially in London. At a large Mosley rally at Olympia on 7 June 1934, mass brawling broke out when hecklers were removed by blackshirts, resulting in bad publicity. This and the Night of the Long Knives in Germany led to the loss of most of the BUF's mass support. The party was unable to fight the 1935 general election. Image File history File links British_Union_of_Fascists_flag. ... Image File history File links British_Union_of_Fascists_flag. ... The flag of the British Union of Fascists showing the Flash and Circle symbolic of action within unity The British Union of Fascists (BUF) was a political party of the 1930s in the United Kingdom. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... The flag of the British Union of Fascists showing the Flash and Circle symbolic of action within unity The British Union of Fascists (BUF) was a political party of the 1930s in the United Kingdom. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper, a tabloid, first published in 1896. ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... Henry Williamson (December 1, 1895 - August 13, 1977), prolific English author known for his natural and social history novels. ... J.F.C. Fuller (September 1, 1878 – February 10, 1966), full name John Frederick Charles Fuller, was a British Major General, military historian and strategist, notable as an early theorist of modern armoured warfare, including categorising principles of warfare. ... The Blackshirts (Italian: camicie nere or squadristi) were Fascist paramilitary groups in Italy during the period immediately following World War I and until the end of World War II. The term was later applied to a similar group serving the British Union of Fascists before the War. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Night of the Long Knives (Saturday June 30 and Sunday July 1, 1934) (German, Nacht der langen Messer), also known as Reichsmordwoche, Operation Hummingbird or the Blood Purge, was a lethal purge of Adolf Hitlers potential political rivals in the Sturmabteilung (SA; also known as storm troopers or... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Plaque commemorating the Battle of Cable Street.

In October 1936 Mosley and the BUF attempted to organise a march through an area with a high proportion of Jewish residents, and violence resulted between local and nationally organised protestors trying to block the march and police trying to force it through, since called the Battle of Cable Street. At length Sir Philip Game the Police Commissioner disallowed the march from going ahead and the BUF abandoned it. Mosley continued to organise marches policed by the blackshirts, and the government was sufficiently concerned to pass the Public Order Act 1936 which, amongst other things, banned political uniforms and quasi-military style organizations and came into effect on 1 January 1937. Image File history File links Battle-of-Cable-Street-red-plaque. ... Image File history File links Battle-of-Cable-Street-red-plaque. ... The Battle of Cable Street or Cable Street Riot took place on Sunday October 4, 1936 in Cable Street in the East End of London. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Battle of Cable Street or Cable Street Riot took place on Sunday October 4, 1936 in Cable Street in the East End of London. ... Air Vice-Marshal Sir Philip Woolcott Game (March 30, 1876–February 4, 1961) was a British Royal Air Force commander and Governor of New South Wales, Australia. ... The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (usually just referred to as the Metropolitan Police Commissioner or, more colloquially, as the Met Commissioner) is the head of the Metropolitan Police Service in London. ... The Public Order Act 1936 is the name of the UK law which helped the government to control extremist political movements in the 1930s. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Cimmie Mosley died of peritonitis in 1933, which left Mosley free to marry his mistress Diana Guinness, née Mitford, (one of the celebrated Mitford sisters). They married in secret in 1936, in the home of Nazi chief Joseph Goebbels; Adolf Hitler was one of the guests. Mosley, who had been spending large amounts of his private fortune on the BUF, wished to establish it on a firm financial footing and was negotiating, through Diana, with Hitler for permission to broadcast commercial radio to Britain from Germany. Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Honourable Diana Mitford (The Honourable Lady Mosley) (17 June 1910 – 11 August 2003) was one of Britains noted Mitford sisters. ... The Mitfords were an aristocratic British family noted for their accomplishments in writing and their notorious lives, particularly of the daughters of the family, known as the Mitford sisters. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Dr. Paul Joseph Goebbels (October 29, 1897 – May 1, 1945) was Adolf Hitlers Propaganda Minister (see Propagandaministerium) in Nazi Germany. ... Hitler redirects here. ...


