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Encyclopedia > Oscar Robertson
Oscar Robertson
Position Guard
Height ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Weight 220 lb (100 kg)
Nationality Flag of United States United States
Born November 24, 1938 (1938-11-24) (age 68)
Charlotte, Tennessee
College Cincinnati
Draft 1st overall, 1960
Cincinnati Royals
Pro career 1960–1974
Awards 1959 USBWA College POY
1960 USBWA College POY
1963-63 NBA MVP
1963-64 Sporting News NBA MVP
1970-71 NBA Champions
12-time All-Star
1961-62 averaged a triple-double
1960 Olympic gold medal
50 Greatest Players in NBA History (1996)
Hall of Fame 1980
Olympic medal record
Men's Basketball
Gold 1960 Rome United States

Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed "The Big O", is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks.[1] The 6-foot-5, 220-pound [2] Robertson played the guard position, and was a twelve-time All-Star, eleven-time member of the All-NBA Team, and one-time winner of the MVP award in fourteen professional seasons. He is the only player in NBA history to average a triple-double for an entire season, and he is regarded as one of the best and most versatile NBA players of all time.[3] He was a key player on the team which brought the Bucks their only NBA championship in the 1970-71 NBA season. However, his playing career, especially during high school and college, was plagued by racism. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre (or meter, see spelling differences) is a measure of length. ... The pound (abbreviations: lb or, sometimes in the United States, #) is a unit of mass in a number of different systems, including various systems of units of mass that formed part of English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The U.S. National Prototype Kilogram, which currently serves as the primary standard for measuring mass in the U.S. It was assigned to the United States in 1889 and is periodically recertified and traceable to the primary international standard, The Kilogram, held at the Bureau International des Poids et... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Charlotte is a town located in Dickson County, Tennessee. ... The University of Cincinnati is a state university located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... 1960 NBA Draft. ... The Sacramento Kings are a National Basketball Association team based in Sacramento, California. ... The Oscar Robertson Trophy is given out annually to outstanding mens college basketball players by the United States Basketball Writers Association. ... The Oscar Robertson Trophy is given out annually to outstanding mens college basketball players by the United States Basketball Writers Association. ... The 1963-64 NBA Season was the 18th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The National Basketball Association first named a Most Valuable Player after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper, currently affiliated with the Fox network. ... The 1970-71 NBA Season was the 25th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Series Summary Bucks win series 4-0 Categories: | ... The National Basketball Association staged its first All-Star Game in the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951. ... The 1961-62 NBA Season was the 16th season of the National Basketball Association. ... A triple-double is a basketball term, defined as an individual performance in a game in which a player accumulates double-digit totals (i. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... A Congressional Gold Medal A gold medal generally represents the highest award for achievement in a non-military field, with no restriction on eligibility. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (also referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Charlotte is a town located in Dickson County, Tennessee. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... The Sacramento Kings are a National Basketball Association team based in Sacramento, California. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... All-star (also, Allstar or All Star) is a term with meanings in both the worlds of sports and entertainment. ... The Associated Press All-NBA Team, also known simply as the All-NBA Team, is an annual honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. ... The National Basketball Association first named a Most Valuable Player after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... A triple-double is a basketball term, defined as an individual performance in a game in which a player accumulates double-digit totals (i. ... The 1970-71 NBA Season was the 25th season of the National Basketball Association. ...


For his outstanding achievements, Robertson was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1980, and was voted one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History in 1996.[4] The United States Basketball Writers Association renamed their college Player of the Year Award the Oscar Robertson Trophy in his honor in 1998, and he was one of five people chosen to represent the inaugural National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame class in 2006.[5] The Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (also referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA) was founded in 1956 by Walter Byers and serves the interests of jounalists who cover college basketball. ... The Oscar Robertson Trophy is given out annually to outstanding mens college basketball players by the United States Basketball Writers Association. ... The National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame is a museum proposed by the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) to be located at the Sprint Center which is scheduled to open in 2007 in Kansas City, Missouri. ...


Robertson was also an integral part of the Oscar Robertson suit of 1970. The landmark NBA antitrust suit, named after the then-president of the NBA Players' Association, led to an extensive reform of the league's strict free agency and draft rules and, subsequently, to higher salaries for all players.[3] This article is about anti-competitive business behavior. ... A trade union or labor union is a continuous association of wage-earners for the purpose of maintaining or improving the conditions of their employment. ... Free agency can be: In Latter-day Saint theology, free agency is the name of the human capacity to make choices for themselves and to choose between right and wrong. ... A (sports) draft is the process by which professional sports teams select players not contracted to any team, often from colleges or amateur ranks. ...

