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Encyclopedia > Orion (constellation)
Orion
Orion
Click for larger image
List of stars in Orion
Abbreviation: Ori
Genitive: Orionis
Symbolism: Orion
Right ascension: 5 h
Declination: +5°
Area: 594 sq. deg. (26th)
Main stars: 7
Bayer/Flamsteed
stars:
81
Stars with
known planets:
2
Bright stars: 8
Nearby stars: 2
Brightest star: Rigel (β Orionis) (0.12m)
Nearest star: π3 Ori (26.3 ly)
Messier objects: 3
Meteor showers: Orionids
Chi Orionids
Bordering
constellations:
Gemini
Taurus
Eridanus
Lepus
Monoceros
Visible at latitudes between +85° and −75°
Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of January
Credit: Mouser Williams

Orion (pronounced /ɒˈraɪən/), a constellation often referred to as The Hunter, is a prominent constellation, one of the largest and perhaps the best-known and most conspicuous in the sky[1]. Its brilliant stars are found on the celestial equator and are visible throughout the world. Its three prominent "belt" stars - three stars of medium brightness in the mid-section of this constellation - make this constellation easy to spot and globally recognized. From mid-northern latitudes, Orion is visible in the evening from October to early January and in the morning from late July to November.[2][3] Look up Orion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This is a celestial map of the constellation Orion the Hunter. ... This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Orion, sorted by decreasing brightness. ... The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun. ... Not to be confused with Arion. ... Equatorial Coordinates Right ascension (abbrev. ... In astronomy, declination (abbrev. ... Here is a list of the 88 modern constellations by their area in the sky, measured in square degrees. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Flamsteed designations for stars are similar to Bayer designations, except that they use numbers instead of Greek letters. ... An extrasolar planet, or exoplanet, is a planet beyond the Solar System. ... Rigel (pronounced ) (β Orionis) is the brightest star in the constellation Orion and the seventh brightest star in the sky, with visual magnitude 0. ... The apparent magnitude (m) of a star, planet or other celestial body is a measure of its apparent brightness as seen by an observer on Earth. ... Pi3 Orionis or Pi-3 Orionis (Ï€3 Ori / Ï€3 Orionis) is the brightest star in the lions hide (or shield) that Orion is holding. ... A light-year or lightyear (symbol: ly) is a unit of measurement of length, specifically the distance light travels in vacuum in one year. ... The Messier objects are a set of astronomical objects catalogued by Charles Messier in his catalogue of Nebulae and Star Clusters first published in 1774. ... A meteor shower, some of which are known as a meteor storm or meteor outburst, is a celestial event where a group of meteors are observed to radiate from one point in the sky. ... The Orionids are a meteor shower that occurs throughout October into early November. ... Gemini (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac known as the twins. It is part of the winter sky, lying between Taurus to the west and the dim Cancer to the east, with Auriga and the near-invisible Lynx to the north and Monoceros and Canis... Taurus (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Eridanus (IPA: , the ancient Greek name for the Po River (now in Italy), in the mythology associated with Phaëton) is the sixth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Lepus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a constellation, lying just south of the Celestial equator, below the constellation Orion, and possibly representing a hare being chased by Orion the hunter. ... Monoceros (IPA: , Greek: ) is a faint constellation on the winter night sky, surrounded by Orion to the east, Gemini to the north, Canis Major to the south and Hydra to the west. ... Download high resolution version (2048x3072, 1509 KB) Note: This image resides in WikiCommons. ... This article is about the star grouping. ... The celestial equator is a great circle on the imaginary celestial sphere, which could be constructed by inflating the Earths equator until it intersects with said sphere. ...


According to the most common contemporary imagery: Orion is standing next to the river Eridanus with his two hunting dogs Canis Major and Canis Minor, fighting Taurus the bull. Other prey of his, such as Lepus the hare, can be found nearby. Not to be confused with Arion. ... Eridanus (IPA: , the ancient Greek name for the Po River (now in Italy), in the mythology associated with Phaëton) is the sixth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Canis Major (pronounced , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... Canis Minor (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... Taurus (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Lepus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a constellation, lying just south of the Celestial equator, below the constellation Orion, and possibly representing a hare being chased by Orion the hunter. ... For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ...


