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Encyclopedia > Ornette Coleman
Ornette Coleman
Ornette Coleman at a concert in October 2005 in Ludwigshafen, Germany
Ornette Coleman at a concert in October 2005 in Ludwigshafen, Germany
Background information
Born March 9, 1930 (1930-03-09) (age 77)
Fort Worth, Texas, United States
Genre(s) Free jazz
Free funk
Avant-garde jazz
Occupation(s) Musician, composer
Instrument(s) Alto saxophone
Violin
Trumpet
Years active 1958-present
Website ornettecoleman.com

Ornette Coleman (born March 9, 1930) is an American saxophonist, violinist, trumpeter and composer. He was one of the major innovators of the free jazz movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1920 × 2560 pixel, file size: 1,020 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bildinhalt: Ornette Coleman Aufnahmeort: Feierabendhaus in Ludwigshafen, Deutschland Aufnahmedatum: 14. ... Map of Germany showing Ludwigshafen am Rhein Ludwigshafen am Rhein is a city in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, with about 166,000 inhabitants. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fort Worth is the sixth-largest city in the state of Texas, located about 30 miles west of Dallas on the West Fork Trinity River and forming part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Free funk is a combination of Avant-garde jazz with funk music. ... Avant-jazz (also known as avant-garde jazz) is a style of music and improvisation that combines elements of avant-garde art music composition with elements of traditional jazz. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... The trumpet is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ...


Coleman's timbre is easily recognized: his keening, crying sound draws heavily on blues music. His album Sound Grammar received the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for music. In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... Sound Grammar is an album by jazz saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman, recorded live in Ludwigshafen, Germany, on 14 October 2005. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...

Contents

Early career

Coleman was born and raised in Fort Worth, Texas, where he began performing R&B and bebop initially on tenor saxophone. Seeking a way to work his way out of his home town, he took a job in 1949 with a Silas Green from New Orleans traveling show and then with touring rhythm and blues shows. After a show in Baton Rouge, he was assaulted and his saxophone was destroyed. [1] Fort Worth is the sixth-largest city in the state of Texas, located about 30 miles west of Dallas on the West Fork Trinity River and forming part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ... Silas Green from New Orleans was an African American owned and run variety tent show, which in various forms toured the southern states between about 1904 and 1957. ...


He switched to alto, which has remained his primary instrument, first playing it in New Orleans after the Baton Rouge incident. He then joined the band of Pee Wee Crayton and travelled with them to Los Angeles. He worked at various jobs, including as an elevator operator, while pursuing his musical career. A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Compilation album cover Connie Curtis Crayton (b 18 December 1914, Rockdale, Texas – d 25 June 1985, Los Angeles), known as Pee Wee Crayton, was an American R&B guitarist and singer. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... For other uses, see Elevator (disambiguation). ...


Even from the beginning of Coleman's career, his music and playing were in many ways rather unorthodox. Coleman was more concerned with relative pitch than with "proper" equal temperament. His sense of harmony and chord progression, far less rigid than that of most swing music or bebop performers, was easily changed and often implied. Many Los Angeles jazz musicians regarded Coleman's playing as out-of-tune, and he sometimes had difficulty finding like-minded musicians with whom to perform. Pianist Paul Bley was an early supporter. The term relative pitch may denote: the distance of a musical note from a set point of reference, e. ... An equal temperament is a musical temperament — that is, a system of tuning intended to approximate some form of just intonation — in which an interval, usually the octave, is divided into a series of equal steps (equal frequency ratios). ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... A chord progression (also chord sequence and harmonic progression or sequence), as its name implies, is a series of chords played in order. ... Swing music, also known as swing jazz, is a form of jazz music that developed during the 1920s and had solidified as a distinctive style by 1935 in the United States. ... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Paul Bley is a free jazz pianist born in Montreal, Canada in 1932 and long-time resident in the USA. His music characteristically features strong senses both of melodic voicing and space. ...


