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Encyclopedia > Orson Scott Card
Orson Scott Card

Card at a science fiction and fantasy symposium at Brigham Young University in 2008.
Born August 24, 1951 (1951-08-24) (age 56)
Flag of the United States Richland, Washington
Occupation Novelist, English Professor
Genres Science fiction, Fantasy, Horror, LDS fiction
Notable work(s) Ender's Game series

Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951)[1] is a bestselling American author, as well as being a critic, political writer, and speaker. He writes in several genres, but primarily known for his science fiction work. His novel Ender's Game and its sequel Speaker for the Dead both won the Hugo Award and the Nebula Award, making Card the only author (as of 2007) to win both of science fiction's top prizes in consecutive years. Card has written, "We care about moral issues, nobility, decency, happiness, goodness—the issues that matter in the real world, but which can only be addressed, in their purity, in fiction."[2] , Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is a private coeducational school completely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church) and run under the auspices of its Church Educational System. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Richland Police Station in foreground. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... This article is about work. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... LDS fiction (or Mormon fiction) is a growing niche market of fiction novels featuring themes related to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the LDS Church, see also Mormon). Much of the recent rise in the number of titles and the improvement in the quality of LDS... Book one in the Enders Game series The Enders Game Series (or simply Ender Series) is a series of science fiction books by Orson Scott Card, started with the short story Enders Game, which was later expanded into the novel Enders Game. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A modern day speaker addressing an audience through microphones Public speaking is the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner intended to inform, influence, or entertain the listeners. ... For the gay mens lifestyle magazine, see Genre (magazine). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Enders Game (1985) is one of the best-known novels by Orson Scott Card. ... Speaker for the Dead (1986) is a science fiction novel by Orson Scott Card and a sequel to the novel Enders Game. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ...

Contents

Early life

Card is descended from Charles Ora Card, a son-in-law of Brigham Young and founder of Cardston, Alberta the first Mormon pioneer settlement in Canada. Card was born in Richland, Washington, and raised in Santa Clara, California as well as Mesa, Arizona and Orem, Utah. He served as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Brazil and graduated from Brigham Young University and the University of Utah; he also spent a year in a Ph.D. program at the University of Notre Dame. Card lives in Greensboro, North Carolina,[3] an environment that played a significant role in Ender's Game. Charles Ora Card (1839 – 1906), founded the town of Cardston, Alberta in 1887, as the first Mormon settlement in Canada, under the direction of John Taylor. ... For other uses, see Brigham Young (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A statue commemorating the Mormon pioneers The Mormon Pioneers were members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, who migrated across the United States from the midwest to the Salt Lake Valley in what is today the State of Utah. ... Richland Police Station in foreground. ... Location of Santa Clara within Santa Clara County, California. ... Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State County Maricopa Government  - Mayor Keno Hawker (R) Area  - City  125. ... Orem is an incorporated city in the north-central part of the state of Utah in Utah County. ... For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ... , Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is a private coeducational school completely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church) and run under the auspices of its Church Educational System. ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU), located in Salt Lake City, is the flagship public research university in the state of Utah, and one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education. ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... Greensboro redirects here. ... Enders Game (1985) is one of the best-known novels by Orson Scott Card. ...


Career

See also: List of works by Orson Scott Card

Card's writing career began primarily as a poet, studying with Clinton F. Larson at Brigham Young University. During his studies as a theatre major, he began "doctoring" scripts, adapting fiction for readers theatre production, and finally writing his own one-act and full-length plays, several of which were produced by faculty directors at BYU. He also explored fiction writing, beginning with stories that eventually evolved into The Worthing Saga. This is a list of the works of Orson Scott Card. ... The Worthing Saga (1990) is a novel by Orson Scott Card. ...