There are other contemporary names for Orion. In Australia, the belt and sword of Orion are sometimes called the Saucepan, because the stars of Orion's belt and sword resemble this kitchen utensil as seen from the Southern Hemisphere. Orion's Belt is called Drie Konings (Three Kings) by Afrikaans speakers in South Africa [4], and French les Trois Rois (the Three Kings) in Daudet's Lettres de Mon Moulin (1866). The appellation Driekoningen (the Three Kings) is also often found in 17th- and 18th-century Dutch star charts and seaman's guides. cast-iron iron enamel stainless steel The cooking pan is a type of food preparation utensil commonly found in the kitchen which includes many more specific cooking vessels such as saucepans and frying pans (or fry pans). ... southern hemisphere highlighted in yellow (Antarctica not depicted). ... Alphonse Daudet (May 13, 1840 - December 17, 1897) was a French novelist. ...


Historically it has had other names, perhaps the earliest known is the Babylonian "Shepherd of Anu", corresponding to an apparent representation of the constellation Auriga or an element of it, as a shepherd's crook. The term Old Babylonian is a period in Mesopotamian history that refers, roughly, to the period between the end of the Third Dynasty of Ur (c. ... In Sumerian mythology and later for Assyrians and Babylonians, Anu (also An; (from Sumerian *An = sky, heaven)) was a sky-god, the god of heaven, lord of constellations, king of gods, spirits and demons, and dwelt in the highest heavenly regions. ... Auriga (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ...

Contents

Stars in the Constellation

The constellation is extremely rich in bright stars and in deep-sky objects. Here are some of its stars. [5] This article is about the astronomical object. ... Deep sky object (DSO) is a term used often in amateur astronomy to denote objects in the night sky other than solar system objects (such as planets, comets and asteroids), single stars and multiple star systems. ...

Star Magnitude Open Clusters Nebulae
Rigel 0.12 NGC 1981 NGC 1976
Betelgeuse 0.5 NGC 2175 NGC 1982
Bellatrix 1.64 Nil NGC 2068
Alnilam 1.70 Nil IC 434
Alnitak 1.77 Nil Nil
  • λ Ori (Meissa) is Orion's head.
  • α Ori (Betelgeuse), at its right shoulder, is a red star with a diameter larger than the orbit of Mars. Although it is the α-star, it is somewhat fainter than Rigel.
  • γ Ori (Bellatrix), is at Orion's left shoulder.
  • ζ Ori (Alnitak), ε Ori (Alnilam) and δ Ori (Mintaka) make up the asterism known as Orion's Belt: three bright stars in a row; from these alone one can recognize Orion.
  • η Ori (Eta Orionis), between Delta Orionis and Rigel.
  • κ Ori (Saiph) is at Orion's right knee.
  • β Ori (Rigel), at the constellation's left knee, is a large blue-white star, among the brightest in the sky. It has three companions, invisible to the naked eye.
  • ι Ori (Hatsya) is at the tip of Orion's sword.

In common with many other bright stars, the names Betelgeuse, Rigel, Saiph, Alnitak, Mintaka, Alnilam, Hatsya and Meissa originate from the Arabic language. Rigel (pronounced ) (β Orionis) is the brightest star in the constellation Orion and the seventh brightest star in the sky, with visual magnitude 0. ... This article is about the star. ... Bellatrix (γ Ori / γ Orionis / Gamma Orionis) is the third brightest star in the constellation Orion and the twenty-second brightest star in the nighttime sky. ... Alnilam, also known as ε Orionis or 46 Orionis, is a large blue star in the constellation of Orion. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Lambda Orionis (λ Ori / λ Orionis) is a star in the constellation Orion. ... This article is about the star. ... According to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, a red giant is a large non-main sequence star of stellar classification K or M; so-named because of the reddish appearance of the cooler giant stars. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... Gamma Orionis (γ Ori / γ Orionis / Bellatrix) is the third brightest star in the constellation Orion and the twenty-second brightest star in the nighttime sky. ... Zeta Orionis is a star in the constellation Orion. ... Epsilon Orionis (ε Ori / ε Orionis) is a large blue star in the constellation of Orion. ... Delta Orionis (δ Ori) is one of the three stars of the belt of the constellation Orion. ... In astronomy, an asterism is a pattern of stars seen in Earths sky which is not an official constellation. ... Eta Orionis is a star system at a distance of 900 light years from Earth and part of the Orion Arm. ... Delta Orionis (δ Ori) is one of the three stars of the belt of the constellation Orion. ... Rigel (pronounced ) (β Orionis) is the brightest star in the constellation Orion and the seventh brightest star in the sky, with visual magnitude 0. ... Kappa Orionis (κ Ori / κ Orionis) is the sixth-brightest star in the constellation of Orion. ... Rigel (pronounced ) (β Orionis) is the brightest star in the constellation Orion and the seventh brightest star in the sky, with visual magnitude 0. ... Hatsya or Iota Orionis is the brightest star in Orions sword. ... Arabic redirects here. ...


