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Encyclopedia > Osman II
Image:20pxOttomanicon.png Sultan Osman II
Ottoman Period
Preceded by:
Mustafa I
Ottoman Sultan
1618–22
Succeeded by:
Mustafa I

Osman II (also known as Genç Osman – meaning Young Osman – in Turkish) (in Arabic عثمان الثاني) (November 3, 1604May 20, 1622) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1618 until his death on 20 May 1622. Image File history File links 20pxOttomanicon. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Osman II of the Ottoman Empire This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Mustafa I (1592 – January 20, 1639) (Arabic: مصطفى الأول) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1617 to 1618 and from 1622 to 1623. ... The Osmanli Dynasty, also the House of Osman, ruled the Ottoman Empire from 1281 to 1923, beginning with Osman I (not counting his father, Ertuğrul), though the dynasty was not proclaimed until 1383 when Murad I declared himself sultan. ... Mustafa I (1592 – January 20, 1639) (Arabic: مصطفى الأول) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1617 to 1618 and from 1622 to 1623. ... The Arabic language (Arabic: ‎ transliterated: ), or simply Arabic (Arabic: ‎ transliterated: ), is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... Events January 14 – Hampton Court conference with James I of England, the Anglican bishops and representatives of Puritans September 20 – Capture of Ostend by Spanish forces under Ambrosio Spinola after a three year siege. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... The Sultan in Disneys Aladdin A Sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Söğüt (1299-1326), Bursa (1326-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanl... Events March 8 - Johannes Kepler discovers the third law of planetary motion (he soon rejects the idea after some initial calculations were made but on May 15 confirms the discovery). ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ...


Osman II was the son of Sultan Ahmed I (1603–17) and his wife Mâhfirûze Sultan. At a young age his mother payed a lot of attention to his education, as a result of this Osman II was a known poet and had mastered many languages, among which: Arabic, Persian, Greek, Latin and Italian. He ascended the throne at the early age of 14 as the result of a coup d'état against his uncle Mustafa I (1617–18, 1622–23). Despite his youth, Osman II soon sought to assert himself as a ruler, and after securing the empire's eastern border by signing a peace treaty with Safavid Iran, he personally led the Ottoman invasion of Poland during the Moldavian Magnate Wars. Forced to sign a peace treaty with the Polish after the Battle of Chotin (Chocim) (which was, in fact, a siege of Chotin led by the Polish hetman Jan Chodkiewicz) in September-October, 1621, Osman II returned home to Istanbul in shame, blaming the cowardice of the Janissaries and the insufficiency of his statesmen for his humiliation. Sultan Ahmed I Ahmed I (April 18, 1590 – November 22, 1617) was the sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1603 until his death. ... Mahfiruze Hatice (? – 1621) was the wife of Ahmed I and mother of Osman II. Categories: | | | ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Persian is a language spoken in Iran, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Bahrain, Iraq, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... A coup détat (pronounced ), or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government through unconstitutional means by a part of the state establishment that mostly replaces just the top power figures. ... Mustafa I (1592 – January 20, 1639) (Arabic: مصطفى الأول) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1617 to 1618 and from 1622 to 1623. ... The Safavids were a long-lasting Turkic-speaking Iranian dynasty that ruled from 1501 to 1736 and first established Shiite Islam as Persias official religion. ... The Moldavian Magnate Wars refer to the period at the end of the 16th century and the beginning of the 17th century when the magnates of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth intervened in the affairs of Moldavia, clashing with the Habsburgs and the Ottoman Empire for domination of the territory. ... Khotyn (Ukrainian: ; Polish: ; Romanian: ; Russian: ) is a town in the Chernivtsi Oblast of Ukraine. ... Khotin fortress overlooks the Dniester river Khotyn (Хотин, Polish: Chocim; Romanian: Hotin; Russian: Хотин, Khotin) is a town in the Chernivetska oblast of Ukraine. ... Hetman`s coat of arms Hetman StanisÅ‚aw Koniecpolski of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth Hetman was the title of the second highest military commander (after the monarch) used in 15th to 18th century Poland and Grand Duchy of Lithuania, known from 1569 to 1795 as the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... Noble Family Chodkiewicz Coat of Arms Chodkiewicz Parents Jan Hieronim Chodkiewicz Krystyna Zborowska Consorts Zofia Mielecka Anna Alojza Ostrogska Children with Zofia Mielecka Hieronim Chodkiewicz Anna Scholastyka Chodkiewicz Date of Birth 1560 Place of Birth  ? Date of Death September 24, 1621 Place of Death Chocim Castle, Poland Jan Karol Chodkiewicz... Events February 9 - Gregory XV is elected pope. ... Istanbul (other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and economic center. ... Young Greeks at the Mosque (Jean Léon Gérôme, oil on canvas, 1865); this oil painting portrays Greek youths who were converted to Islam to become the elite of the army (Turkish yeniceri, recruit) The Janissaries (or janizaries; in Turkish: Yeniçeri (yeni çeri, meaning new soldier); in...