After returning to Provo, Utah, from his LDS mission in Brazil, Card started the Utah Valley Repertory Theatre Company, which for two summers produced plays at "the Castle," a Depression-era outdoor amphitheater behind the then-active state mental hospital in Provo; his company's were the first plays ever produced there. Meanwhile, he took part time employment as a proofreader at BYU Press, then made the jump to full time employment as a copy editor. In 1976, in the midst of a paid acting gig in the Church's musical celebrating America's Bicentennial, he secured employment as an assistant editor at the Church's official magazine, Ensign, and moved to Salt Lake City. It was while working at Ensign that Card published his first piece of fiction. His short story "Gert Fram" appeared in the July 1977 fine arts issue of that magazine under the pseudonym Byron Walley. Provo is a city in Utah and the county seat of Utah County, located about 35 miles south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. ... A pair of sister missionaries at the Oakland Temple Visitors Center The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) is one of the most active modern practitioners of missionary work, with over 50,000 full-time missionaries worldwide. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... The name amphitheatre (alternatively amphitheater) is given to a public building of the Classical period (being particularly associated with ancient Rome) which was used for spectator sports, games and displays. ... The United States Bicentennial was celebrated on Sunday, July 4, 1976, the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. ... Ensign is an official magazine of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is Salt Lake Citys top tourist draw. ...


Science fiction

He first wrote the short story "Ender's Game" while working at the BYU press, and submitted it to several publications. It was eventually purchased by Ben Bova at Analog Science Fiction and Fact and published in the August 1977 issue. Meanwhile, he started writing half-hour audioplays on the history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the New Testament, and other subjects for Living Scriptures in Ogden, Utah; on the basis of that continuing contract, some freelance editing work, and a novel contract for Hot Sleep and A Planet Called Treason, he left Ensign and began supporting his family as a freelancer. Enders Game (1985) is one of the best-known novels by Orson Scott Card. ... Benjamin William Bova (born November 8, 1932) is an American science fiction author and editor. ... April 1997 issue of Analog. ... The early history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is shared by the larger Latter Day Saint movement, which originated in upstate New York under the leadership of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... Ogden sign over Washington Boulevard at the Ogden River; toward downtown Ogden is the county seat of Weber County,GR6 Utah, United States. ... Hot Sleep: The Worthing Chronicle is a book by Orson Scott Card, published in 1979. ... A Planet Called Treason, a science fiction novel by Orson Scott Card, was originally published in 1979 by St Martins Press and Dell Publishing Co. ...


He completed his master's degree in English at the University of Utah in 1981 and began a doctoral program at the University of Notre Dame, but the recession of the early 1980s caused the flow of new book contracts to temporarily dry up. He returned to full-time employment as the book editor for Compute! Magazine in Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1983. In October of that year, a new contract for the Alvin Maker "trilogy" (now up to 6 books) allowed him to return to freelancing.


Ender's Game and its sequel Speaker for the Dead were both awarded the Hugo Award and the Nebula Award, making Card the only author (as of 2007) to win both of science fiction's top prizes in consecutive years. Card continued the series with Xenocide, Children of the Mind, Ender's Shadow, Shadow of the Hegemon, Shadow Puppets, Shadow of the Giant, and the 2007 release of A War of Gifts. Card has also announced his plan to write Shadows in Flight, a book that connects the "Shadow" series and "Speaker" series together, and Ender in Exile: Ganges, a book that takes place after Shadow of the Giant and before the short story "Investment Counselor". Furthermore, Card recently announced that Ender's Game will soon be made into a movie. It is slated to be directed by Wolfgang Petersen, who also directed The NeverEnding Story and Das Boot. Card is writing the screenplay himself. Enders Game (1985) is one of the best-known novels by Orson Scott Card. ... Speaker for the Dead (1986) is a science fiction novel by Orson Scott Card and a sequel to the novel Enders Game. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Xenocide (1991) is the third novel in the Enders Game series of books by Orson Scott Card. ... Children of the Mind is the fourth book of Orson Scott Cards popular Enders Game series, a series of four science fiction novels that focus on Ender Wiggin himself. ... Enders Shadow is a 1999 parallel novel by Orson Scott Card with a plot covering the events in Enders Game from the point of view of a supporting charactor named Bean. ... Shadow of the Hegemon (2001) is the second novel in Orson Scott Cards Enders Shadow series (often called the Bean Quartet) and the sixth novel in the Enders Game series. ... Shadow Puppets, by Orson Scott Card, is the sequel to Shadow of the Hegemon and the third book in the Enders Shadow series (often called the Bean Quartet). ... Shadow of the Giant (2005) is the fourth and final novel of the Shadow Quartet. ... Shadows in Flight is a science fiction novel by Orson Scott Card, which is to be the 5th book in the Enders Shadow series (aka Shadow/Bean Quintet). ... Wolfgang Petersen Wolfgang Petersen (born March 14, 1941 in Emden, Lower Saxony, Germany) is a German film director. ... This article is about the motion picture. ... For the song Das Boot, see U96. ...