Locating other stars

Using Orion to find stars in neighbor constellations
Using Orion to find stars in neighbor constellations

Orion is very useful in locating other stars. By extending the line of the Belt southeastward, Sirius (α CMa) can be found; northwestward, Aldebaran (α Tau). A line eastward across the two shoulders indicates the direction of Procyon (α CMi). A line from Rigel through Betelgeuse points to Castor and Pollux (α Gem and β Gem). Additionally, Rigel is part of the Winter Circle. Sirius and Procyon, which may be located from Orion by tracing lines, also are points in both the Winter Triangle and the Circle.[6] Image File history File links Orion-guide_dark. ... Image File history File links Orion-guide_dark. ... This article is about the brightest star in the night sky of Earth. ... Aldebaran from the Arabic (الدبران al-dabarān) meaning the follower, (α Tau / α Tauri / Alpha Tauri) is the brightest star in the constellation Taurus and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ... Procyon (α CMi / α Canis Minoris / Alpha Canis Minoris) is the brightest star in the constellation Canis Minor and the eighth brightest star in the nighttime sky. ... Castor (α Gem / α Geminorum / Alpha Geminorum) is the second brightest star in the constellation Gemini and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ... Pollux (β Gem / β Geminorum / Beta Geminorum) is one of the brightest star in the constellation Gemini and one of the brightest stars in the nighttime sky. ... Red = Winter Trangle, Blue = Winter Hexagon The Winter Hexagon or Winter Circle is an asterism appearing to be in the form of a hexagon with vertices at Rigel, Aldebaran, Capella, Pollux/Castor, Procyon, and Sirius. ... The Winter Triangle is an astronomical asterism involving an imaginary triangle drawn, during the winter, upon the northern hemispheres celestial sphere; with its defining vertices at Betelgeuse, Procyon, and Sirius. ...


See also the list of stars in Orion. This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Orion, sorted by decreasing brightness. ...


Notable deep sky objects

Hanging from Orion's belt is his sword, consisting of the multiple stars θ1 and θ2 Orionis, called Trapezium and the Orion Nebula (M42). This is a spectacular object which can be clearly identified with the naked eye as something other than a star; using binoculars, its swirling clouds of nascent stars, luminous gas, and dust can be observed. The Trapezium, or Orion Trapezium Cluster is a tight open cluster of stars that lies within the heart of the Orion Nebula, in the constellation of Orion. ... The Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated south of Orions Belt. ...


Another famous nebula is IC 434, the Horsehead Nebula, near ζ Orionis. It contains a dark dust cloud whose shape gives the nebula its name. The Triangulum Emission Nebula NGC 604 The Pillars of Creation from the Eagle Nebula For other uses, see Nebula (disambiguation). ... The Index Catalogue (IC) —also known as the Index Catalogue of Nebulae, the Index Catalogue of Nebulae and Clusters of Stars, IC I, or IC II— is a catalogue of galaxies, nebulae and star clusters that serves as a supplement to the New General Catalogue. ... See also Horsehead Nebula for the place in The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ...


Besides these nebulae, surveying Orion with a small telescope will reveal a wealth of interesting deep sky objects, including M43, M78, as well as multiple stars including Iota Orionis and Sigma Orionis. A larger telescope may reveal objects such as Barnard's Loop, the Flame Nebula (NGC 2024), as well as fainter and tighter multiple stars and nebulae. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... De Mairans Nebula (also known as M43 and NGC 1982) is an H II region in the Orion constellation. ... The Diffuse Nebula M78 (also known as Messier Object 78, Messier 78, M78, or NGC 2068) is a diffuse nebula in the Orion constellation. ... Hatsya or Iota Orionis is the brightest star in Orions sword. ... Sigma Orionis or Sigma Ori (σ Orionis / σ Ori) is a five star system in the constellation Orion. ... Barnards Loop (catalogue designation Sh 2-276) is an emission nebula in the constellation of Orion. ... NGC2024 or the Flame Nebula is near the easternmost star in Orions Belt, Alnitak. ...


All of these nebulae are part of the larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex which is located approximately 1,500 light-years away and is hundreds of light-years across. It is one of the most intense regions of stellar formation visible in our galaxy. A picture of Barnards Loop, which is a primary component of the nebula complex. ...