In 1958 Coleman led his first recording session for Something Else!!!! The Music of Ornette Coleman. The session also featured trumpeter Don Cherry, drummer Billy Higgins, bassist Don Payne and Walter Norris on piano. Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Something Else!!!! (sometimes called Something Else!!!! The Music of Ornette Coleman) is the 1958 debut album by jazz saxophonist Ornette Coleman. ... The trumpet is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... Don Cherry (November 18, 1936–October 19, 1995) was an innovative jazz trumpeter probably best known for his long association with saxophonist Ornette Coleman. ... For the comic book character, see Drummer (comics). ... Billy Higgins (October 11, 1936–May 3, 2001) was an American jazz drummer. ... Donald Milford Payne (b. ... Walter Norris (b. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ...


The Shape of Jazz to Come

1959 found Coleman very busy. He signed a multi-album contract with Atlantic Records and released Tomorrow Is the Question!, a quartet album, with Shelly Manne on drums, and excluding the piano, which he would not use again until the 1990s. Next Coleman brought double bassist Charlie Haden – one of a handful of his most important collaborators – into a regular group with Haden, Cherry, and Higgins. (All four had played with Paul Bley the previous year.) They recorded The Shape of Jazz to Come in 1959. It was, according to critic Steve Huey, “a watershed event in the genesis of avant-garde jazz, profoundly steering its future course and throwing down a gauntlet that some still haven't come to grips with.” [2] While definitely – if somewhat loosely – blues-based and often quite melodic, the album's songs were harmonically unusual and unpredictable. Some musicians and critics saw Coleman as a talentless charlatan; others regarded him as a genius. Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label, and operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... Shelly Manne (June 11, 1920–September 26, 1984), born Sheldon Manne in New York, New York, was an American jazz drummer. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... Charles Edward Haden (born August 6, 1937) is a jazz double bassist, probably best known for his long association with saxophonist Ornette Coleman. ... The Shape of Jazz to Come was the first free jazz album ever recorded. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... “Blues music” redirects here. ... An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ...


Coleman's quartet received a lengthy – and sometimes controversial – engagement at New York City's famed Five Spot jazz club. Such notable figures as The Modern Jazz Quartet, Leonard Bernstein and Lionel Hampton were favorably impressed, and offered encouragement. (Hampton was so impressed he reportedly asked to perform with the quartet; Bernstein later helped Haden obtain a composition grant from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation.) Opinion was, however, divided: trumpeter Miles Davis famously declared Coleman was "all screwed up inside," (although this comment was later recanted) and Roy Eldridge stated, "I'd listened to him all kinds of ways. I listened to him high and I listened to him cold sober. I even played with him. I think he's jiving baby." New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Five Spot Cafe was located in New York City at the corner of Cooper Square and St. ... The Modern Jazz Quartet was established in 1952 by Milt Jackson (vibraphone), John Lewis (piano, musical director), Percy Heath (bass), and Kenny Clarke (drums). ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Lionel Hampton with George W. Bush Lionel Leo Hampton (April 20, 1908, Louisville, Kentucky – August 31, 2002 New York City), was a jazz bandleader and percussionist. ... The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation was founded in 1925 by Mr. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ... Roy David Eldridge (January 30, 1911 – February 6, 1989) was a jazz trumpet player in the Swing era. ...


On the Atlantic recordings, Scott LaFaro sometimes replaces Charlie Haden on double bass and either Billy Higgins or Ed Blackwell features on drums. These recordings are collected in a boxed set, Beauty is a Rare Thing. Rocco Scott LaFaro (April 3, 1936, Newark, New Jersey - July 6, 1961, Flint, New York) was one of the most influential jazz bassists of the 20th century. ... Charles Edward Haden (born August 6, 1937) is a jazz double bassist, probably best known for his long association with saxophonist Ornette Coleman. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... Billy Higgins (October 11, 1936–May 3, 2001) was an American jazz drummer. ... Ed Blackwell (October 10, 1929 – October 7, 1992) was a jazz drummer. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... A boxed set (often erroneously referred to as a box set) is one or more musical recordings, films, or television programs that are contained in a box. ...