Other works include the alternate histories The Tales of Alvin Maker and Pastwatch: The Redemption of Christopher Columbus, Robota, a collaboration with Star Wars artist Doug Chiang, and Empire, his latest novel, which is about a near-future civil war in the United States. The Tales of Alvin Maker is a series of novels by Orson Scott Card that revolve around the experiences of a young man, Alvin Miller, who discovers he has incredible powers for creating and shaping things around him. ... See Roza Robota for the World War 2 Resistance Hero Robota (2003) is an illustrated book by Doug Chiang and Orson Scott Card about a mysterious fourth planet of the solar system named Orpheus. ... Doug Chiang is an American movie designer and artist. ... Empire (2006) is a speculative fiction novel by Orson Scott Card. ... This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ...


Other genres

He has since branched out into other areas of fiction with novels such as Lost Boys, Treasure Box and Enchantment. Other works include the novelization of the James Cameron film The Abyss and the comic book Ultimate Iron Man for Marvel Comics' Ultimate Marvel Universe series. Outside the published fiction world, Card contributed dialog to two video games, the The Secret of Monkey Island and The Dig in the early 1990s.[4] Treasure Box (1996) is the second non-Science-Fiction novel written by Orson Scott Card. ... Enchantment is a 1999 novel by author Orson Scott Card. ... For other persons named James Cameron, see James Cameron (disambiguation). ... The Abyss is a 1989 science fiction film which was written and directed by James Cameron, starring Ed Harris, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, and Michael Biehn. ... This article is about the two Ultimate Iron Man miniseries. ... The Secret of Monkey Island (SMI) is a well known adventure game that spawned a series of famous and classic comedy adventure games, known as the Monkey Island series as well as making a name for LucasArts (then Lucasfilm Games) as a producer of adventure games, thus the largest competitor... The Dig is a graphical adventure game developed by LucasArts and released in 1995, and a novel based on the game written by Alan Dean Foster. ...


In 2000, Card published the first historical novel in The Women of Genesis series. This series explores the lives of the principal women mentioned in the first book of the Bible and includes Sarah (2000), Rebekah (2002), and Rachel and Leah (2004). Book one in the Women of Genesis series The Women of Genesis series is a series of books begun in 2000 by Orson Scott Card. ... Sarah (2000) is the first novel in The Women of Genesis series by Orson Scott Card. ... Rebekah (2001) is the second novel in The Women of Genesis series by Orson Scott Card. ... Rachel and Leah (2004) is the thrid novel in The Women of Genesis series by Orson Scott Card. ...


In the fall of 2005, Card also launched Orson Scott Card's InterGalactic Medicine Show.[5] He edited the first two issues, but found that the demands of teaching, writing, and directing plays for his local church theatre group made it impossible to respond to writers' submissions in a timely manner; former Card student and experienced freelance writer and editor Edmund Schubert became the new editor as of June 1, 2006. Intergalactic Medicine Show is an American Webzine devoted to science fiction and fantasy short fiction. ...