History

Star formation in the Orion constellation as photographed in infrared by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
Star formation in the Orion constellation as photographed in infrared by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

The configurations of the constellation Orion roughly formed about 1.5 million years ago, because of relative slow movements of stars within the constellation from earth's perspective (especially the belt of Orion). Orion will remain visible in the night sky for the next 1 to 2 million years, making it one of the longest observable constellations, parallel to the rise of human civilization. For other uses, see Infrared (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... The Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly the Space Infrared Telescope Facility [SIRTF]) is an infrared space observatory, the fourth and final of NASAs Great Observatories. ...


Being so bright and distinctive, the pattern of stars that forms Orion was recognized as a coherent constellation by many ancient civilizations, though with different representations and mythologies.


The ancient Sumerians saw this star pattern as forming part of an image of a shepherd (sometimes in a chariot) with his sheep and in some versions a shepherd's crook, while in China, Orion was one of the 28 lunar mansions Sieu (Xiu) (宿). Known as Shen (參), literally meaning "three", it is believed to be named so for the three stars located in Orion's belt. (See Chinese constellation) Sumer ( Sumerian: KI-EN-GIR, Land of the Lords of Brightness[1], or land of the Sumerian tongue[2][3], Akkadian: Å umeru; possibly Biblical Shinar ), located in southern Mesopotamia, is the earliest known civilization in the world. ... Twenty-eight mansions (二十八宿, pinyin: èrshíbāxiù) are 28 mansions in Chinese constellation. ... The Three Stars mansion (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is one of the Twenty-eight mansions of the Chinese constellations. ... Chinese constellations are different from the western constellations, due to the independent development of ancient Chinese astronomy. ...


The stars were associated with Osiris, the god of death and underworld, by the ancient Egyptians. The Giza pyramid complex, which consists of the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Pyramid of Khafre and the Pyramid of Menkaure, is said to be a sky-map of the Belt of Orion, that is, of Osiris. In archeoastronomy, Graham Hancock and Robert Bauval describe this arrangement as central to the Orion Correlation Theory or OCT. For other uses, see Osiris (disambiguation). ... Map of Ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was the civilization of the Nile Valley between about 3000 BC and the conquest of Egypt by Alexander the Great in 332 BC. As a civilization based on irrigation it is the quintessential example of an hydraulic empire. ... 19th-century tourists in front of the Sphinx - view from South-East, Great Pyramid in background The Giza Necropolis stands on the Giza Plateau, on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt. ... The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa, and is the only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... The Pyramid of Khafre and the Great Sphinx of Giza Khafres Pyramid (29° 58′ 32″ N 31° 07′ 52″ E), is the second largest of the Pyramids of Giza and the tomb of the Fourth dynasty Egyptian Pharaoh Khafre. ... The Pyramid of Menkaure Menkaures Pyramid is the smallest of the three Pyramids of Giza and the tomb of the Fourth dynasty Egyptian Pharaoh Menkaure. ... Archaeoastronomy (also spelled Archeoastronomy) is, as the name implies, the combination of astronomical and archaeological studies. ... Graham Hancock (born August 2, 1950) is a British writer and journalist. ... Robert Bauval was born on 5 March 1948 in Alexandria, Egypt to parents of Belgian origin. ... Graham Hancock (born August 2, 1950) is a British writer and journalist. ...


References in ancient Middle Eastern and Mediterranean literature to the "belt and sword" imagery of Orion are those most often echoed in modern western literature and for this reason this imagery has found its way into popular western culture, for example in the form of the shoulder insignia of the 27th Infantry Division of the United States Army during both World Wars, probably owing to a pun on the name of the division's first commander, Major General John F. O'Ryan.
... The 27th Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War I and World War II. World War I Activated: July 1917 (National Guard Division from New York). ... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... John Francis ORyan (August 21, 1874 - January 29, 1961), General of the 27th Division during WWI. John F. ORyan was the General of the 27th Infantry Division of the United States during WWI. During the mid 1920s he was New York State Transit Commissioner, and was also involved...


Around October 21 each year the famous Orionid meteor shower reaches its peak. Coming from the border to the constellation Gemini as much as 20 meteors per hour can be seen. is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Orionids are a meteor shower that occurs throughout October into early November. ...