In the London County Council elections in 1937, the BUF stood in three of its East London strongholds, polling up to a quarter of the vote. Mosley then made most of the employees redundant, some of whom then defected from the party with William Joyce. As the European situation moved towards war, the BUF began nominating Parliamentary candidates and launched campaigns on the theme of 'Mind Britain's Business'. After the outbreak of war, he led the campaign for a negotiated peace. He was at first received well but, after the invasion of Norway, this gave way to hostility and Mosley was nearly assaulted. London County Council emblem is still seen today on buildings, especially housing, from that era London County Council (LCC) was the principal local government body for the County of London from 1889 until 1965, when it was replaced by the Greater London Council. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Joyce lies in an ambulance under armed guard before being taken from British Second Army Headquarters to hospital. ...


Internment

On 23 May 1940 Mosley, along with most active fascists in Britain, was interned under Defence Regulation 18B, and the BUF was later proscribed. Diana Mosley was also interned, shortly after the birth of their son Max, and they lived together for most of the war in a house in the grounds of Holloway prison. Mosley used the time to read extensively on classical civilizations. The couple were released in 1943, when Mosley was suffering with phlebitis, and spent the rest of the war under house arrest. Image File history File links Mosleyarrest. ... Image File history File links Mosleyarrest. ... May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Defence Regulation 18B was the most famous of the Defence Regulations used by the British Government during World War II. It allowed for the internment of people suspected of being Nazi sympathisers. ... HM Prison Holloway is a womens prison in the London Borough of Islington, London, United Kingdom. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Phlebitis is an inflammation of a vein, usually in the legs. ...

Post-war politics

After the war Mosley was contacted by his former supporters and persuaded (initially against his will) to rejoin active politics. He formed the Union Movement, calling for a single nation-state covering the continent of Europe (known as Europe a Nation), and later attempted to launch a National Party of Europe to this end. The Union Movement's meetings were often physically disrupted, as Mosley's meetings had been before the war, and largely by the same opponents. This led to Mosley's decision, in 1951, to leave England and live in Ireland. He later moved to Paris. Of his decision to leave, he said, "You don't clear up a dungheap from underneath it." The Union Movement was an extreme right wing political party founded in Britain by Oswald Mosley. ... Europe a Nation was a policy developed by British politician Oswald Mosley as the cornerstone of his Union Movement. ... The Flash and Circle symbol of the Union Movement was chosen as the emblem of the new group The National Party of Europe (NPE) was an initiative undertaken by a number of far right parties in Europe during the 1960s to help increase cross-border co-operation and work towards... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région ÃŽle-de-France Département Paris (75) Subdivisions 20 arrondissements Mayor Bertrand Delanoë  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land...


Mosley briefly returned to Britain in order to fight the 1959 general election at North Kensington, shortly after the 1958 Notting Hill race riots. Concerns over immigration were beginning to come into the spotlight for the first time and Mosley led his campaign on this issue. When Mosley's final share of the vote was less than he expected, he launched a legal challenge to the election on the assumption that the result had been rigged (the election was upheld). He returned for the last time to contest the 1966 general election before he wrote his autobiography, My Life (1968) and retired. In 1977 he was nominated for the post of Lord Rector of Glasgow University. He polled over 100 votes but finished bottom of the poll. This United Kingdom general election was held on October 8, 1959, and marked a third successive victory for the ruling Conservative party, led by Harold MacMillan. ... Kensington is an area to the west of Central London in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. ... The UK general election in 1966 was called by Harold Wilson because his government, elected in the 1964 election, had an unworkably small majority. ... The book cover My Life is the autobiography of the British Fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The position of Lord Rector of Glasgow University is elected every three years by the students at the University of Glasgow. ...


He had three children by Cimmie, including Nicholas Mosley, who wrote a biography of his father. By Diana Mitford, he had two sons, including Max Mosley, who is president of the FIA. Mosley was a noted philanderer and had numerous affairs, including, during his first marriage, with his wife's sister Lady Alexandra Metcalfe, as well as her stepmother, Grace Curzon, Marchioness Curzon of Kedleston, the American-born widow of Lord Curzon of Kedleston. Nicholas Mosley, 3rd Baron Ravensdale (born June 25, 1923) is a British novelist. ... Max Rufus Mosley (born 1940, London, England) is currently serving his fourth term as president of the Fédération Internationale de lAutomobile. ... The Fédération Internationale de lAutomobile, commonly referred to as the FIA, is a non-profit association established on June 20, 1904 to represent the interest of motoring organisations and motor car users. ... George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, British statesman The Most Honourable George Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston (January 11, 1859 – March 20, 1925), was a conservative British statesman who served as Viceroy of India. ...


The Papers of Oswald Mosley are housed at the University of Birmingham Special Collections. Website http://www. ...