Contents

Early years

Robertson was born in poverty and grew up in a segregated housing project in Indianapolis. In contrast to many other boys who preferred to play baseball, he was drawn to basketball, literally, because it was "a poor kids' game." Because his family could not afford a basketball, he learned how to shoot by tossing tennis balls and rags bound with rubber bands into a peach basket behind his family's home.[3] In 1954, Robertson attended Crispus Attucks High School, a segregated all-black school. As a sophomore that year, he starred on an Attucks team that lost in the semi-state finals (state quarterfinals) to eventual state champions Milan, whose story would later be the basis of the 1986 movie classic Hoosiers. The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterized by separation of different races in daily life when both are doing equal tasks, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... Crispus Attucks High School of Indianapolis Public Schools in Indianapolis, Indiana was named for Crispus Attucks (c. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hoosiers is a 1986 movie about a small-town high school basketball team that wins the state championship, set during a time when Indiana had only one state champ in basketball regardless of varied enrollments. ...


At Crispus Attucks, Robertson’s coach was Ray Crowe, whose emphasis on a fundamentally sound game had a positive effect on Robertson’s style of play. With Robertson leading the team, Crispus Attucks proceeded to dominate its opposition, going 31-1 in 1955 and winning the first state championship for any all-black school in the nation. The following year the team finished with a perfect 31-0 record and won a second staight state title, becoming the first team in Indiana to secure a perfect season along the way to a state-record 45 straight victories. The state championships won by the all-black school were the first-ever for Indianapolis. However, the celebrations were cut short by the city’s leaders. The players were driven outside of town to hold their party because, said Robertson in the Indianapolis Star, "They said the blacks are gonna tear up downtown." Robertson was also named Indiana's "Mr. Basketball" in 1955, after scoring 24.0 points per game during his senior season.[3] After his graduation that year, Robertson enrolled at the University of Cincinnati. The Indianapolis Star is a daily newspaper which began publishing on June 6, 1903. ... The University of Cincinnati is a state university located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ...


Robertson continued to dominate his opponents while at Cincinnati, recording an incredible scoring average of 33.8 points per game, the third highest in college history. In each of his three years, he won the national scoring title, was named an All-American, and was chosen College Player of the Year, while setting 14 NCAA and 19 school records.[4] Robertson’s stellar play led the Bearcats to a 79-9 overall record during his three varsity seasons, including two Final Four appearances. However, a championship eluded Robertson, a phenomenon which would become a repeated occurrence in his later career. When Robertson left college he was the all-time leading NCAA scorer until fellow Hall of Fame player Pete Maravich topped him in 1970.[3] The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Cincinnati Bearcats are the NCAA athletic teams representing the University of Cincinnati. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ... Peter Press Pistol Maravich (June 22, 1947 – January 5, 1988) was an American basketball player known for his dazzling ballhandling, incredible shooting abilities, and creative passing. ...


But despite his success on the court, Robertson’s college career was soured by racism. He was Cincinnati's fifth black player, preceded by Chester Smith (1932), London Gant (1936), Willard Stargel (1942), and Tom Overton (1951). Road trips to segregated cities were especially difficult, with Robertson often sleeping in college dorms instead of hotels. "I'll never forgive them," he told the Indianapolis Star years later.[3] Decades after his college days, Robertson’s stellar NCAA career was rewarded by the United States Basketball Writers Association when, in 1998, they renamed the trophy awarded to the NCAA Division I Player of the Year the Oscar Robertson Trophy. This honor brought the award full circle for Robertson since he had won the first two awards ever presented.[6] The Oscar Robertson Trophy is given out annually to outstanding mens college basketball players by the United States Basketball Writers Association. ...


1960 Olympics

After college, Robertson co-captained the United States basketball team at the 1960 Summer Olympics with Jerry West. The team, described as the greatest assemblage of amateur basketball talent ever, went undefeated during the competition to win the gold medal. Robertson was the team's starting forward, but played point guard as well. He was the co-leading scorer with fellow NBA legend Jerry Lucas, as the United States team won its nine games by a dominating margin of 42.4 points per game. Ten of the twelve college players on the American squad later played professionally in the NBA, including future Hall-of-Famers West, Lucas, and Walt Bellamy.[7] Basketball at the 1960 Summer Olympics was the fifth appearance of the sport in Olympic competition. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) has had one of the most successful careers ever in professional basketball, first as a player, then as a coach, and finally as an executive. ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... In the context of basketball, forward usually refers to one of two positions: Power forward Small forward In addition, some basketball players share the attributes of a small forward and a point guard, and are accordingly called point forwards. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Jerry Lucas as a player of the San Francisco Warriors Jerry Ray Lucas (born March 30, 1940) was a legendary basketball star from the 1950s to the 1970s, and is now a world-renowned memory education expert. ... Walter Jones Bellamy (born July 24, 1939 in New Bern, North Carolina) is a former pro basketball player. ...