Mythology

An engraving of Orion from Johann Bayer's Uranometria, courtesy of the US Naval Observatory Library
An engraving of Orion from Johann Bayer's Uranometria, courtesy of the US Naval Observatory Library
Main article: Orion (mythology)

Greek mythology has several versions of the history of Orion, the gigantic hunter of primordial times[7]. These end in different versions of his death: He challenged the gods, by claiming that he could kill every wild animal on Earth. Some versions then say Artemis shot him with her arrows; but others say that Artemis or Earth produced a great Scorpion whom he could not defeat and which killed him. The gods raised him and the Scorpion to the skies, as Scorpio/Scorpius. Yet other stories say Orion was chasing the Pleiades.[8] Download high resolution version (2550x3548, 1334 KB)A print of the copperplate engraving for Johann Bayers Uranometria showing the constellation Orion. ... Download high resolution version (2550x3548, 1334 KB)A print of the copperplate engraving for Johann Bayers Uranometria showing the constellation Orion. ... Johann Bayer (1572 – March 7, 1625) was a German astronomer. ... Uranometrias engraving of the constellation Orion, courtesy of the US Naval Observatory Library Uranometria is the short title of a star atlas produced by Johann Bayer. ... Aerial view of USNO. The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) is one of the oldest scientific agencies in the United States. ... Not to be confused with Arion. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Not to be confused with Arion. ... Scorpio the animal Scorpio is an astrological sign, which originated from the constellation Scorpius, and is the eighth sign of the zodiac. ... Scorpius (, and Latin for scorpion) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Pleiades refers to: Pleiades (star cluster) an open cluster of stars in the constellation Taurus. ...


The nearby constellations of Canis Major and Canis Minor are visualized in some myths as Orion's hunting dogs. Canis Major (pronounced , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... Canis Minor (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ...


It may be that the naming of the constellation precedes the mythology in this case. It has been suggested that Orion is named from the Akkadian Uru-anna, the light of heaven, the name then passing into Greek mythology. As such, the myth surrounding Orion may derive simply from the relative positions of the constellations around it in the sky. In some depictions, Orion appears to be composed of three bodies, having three arms [1], two divergent legs, and a small central one, as well as the three bodies being bound at the waist. As such, together with other features of the area in the Zodiac sign of Gemini (i.e. the Milky Way, the deserted area now considered as the constellations Camelopardalis and Lynx, and the constellations Gemini, Auriga, and Canis Major), this may be the origin of the myth of the cattle of Geryon, which forms one of The Twelve Labours of Heracles. Akkad (or Agade) was a city and its region of northern Iraq) between Assyria to the northwest and Sumer to the south. ... For other uses, see Zodiac (disambiguation). ... An animation of the constellation Gemini (center), the twins, shows two parallel stick figures. ... For other uses, see Milky Way (disambiguation). ... Camelopardalis, Latin for giraffe, is the name of a large but faint northern constellation first recorded by Jakob Bartsch in 1624, but probably created earlier by Petrus Plancius. ... Lynx (IPA: ) is a constellation of the northern hemisphere, introduced in the 17th century by Johannes Hevelius. ... Gemini (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac known as the twins. It is part of the winter sky, lying between Taurus to the west and the dim Cancer to the east, with Auriga and the near-invisible Lynx to the north and Monoceros and Canis... Auriga (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ... Canis Major (pronounced , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... Heracles fighting Geryon, amphora by the E Group, ca. ... Hercules and the Hydra by Antonio Pollaiuolo The Twelve Labours (Greek: dodekathlos) of Heracles (Latin: Hercules) are a series of archaic episodes connected by a later continuous narrative, concerning a penance carried out by Heracles, the greatest of the Greek heroes. ... Alcides redirects here. ...


In pre-Christian Scandinavia, the "Orion's belt" portion of the constellation was known as Frigg's Distaff (Friggerock) or Freyja's distaff[9]. For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Frigg (disambiguation). ... Spinning Flax from a distaff As a noun, a distaff is a tool used in spinning. ... -1...


In Finnish mythology the constellation of Orion is called the scythe of Väinämöinen. The term most likely comes from the fact it can be seen in the sky in early autumn in the Northern Hemisphere, the time of harvesting crops. Finnish mythology has many features that it shares with other Finnic mythologies, like the Estonian mythology, and also elements similar with non-Finnic neighbours, especially the the Balts and the Scandinavians. ... Illustration from the Kalevala, by Akseli Gallen-Kallela 1896. ...