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Harry Mallaby-Deeley
Member of Parliament for Harrow
19181924
Succeeded by
Sir Isidore Salmon
Preceded by
John Emanuel Davison
Member of Parliament for Smethwick
1926–1931
Succeeded by
Alfred Wise
Political offices
Preceded by
The Lord Cushendun
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1929-1930
Succeeded by
Clement Attlee
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Sir Oswald Mosley, 5th Baronet Mosley
Baronet Mosley
?-1980
Succeeded by
Sir Nicholas Mosley, 7th Baronet Mosley

The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Harrow was a parliamentary constituency centred on the Harrow suburb of North London. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1918 held on 14th December 1918, after the Representation of the People Act 1918. ... The 1924 UK general election was held on 29th October 1924. ... Sir Isidore Salmon (10 February 1876 – 16 September 1941) was a British Conservative Party politician. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Smethwick was a parliamentary constituency, centred on the town of Smethwick in West Midlands. ... The UK general election on Tuesday 27 October 1931 was the last in the United Kingdom not held on a Thursday. ... Alfred Roy Wise (1901 – 21 August 1974) was a British Conservative Party politician. ... Ronald John McNeill, 1st Baron Cushendun (April 30, 1861) - (October 12, 1934) was a British statesman and politician. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, FRS, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1945 to 1951. ... The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Act of Union in 1801. ... The Right Honourable Nicholas Mosley, 3rd Baron Ravensdale (born June 25, 1923) is a British novelist. ...

Trivia

Not the Nine OClock News (DVD) Not the Nine OClock News was a comedy television programme shown on the BBC, broadcast from 1979 to 1982. ... Mel Smith Mel Smith is an English actor, film director, writer, producer born in London on December 3, 1952) He attended New College, Oxford. ... Pamela Stephenson on Not The Nine OClock News Pamela Stephenson (also known as Pamela Stephenson Connolly), (born December 4, 1949 in Takapuna, Auckland) is a New Zealand-Australian actress, psychologist, and former comedian, now resident in Beverly Hills, California. ... Griff Rhys Jones (born 6 November 1953) is the comedy partner and foil of Mel Smith. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ... Called English literatures performing flea, P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output. ... Roderick Spode, 8th Earl of Sidcup, also known as Lord Sidcup, is a minor fictional character from the novels of P. G. Wodehouse. ... Declan Patrick MacManus (born 25 August 1954, in London), better known by his stage name, Elvis Costello, is an English musician, singer, and songwriter of Irish ancestry. ... Less Than Zero is the eighth track on Elvis Costellos debut album My Aim Is True, and the first Costello single that Stiff Records released. ... ... Mosley was a 1997 movie produced by HBO Home Video chronicling British fascist Oswald Mosleys life. ... British actor Jonathan Cake (b. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC History is a magazine devoted to history enthusiasts of all levels of knowledge and interest. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... A list of the worst Britons in history, according to ten English historians, was compiled by the BBC History Magazine in late 2005. ... Guy Walters (born August 8, 1971, Kensington, London) is a British author and journalist. ...

Bibliography

  • Oswald Mosley, Robert Skidelsky
  • Fascism in Britain, Richard Thurlow
  • Blackshirt, Stephen Dorril, Viking Publishing, ISBN 0-670-86999-6
  • Hurrah for the Blackshirts!, Martin Pugh, ISBN 0-224-06439-8

The Right Honourable Robert Jacob Alexander Skidelsky, Baron Skidelsky (born 1939 in Harbin, China) is a British economist of Russian origin, author of a major biography in three volumes of John Maynard Keynes. ...

See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Oswald Mosley

Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Battle of Cable Street or Cable Street Riot took place on Sunday October 4, 1936 in Cable Street in the East End of London. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Oswald Mosley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1987 words)
Mosley continued to organise marches policed by the flshirts, and the government was sufficiently concerned to pass the Public Order Act 1936 which, amongst other things, banned political uniforms and quasi-military style organizations and came into effect on 1 January 1937.
Mosley was a noted philanderer and had numerous affairs including, during his first marriage, with his wife's sister Lady Alexandra Metcalfe, as well as her stepmother, Grace Curzon, Marchioness Curzon of Kedleston, the American-born widow of Lord Curzon of Kedleston.
The Papers of Oswald Moseley are housed at the University of Birmingham Special Collections.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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