Part of the uniqueness of Coleman's early sound came from his use of a plastic saxophone. Coleman claimed that it sounded drier, without the pinging sound of metal. In more recent years he has played a metal saxophone.


Free Jazz

In 1960, Coleman recorded Free Jazz: A Collective Improvisation, which featured a double quartet, including Cherry and Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, Eric Dolphy on bass clarinet, Haden and LaFaro on bass, and both Higgins and Blackwell on drums. The record was recorded in stereo, with a reed/brass/bass/drums quartet isolated in each stereo channel. Free Jazz was, at nearly 40 minutes, the lengthiest recorded continuous jazz performance to date, and was instantly one of Coleman's most controversial albums. The music features a regular but complex pulse, one drummer playing "straight" while the other played double-time; the thematic material is a series of brief, dissonant fanfares; as is conventional in jazz, there are a series of solos features for each member of the band, but the other soloists are free to chime in as they wish, producing some extraordinary passages of collective improvisation by the full octet. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Frederick Dewayne Hubbard (born April 7, 1938 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American jazz trumpeter. ... The trumpet is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... Eric Allan Dolphy (June 20, 1928 – June 29, 1964) was a jazz musician who played alto saxophone, flute and bass clarinet. ... The bass clarinet is a musical instrument of the clarinet family. ... Label for 2. ... Reed instruments are musical instruments; they are members of the woodwind family. ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ...


Coleman intended “Free Jazz” simply to be the album title, but his growing reputation placed him at the forefront of jazz innovation, and free jazz was soon considered a new genre, though Coleman has expressed discomfort with the term. This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ...


Among the reasons Coleman may not have entirely approved of the term free jazz is that his music contains a considerable amount of composition. His melodic material, although skeletal, strongly recalls the melodies that Charlie Parker wrote over standard harmonies, and in general the music is closer to the bebop that came before it than is sometimes popularly imagined. (Several early tunes of his, for instance, are clearly based on favorite bop chord changes like "Out of Nowhere" and "I Got Rhythm.") Coleman very rarely played standards, concentrating on his own compositions, of which there seems to be an endless flow. There are exceptions, though, including a classic reading (virtually a recomposition) of "Embraceable You" for Atlantic, and an improvisation on Thelonious Monk's "Criss-Cross" recorded with Gunther Schuller. This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Musical composition is a phrase used in a number of contexts, the most commonly used being a piece of music. ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ... Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ... Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. ... Gunther Schuller Gunther Schuller (born November 22, 1925) studied at the St. ...


1960s

After the Atlantic period and into the early part of the 1970s, Coleman's music became more angular and engaged fully with the jazz avant-garde which had developed in part around Coleman's innovations. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ...


His quartet dissolved, and Coleman formed a new trio with David Izenzon on bass, and Charles Moffett on drums. Coleman began to extend the sound-range of his music, introducing accompanying string players (though far from the territory of "Parker With Strings") and playing trumpet and violin himself; he initially had little conventional technique, and used the instruments to make large, unrestrained gestures. His friendship with Albert Ayler influenced Coleman's development on trumpet and violin. (Haden would later sometimes join this trio to form a two-bass quartet.) Charles Moffett was a jazz drummer probably best known for his part in Ornette Colemans trio in the 1960s and 70s. ... The trumpet is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ... A musical technique is a technique used in the composition, precomposition, or performance of music, including extended techniques. ... Albert Ayler (July 13, 1936–November 1970) was an American jazz saxophonist, singer and composer. ...


Between 1965 and 1967 Coleman signed with legendary jazz record label Blue Note Records and released a number of recordings starting with the influential recordings of the trio At the Golden Circle Stockholm. See also: 1964 in music, other events of 1965, 1966 in music, 1960s in music and the list of years in music // January 4 - Fender Guitars is sold to CBS for $13 million. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Blue Note Records is a jazz record label, established in 1939 by Alfred Lion and Francis Wolff. ... At the Golden Circle Stockholm is a two volume album by Ornette Coleman Trio, documenting concerts on the nights of December 3rd and 4th 1965 in the Gyllene Cirkeln club in Stockholm. ...