In ancient Aram, the constellation was known as Nephila, Orion's descendants were known as Nephilim[10]. The term Aram can refer to: Aram (אֲרָם or ), the son of Shem, according to the Table of nations of Genesis 10 in the Hebrew Bible. ... For other uses, see Nephilim (disambiguation). ...


The constellation is mentioned in Horace's Odes, Homer's Odyssey and Iliad, and Virgil's Aeneid. For other people named Horace, see Horace (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ode (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... This article is about Homers epic poem. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story...


In other cultures

The Bible mentions Orion three times: Job 9:9 ("He is the maker of the Bear and Orion"), Job 38:31 ("Can you loosen Orion`s belt?"), and Amos 5:8. ("He who made the Pleiades and Orion") For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... The Book of Amos is one of the books of the Neviim and of the Old Testament. ...


The Chinese character 參 (pinyin shēn) originally meant the constellation Orion (Chinese: 參宿; pinyin: shēnxiù); its Shang dynasty version, over three millennia old, contains at the top a representation of the three stars of Orion's belt atop a man's head (the bottom portion representing the sound of the word was added later)[11]. Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Hán tá»±: A Chinese character or Han character (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a logogram used in writing Chinese, Japanese, rarely Korean, and formerly Vietnamese. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Remnants of advanced, stratified societies dating back to the Shang period have been found in the Yellow River Valley. ...


The Seri people of northwestern Mexico call the three stars in the belt of this constellation Hapj (a name denoting a hunter) which consists of three stars: Hap (mule deer), Haamoja (pronghorn), and Mojet (bighorn sheep). Hap is in the middle and has been shot by the hunter; its blood has dripped onto Tiburón Island.[12] The Seris are an indigenous group of the Mexican state of Sonora. ... Tiburón Island (Spanish: Isla del Tiburón; Seri: Tahéjöc) is the largest island in the Gulf of California. ...


Orion is also important in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy. For example, the Yolngu people of Arnhem Land say that the constellation of Orion, which they call Julpan, is a canoe. They tell the story of two brothers who went fishing, and caught and ate a fish that was forbidden under their law. Seeing this, the Sun sent a waterspout that carried the two brothers and their canoe up into the sky where they became the Orion constellation. Many of the Australian Aboriginal cultures have a strong element of astronomy. ... For Yolngu language see Yolngu Matha. ... Arnhem Land is an area of 97,000 km² in the north-eastern corner of the Northern Territory, Australia. ... Sol redirects here. ...


In Indian Mythology, the constellation is known as 'Vyadh', which also means "The Hunter".


Citations

  1. ^ Dolan, Chris. Orion. Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  2. ^ Introduction to the Constellations. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  3. ^ Look for Orion the Hunter, and Sirius the Dog Star >> skywatching. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  4. ^ ph . Astronomy . Three Kings/Cape Clouds
  5. ^ BBC - Science & Nature - Space - Constellation Guide - Orion
  6. ^ Orion Constellation
  7. ^ Star Tales – Orion
  8. ^ Chandra :: Photo Album :: Constellation Orion
  9. ^ Schön, Ebbe. (2004). Asa-Tors hammare, Gudar och jättar i tro och tradition. Fält & Hässler, Värnamo. p. 228.
  10. ^ Peake's commentary on the Bible
  11. ^ 漢語大字典 Hànyǔ Dàzìdiǎn (in Chinese), 1992 (p.163). 湖北辭書出版社和四川辭書出版社 Húbĕi Cishu Chūbǎnshè and Sìchuān Cishu Chūbǎnshè, re-published in traditional character form by 建宏出版社 Jiànhóng Publ. in Taipei, Taiwan; ISBN 957-813-478-9
  12. ^ Moser, Mary B.; Stephen A. Marlett (2005). Comcáac quih yaza quih hant ihíip hac: Diccionario seri-español-inglés (in Spanish and English). Hermosillo, Sonora and Mexico City: Universidad de Sonora and Plaza y Valdés Editores. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Ian Ridpath and Wil Tirion (2007). Stars and Planets Guide, Collins, London. ISBN 978-0007251209. Princeton University Press, Princeton. ISBN 978-0691135564.