Professional career

Cincinnati Royals

Prior to the 1960-61 NBA season, Robertson made himself eligible for the 1960 NBA Draft. There, he was drafted by the Cincinnati Royals as a territorial pick. The Royals also gave Robertson a $33,000 signing bonus, a far cry from his childhood days when he was too poor to afford a basketball.[3] Robertson soon proved worthy of their trust, continuing to dominate his opposition on the professional level. In his rookie season, Robertson finished with incredible all-around stats of 30.5 points, 10.1 rebounds and 9.7 assists (leading the league), almost averaging a triple-double for the entire season. For his spectacular performance, he was named NBA Rookie of the Year, was elected into the All-NBA First Team – which would happen in each of Robertson’s first nine years – and made the first of 12 All-Star game appearances.[1] In addition, he was named the All-Star Game MVP following his 23 point, 14 assist, and 9 rebound performance in a West victory. However, the Royals finished with a dismal 33-46 record and stayed in the cellar of the Western Division. The 1960-61 NBA Season was the 15th season of the National Basketball Association. ... 1960 NBA Draft. ... The Sacramento Kings are a National Basketball Association team based in Sacramento, California. ... The slam dunk by LeBron James is a field goal worth 2 points. ... A rebound in basketball is the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw. ... In basketball, an assist is attributed to a player who passes the ball to a teammate in a way that leads to a score by field goal, meaning that he or she was assisting in the basket. ... A triple-double is a basketball term, defined as an individual performance in a game in which a player accumulates double-digit totals (i. ... The National Basketball Associations Rookie of the Year Award, first given after the 1952-1953 NBA season, is given to the top first-year player in the league. ... The Associated Press All-NBA Team, also known simply as the All-NBA Team, is an annual honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. ... The NBA staged its first All-Star Game in the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951. ... In American sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ...


In the 1961-62 NBA season, Robertson wrote NBA history. In that season, he became the only player in NBA history to average a triple-double for the entire season, averaging 30.8 points, 11.4 assists and 12.5 rebounds per game.[1] He also convincingly broke the assists record by Bob Cousy, who had recorded 715 regular season assists two seasons earlier, by logging 899 of them. The Royals earned a playoff berth; however, they were eliminated in the first round by the Detroit Pistons.[8] In the following 1962-63 NBA season, Robertson further established himself as one of the greatest players of his generation, averaging an impressive 28.3 points, 10.4 rebounds and 9.5 assists, nearly missing out on another triple-double season.[1] The Royals would charge into the Eastern Division Finals, but then succumb in a grueling seven games series against a great Boston Celtics team led by Bill Russell.[9] The 1961-62 NBA Season was the 16th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... The 1962 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1961-1962 season. ... The Detroit Pistons are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in the Detroit metropolitan area. ... The 1962-63 NBA Season was the 17th season of the National Basketball Association. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the...


In the 1963-64 NBA season, the Royals achieved an impressive 55-25 record,[10] which meant second place in the Eastern Division. Under new coach Jack McMahon, Robertson flourished, and for the first time in his career, he had a decent supporting cast: second scoring option Jack Twyman was now supplemented by blossoming frontcourt players Jerry Lucas and Wayne Embry, and fellow guard Adrian Smith helped Robertson in the backcourt. Robertson had another magnificent season, leading the NBA in free-throw percentage, scoring a career-high 31.4 points per game, and averaging 9.9 rebounds and 11.0 assists per game — just missing another triple-double season. [1] For his feats, he won the NBA MVP Award and became the only player other than legendary centers Bill Russell and Wilt Chamberlain to win this title from 1960 to 1968.[3] Robertson also won his second All-Star Game MVP award that year after scoring 26 points, grabbing 14 rebounds, and dishing off 8 assists in an East victory. In the postseason, the Royals defeated the Philadelphia 76ers led by Wilt Chamberlain, but then were dominated by the Celtics losing four games to one.[3] The 1963-64 NBA Season was the 18th season of the National Basketball Association. ... John Joseph (Jack) McMahon (born December 3, 1928 – died June 11, 1989) was a professional basketball player and coach. ... John Kennedy “Jack” Twyman (born May 11, 1934 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is a former professional basketball player. ... Jerry Lucas as a player of the San Francisco Warriors Jerry Ray Lucas (born March 30, 1940) was a legendary basketball star from the 1950s to the 1970s, and is now a world-renowned memory education expert. ... Wayne Embry (born March 26, 1937 Springfield, OH - ) was a center/forward with an 11 year career from 1959 to 1969. ... Adrian Frederik H Smith (born February 27, 1957 in Hackney, East London, England) is a songwriter and one of three guitarists/songwriters in the heavy metal band Iron Maiden. ... National Basketball Association Most Valuable Player Award was first awarded after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... The 1964 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1963-1964 season. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


From a win-loss perspective, however, this season would be Robertson’s last successful Royals season. From the 1964-65 NBA season on, things began to turn sour for the franchise. Despite Robertson’s stellar play, never failing to record averages of at least 24.7 points, 6.0 rebounds and 8.1 assists in the six following years,[1] the Royals were eliminated in the first round three times in a row from 1965 to 1967, and then even missed the playoffs three consecutive seasons from 1968 to 1970. In the 1969-70 NBA season, the sixth disappointing season in a row, fan support was waning. To attract the public, 41-year old head coach Bob Cousy even made a short-lived comeback. For seven games, the legendary Celtics point guard partnered Robertson in the Royals’ backcourt, but they still missed the playoffs.[3] The 1964-65 NBA Season was the 19th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1969-70 NBA Season was the 24th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Milwaukee Bucks and the "Oscar Robertson suit”