In 1966, Coleman was criticised for recording The Empty Foxhole, a trio with Haden, and Coleman's son Denardo Coleman – who was ten years old. Some regarded this as perhaps an ill-advised publicity ploy on Coleman's part, and judged the move as a misstep. Others, however, noted that despite his youth, Denardo had studied drumming for several years, his technique – which, though unrefined, was respectable and enthusiastic – owed more to pulse-oriented free jazz drummers like Sunny Murray than to bebop drumming. Denardo has matured into a respected musician, and has been his father's primary drummer since the late 1970s. Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Sunny Murray is one of the pioneers of the free jazz style of drumming. ... Bebop is a form of jazz characterized by fast tempos and improvisation based on harmonic structure rather than melody. ...


Coleman formed another quartet. A number of bassists and drummers (including Haden, Jimmy Garrison and Elvin Jones) appeared, and Dewey Redman joined the group, usually on tenor saxophone. Jimmy Garrison (March 3, 1933 – April 7, 1976) was an American jazz double bassist best known for his long association with John Coltrane from 1961 – 1967. ... Elvin Ray Jones (September 9, 1927 – May 18, 2004) was a jazz drummer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ...


He also continued to explore his interest in string textures – from the Town Hall concert in 1962, culminating in Skies of America in 1972. (Sometimes this had a practical value, as it facilitated his group's appearance in the UK in 1965, where jazz musicians were under a quota arrangement but classical performers were exempt.) Town Hall, 1962 is an album by Ornette Coleman released on the ESP-Disk label. ... See also: 1960s in music. ... Skies of America is a 1972 album by jazz saxophonist Ornette Coleman. ... See also: other events of 1972 list of years in music 1970s in music // January 17 - Highway 51 South in Memphis, Tennessee is renamed Elvis Presley Blvd January 20 - Pink Floyd debuts Dark Side of the Moon during a performance at The Dome, in Brighton, but due to technical difficulties... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...


Later career

Later, however, Coleman, like Miles Davis before him, took to playing with electrified instruments. Albums like Virgin Beauty and Of Human Feelings used rock and funk rhythms, sometimes called free funk. On the face of it, this could seem to be an adoption of the jazz fusion mode fashionable at the time, but Ornette's first record with the group, which later became known as Prime Time (the 1976 Dancing in Your Head), was sufficiently different to have considerable shock value. Electric guitars were prominent, but the music was, at heart, rather similar to his earlier work. These performances have the same angular melodies and simultaneous group improvisations – what Joe Zawinul referred to as "nobody solos, everybody solos" and what Coleman calls harmolodics—and although the nature of the pulse has altered, Coleman's own rhythmic approach has not. Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ... An Electric Musical Instrument (which, in the broadest sense, includes both electrically amplified acoustic instruments and electronic musical instruments) is one in which a loudspeaker is used as the main sound generator. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Funk is a distinct style of music originated by African-Americans, e. ... Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ... Free funk is a combination of Avant-garde jazz with funk music. ... Jazz fusion (or jazz-rock fusion or fusion) is a musical genre that merges elements of jazz with other styles of music, particularly pop, rock, folk, reggae, funk, metal, country, R&B, hip hop, electronic music and world music. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dancing in Your Head is a 1976 release by jazz artist Ornette Coleman. ... An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... Joe Zawinul live with The Zawinul Syndicate (Freiburg/Germany, 2007) Josef Erich Zawinul (born July 7, 1932 in Vienna, Austria, died September 11, 2007 in Vienna) was a jazz keyboardist and composer. ... Harmolodics is a music theory developed by jazz saxophonist Ornette Coleman. ...