Probably the first Sultan to identify and attempt to tackle the Janissaries as a praetorian institution doing more harm than good to the modern empire, Osman II closed their coffee shops (the gathering points for conspiracies against the throne) and started planning to create a new, loyal and ethnic Turkic army consisting of Anatolian, Syrian and Egyptian Turks and Turkmens. The result was a palace uprising by the Janissaries. Osman II was promptly imprisoned by the Janissaries. When an executioner was sent to strangle him Osman II refused to give in and started fighting the man and was only subdued when he was hit on his back with the rear end of an axe by one of his imprisoners. After that he was strangled with a bowstring. Alternatively, Turkish traveller Evliya Celebi recorded that after a putting up a desperate struggle, Osman was killed by the Grand Vizier Davut Pasha from 'compression of his testicles' which was 'a mode of execution reserved by custom to the Ottoman sultans'[1]. Young Greeks at the Mosque (Jean Léon Gérôme, oil on canvas, 1865); this oil painting portrays Greek youths who were converted to Islam to become the elite of the army (Turkish yeniceri, recruit) The Janissaries (or janizaries; in Turkish: Yeniçeri (yeni çeri, meaning new soldier); in... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... This is the disambiguation page for the terms Turk, Turkey, Turkic, and Turkish. ... Asia Minor lies east of the Bosporus, between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean. ... Young Greeks at the Mosque (Jean Léon Gérôme, oil on canvas, 1865); this oil painting portrays Greek youths who were converted to Islam to become the elite of the army (Turkish yeniceri, recruit) The Janissaries (or janizaries; in Turkish: Yeniçeri (yeni çeri, meaning new soldier); in... Young Greeks at the Mosque (Jean Léon Gérôme, oil on canvas, 1865); this oil painting portrays Greek youths who were converted to Islam to become the elite of the army (Turkish yeniceri, recruit) The Janissaries (or janizaries; in Turkish: Yeniçeri (yeni çeri, meaning new soldier); in... Evliya Çelebi (also known as Derviş Mehmed Zilli) was one of the most famous Ottoman travelers, who traveled throughout the territories of the Ottoman Empire and the neighbouring lands over a period of forty years. ...


Osman II was a very progressive Sultan, but the lack of a professional and willing cadre to aid him in his reforms caused his downfall. As a ruler he was perceptive and energetic. In contrast to most of his successors he compares favourably. His worst fault as a politician was probably that he tried too much too soon.


Notes

  1. ^ Goodwin, Jason: Lords of the Horizons, chapter 15: The Cage, published 1998


 
Sultans of the Ottoman Empire

  Results from FactBites:
 
Osman II - MSN Encarta (310 words)
Osman II (1603-1622), 16th sultan of the Ottoman Empire (1618-1622), son of Ahmed I.
Osman was brought to the throne in place of his brother, Mustafa I, by a clique of devshirme ministers (non-Muslims converted to Islam) who assumed that they would be able to dominate him because of his youth and inexperience.
Osman's concepts of reform were unique in his time, and were not accepted in the Ottoman Empire until the 19th century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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