Prior to the 1970-71 season, the Royals stunned the basketball world by trading Robertson to the Milwaukee Bucks for Flynn Robinson and Charlie Paulk. Officially, no reasons were named, but many pundits suspected head coach Bob Cousy was jealous of all the attention Robertson was getting.[3] Robertson himself said: "I think he [Cousy] was wrong and I will never forget it.”[3] The 1970-71 NBA Season was the 25th season of the National Basketball Association. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Flynn James Robinson (born April 28, 1941 in Elgin, Illinois) is an American former professional basketball player. ...


However, the trade proved highly beneficial for the veteran Robertson. After being stuck with an under-performing team for the last six years, he now was paired with the young Lew Alcindor, who would become the all-time NBA scoring leader under the name of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. With Alcindor in the low post and Robertson running the backcourt, the Bucks charged to a league best 66-16 record, including a then-record 20 game win streak, a dominating 12-2 record in the playoffs, and crowned their season with the NBA title by routing the Baltimore Bullets with 4-0 in the 1971 NBA Finals. For the first time in his career, Robertson had won a championship on the NCAA or NBA level.[3] For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... This is a list of the longest winning streaks in National Basketball Association history. ... The 1971 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1970-1971 season. ... There have been two separate franchises in the National Basketball Association known as the Baltimore Bullets: For the team that played in the league from 1947 through 1955, when it became the last NBA franchise to fold, see: Baltimore Bullets (original) For the later team of that name, still in... Series Summary Bucks win series 4-0 Categories: | ...


From a historical perspective however, Robertson’s most important contribution was made in court. It was the year of the landmark Oscar Robertson suit, an antitrust suit filed by the NBA's Players Association against the league. As Robertson was the president of the Players Association, the case bore his name. In this suit, the proposed merger between the NBA and the ABA was stalled, and the college draft as well as the free agency clauses were reformed.[3] Robertson himself stated that the main reason was that clubs basically owned their players: players were forbidden to talk to other clubs once their contract was up, because free agency did not exist back then.[11] Six years after the suit was filed, the NBA finally reached a settlement, the leagues merged, and the Oscar Robertson suit encouraged signing of more free agents and eventually led to higher salaries for all players.[3] This article is about anti-competitive business behavior. ... For information about the ABA that began in 2000 see American Basketball Association (21st century). ...


On the hardwood, the veteran Robertson still proved he was a valuable player. Paired with Abdul-Jabbar, two more division titles with the Bucks followed in the 1971-72 and 1972-73 season. In Robertson's last season, he helped lead Milwaukee to a league-best 59-23 record and helped them to reach the 1974 NBA Finals. There, Robertson had the chance to end his stellar career with a second ring. The Bucks were matched up against the Boston Celtics, but powered by an inspired Dave Cowens, the Bucks lost in seven games.[3] As a testament to Robertson's importance to the Bucks, in the season following his retirement the Bucks fell to last place in their division with a 38-44 record in spite of the continued presence of Abdul-Jabbar.[12] The 1971-72 NBA Season was the 26th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1972-73 NBA Season was the 27th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The Eastern Belfast Ladz defeat The Western Belfast Ladz, 4 games to 3. ... Dave Cowens David William Cowens (born October 25, 1948 in Newport, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player and NBA Head Coach. ...


Post-NBA career

After he retired as an active player, Robertson stayed involved in efforts to improve living conditions in his native Indianapolis, especially concerning fellow African-Americans.[3] In addition, he worked as a color commentator with Brent Musburger on games televised by CBS during the 1974-75 NBA season.[13] After his retirement, the Kansas City Kings (the Royals moved there while Robertson was with the Bucks) retired his number 14 jersey; the retirement continues to be honored by the Kings in their current home of Sacramento. The Bucks also retired the number 1 jersey he wore in Milwaukee. Since 1994, a nine-foot bronze statue honors Robertson outside the Fifth Third Arena at Shoemaker Center, the current home of Cincinnati Bearcats basketball.[4]Robertson attends many of the games there, viewing the Bearcats from a chair at courtside. After many years outside the spotlight, on November 17, 2006, Robertson was recognized for his impact on college basketball as a member of the founding class of the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame. He was one of five, along with John Wooden, Bill Russell, Dean Smith and Dr. James Naismith, selected to represent the inaugural class.[14] Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Brent Woody Musburger (born May 26, 1939 in Portland, Oregon) is an American sportscaster for ABC. // Educated at Northwestern Universitys Medill School of Journalism, Musburger began his career as a sportswriter for the now-defunct Chicago American newspaper. ... CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ... The 1974-75 NBA Season was the 29th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The Sacramento Kings are a professional basketball team which is based in Sacramento, California. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame is a museum proposed by the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) to be located at the Sprint Center which is scheduled to open in 2007 in Kansas City, Missouri. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the... Dean Edwards Smith (born February 28, 1931) is a retired head coach of men’s college basketball. ... James Naismith James Naismith, M.D. (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was the Canadian-American inventor of the sport of basketball and the first to introduce the use of a helmet in American football. ...


Legacy

Robertson is universally regarded as one of the greatest players in NBA history, a triple threat who could score inside, outside and also was a stellar playmaker. His rookie scoring average of 30.5 points per game is the third highest of any rookie in NBA history, and Robertson averaged more than 30 points per game in six of his first seven seasons.[1] Only two other players in the NBA have had more 30+ point per game seasons in their career. Robertson was the first player to average more than 10 assists per game, doing so at a time when the criteria for assists were more stringent than today.[3] Furthermore, Robertson is the only guard in NBA history to ever average more than 10 rebounds per game, doing so three times. In addition to his 1964 regular season MVP award, Robertson won three All-Star Game MVPs in his career (in 1961, 1964, and 1969). He has the all-time highest scoring average in the All-Star Game for players participating in four or more games (the league standard for the record) at 20.5 points per game. He ended his career with 26,710 points (25.7 per game, eighth-best all time), 9,887 assists (9.5 per game) and 7,804 rebounds (7.5 per game).[1] NBA minimum requirements for scoring average are 70 games played or 1400 points scored. ...


Robertson also set yardsticks in versatility. If his first five seasons are strung together, Robertson averaged a triple-double over these 400+ games, averaging an incredible 30.3 points, 10.4 rebounds and 10.6 assists.[15] For his career, Robertson had 181 triple-doubles, a record that has never been approached.[16] These numbers are even more astonishing if it is taken into account that the three-point shot did not exist when he played, which was introduced by the NBA in the 1979-80 season and benefits sharpshooting backcourt players. In 1967-68, Robertson also became the first of only two players in NBA history to lead the league in both scoring average and assists per game in the same season. The official scoring and assist titles went to other players that season, however, because the NBA based the titles on point and assist totals (not averages) prior to the 1969-70 season. Robertson did, however, win a total of six NBA assist titles during his career. For his career, Robertson shot a high .485 field goal average and led the league in free-throw percentage twice — in the 1963-64 and 1967-68 seasons.[1] The 1979-80 NBA Season was the 34th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1967-68 NBA Season was the 22nd season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1969-70 NBA Season was the 24th season of the National Basketball Association. ...


Robertson is recognized by the NBA as the first legitimate "big guard”, paving the way for other over-sized backcourt players like Magic Johnson.[3] Furthermore, he is also credited to have invented the head fake and the fadeaway jump shot, a shot which Michael Jordan later became famous for.[17] For the Cincinnati Royals, now relocated and named the Sacramento Kings, he scored 22,009 points and 7,731 assists, and is all-time leader in both statistics for the combined Royals / Kings teams.[3] “Earvin Johnson” redirects here. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... The Sacramento Kings are a professional basketball team which is based in Sacramento, California. ...


Robertson was enshrined in the Basketball Hall of Fame on April 28, 1980. He received the "Player of the Century" award by the National Association of Basketball Coaches in 2000 and was ranked #3 on SLAM Magazine's Top 75 NBA Players in 2003, behind fellow NBA legends Michael Jordan and Wilt Chamberlain. Furthermore, in 2006, ESPN named Robertson the second greatest point guard of all time, praising him as the best post-up guard of all time and placing him only behind Los Angeles Lakers legend Magic Johnson.[15] The Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... The National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC), headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri was founded in 1927 by Phog Allen, the University of Kansas basketball coach. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... {{Infobox Network | network_name = ESPN| network_logo = | country =  United States| network_type = Cable Television Network| available = National| owner = The Walt Disney Company (80%) Hearst Corporation (20%)| key_people = George Bodenheimer, President, ESPN, Inc. ... Lakers logo 1966-1991 The Los Angeles Lakers are a professional basketball team, based in Los Angeles, California, which plays in the National Basketball Association. ... “Earvin Johnson” redirects here. ...


In 1959, the Player of the Year Award was established to recognize the best college basketball player of the year by the United States Basketball Writers Association. Five nominees are presented and the individual with the most votes receives the award during the NCAA Final Four. In 1998, it was renamed the Oscar Robertson Trophy in honor of the player who won the first two awards because of his outstanding career and his continuing efforts to promote the game of basketball. In 2004, an 18” bronze statue of Robertson was sculpted by world-renowned sculptor Harry Weber.[6] The United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA) was founded in 1956 by Walter Byers and serves the interests of jounalists who cover college basketball. ... The Oscar Robertson Trophy is given out annually to outstanding mens college basketball players by the United States Basketball Writers Association. ...


Personal life

Book cover of "The Big O", Robertson's biography.

Robertson is the son of Mazell and Bailey Robertson. He has two brothers, Bailey Jr. and Henry. He remembers a tough childhood, plagued by poverty and racism.[18] Due to his troubled childhood, Robertson was known to be sullen and prone to violent outbreaks. However after winning the Olympic gold medal, then signing his first big contract with the Royals and marrying his sweetheart Yvonne Crittinden within several months, he blossomed into a calm, content young man. His U. S. Olympic team mate Jerry West remarked amicably how much Robertson had "grown up" in that year.[17] In the following years, Robertson fathered daughters Shane Yvonne (b. 1962) and Tia Elaine (b. 1964), and led a private life without scandal; when a biography was going to be written about him in the 1990s, Robertson joked that his life had been "dull", and that he had been "married to the same woman for a long time"[17] However, Robertson proved his character strength in 1997 when his daughter Tia suffered lupus-related kidney failure, and Robertson donated one of his own kidneys.[17] He has been an honorary spokesman for the National Kidney Foundation ever since. In 2003, he published his own biography, The Big O, after his own nickname. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus) is a chronic autoimmune disease that is potentially debilitating and sometimes fatal as the immune system attacks the body’s cells and tissue, resulting in inflammation and tissue damage. ... Renal failure is when the kidneys fail to function properly. ... What is the National Kidney Foundation? The National Kidney Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to patient advocacy, specifically in regards to kidneys and kidney diseases, urinary tract diseases, dialysis, and organ transplantation. ...


Regarding basketball, Robertson has stated that legendary Harlem Globetrotters players Marques Haynes and "clown prince" Goose Tatum were his idols.[11] Now in his sixties, he refrains from playing basketball, although he still follows it on TV, and now lists woodworking as his prime hobby.[11] Robertson adds that he still could average a triple-double season in today’s basketball, and that he is highly skeptical that anyone else could do it. He is also rumored to be highly annoyed by autograph seekers, snarling and being quite rude to them. [11] Finally, he thinks that the best player who ever played basketball is Los Angeles Lakers forward Elgin Baylor.[11] The Harlem Globetrotters are an exhibition basketball team that combines athleticism and comedy to create one of the best-known sports entertainment franchises in the world. ... Marques Haynes (October 3, 1926 – ) is a former pro basketball player and member of the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Reece Goose Tatum (presumably born 1921, but he was elusive about this all his life - January 18, 1967) was a long-time player of the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Lakers logo 1966-1991 The Los Angeles Lakers are a professional basketball team, based in Los Angeles, California, which plays in the National Basketball Association. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ...


Books

  • Robertson, Oscar The Big O: My Life, My Times, My Game (2003) ISBN 1-57954-764-8 autobiography

Grace, Kevin. "Cincinnati Hoops." Chicago, IL: Arcadia, 2003.


Grace, Kevin; Hand, Greg; Hathaway, Tom; and Hoffman, Carey. "Bearcats! The Story of Basketball at the University of Cincinnati." Louisville, KY: Harmony House, 1998.


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i basketball-reference.com. Oscar Robertson stats. Retrieved on 2007-01-25.
  2. ^ NBA.com, Oscar Robertson summary, accessed May 1st, 2007.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t nba.com. Oscar Robertson nba.com summary. Retrieved on 2007-01-25.
  4. ^ a b c hoophall.com. Oscar Robertson NBA Hall of Fame summary. Retrieved on 2007-01-25.
  5. ^ abc.com. Wooden, Russell lead founding class into Collegiate Hall of Fame. Retrieved on 2007-01-25.
  6. ^ a b usbwa.com. Oscar Robertson Trophy. Retrieved on 2007-01-25.
  7. ^ usabasketball.com. Games of the XVIIth Olympiad -- 1960. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  8. ^ basketball-reference.com. 1962 Cincinnati Royals. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  9. ^ basketball-reference.com. 1963 Cincinnati Royals. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  10. ^ basketball-reference.com. 1964 Cincinnati Royals. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  11. ^ a b c d e thebigo.com. Oscar Robertson FAQ. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  12. ^ basketball-reference.com. 1975 Milwaukee Bucks. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  13. ^ thebigo.com. Oscar Robertson Company Information. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  14. ^ abc.com. Wooden, Russell lead founding class into Collegiate Hall of Fame. Retrieved on 2007-01-25.
  15. ^ a b espn.com. Daily Dime: Special Edition – The 10 Greatest Point Guards Ever. Retrieved on 2007-01-25.
  16. ^ Wojnarowski, Adrian. Making triple trouble. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  17. ^ a b c d Flatter, Ron. ESPN Classic – Oscar defined the triple-double. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  18. ^ thebigo.com. Oscar Robertson Company Information. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.