On writing

Teaching

In 2005, Card accepted a permanent appointment as "distinguished professor" at Southern Virginia University in Buena Vista, Virginia, a small liberal arts college run based on the principles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Card has cited his frustration with dismal teaching methodology for creative writing in most universities as a reason for accepting this position, along with his desire to teach the techniques of effective fiction writing to writers whose values are more harmonious with his own. Card has worked closely with colleagues to develop new and effective ways to educate aspiring writers and has published two books on the subject. He was eager for the opportunity to apply these techniques in a university environment—his assorted workshops did not allow the follow-through he desired. After being affected by stories of his students' parents in some of their essays he decided to stop teaching regularly at the university to spend time with his youngest child who still lives at home.[6] Southern Virginia University is a liberal arts college located in Buena Vista, Virginia. ... Buena Vista, Virginia 6002 happy citizens and 3 old grouches Buena Vista, pronounced [ËŒbjunəˈvɪstÉ™] by locals, despite the correct Spanish pronunciation of [bwenaˈßista], is an independent city located within the confines of Rockbridge County in the state of Virginia. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ...


Literary Boot Camp

Since 2001, Card has run an annual, one-week intensive critique workshop for aspiring writers called "Literary Boot Camp." Participants are picked from applicants who submit a sample of their fiction writing. The week-long workshop is paired with a weekend lecture-style workshop open to all comers. Graduates have gone on to win major science fiction and fantasy contests (for instance, the now-defunct Phobos contest and the Writers of the Future contest), sell many stories to the SF and fantasy magazines such as Asimov's Science Fiction and Realms of Fantasy, sell books to major publishers (Judson Roberts' Strongbow Saga trilogy is one of many examples), etc. Writers of the Future (WOTF) is a science fiction and fantasy story contest that was originated by L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s. ... Cover for an issue of Asimovs Science Fiction. ... Realms of Fantasy is a bimonthly fantasy magazine. ...


Books on writing

Card has written two books on the subject of creative writing. The first of these books was Characters and Viewpoint published in 1988. The second was How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy published in 1990. Both of the books were published by Writer's Digest Books and remain in print. Writers Digest, established in 1920, is a United States publication devoted to both beginning and established writers, offering interviews, classifieds, market listings, calls for manuscripts, and tips. ...


Writers of the Future

Card also serves as a judge in the Writers of the Future contest[7] The Writers of the Future contest is a science fiction and fantasy story contest for amateur writers originated by L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s. Writers of the Future (WOTF) is a science fiction and fantasy story contest that was originated by L. Ron Hubbard in the early 1980s. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was the founder of the Church of Scientology, as well as the author of Dianetics and the body of works comprising Scientology doctrine. ...


Personal views

Political writing

Card is active as a critic, political writer, and speaker. During 1998 when Card published Ender's Shadow, several versions of the book had a political statement about the "unprovoked attacks by the Clinton administration" on Afghanistan with cruise missiles.[citation needed] Shortly after the September 11, 2001 attacks Card began to write a weekly column named variously "War Watch", "World Watch", or "Civilization Watch", depending upon the topic. The column is published in the Greensboro Rhinoceros Times. Card also writes an "Uncle Orson Reviews Everything" column. Both columns are archived on Card's websites. Card is a vocal supporter of many aspects of George W. Bush's leadership style, the war on terror, aspects of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and aspects of the USA PATRIOT Act. Though he praises Fox News for aspects of their news coverage, he maintains his cynicism, as when he saw they were broadcasting soldiers' messages back to loved ones at home and said, "I thought of what it meant to them... and being human, I was touched. At the same time, being a cynical critic of pretty much everything, the thought flashed through my mind: So Fox News is profiting from the love and loneliness and fear of our military people?"[8] Card is also known for his strong support for the State of Israel.[citation needed] The afterword of Empire discusses his views on American politics.[9] A Taurus KEPD 350 cruise missile of the German Luftwaffe A cruise missile is a guided missile which carries an explosive payload and uses a lifting wing and a propulsion system, usually a jet engine, to allow sustained flight; it is essentially a flying bomb. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... The Rhinoceros Times is a weekly right-wing news and opinion magazine published in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA. The Rhino is edited by John Hammer and features editorial columns by Orson Scott Card. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The War on Terrorism (also known as the War on Terror) is campaign begun by the Bush administration which includes various military, political, and legal actions taken to ostensibly curb the spread of terrorism following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. ... In the United States, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an Act of Congress which President George W. Bush signed into law... Fox News redirects here. ... This article is about the current understanding of the word cynicism. ... The State of Israel (Hebrew: מְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל, transliteration: ; Arabic: دَوْلَةْ اِسْرَائِيل, transliteration: ) is a country in the Middle East on the eastern edge of the Mediterranean Sea. ... Empire (2006) is a speculative fiction novel by Orson Scott Card. ...


