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Encyclopedia > Ostia
Scale model of Portus, near Ostia
Scale model of Portus, near Ostia
The Temple of the goddess Roma on the Forum of Ostia.
The Temple of the goddess Roma on the Forum of Ostia.

Ostia or Ostia Antica is a large neighborhood in the commune of Rome, Italy, on the coast facing the Tyrrhenian Sea. It was the harbor of ancient Rome and perhaps its first colonia. Image File history File links Ostia_model. ... Image File history File links Ostia_model. ... Portus is an ancient harbour of Latium, Italy, on the right bank of the Tiber River, at its mouth. ... Download high resolution version (1536x1024, 488 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1536x1024, 488 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... In ancient Rome, Roma was a supposed deity to whom were dedicated some temples and sacred sites. ... The Forum of Jerash, in Jordan. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Location within Province of Rome in the Region of Latium Coordinates: Region Latium Province Province of Rome Mayor of Rome Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... Tyrrhenian Sea. ... A harbor or harbour (see spelling differences), or haven, is a place where ships may shelter from the weather or are stored. ... The Roman Forum was the central area around which ancient Rome developed. ... It has been suggested that Colonisation be merged into this article or section. ...

Contents

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History

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Origins

Located at the mouth of the River Tiber, Ostia was said to have been founded by Ancus Marcius, the fourth king of Rome, in the 7th century BC. A later inscription refers to the event [Anco Marcio regi quarto a Romulo qui ab urbe condita primum coloniam --- deduxit]. However the most ancient archaeological remains so far discovered are no older than the 4th century BC. The most ancient buildings currently visible are from the 3rd century BC, notably the Castrum (military camp) and of a slightly later date are, the Capitolium (temple of Jupiter, Juno and Minerva). The opus quadratum, the walls of the original castrum at Ostia provide important evidence for the building techniques that were employed in Roman urbanisation during the period of the Middle Republic. Tiber River in Rome The Tiber (Italian Tevere, Latin Tiberis), the third-longest river in Italy at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches in two branches that cross the suburbs... Ancus Marcius (r. ... There were seven traditional Kings of Rome before the establishment of the Roman Republic. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 7th century BC started on January 1, 700 BC and ended on December 31, 601 BC. // Overview Events Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria who created the the first systematically collected library at Nineveh A 16th century depiction of the Hanging Gardens of... Bold textSUCK ON THAT MUTHA FUCKA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Archaeology, archeology, or archæology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech/discourse) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains and environmental data, including architecture, artifacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 4th century BC started on January 1, 400 BC and ended on December 31, 301 BC. // Overview Events Bust of Alexander the Great in the British Museum. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 3rd century BC started on January 1, 300 BC and ended on December 31, 201 BC. // Events The Pyramid of the Moon, one of several monuments built in Teotihuacán Teotihuacán, Mexico begun The first two Punic Wars between Carthage... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... IVNO REGINA (Queen Juno) on a coin celebrating Julia Soaemias. ... Minerva and the Muses, by Hans Rottenhammer (1603). ...


Although Ostia was probably founded for the sole purpose of military defense — since hostile armies could eventually reach Rome by water through the mouth of the Tiber River — in time the port became a very important commercial harbor. Tiber River in Rome The River Tiber (Italian Tevere), the third longest river in Italy (disputed — see talk page) at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through the Campagna and Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches...


Many of the goods that Rome received from its colonies and provinces passed through Ostia, including the essential grain supply to the city of Rome. In this role, Ostia soon replaced Pozzuoli, known to the ancient Romans as Puteoli, a port near Naples). The megalopolis of ancient Rome could never be fed entirely from its own surrounding countryside. ... Pozzuoli (pop. ... Country Italy Region Campania Province Naples (NA) Mayor Rosa Russo Jervolino Elevation 17 m Area 117 km² Population  - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 1,000,470  - Density 8,457/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Napoletani Dialing code 081 Postal code 80100 Patron Saint Januarius  - Day September...