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External links

Preceded by
Bob Boozer
NBA first overall draft pick
1960 NBA Draft
Succeeded by
Walt Bellamy
1960 Olympic Champions Men's Basketball

Jay Arnette | Walt Bellamy | Bob Boozer | Terry Dischinger | Burdette Haldorson | Darrall Imhoff
Allen Kelley | Lester Lane | Jerry Lucas | Oscar Robertson | Adrian Smith | Jerry West Bob Boozer, as a collegiate All-American Robert Louis Bob Boozer (born April 26, 1937 in Omaha, Nebraska) is a former professional basketball player. ... National Basketball Association first overall pick in its annual player draft. ... 1960 NBA Draft. ... Walter Jones Bellamy (born July 24, 1939 in New Bern, North Carolina) is a former pro basketball player. ... Walter Jones Bellamy (born July 24, 1939 in New Bern, North Carolina) is a former pro basketball player. ... Bob Boozer, as a collegiate All-American Robert Louis Bob Boozer (born April 26, 1937 in Omaha, Nebraska) is a former professional basketball player. ... Terry Gilbert Dischinger (born November 14, 1940 in Terre Haute, Indiana) is a former professional basketball player in the NBA. Dischinger was made the first pick of the second round of the NBA Draft in 1962 out of Purdue University by the Chicago Zephyrs. ... Darrall Tucker Imhoff (born October 11, 1938 in San Gabriel, California) is a former pro basketball player. ... Jerry Lucas as a player of the San Francisco Warriors Jerry Ray Lucas (born March 30, 1940) was a legendary basketball star from the 1950s to the 1970s, and is now a world-renowned memory education expert. ... Adrian Howard Smith (born October 5, 1936 in Farmington, Kentucky) is an American former NBA player. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) has had one of the most successful careers ever in professional basketball, first as a player, then as a coach, and finally as an executive. ...