See also

Aurvandil is mentioned once in Norse Mythology, in the Skáldskaparmal section of Snorri Sturlusons Edda: Thor went home to Thrúdvangar, and the hone remained sticking in his head. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
This article is about the star grouping. ... Andromeda (IPA: ) is a constellation named for the princess Andromeda (which is Greek for Ruler over men), a character in Greek mythology. ... Antlia (IPA: , Latin: ) is a relatively new constellation as it was only created in the 18th century, being too faint to be acknowledged by the ancient Greeks. ... Apus (Latin for bird of paradise) is a faint southern constellation, not visible to the ancient Greeks. ... Aquarius (IPA: , Latin: ) is the eleventh sign of the zodiac, situated between Capricornus and Pisces. ... Aquila (IPA: , Latin: ; sometimes named the Vulture), is one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, also mentioned by Eudoxus (4th century BC) and Aratus (3rd century BC) and now also part of the list of 88 constellations acknowledged by the IAU. It lies roughly at the celestial equator. ... Ara (Latin for Altar) is a faint southerly constellation between the constellations Centaurus and Lupus. ... Aries (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Auriga (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ... Boötes (IPA: Greek: herdsman) is one of the 88 modern constellations and was also one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy. ... Caelum (IPA: ; earlier Cæla Sculptoris (Latin: ) is a minor southern constellation introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. ... Camelopardalis, Latin for giraffe, is the name of a large but faint northern constellation first recorded by Jakob Bartsch in 1624, but probably created earlier by Petrus Plancius. ... Cancer (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the thirteen constellations of the zodiac. ... Canes Venatici (Latin for Hunting dogs) is a small northern constellation that was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. ... Canis Major (pronounced , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... Canis Minor (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... For the astrological sign, see Capricorn (astrology). ... Carina (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation which forms part of the old constellation of Argo Navis. ... Cassiopeia (pronounced , colloquially ) is a northern constellation which Greek mythology considered to represent the vain queen Cassiopeia who boasted about her unrivaled beauty. ... Centaurus (Latin for centaur) was one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, and counts also among the 88 modern constellations. ... Cepheus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation named after King Cepheus in Greek mythology, and is considered to represent a king. ... Cetus (pronounced , latinized form of Ancient Greek κῆτος - kētos, “whale, any sea-monster or huge fish”) is a constellation of the northern winter sky, in the region known as the Water, near other watery constellations like Aquarius, Pisces, and Eridanus. ... For other uses of the word, see chameleon (disambiguation) Chamaeleon (Latin for chameleon) is a minor southern constellation. ... Circinus, Latin for Compass, is one of the small southern (declination −50 to −60 degrees) constellations. ... Columba, Latin for dove, is a small constellation just south to Canis Major and Lepus, it was cut out of the constellation Canis Major by Augustin Royer, in 1679. ... Coma Berenices (IPA: , Latin: ) is a traditional asterism that has since become a constellation. ... Corona Australis (IPA: ) or Corona Austrina (IPA: , Latin: ) was one of Ptolemys 48 constellations, and also counts among the 88 modern constellations. ... Corona Borealis (Latin for northern crown) is a small northern constellation whose main stars form a semicircular arc. ... Corvus (pronounced , Latin: ) is a small southern constellation with only 11 stars visible to the naked eye (brighter than magnitude 5. ... Crater (Latin for cup) is one of the 88 modern constellations and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... CRUX is a lightweight, i686-optimized Linux distribution targeted at experienced Linux users. ... Cygnus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ... For other uses, see Delphinus (disambiguation). ... This article is about a constellation in the sky. ... Draco (IPA: , Latin: ) is a far northern constellation that is circumpolar for many northern hemisphere observers. ... Equuleus (IPA: , Latin: Despite its smallness and lack of bright stars (none are brighter than fourth magnitude), it was also one of Ptolemys 48 constellations. ... Eridanus (IPA: , the ancient Greek name for the Po River (now in Italy), in the mythology associated with Phaëton) is the sixth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Fornax (pronounced , Latin: ) is a southern constellation which was first introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille under the name Fornax Chemica (Latin for chemical furnace), representing a small solid-fuel heater formerly used for heating chemical experiments. ... Gemini (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac known as the twins. It is part of the winter sky, lying between Taurus to the west and the dim Cancer to the east, with Auriga and the near-invisible Lynx to the north and Monoceros and Canis... Grus (Latin for Crane) is a southern constellation. ... Hercules (pronounced ) is the fifth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Horologium (Latin for clock) is one of the lesser southern constellations (declination around -60 degrees). ... Hydra (IPA: ) is the largest of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy. ... Hydrus (Latin for Hydra, also referred to as male Hydra or little Hydra) is a minor southern constellation. ... Indus (IPA: ) is a southern constellation that is supposed to represent an American Indian. ... Lacerta, being Latin for Lizard, is one of the 88 official constellations