In 87 BC, the town was razed by Marius, and again in 67 BC it was sacked by pirates. After this second attack, the town was re-built and provided with protective walls by the statesman and orator Marcus Tullius Cicero. The town was then further developed during the 1st century AD, mainly under the influence of Tiberius, who ordered the building of the first Forum. The town was also soon enriched by the construction of a new harbor on the northern mouths of the Tiber (which reaches the sea with a larger mouth in Ostia, Fiumara Grande, and a narrower one near to the current Fiumicino International Airport). The new harbor, not surprisingly called Portus, from the Latin for "harbor," was excavated from the ground at the orders of the emperor Claudius; it has a hexagonal form, in order to reduce the erosive forces of the waves. Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC - 80s BC - 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC Years: 92 BC 91 BC 90 BC 89 BC 88 BC - 87 BC - 86 BC 85 BC 84... Gaius Marius (Latin: C·MARIVS·C·F·C·N)¹ (157 BC - January 13, 86 BC) was a Roman general and politician elected Consul an unprecedented seven times during his career. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 72 BC 71 BC 70 BC 69 BC 68 BC 67 BC 66 BC 65 BC 64... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses see Cicero (disambiguation) Marcus Tullius Cicero (January 3, 106 BC - December 7, 43 BC) was an orator and statesman of Ancient Rome, and is generally considered the greatest Latin prose stylist. ... The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... Tiberius Caesar Augustus, born Tiberius Claudius Nero (November 16, 42 BC – March 16 AD 37), was the second Roman Emperor, from the death of Augustus in AD 14 until his own death in 37. ... The Forum of Jerash, in Jordan. ... Leonardo da Vinci International Airport (IATA: FCO, ICAO: LIRF), also known as Fiumicino International Airport, is Italys largest airport, with over 29 million passengers in the year 2005. ... Portus is an ancient harbour of Latium, Italy, on the right bank of the Tiber River, at its mouth. ... This is a list of Roman Emperors with the dates they controlled the Roman Empire. ... For other uses, see Claudius (disambiguation). ...

Ostia public latrinas.
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Ostia public latrinas.

The town was provided with all the services a town of the time could require; in particular, a famous lighthouse. Archaeologists also discovered the public latrinas, organized for collective use as a series of seats that allow us to imagine today that the function was also a social moment. In addition, Ostia had a large theatre, public baths and a firefighting service. The mosaic floors of the baths are still visible near today's entrance to the town. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 550 KB)Public toilets, Ostia Antica I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 550 KB)Public toilets, Ostia Antica I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A latrine is a method of disposal of human waste used in rural areas and much of the developing world. ... The Peggys Point lighthouse in Nova Scotia, Canada An aid for navigation and pilotage at sea, a lighthouse is a tower building or framework sending out light from a system of lamps and lenses or, in older times, from a fire. ... A latrine is a method of disposal of human waste used in rural areas and much of the developing world. ...


Trajan too, required a widening of the naval areas, and ordered the building of another harbor, again pointing towards the north. It must be remembered that at a relatively short distance, there was also the harbor of Civitavecchia (Centum Cellae), and Rome was starting to have a significant number of harbors, the most important remained Portus. Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus (September 18, 53 – August 9, 117), Roman Emperor (98-117), commonly called Trajan, was the second of the Five Good Emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Civitavecchia is a town and comune of the province of Rome in the central Italian region of Lazio, a sea port on the Tyrrhenian sea, 50 miles WNW of Rome, 42°06N 11°47E. According to the 2003 census, its population was 50,100. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Location within Province of Rome in the Region of Latium Coordinates: Region Latium Province Province of Rome Mayor of Rome Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ...

Ostia housed an imperial mint; this coin of Maxentius was struck there.
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Ostia housed an imperial mint; this coin of Maxentius was struck there.
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Image File history File links Follis-Maxentius-s3776. ... Image File history File links Follis-Maxentius-s3776. ... Maxentius as Augustus on a coin. ...

Rise and fall of Ostia

Ostia grew to 50,000 inhabitants in the 2nd century and in time focused its naval activities on Portus. With the end of the Roman Empire, Ostia fell slowly into decay, and was finally abandoned in the 9th century due to the fall of the Roman Empire in combination with repeated invasions and sackings by Arab pirates; the inhabitants moved to Gregoriopolis. In the Middle Ages, bricks from buildings in Ostia were used for several other occasions. The Leaning Tower of Pisa was entirely built of material originally belonging to Ostia. The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Portus is an ancient harbour of Latium, Italy, on the right bank of the Tiber River, at its mouth. ... The Roman Empire was a phase of the ancient Roman civilization characterized by an autocratic form of government. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was that century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب) are an ethnic group who are predominantly speakers of the Arabic language, mainly found throughout the Middle East and North Africa. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Tower of Pisa. ...


