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Encyclopedia > Osman I
Image:20pxOttomanicon.png Osman I
Ottoman Period
Preceded by:
Ertuğrul
Ottoman ruler
12811326
Succeeded by:
Orhan I

Osman I (12581326) (Ottoman: عثمان بن أرطغرل) was born in 1258 and inherited the title bey (chief) from his father, Ertuğrul, as the ruler of the village of Söğüt in 1281. The birth of the empire originated with the conquest of the Turkish tribe of Eskenderum and the city of Eskişehir (Turkish for 'Old City') in 13011303, although Osman had already in 1299 declared the independence from the Seljuk Empire of his own small kingdom, the Ottoman Principality. Image File history File links Information_icon. ... Image File history File links 20pxOttomanicon. ... In the late 13th century the Seljuq empire had collapsed and Anatolia was divided into many small states. ... Osman Ghazi of the Ottoman Turks This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... ErtuÄŸrul (أرطغل), also ErtoÄŸrul (with title ErtuÄŸrul Gazi), (1198-1281) was the father of Osman I, the founder of the Ottoman Empire. ... The Ottoman Dynasty (or the Imperial House of Osman) ruled the Ottoman Empire from 1281 to 1923, beginning with Osman I (not counting his father, ErtuÄŸrul), though the dynasty was not proclaimed until 1383 when Murad I declared himself sultan. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Osman I (1299-1326) to Orhan I (1326-1359) Aradia de Toscano, is initiated into a Dianic cult of Italian Witchcraft (Stregheria), and discovers through a vision that she is the human incarnation of the goddess Aradia. ... Orhan (Turkish: also Orhan Gazi or Orkhan) (1284–1359), was the second bey (chief) of the newborn Ottoman Empire (at the time known as the Osmanli tribe) from 1326 to 1359. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Osman I (1299-1326) to Orhan I (1326-1359) Aradia de Toscano, is initiated into a Dianic cult of Italian Witchcraft (Stregheria), and discovers through a vision that she is the human incarnation of the goddess Aradia. ... Ottoman Turkish (Turkish: Osmanlıca or Osmanlı Türkçesi, Ottoman Turkish: لسان عثمانی - lisân-i Osmânî) is the variant of the Turkish language that was used as the administrative and literary language of the Ottoman Empire. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Bey is the Turkish word for chieftain, traditionally applied to the leaders of small tribal groups. ... ErtuÄŸrul, also ErtoÄŸrul, (1198-1281) was the father of Osman I, the founder of the Ottoman Empire. ... Söğüt was a Seljuk Turkish tribe in western Anatolia that later gave birth to the Ottoman Empire. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... shows the Location of the Province EskiÅŸehir EskiÅŸehir (literal meaning: old town) is a province in northwestern Turkey. ... Events February 7 - Edward of Caernarvon (later King Edward II of England) becomes the first Prince of Wales End of the reign of Emperor Go-Fushimi, emperor of Japan Emperor Go-Nijō ascends to the throne of Japan Dante was sent into Exile in Florence. ... // Events 24 February: Battle of Roslin 20 April: Pope Boniface VIII founds the University of Rome La Sapienza Edward I of England reconquers Scotland (see also: William Wallace, Wars of Scottish Independence) The Khilji Dynasty conquers time travel Births Saint Birgitta, Swedish saint (died 1373) Gegeen Khan, Mongol emperor of... Events Osman I declares the independence of the Ottoman Principality The County of Holland is annexed by the County of Hainaut April 1, 1299 Kings Towne on the River Hull granted city status by Royal Charter of King Edward I of England. ... The Seljuk coat of arms was a double headed eagle The Seljuk Turks (also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq; in modern Turkish Selçuklular; in Persian سلجوقيان SaljÅ«qiyān; in Arabic سلجوق SaljÅ«q, or السلاجقة al-Salājiqa) were a major branch of the Oghuz Turks and a dynasty that ruled parts of...


Osman is regarded as the founder of the Ottoman Empire, and it is from him that its inhabitants, the Turks, called themselves Osmanli until the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, the only national appellation they recognized. Ertuğrul, Osman's predecessor, had previously maintained himself as the vassal and lieutenant of the Seljuk Sultan of Rüm at Konya (Iconium), but Osman, after the death of Ala ad-Din Kay Qubadh III in 1307, waged wars and accumulated dominions as an independent ruler. He had become the Bey, or chief, of his tribe twelve years earlier, after Ertuğrul’s death in 1288. Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem At the height of its power (1683) Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–1922 Mehmed VI... The Seljuk coat of arms was a double headed eagle The Seljuk Turks (also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq; in modern Turkish Selçuklular; in Persian سلجوقيان SaljÅ«qiyān; in Arabic سلجوق SaljÅ«q, or السلاجقة al-Salājiqa) were a major branch of the Oghuz Turks and a dynasty that ruled parts of... Sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... The Sultanate of Rûm was a Seljuk sultanate in Anatolia from 1077 to 1307. ... Tomb of Mevlana Rumi is a popular attraction of Konya. ... Events July - The Knights Hospitaller begin their conquest of Rhodes. ... Events February 22 - Nicholas IV becomes Pope. ...