Some critics have suggested Coleman's frequent use of the vaguely-defined term harmolodics is a musical MacGuffin: a red herring of sorts designed to occupy critics over-focused on Coleman's sometimes unorthodox compositional style. Jerry Garcia played guitar on three tracks from Coleman's Virgin Beauty (1988) - "Three Wishes," "Singing In The Shower," and "Desert Players." Twice in 1993, Coleman joined the Grateful Dead on stage playing the band's "The Other One," "Wharf Rat," "Stella Blue," and covering Bobby Bland's "Turn On Your Lovelight," among others. Another unexpected association was with guitarist Pat Metheny, with whom Coleman recorded Song X (1985); though released under Metheny's name, Coleman was essentially co-leader (contributing all the compositions). A MacGuffin (sometimes McGuffin or Maguffin) is a plot device that motivates the characters and/or advances the story, but has little other relevance to the story. ... In literature, a red herring is a plot device intended to distract the reader from a more important event in the plot, usually a twist ending. ... Jerome John Jerry the Bulldog Garcia (August 1, 1942 – August 9, 1995) was an American musician, songwriter, and artist best known for being the lead guitarist and vocalist of the psychedelic rock band the Grateful Dead. ... This article is about the band. ... Bobby Blue Bland was born Robert Calvin Bland, January 27, 1930,[1] in Rosemark, Tennessee) and is an influencial African-American singer, and an original member of The Beale Streeters. ... Patrick Bruce Metheny (born August 12, 1954 in Lees Summit, Missouri) is an American jazz guitarist. ...


In 1991, Coleman played on the soundtrack for David Cronenberg's Naked Lunch; the orchestra was conducted by Howard Shore. It is notable among other things for including a rare sighting of Coleman playing a jazz standard: Thelonious Monk's blues line “Misterioso.” David Paul Cronenberg OC, FRSC (born May 15, 1943[2]) is a Canadian film director and occasional actor. ... Naked Lunch is a 1991 film by the Canadian director David Cronenberg. ... Howard Leslie Shore (born October 18, 1946) is an Oscar, Golden Globe and Grammy Award-winning Canadian composer, best known for composing the scores to The Lord of the Rings film trilogy and films of David Cronenberg. ... Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ... Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. ...

Ornette Coleman, before collapsing onstage at Bonnaroo Music Festival in Manchester, TN on June 17th, 2007
Ornette Coleman, before collapsing onstage at Bonnaroo Music Festival in Manchester, TN on June 17th, 2007

The mid-1990s saw a flurry of activity from Coleman: He released four records between 1995 and 1996, and for the first time in many years worked regularly with piano players (either Geri Allen or Joachim Kühn). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (700 × 700 pixel, file size: 191 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ornette Coleman, seconds before collapsing onstage from heat stroke, during a performance at Bonnaroo Music Festival in Manchester, TN on June 17th, 2007 Photo by... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (700 × 700 pixel, file size: 191 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ornette Coleman, seconds before collapsing onstage from heat stroke, during a performance at Bonnaroo Music Festival in Manchester, TN on June 17th, 2007 Photo by... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... The cover of Geri Allens 2004 album The Life of a Song. ... Joachim Kühn (born March 15, 1944) is a German jazz pianist. ...


Coleman has rarely performed on other musicians' records. Exceptions include extensive performances on albums by Jackie McLean in 1967 (New and Old Gospel, on which he played trumpet), and James Blood Ulmer in 1978, and cameo appearances on Yoko Ono's Plastic Ono Band album (1970), Joe Henry's Scar (2001) and Lou Reed's The Raven (2003). John Lenwood (Jackie) McLean (born May 17, 1932) is an American jazz alto saxophonist and educator, born in New York City. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... James Blood Ulmer (born 2 February 1942 in St Matthews, South Carolina) is an American jazz and blues guitarist and singer. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko (ONO Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... Yoko Ono/Plastic Ono Band is the avant-garde debut album by Yoko Ono, after recording three experimental releases with John Lennon and a live album with Lennon credited to the Plastic Ono Band. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joe Henry is a singer, songwriter, guitarist and record producer. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Lewis Reed[1] (born March 2, 1942) is an American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... For the album by The Stranglers, see The Raven (The Stranglers album). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In September 2006 he released a live album titled Sound Grammar with his newest quartet (Denardo drumming and two bassists, Gregory Cohen and Tony Falanga). This is his first album of new material in ten years, and was recorded in Germany in 2005. It won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for music. Sound Grammar is an album by jazz saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman, recorded live in Ludwigshafen, Germany, on 14 October 2005. ... Greg Cohen was born in Los Angeles, California. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