A "local sacking" was carried out by baroque architects, who used the remains as a sort of marble store for the palazzi they were building in Rome. Soon after, foreign explorers came in search of ancient statues and objects. The Papacy started organizing its own investigations with Pope Pius VII and the research still continues today. It has been estimated that two thirds of the ancient town have currently been found. Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... An architect is a person licensed in the art of planning, designing and overseeing the construction of buildings, or more generally, the designer of a scheme or plan. ... Venus de Milo, front. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... Pius VII, O.S.B., born Barnaba Nicolò Maria Luigi Chiaramonti (August 14, 1740 – August 20, 1823), was Pope from March 14, 1800 to August 20, 1823. ...


For the naval battle of 849 between Christian and Saracens, see Battle of Ostia. Events Births Deaths August 18 - Walafrid Strabo, German monk and theologian Categories: 849 ... The Battle of Ostia was a naval battle fought in 849 AD between the Muslims of souther Italy and a Christian League of Papal, Neapolitan and Gaetan ships. ...

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Ostia under fascism

Ostia was rejuvenated during the fascist era; it was renamed Lido di Ostia, or Ostia Lido, or Lido di Roma, lido meaning "beach" in Italian. Following the general urbanised re-planning of Rome, a new quartiere was created ex novo in the southern side of the capital city (EUR), and an acceptable road, dedicated to Italian explorer Christopher Columbus, was built to connect it with the seaside. Ostia became the beach resort of Rome, and was connected by a railway before the construction of the Fiumicino airport. The town was re-organized in a pure so-called "fascist architecture," which recalls some colonial, Mediterranean and rationalist styles, and divided into a coastal side, distributed in small villas used as second houses by Romans, and a rear side for workers. Ostia became one of the peripheral quartieri and borgate created all around Rome for the lower classes. Fascism is a radical political ideology that combines elements of corporatism, authoritarianism, nationalism, militarism, anti-anarchism, anti-communism and anti-liberalism. ... Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ... Palazzo dei Congressi The Esposizione Universale Roma (E.U.R.) is a large complex, built in 1935 by Benito Mussolini as symbol of fascism for the world; he wanted to expand the new Rome in the west, to connect it to the sea. ... Christopher Columbus portrait, painted by Alejo Fernándõ between 1505 and 1536. ... A type of Italian architecture from the 1930s used to celebrate the XXth year of the fascist regime in Rome. ... The idea and function of a villa has evolved considerably since its invention towards the end of the Roman Republic. ...


During the Fascist period many of the structures of Ancient Ostia were renovated or in some cases reconstructed. The whole of the exterior of the Theatre, and much of the interior, date from 1930 to 1933. 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


However, the fascist renewal was not long enjoyed, due to the imminence of World War II, which arrived when part of the works were still in progress; it was only in the 1960s that Ostia began to be used as a beach and as a holiday site, effectively becoming a part of the town, and it still is part of the territory of the council of Rome. This article is becoming very long. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... 90 mile beach Australia A beach or strand is a geological formation consisting of loose rock particles such as sand, shingle, cobble, or even shell along the shoreline of a body of water. ... The word holiday has related but different meanings in English-speaking countries. ...

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Photos

The theatre as seen from the ancient main road.
The theatre as seen from the ancient main road.
Inside the theatre.
Inside the theatre.
Mosaic floor in the market.
Mosaic floor in the market.


Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 326 KB) Summary Photo taken by Jack Curran, December 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 326 KB) Summary Photo taken by Jack Curran, December 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 650 KB) Summary Photo taken by Jack Curran, December 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 650 KB) Summary Photo taken by Jack Curran, December 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x900, 604 KB) Summary Photo taken by Jack Curran, December 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x900, 604 KB) Summary Photo taken by Jack Curran, December 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

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External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Ostia Antica

Coordinates: 41°45′N 12°18′E Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Ostia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (789 words)
Ostia is a fraction of the comune of Rome, Italy, on the coast facing the Tyrrhenian Sea.
With the end of the Roman Empire, Ostia fell slowly into decay, and was finally abandoned in the 9th century due to the fall of the Roman empire in combination with repeated invasions and sackings by Arab pirates; the inhabitants moved to Gregoriopolis.
Ostia became the beach resort of Rome, and was connected by a railway, while the first projects for the Fiumicino airport were drafted out.
Ostia: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (1290 words)
Ostia is a fraction of the commune of Rome, Italy, on the coast facing the Tyrrhenian Sea.
Ostia was rejuvenated during the fascist era; it was renamed Lido di Ostia, or Ostia Lido, or Lido di Roma, lido meaning "beach" in Italian.
Ostia became the beach resort of Rome, and was connected by a railway before the construction of the Fiumicino airport.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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