Political identification

Card identifies himself as a Democrat because he is pro-gun control/anti-National Rifle Association, highly critical of free-market capitalism, and because he believes that the Republican party in the South continues to tolerate racism. Card encapsulated his views thus:[10] The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... This article concerns the National Rifle Association of the USA. For the UK organisation, see National Rifle Association of the United Kingdom The National Rifle Association, or NRA, is a non-profit group for the promotion of marksmanship, firearm safety, and the protection of hunting and personal protection firearm rights... In theoretical economics, a free market is a controversial model of an idealized economy, wherein exchanges are free from coercion and control except for guardianship which allows for private property ownership in land, natural resources, and the broadcast spectrum, as well as intellectual property and corporations. ... GOP redirects here. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota...

Maybe the Democrats will even accept the idea that sometimes the people don't want to create your utopian vision (especially when your track record is disastrous and your "utopias" keep looking like hell)... The Democratic Party ought to be standing as the bulwark of the little guy against big money and rapacious free-market capitalism, here and abroad. After all, the Republicans seem to be dominated by their own group of insane utopians—when they're not making huggy-huggy with all those leftover racists from the segregationist past.

He has described himself as a Moynihan Democrat, and later as a "Tony Blair" Democrat, saying he has to look outside the U.S. for someone representative for his views now that Moynihan has died and the Democrats oppose Bush. He has written columns condemning extremist liberals as being part of what's wrong with America, and praises Zell Miller for trying to save the Democratic Party. During the 2004 election Card wrote many articles supporting the Bush/Cheney ticket, criticizing John Kerry, and lambasting his own state's senator, John Edwards, as being absurd, insincere, and an opportunistic shill. Prior to the 2004 presidential race, Card had written that his state needed to regain control from people like Edwards and advocated running a strong primary opponent against Edwards should he run for reelection to the Senate.[11] He has also been a staunch defender of Fox News, stating that "It's a good feeling to hear about our war from people who actually think it would be a good thing if we win."[8] Card also publicly endorses children of illegal immigrants receiving in-state college tuition rates[12] and has stated there is a need for moderation in tax cuts.[13] Daniel Patrick “Pat” Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a United States Senator, Ambassador, and eminent sociologist. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Zell Bryan Miller (born February 24, 1932) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ... A shill is an associate of a person selling goods or services who pretends no association to the seller and assumes the air of an enthusiastic customer. ... Illegal alien and Illegal aliens redirect here. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ...


On November 6, 2006, just one day before a major election in the United States, Card wrote an opinion piece for RealClearPolitics, in which he encourages voters to support the Republicans: is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... RealClearPolitics is a right-leaning Chicago based political website founded in 2000 by John McIntyre and Tom Bevan. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...

There is only one issue in this election that will matter five or ten years from now, and that's the War on Terror... I say this as a Democrat, for whom the Republican domination of government threatens many values that I hold to be important to America's role as a light among nations. But there are no values that matter to me that will not be gravely endangered if we lose this war.