Coach: Pete Newell
National Basketball Association | NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar | Nate Archibald | Paul Arizin | Charles Barkley | Rick Barry | Elgin Baylor | Dave Bing | Larry Bird | Wilt Chamberlain | Bob Cousy | Dave Cowens | Billy Cunningham | Dave DeBusschere | Clyde Drexler | Julius Erving | Patrick Ewing | Walt Frazier | George Gervin | Hal Greer | John Havlicek | Elvin Hayes | Magic Johnson | Sam Jones | Michael Jordan | Jerry Lucas | Karl Malone | Moses Malone | Pete Maravich | Kevin McHale | George Mikan | Earl Monroe | Hakeem Olajuwon | Shaquille O'Neal | Robert Parish | Bob Pettit | Scottie Pippen | Willis Reed | Oscar Robertson | David Robinson | Bill Russell | Dolph Schayes | Bill Sharman | John Stockton | Isiah Thomas | Nate Thurmond | Wes Unseld | Bill Walton | Jerry West | Lenny Wilkens | James Worthy Peter F. Pete Newell (born August 3, 1915 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a former college mens basketball coach. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (commonly referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to comprise the fifty best and most influential players... For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... Nathaniel (Nate) Tiny Archibald (born September 2, 1948 in New York City) is a former professional basketball player. ... Paul Joseph Arizin (April 9, 1928 – December 12, 2006), nicknamed Pitchin Paul, was an American basketball player who spent his entire National Basketball Association career with the Philadelphia Warriors from 1950 to 1962. ... Charles Wade Barkley (born February 20, 1963) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Rick Barry (with a basket) as a player of the Golden State Warriors Richard Francis Dennis Barry III (born March 28, 1944 in Elizabeth, New Jersey, USA) is a former professional basketball player, remembered for his sharpshooting, his excellent passing, his tenacious and quarrelsome spirit and his odd-looking but... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... David Bing (born November 24, 1943 in Washington, D.C.) is a former All-Star player in the National Basketball Association, primarily for the Detroit Pistons from 1966 to 1975. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is an American former NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players to ever play, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... Dave Cowens David William Cowens (born October 25, 1948 in Newport, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player and NBA Head Coach. ... William John Billy Cunningham (born June 3, 1943 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former pro basketball player, who was nicknamed the Kangaroo Kid, and coach. ... David Albert DeBusschere (October 16, 1940 - May 14, 2003) was a professional basketball player born in Detroit, Michigan. ... Clyde Austin Drexler (born June 22, 1962 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a former National Basketball Association shooting guard. ... Julius Winfield Erving II (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is a former American basketball player who helped launch a modern style of play that emphasizes leaping and play above the rim. ... Patrick Aloysius Ewing (born August 5, 1962) is a Jamaican-born American former NBA player. ... Walter Clyde Frazier (born March 29, 1945 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American former basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... George Gervin (born April 27, 1952 in Detroit, Michigan) is a former professional basketball player, a shooting guard for the American Basketball Associations (ABA) Virginia Squires and San Antonio Spurs and the National Basketball Associations (NBA) San Antonio Spurs and Chicago Bulls. ... Harold Everett Greer (born June 26, 1936 in Huntington, West Virginia) is a former pro basketball player. ... John J. Havlicek (born April 8, 1940 in Martins Ferry, Ohio) is a former professional basketball player who competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA titles, half of them coming in his first four seasons. ... Elvin Ernest Hayes (born November 17, 1945 in Rayville, Louisiana) is considered as one of the all-time great collegiate and professional basketball players. ... “Earvin Johnson” redirects here. ... Samuel Sam Jones (born June 24, 1933 in Wilmington, North Carolina) is a former professional basketball player. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Jerry Lucas as a player of the San Francisco Warriors Jerry Ray Lucas (born March 30, 1940) was a legendary basketball star from the 1950s to the 1970s, and is now a world-renowned memory education expert. ... Karl The Mailman Malone (born July 24, 1963, in Bernice, Louisiana) is an American former professional basketball player. ... Moses Eugene Malone (born March 23, 1955 in Petersburg, Virginia) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player who also played in the American Basketball Association (ABA), as well as on the NBAs Atlanta Hawks, Houston Rockets, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, San Antonio Spurs and Washington Bullets. ... Peter Press Pistol Maravich (June 22, 1947 – January 5, 1988) was an American basketball player known for his dazzling ballhandling, incredible shooting abilities, and creative passing. ... Kevin Edward McHale (born December 19, 1957) is an American former professional basketball player who starred for thirteen seasons in the NBA for the Boston Celtics. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ... Earl Vernon Monroe (born on November 21, 1944, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), was an American professional basketball player known for his flamboyant dribbling, passing and play-making. ... Hakeem Abdul Olajuwon (born Akeem Abdul Olajuwon on January 21, 1963) is a retired American professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (born March 6, 1972 in Newark, New Jersey), frequently referred to simply as Shaq, is one of the most famous American professional basketball players, generally regarded as one of the most dominant in the National Basketball Association. ... Robert Lee Parish (born August 30, 1953 ) in Shreveport, Louisiana) is a retired American basketball center. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Scottie Maurice Pippen (born September 25, 1965 in Hamburg, Arkansas) is a former American professional basketball player who played in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and is most remembered for leading the Chicago Bulls together with Michael Jordan to six championships and being one of the best all-around players... Willis Reed Jr. ... David Maurice Robinson (born August 6, 1965 in Key West, Florida) is a former NBA basketball player, who is often considered one of the greatest centers to ever play the game. ... William Felton Bill Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 9 in Russell was the... Adolph Schayes (known as Dolph Schayes) (born May 19, 1928 in New York, New York) was a professional basketball player and coach in the NBA. He played his college basketball at New York University 1944-48. ... William Walton Bill Sharman (born May 25, 1926 in Abilene, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... John Houston Stockton (born March 26, 1962) is a former American professional basketball player. ... Isiah Lord Thomas III () (born April 30, 1961, in Chicago, Illinois) is a retired American professional basketball player in the NBA, and is currently the head coach and president of basketball operations for the NBAs New York Knicks. ... Nathaniel Nate Thurmond (born July 25, 1941, in Akron, Ohio) is rated by many one of the best defensive centers ever to play pro basketball, feared and praised by legends including Bob Pettit, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and Wilt Chamberlain. ... Westley Sissel Wes Unseld (born March 14, 1946 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American former basketball player and coach in the NBA. Unseld is a prominent member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African-Americans. ... William Theodore Walton III, better known as Bill Walton (born November 5, 1952, in La Mesa, California), is an American former basketball player and current television sportscaster. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) has had one of the most successful careers ever in professional basketball, first as a player, then as a coach, and finally as an executive. ... Lenny Wilkens with the Portland Trail Blazers Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former National Basketball Association player, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching wins and losses. ... James Ager Worthy (b. ...

Persondata
NAME Oscar Palmer Robertson
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Big O
SHORT DESCRIPTION NBA player
DATE OF BIRTH 24 November 1938
PLACE OF BIRTH Charlotte, Tennessee
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Oscar Robertson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (944 words)
Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee) is a former NBA player and is considered by many to be one of the greatest basketball players in history.
Robertson's best statistical season was 1961-62, when he averaged a triple-double for the entire season: 30.8 points, 11.4 assists and 12.5 rebounds per game, a feat that has never been duplicated.
Robertson was the first player to average more than 10 assists per game in an NBA season, and accomplished the feat five times with Cincinnati at a time when the criteria for an assist was more stringent than it is today [2].
Oscar Robertson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (256 words)
Oscar Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee) was one of the greatest basketball players, and was described by coaching great Red Auerbach as the most versatile player he knew.
His best statistical season was 1961-62, when Robertson averaged a triple-double for the entire season: 30.8 points, 11.4 assists and 12.5 rebounds per game, a feat that has never been duplicated.
Robertson ended his career with 26,710 points (25.7 per game), 9,887 assists (9.5 per game) and 7,804 rebounds (7.5 per game), and was the all-time leader in career assists and free throws made.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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