Coleman was performing at the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tennessee on June 17, 2007 when he collapsed due to heat stroke on a day when temperatures peaked at 95 degrees. He was rushed to a nearby hospital where his condition soon stabilized.[3] The Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival is a four day annual music festival by Superfly Productions and AC Entertainment, first held in 2002. ... Manchester is a city located in Coffee County, Tennessee. ...


Legacy

Although now an elder statesman of jazz, Coleman continues to push himself into unusual playing situations, often with much younger musicians or musicians from radically different musical cultures, and continues to perform regularly. An increasing number of his compositions, while not ubiquitous, have become minor jazz standards, including "Lonely Woman," "Peace," "Turnaround," "When Will the Blues Leave?" "The Blessing," and "Law Years," among others. He has influenced virtually every saxophonist of a modern disposition, and nearly every such jazz musician, of the generation that followed him. His songs have proven endlessly malleable: pianists such as Paul Bley and Paul Plimley have managed to turn them to their purposes; John Zorn recorded Spy Vs Spy (1989), an album of radical thrash-metal versions of Coleman songs; and there have even been country-music versions of Coleman tunes (by Richard Greene). Coleman's playing has profoundly influenced, directly or otherwise, countless musicians, trying as he has for five decades to understand and discover the shape of not just jazz, but all music to come. Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ... Paul Bley is a free jazz pianist born in Montreal, Canada in 1932 and long-time resident in the USA. His music characteristically features strong senses both of melodic voicing and space. ... Paul (Horace) Plimley (b. ... John Zorn (born September 2, 1953 in Queens, USA) is an American avant-garde composer, arranger, record producer, saxophonist and multi-instrumentalist. ... Richard Marius Joseph Greene (25 August 1918 in Plymouth - 1 June 1985 in Norfolk) - some sources list his birthdate as 1914 - was a noted English movie and television actor. ...


On February 11, 2007, Ornette Coleman was honored with a Grammy award for lifetime achievement, in recognition of this legacy. The ceremony's closing act, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, accordingly paid tribute to Coleman by displaying a sign reading, "Love to Ornette Coleman" during their performance. The 49th Annual Grammy Awards honored the best in music for the 2006 recording year. ... Red Hot Chili Peppers is an American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1983. ...


Discography

See also Ornette Coleman albums

  • Something Else!!!! (1958)
  • Coleman Classics Vol. 1 (1958)
  • Tomorrow Is the Question! (1959)
  • The Shape of Jazz to Come (1959)
  • Change of the Century (1959)
  • This Is Our Music (1960)
  • Free Jazz (1960)
  • Ornette! (1961)
  • Ornette on Tenor (1961)
  • The Art of the Improvisers (1961)
  • Twins (1961)
  • Beauty Is a Rare Thing (1961)
  • Town Hall (1962)
  • Chappaqua Suite (1965)
  • An Evening with Ornette Coleman (1965)
  • Who's Crazy Vol. 1 & 2 (1965)
  • The Paris Concert (1965)
  • Live at the Tivoli (1965)
  • At the "Golden Circle" Vol. 1 & 2 (1965)
  • Ornette Coleman: The Empty Foxhole (1966)
  • The Music of Ornette Coleman - Forms & Sounds (1967)
  • The Unprecedented Music of Ornette Coleman (1968)
  • Live in Milano (1968)
  • New York Is Now (1968)
  • Love Call (1968)
  • Ornette at 12 (1968)
  • Crisis (1969)
  • Man on the Moon/Growing Up (1969)
  • Broken Shadows (1969)
  • Friends and Neighbors (1970)
  • Science Fiction (1971)
  • European Concert (1971)
  • The Belgrade Concert (1971)
  • Skies of America (1972)
  • J for Jazz Presents O.C. Broadcasts (1972)
  • To Whom Who Keeps a Record (1975)
  • Dancing in Your Head (1976)
  • Body Meta (1976)
  • Soapsuds, Soapsuds (1977)
  • Of Human Feelings (1979)
  • Opening the Caravan of Dreams (1983)
  • Prime Time/Time Design (1983)
  • Song X (1985)
  • In All Languages (1987)
  • Live at Jazzbuehne Berlin (1988)
  • Virgin Beauty (1988)
  • Naked Lunch (1991)
  • Tone Dialing (1995)
  • Sound Museum - Hidden Man & Three Women (1996)
  • Colors: Live from Leipzig (1997)
  • Sound Grammar (2006)