Osman was twenty-four years of age at his accession, and he had already both proven his skill as a leader, and his prowess as a combatant. His early fortunes and exploits are favorite subjects with Oriental writers, especially in love stories of his wooing and winning the fair Mal Hatun. These legends have probably been romanticized by the poetical pens which recorded them in later years. The Ottoman writers attached great importance to a legendary dream of the founder of their empire. Mal Hatun was the wife of Osman I, Valide Sultan, and daughter of Sheik Edebali. ...

For more details on this topic, see Foundation of Ottoman Empire.

Ottoman historians often dwell on the prophetic significance of his name, which means "bone-breaker", signifying the powerful energy with which he and his appeared to show in the following centuries of conquest. “Osman” means the “Bone-breaker.” It is also the name given to a large species of vulture, commonly called the royal vulture, which is considered the emblem of sovereignty and warlike power in the East, comparable to the eagle in the nations of the West. Foundation of the Ottoman Empire is one of the oldest sources regarding the establishment of the Ottoman Empire. ... Orders Falconiformes (Fam. ...


Osman is celebrated by Oriental writers for his personal beauty, and for “his wondrous length and strength of arm.” Like Artaxerxes Longimanus of the old dynasty of Persian kings, Liu Bei in the Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Gautama the Buddha, and the Highland chieftain of whom Wordsworth sang, Osman is said to have been able to touch his knees with his hands when standing upright. He was claimed to be unsurpassed in his skill and graceful carriage as a horseman; and the jet black colour of his hair, his beard, and eyebrows, gained him in youth the title of “Kara,” meaning “Black”, Osman. The epithet “Kara,” which is often found in Turkish history is considered to imply the highest degree of manly beauty when applied to a person. He dressed simply, in the tradition of the first warriors of Islam, and like them he wore a turban of ample white linen, wreathed round a red centre. His loose flowing kaftan was of one colour, and had long open sleeves. A sculpture dating back to the time of Achaemenid Empire Artaxerxes I (Artakhshathra I) was king of the Persian Empire from 465 BC to 424 The name as given is the Greek form; the Persian form is Artakhshathra. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Liu. ... An illustration of the book Romance of the Three Kingdoms (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: sānguó yÇŽnyì), written by Luó Guànzhōng in the 14th century, is a Chinese historical novel based upon events in the turbulent years near the end of the Han Dynasty, and the... Media:Example. ... William Wordsworth, English poet William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the Quran, its principal scripture, whose followers, known as Muslims (مسلم), believe God (Arabic: الله ) sent through revelations to Muhammad. ...


The last prince of the family of Aleaddin, to which that of Osman's had been indebted for its foundation in Asia Minor, was now dead. There was no other among the various Emirs of that country who could compete with Osman for the headship of the whole Turkish population and dominion over the whole peninsula, save the Emir of Karamanogullari. A long and fierce struggle between the Osman and Karamanogullari princes for the ascendency, commenced in Osman’s lifetime and was protracted during the reigns of many of his successors. Osman himself had gained some advantages over his Karamanli rival; but the weak and wealthy possessions of the Byzantine Emperor in the north-east of Asia Minor were more tempting marks for his ambition than the Karamanoglu plains, and it was over Greek cities and armies that the triumphs of the last twenty-six years of Osman’s life were achieved. Entrance to the emirs palace in Bukhara. ...


Not all of Osman’s counselors agreed with Osman's path of conquest. Osman silenced all remonstrance and quelled all risk of dissension and mutiny by an act of prompt ferocity, which shows that the great ancestor of the Ottoman Sultans had a full share of the ruthless cruelty that has been the dark characteristic of the Turkish Royal House. Osman’s uncle, the aged Dundar who had marched with Ertoghrul from the Euphrates seventy years before, was still alive when Osman in 1299 summoned a council of his principal followers and announced to them his intention to attack the lord of the important Greek fortress of Keaprihissar. The old uncle urgently opposed this enterprise, stressing the danger of provoking, with such ambitious aggrandizement, all the neighboring princes, Turkish as well as Greek, to unite in a league against their tribe, leading to its destruction. Enraged at the chilling caution of the grey-headed man and probably having observed others beginning to share it, he spoke not a word in reply but killed his old uncle on the spot — a bloodly lesson to all who should harbour thoughts of contradicting the fixed will of so stern a lord.


Reference

  • Incorporates text from History of Ottoman Turks(1878)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Osman I - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1587 words)
Osman I (1258–1326) (Ottoman: عثمان بن أرطغل) was born in 1258 and inherited the title bey (chief) from his father, Ertuğrul, as the ruler of the village of Söğüt in 1281.
Osman is regarded as the founder of the Ottoman Empire, and it is from him that its inhabitants, the Turks, called themselves Osmanli until the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, the only national appellation they recognized.
One day when Osman and his brother Goundonroulp were at the castle of their neighbor, the lord of Ineani, an armed force suddenly appeared at the gate, led by the chieftain of Eskişehir and his ally, Michael of the Peaked Beard, the Greek lord of Khirenkia, a fortified city at the foot of Phrygian Olympus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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