Environment and science

Although he supports government-funded research into alternative energy sources and the phasing out of fossil fuel use, Card has also frequently criticized precipitate action on global warming, and has voiced the suggestion that scientific evidence against global warming is suppressed because global warming has become an academic orthodoxy that discourages opposing evidence.[14] His short story "Angles" also features scientists fearing to pursue research because it would run counter to scientific dogma. Similarly, he has voiced distrust of Darwinism as dogma in opposition to Intelligent Design (which he also distrusts, for entirely different reasons). While criticizing scientists for claiming that Darwinism explains "completely how evolution works," Card also said that "real science does not—and never can—prove or even support" Intelligent Design.[15] Alternative energy is energy derived from sources that do not harm the environment or deplete the Earths natural resources. ... Fossil fuels or mineral fuels are fossil source fuels, that is, hydrocarbons found within the top layer of the earth’s crust. ... Global warming refers to the increase in the average temperature of the Earths near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. ... Charles Darwin Darwinism is a term for the underlying theory in those ideas of Charles Darwin concerning evolution and natural selection. ... For other uses, see Intelligent design (disambiguation). ... This article is about evolution in biology. ...


Premarital sex

Card has written that an increase in crime in USA of the 1970s and 1980s "might well have been the result" of what he calls "the New Morality and the Pill" because they may have increased the number of babies born to "the people with poor impulse control" who are "most likely to be irresponsible parents."[16]


Homosexuality

Card's views on homosexuality have led a number of critics to accuse him of being homophobic.[17]


Card has called same-sex marriage a "potentially devastating social experiment" and argued that same-sex marriage is not necessary to ensure equal rights, since "Any homosexual man who can persuade a woman to take him as her husband can avail himself of all the rights of husbandhood under the law."[18] He also notes that "gay activism as a movement is no longer looking for civil rights, which by and large homosexuals already have."[19] He also says he is against "changing the word 'marriage' to apply to something it's never applied to."[20] Elsewhere he writes that, with respect to the polity, the citizens at large: One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ... For other uses, see Polity (disambiguation). ...

Laws against homosexual behavior should remain on the books, not to be indiscriminately enforced against anyone who happens to be caught violating them, but to be used when necessary to send a clear message that those who flagrantly violate society's regulation of sexual behavior cannot be permitted to remain as acceptable, equal citizens within that society. The goal of the polity is not to put homosexuals in jail. The goal is to discourage people from engaging in homosexual practices in the first place, and, when they nevertheless proceed in their homosexual behavior, to encourage them to do so discreetly, so as not to shake the confidence of the community in the polity's ability to provide rules for safe, stable, dependable marriage and family relationships.[19]

Writing of the LDS Church's attitude towards homosexuals, he argues that because the Church leaders and prophets teach against homosexual behaviour, it is hypocritical for a practising homosexual to claim to be a Church member but still deny that their behavior is sinful.[19] Main article: Sexuality and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, homosexuality is officially seen as a set of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors, and not an immutable condition or an indication of an innate identity (Oaks 1995). ...


Card disputes those who call these views homophobic, stating he does not advocate or condone "harsh personal treatment of individuals who are unable to resist the temptation to have sexual relations with persons of the same sex",[19] and that he views homosexuals as "human beings with as complex a combination of good and evil in them as I find within myself." Speaking of tolerance, he says "That we must treat sinners kindly is true; that we must courageously and firmly reject sin is also true." Speaking of homophobic violence: "I think there is no room in America for violence directed against any group (or any individual) for any reason short of immediate defense against physical attack - which doesn't often come up with homosexuals."[19] Card also says he is attacked for being too tolerant of homosexuals.[19][21] The persecution of gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgendered individuals is the practice of attacking a person, usually physically, because they are or are perceived to be lesbian, gay or transgender. ...


Card himself identifies his position as "walking a middle way, which condemns the sin but loves the sinner".[19] Card says that when homosexuality appears in his fiction (as in Songmaster and The Ships of Earth) it is not to argue for or against homosexuality, but rather "to create real and living characters".[19] Songmaster is a fantasy novel by Orson Scott Card. ... The Ships of Earth (1994) is the third book of the Homecoming Saga written by Orson Scott Card. ...