acknowledged by the International Astronomical Union. ... Leo (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Leo Minor (Latin for Small Lion) is a rather dim constellation that can barely be recognized as a triangle and lies between the easily discerned constellations Ursa Major and Leo. ... Lepus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a constellation, lying just south of the Celestial equator, below the constellation Orion, and possibly representing a hare being chased by Orion the hunter. ... Libra (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , Unicode ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Lupus (Latin for Wolf) is a southern constellation. ... Lynx (IPA: ) is a constellation of the northern hemisphere, introduced in the 17th century by Johannes Hevelius. ... For other uses, see Lyra (disambiguation). ... Mensa (Latin for Table) is a southern constellation which was first introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille under the name Mons Mensae (Latin for table mountain). ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations ... Monoceros (IPA: , Greek: ) is a faint constellation on the winter night sky, surrounded by Orion to the east, Gemini to the north, Canis Major to the south and Hydra to the west. ... Musca (Latin for Fly) is one of the minor southern constellations. ... Norma (IPA: , Latin: ), is a small and inconspicuous [penis] that lies in the southern hemisphere between Scorpius and Centaurus. ... Octans (Latin for octant) is an inconspicuous constellation introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. ... Ophiuchus (IPA: ), formerly referred to as Serpentarius (IPA: ), the former originating in the Greek language and the latter in the Latin language, both meaning serpent-holder, is one of the 88 constellations and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... Pavo, being Latin for Peacock, is a southern constellation. ... Pegasus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation, named after the mythological winged horse Pegasus. ... Perseus is a northern constellation, named after the Greek hero who slew the monster Medusa. ... Phoenix (IPA: ) is a minor southern constellation, introduced by Dutch navigators Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman, and popularized by Johann Bayers Uranometria in 1603. ... Pictor (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the minor southern (declination -50° to -60°) constellations. ... For other uses, see Pisces. ... Piscis Austrinus or Piscis Australis (both of which are Latin for Southern Fish) was one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, and is also one of the 88 modern constellations. ... Puppis (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Pyxis constellation | Argo Navis constellation ... Reticulum (Latin for reticle), is one of the minor southern (declination -60 degrees) constellations. ... This article is about the constellation; for the trigonometric function, see versine. ... For other uses, see Sagittarius. ... This article is about the constellation. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Sculptor constellation ... Scutum (Latin for shield) is a small constellation. ... Serpens (the snake) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... For the Ancient Roman coin denomination, see sextans (coin). ... Taurus (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Telescopium (Latin for Telescope) is a minor southern constellation identified and named by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille, the 18th century French astronomer, a student of the southern skies. ... Triangulum is a small northern constellation whose three brightest stars, of third and fourth magnitude, form an elongated triangle. ... Triangulum Australe is a small southern constellation whose three brightest stars, of second and third magnitude, form an approximately equilateral triangle. ... Tucana (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation. ... This article is about the constellation. ... Block quote :See also Ursa Minor Alpha a place in The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ... Vela (pronounced , Latin: ) is a southern constellation, one of the four parts into which Argo Navis was split (the others being Carina, Puppis and Pyxis). ... Virgo (pronounced , Latin: , symbol , ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Volans constellation ... Vulpecula (IPA: , Latin: ) is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. ... This article is about the geographer, mathematician and astronomer Ptolemy. ... Andromeda (IPA: ) is a constellation named for the princess Andromeda (which is Greek for Ruler over men), a character in Greek mythology. ... Aquarius (IPA: , Latin: ) is the eleventh sign of the zodiac, situated between Capricornus and Pisces. ... Aquila (IPA: , Latin: ; sometimes named the Vulture), is one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, also mentioned by Eudoxus (4th century BC) and Aratus (3rd century BC) and now also part of the list of 88 constellations acknowledged by the IAU. It lies roughly at the celestial equator. ... Ara (Latin for Altar) is a faint southerly constellation between the constellations Centaurus and Lupus. ... The constellation Argo Navis drawn by Johannes Hevelius in 1690 Argo Navis (or simply Argo) was a large southern constellation representing the Argo, the ship used by Jason and the Argonauts in Greek mythology. ... Aries (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Auriga (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ... Boötes (IPA: Greek: herdsman) is one of the 88 modern constellations and was also one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy. ... Cancer (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the thirteen constellations of the zodiac. ... Canis Major (pronounced , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... Canis Minor (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... For the astrological sign, see Capricorn (astrology). ... