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Encyclopedia > Ossie Davis
Ossie Davis in The Green Pastures, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1951
Ossie Davis in The Green Pastures, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1951

Ossie Davis (December 18, 1917February 4, 2005) was an African American film actor, director and social activist. Ossie Davis in “The Green Pastures”, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, April 12, 1951 From the collection of the Library of Congress and in the public domain: http://memory. ... Ossie Davis in “The Green Pastures”, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, April 12, 1951 From the collection of the Library of Congress and in the public domain: http://memory. ... Ossie Davis in The Green Pastures, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1951 The Green Pastures was a play written in 1930 by Marc Connelly adapted from Ol Man Adam an His Chillun (1928), a collection of folk tales written up by Roark Bradford. ... Photographic self-portrait by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... In the Gregorian Calendar, December 18 is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years), at which point there will be 13 days remaining to the end of the year. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ...


Davis was born Raiford Chatman Davis in Cogdell, Georgia. Following his parents' wishes, he attended Howard University, graduating in 1938. His acting career, which spanned seven decades, began in 1939 with the Rose McClendon Players in Harlem. He made his film debut in 1950 in the Sidney Poitier film No Way Out. Howard University is a historically black university in Washington, D.C. Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named after Oliver O. Howard. ... Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Sidney Poitier (left) on the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C., with Harry Belafonte and Charlton Heston Sidney Poitier KBE (pronounced PWA-tee-AY) (born February 20, 1927), is a Bahamian American Academy Award-winning actor (film and stage), film director, and activist. ... No Way Out is a film released by on August 16, 1950 by 20th Century Fox . ...


Davis experienced many of the same struggles that most African American actors of his generation underwent; he wanted to act but he did not want to play stereotypical subservient roles, such as a butler, that was the standard for black actors of his generation. Instead, he tried to follow the example of Sidney Poitier and play more distinguished characters. When he found it necessary to play a Pullman porter or a butler, he tried to inject the role with a certain degree of dignity. // For other uses see Butler (disambiguation) The butler is a senior servant in a large household. ... Sidney Poitier (left) on the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C., with Harry Belafonte and Charlton Heston Sidney Poitier KBE (pronounced PWA-tee-AY) (born February 20, 1927), is a Bahamian American Academy Award-winning actor (film and stage), film director, and activist. ... The Pullman Palace Car Company, owned by George Pullman, manufactured railroad train cars in the mid to late 1800s through the early decades of the 20th century, during the boom of railroads in the United States. ... The interior of a Pullman car on the Chicago and Alton Railroad circa 1900. ...


In addition to acting, Davis, along with Melvin Van Peebles, was one of the first African American directors. Along with Bill Cosby and Poitier, Davis was one of a handful of African American actors able to find commercial success while avoiding stereotypical roles prior to 1970. However, Davis never had the tremendous commercial or critical success that Cosby and Poitier enjoyed. As a playwright, Davis wrote Paul Robeson: All-American, which is frequently performed in theatre for young audiences programs. Melvin Van Peebles, as pictured on the movie poster for Melvin Van Peebles (born August 21, 1932 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American actor, director, screenwriter and composer, and the father of actor and director Mario Van Peebles. ... William Henry Bill Cosby, Jr. ... Template:Unsourced A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is someone who writes dramatic literature or drama. ...


Davis found recognition late in his life by working in several of director Spike Lee's films, including Do The Right Thing, Jungle Fever, She Hate Me and Get on the Bus. He also found work as a commercial voice-over artist and served as the narrator of the early-1990s CBS sitcom Evening Shade, starring Burt Reynolds, where he also played one of the residents of a small southern town. Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957 in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with social and political issues. ... Do the Right Thing is a 1989 motion picture produced, written, and directed by Spike Lee and released by Universal Pictures. ... Jungle Fever is a 1991 film directed by Spike Lee, starring Wesley Snipes and Annabella Sciorra. ... She Hate Me (2004) is a feature film directed by Spike Lee and starring Anthony Mackie, Kerry Washington, and Ellen Barkin. ... Get On The Bus is a 1998 single by Destinys Child featuring Timbaland, released to promote the soundtrack for the film Why Do Fools Fall In Love. ... A voice-over is a narration that is played on top of a video segment, usually with the audio for that segment muted or lowered. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... CBS (an abbreviation for Columbia Broadcasting System, its former legal name) is one of the largest television networks, and formerly one of the largest radio networks, in the United States. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Evening Shade aired on CBS from 1990 to 1994. ... Burt Reynolds in 2005 Burt Reynolds (born Burton Leon Reynolds, Jr. ...


In 1948, Ossie Davis married actress Ruby Dee; in their joint autobiography "With Ossie and Ruby", they later described their decision to have an open marriage.[1] They were well-known civil rights activists, being personal friends of Malcolm X, Jesse Jackson, Martin Luther King Jr. and others. Davis and Dee helped organize (and served as MCs for) the 1963 civil rights March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Davis, alongside Ahmed Osman, delivered the eulogy at the funeral of Malcolm X; he re-read part of this eulogy at the end of Spike Lee's film Malcolm X. He also delivered the eulogy for Martin Luther King, Jr. Actress Ruby Dee September 25, 1962 photographed by Carl Van Vechten Ruby Dee (born October 27, 1924) is an African American actress and activist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, also known as Detroit Red and Al-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Omaha, Nebraska, May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965 in New York City) was a Muslim Minister and National Spokesman for the Nation of Islam. ... Jesse Louis Jackson (born October 8, 1941) is an American politician, civil rights activist, and Baptist minister. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Demonstrator at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was a large political rally that took place in Washington, D.C. on August 28, 1963. ... Ahmed Osman (born 1934) is an Egyptian-born author, most noted for literally identifying the Hebrew liberator Moses with the Egyptian monotheist pharaoh Akhenaten. ... Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, also known as Detroit Red and Al-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Omaha, Nebraska, May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965 in New York City) was a Muslim Minister and National Spokesman for the Nation of Islam. ...


Davis and wife Ruby Dee were recipients of the Kennedy Center Honors in 2004. They were also named to the NAACP Image Awards Hall of Fame in 1989. Their son Guy Davis is a blues musician and former actor, who appeared in the film Beat Street and the daytime soap opera One Life to Live. The Kennedy Center Honors have been awarded annually, since 1978 by the Board of Trustees of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. ... The NAACP Image Award is an award presented annually by the NAACP to honor the top African-Americans in film, television, music and literature. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the comic book artist, see Guy Davis Guy Davis (May 12, 1952- ) is a blues guitarist. ... Beat Street (1984) was the second mainstream hip hop dramatic feature film, following Breakin. It was set in New York City during the rise of the popularity hip hop culture in the early 1980s. ... One Life to Live is an American soap opera which has been broadcast on the ABC television network since July 15, 1968. ...


Davis was found dead on February 4th 2005, in a hotel room in Miami, Florida, of natural causes. He was in the first stages of working on a film called Retirement. [2] Nickname: The Magic City Location in Miami-Dade County and the state of Florida. ...


His last role was a several episode guest role on the groundbreaking Showtime drama series The L Word as a father struggling with the acceptance of his daughter Bette (Jennifer Beals) parenting a child with her lesbian partner. Showtime is a subscription television brand used by a number of channels and platforms around the world, but primarily refers to a group of channels in the United States. ... This article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. ... Jennifer Beals (born December 19, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former teen model and American film actress who is best known for her role as Alex Owens in the 1983 movie Flashdance. ...


In his final episodes, his character was taken ill and died. His wife Ruby Dee was present during the filming of his own death scene. That episode, which aired shortly after Davis's own death, aired with a dedication to the actor.


Filmography

As Actor:

No Way Out is a film released by on August 16, 1950 by 20th Century Fox . ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Fourteen Hours is a 1951 film which stars Grace Kelly. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... This article needs cleanup. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The Hill is a 1965 film set in a British army prison in North Africa in World War II. It stars Sean Connery, Harry Andrews, Ian Bannen, Ossie Davis and Michael Redgrave. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Sam Whiskey is a 1969 film starring movie and televvision star Burt Reynolds a decade before he zoomed to superstar status in the late 1970s. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...

External links

  • Ossie Davis on the Internet Movie Database
  • Eulogy of Malcolm X
  • Ossie Davis at the Internet Broadway Database
  • Ossie Davis in the news supporting Mumia Abu-Jamal
  • Ossie Davis biography and video interview excerpts by The National Visionary Leadership Project

mimi The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about actors, films, television shows, television stars, video games and production crew personnel. ... The Internet Broadway Database (IBDB) is an online database of Broadway theatre productions and their personnel. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tribute to Ossie Davis (1995 words)
Throughout his distinguished 66-year professional career, the late Ossie Davis was a widely beloved, highly accomplished writer, actor and director of stage, TV and movies—as well as being a courageous champion of civil rights, human rights, justice and a return to sanity in American domestic and foreign policy.
Ossie and Ruby were celebrated as “national treasures” when they received the National Medal of Arts, they have been enshrined in the NAACP Image Awards Hall of Fame and they were among the select recipients of the Kennedy Center Honors.
Ossie was the oldest of five children of a self-taught railroad builder and herb doctor.
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Ossie Davis (1917-2005) (991 words)
Ossie Davis, a native of south Georgia, was one of the most recognized and influential African American performers and activists of the late twentieth century.
Ossie Davis was born Raiford Chatman Davis on December 18, 1917, in the Clinch County town of Cogdell, where his father was a railroad engineer.
Davis raised money for the Freedom Riders when they were arrested in the South for violating segregation laws, and he sued in federal court to ensure voting rights for African Americans.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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