Family

He and his wife Kristine are the parents of five children, each with at least one name of authors he and his wife admire. Their children's names are Michael Geoffrey (Geoffrey Chaucer), Emily Janice (Emily Brontë and Emily Dickinson), Charles Benjamin (Charles Dickens), Zina Margaret (Margaret Mitchell) and Erin Louisa (Louisa May Alcott). Charles, afflicted with cerebral palsy, died shortly after his seventeenth birthday and their daughter, Erin, died the day she was born.[3] Currently Card and his wife live with their youngest living child, Zina, in Greensboro, North Carolina.[3] Chaucer redirects here. ... Emily Jane Brontë (pronounced ); (July 30, 1818 – December 19, 1848) was a British novelist and poet, now best remembered for her only novel Wuthering Heights, a classic of English literature. ... From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949), popularly known as Margaret Mitchell was an American author, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her novel, Gone with the Wind, published in 1936. ... Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. ... Cerebral palsy (CP) is an umbrella term encompassing a group of non-progressive,[1] non-contagious conditions that cause physical disability in human development. ... Greensboro redirects here. ...


The life of their son Charles influenced some of Card's fiction, most notably the Homecoming series, Lost Boys and Folk of the Fringe. Their daughter, Emily, along with two other writers adapted Card's short stories "Clap Hands and Sing", "Lifeloop" and "A Sepulchre of Songs" for the stage in Posing as People.[22] The Homecoming Saga is a science fiction series by Orson Scott Card. ...


Awards

The John W. Campbell Award for the Best New Writer in Science Fiction is awarded annually by the World Science Fiction Society. ... Worldcon, a. ... Songmaster is a fantasy novel by Orson Scott Card. ... Enders Game (1985) is one of the best-known novels by Orson Scott Card. ... Speaker for the Dead (1986) is a science fiction novel by Orson Scott Card and a sequel to the novel Enders Game. ... The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ... Eye for Eye is a novella written by Orson Scott Card. ... The first book in Orson Scott Cards series The Tales of Alvin Maker, Seventh Son (1987) is about Alvin Miller, the Seventh son of a seventh son. ... The Mythopoeic Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study of fantasy and mythic literature. ... The second book in Orson Scott Cards series The Tales of Alvin Maker, The Red Prophet is about Alvin Miller, his fathers seventh son, Lolla-Wossiky, a troubled whisky Red, and Ta-Kumsaw, Lolla-Wossikys older brother. ... Alvin Journeyman is a book published in 1995 by Orson Scott Card. ... Enders Game (1985) is one of the best-known novels by Orson Scott Card. ... Enders Shadow is a 1999 parallel novel by Orson Scott Card with a plot covering the events in Enders Game from the point of view of a supporting charactor named Bean. ...