Bibliography

Selected articles: Something Else!!!! (sometimes called Something Else!!!! The Music of Ornette Coleman) is the 1958 debut album by jazz saxophonist Ornette Coleman. ... The Shape of Jazz to Come was the first free jazz album ever recorded. ... Change of the Century is an album, recorded in 1959 and originally released in 1960, by jazz saxophonist Ornette Coleman (see 1960 in music). ... This Is Our Music is an album, recorded and originally released in 1960, by jazz saxophonist Ornette Coleman (see 1960 in music). ... Town Hall, 1962 is an album by Ornette Coleman released on the ESP-Disk label. ... At the Golden Circle Stockholm is a two volume album by Ornette Coleman Trio, documenting concerts on the nights of December 3rd and 4th 1965 in the Gyllene Cirkeln club in Stockholm. ... Skies of America is a 1972 album by jazz saxophonist Ornette Coleman. ... Dancing in Your Head is a 1976 release by jazz artist Ornette Coleman. ... Song X is an album by Pat Metheny and Ornette Coleman. ... In All Languages is a 1987 double album by Ornette Coleman. ... Sound Grammar is an album by jazz saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman, recorded live in Ludwigshafen, Germany, on 14 October 2005. ...

  • Coleman, Ornette. Interview with Andy Hamilton. A Question of Scale The Wire July 2005.
  • Interview with Eldridge, Roy. Esquire March 1961.
  • Jost, Ekkehard (1975). Free Jazz (Studies in Jazz Research 4). Universal Edition. 
  • Spellman, A. B. (1985 originally 1966). Four Lives in the Bebop Business. Limelight. ISBN 0-87910-042-7. 

Notes

  1. ^ Spellman, A. B. (1985 originally 1966). Four Lives in the Bebop Business. Limelight, 98-101. ISBN 0-87910-042-7. 
  2. ^ Huey, Steve. The Shape of Jazz To Come.
  3. ^ "Ornette Coleman hospitalized" (HTML), Reuters, 2007-06-18. Retrieved on 2007-06-18. (English) “Jazz legend Ornette Coleman collapsed from heat stroke during his performance Sunday at the Bonnaroo festival in Manchester, Tenn.” 

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Ornette Coleman

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Ornette Coleman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1494 words)
Coleman's timbre is perhaps one of the most easily recognized in jazz: his keening, crying sound draws heavily on blues music.
Coleman meant for Free Jazz simply to be the album title, but his growing reputation placed him at the forefront of jazz innovation, and free jazz was soon considered a new genre, though Coleman has expressed discomfort with the term.
Coleman began to extend the sound-range of his music, introducing accompanying string players (though far from the territory of "Parker With Strings") and playing trumpet and violin himself; he initially had little conventional technique, and used the instruments to make large, unrestrained gestures.
E.J.N. - ORNETTE COLEMAN (1442 words)
In 1975, Coleman formed his current band, Prime Time, and now the "free jazz/classical composer" was creating very danceable music that combined elements of jazz, funk, R & B, and rock with an unusual mix of instruments: two guitarists, two drummers, two bassists, and Coleman on sax, violin and trumpet.
Ornette Coleman has always had an unusual ability to resurface at times when musical establishments were in need of revitalization.
Coleman's music has always reflected the richness and range of musical expression and today he speaks as a mature artist at the peak of his power.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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