References

  1. ^ Orson Scott Card. The Internet Movie Database (IMDb). Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  2. ^ Uncle Orson's Writing Class - The "Maguffin". Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. (2000-04-26). Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  3. ^ a b c Who Is Orson Scott Card?. Hatrack River Enterprises Inc.. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  4. ^ Interview with Author Orson Scott Card.. Gaming Today. Retrieved on 2007-06-18.
  5. ^ Orson Scott Card's Intergalactic Medicine Show. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  6. ^ Uncle Orson Reviews Everything. Hatrack River Enterprises Inc. (2007-05-27). Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  7. ^ Writers of the Future contest.. Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  8. ^ a b Card, Orson Scott (2003-04-24). War Watch: The Most Careful of All Wars. The Ornery American. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  9. ^ Card, Orson Scott (November 28, 2006). Empire. Tor Books. ISBN ISBN 0-7653-1611-0. 
  10. ^ Card, Orson Scott (2003-06-24). War Watch: Judges, filibusters, and Hillary. The Ornery American. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  11. ^ Card, Orson Scott (2002-11-11). War Watch: Where Do the Parties Go Now?. The Ornery American. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  12. ^ Card, Orson Scott (2003-05-21). War Watch: Anti-Americans, Paradise, and Cheap Tuition. The Ornery American. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  13. ^ Card, Orson Scott (2004-03-07). Civilization Watch: When Progress Stops Being Progress. The Ornery American. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  14. ^ Card, Orson Scott (2007-04-29). Civilization Watch: Don't You Dare Ask for Proof. The Ornery American. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  15. ^ Card, Orson Scott (2006-01-08). WorldWatch: Creation and Evolution in the Schools. The Ornery American. Retrieved on 2006-10-18.
  16. ^ Card, Orson Scott (2005-09-11). Freakonomics. The Ornery American. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
  17. ^ See, for example:
    Minkowitz, Donna (Feb. 3, 2000), My favorite author, my worst interview, Salon.com, <http://archive.salon.com/books/feature/2000/02/03/card/index.html> ,
    Cline, Austin (Jan. 3, 2004), Orson Scott Card: Criminalize Homosexual Behavior, About.com:Agnosticism / Atheism, <http://atheism.about.com/b/2004/01/03/orson-scott-card-criminalize-homosexual-behavior.htm> ,
    Friedrichs, Ellen (Jan. 22, 2008), Homophobic Author, Orson Scott Card, Gets Award, About.com:GLBT Teens, <http://gayteens.about.com/b/2008/01/22/homophobic-author-orson-scott-card-gets-award.htm> ,
    Whelan, Debra Lau (Jan. 16, 2008), Controversial Author Wins Edwards Award, School Library Journal: Reed Elsevier Inc, <http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA6523290.html> 
  18. ^ Card, Orson Scott (2004-02-15). Civilization Watch: Homosexual "Marriage" and Civilization. The Ornery American. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h Card, Orson Scott (1990). The Hypocrites of Homosexuality. Sunstone Magazine. Retrieved on 2008-01-25.
  20. ^ Minkowitz, Donna (2000-02-03). My Favourite Author, My Worst Interview. Salon Books. Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
  21. ^ Minkowitz, Donna (Feb. 3, 2000), My favorite author, my worst interview, Salon.com, <http://archive.salon.com/books/feature/2000/02/03/card/index.html> 
  22. ^ Posing as People. Hatrack River Enterprises Inc..

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Donna Minkowitz is a Pulitzer-nominated writer/journalist from Brooklyn, New York, United States. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... In 1974, the Sunstone Foundation started the Sunstone Magazine to feature such subjects as Mormon experience, scholarship, art, short fiction and poetry. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Donna Minkowitz is a Pulitzer-nominated writer/journalist from Brooklyn, New York, United States. ...

Additional reading

  • Card Catalogue: The Science Fiction and Fantasy of Orson Scott Card, Michael R. Collings, Hypatia Press, 1987, ISBN 0940841010
  • In the Image of God: Theme, Characterization and Landscape in the Fiction of Orson Scott Card, Michael R. Collings, Greenwood Press, 1990, ISBN 0-313-26404-X
  • The Work of Orson Scott Card: An Annotated Bibliography and Guide, Michael R. Collings and Boden Clarke, 1997
  • Storyteller: The Official Guide to the Works of Orson Scott Card, Michael R. Collings, Overlook Connection Press, 2001, ISBN 1-892950-26-X

Greenwood Press, based in Connecticut, is an imprint of Greenwood Publishing Group and owned by Reed Elsevier. ...

See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... This is a list of the works of Orson Scott Card. ... Signature Books In the late 1970s, Scott Kenny decided there needed to be a Mormon press that didn’t have political ties to the LDS church and in 1980 he and a few investors created Signature Books and in 1981 published it’s first book, Saintspeak by Orson Scott Card. ... LDS fiction (or Mormon fiction) is a growing niche market of fiction novels featuring themes related to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the LDS Church, see also Mormon). Much of the recent rise in the number of titles and the improvement in the quality of LDS...

External links

About Card

By Card

There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The Quran desecration controversy of 2005 captured international attention in April 2005 when Newsweek published an article which appeared to confirm several previous allegations that U.S. personnel at the Guantánamo Bay prison camp had damaged a copy of the Quran by putting it in a toilet... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... Jedi Knights and Jedi Knight redirect here. ... The so-called Hockey stick graph as shown in the 2001 IPCC report. ...

Fan sites

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ...

Other

Persondata
NAME Card, Orson Scott
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Science fiction novelist
DATE OF BIRTH August 24, 1951
PLACE OF BIRTH Richland, Washington
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richland Police Station in foreground. ...

 
 

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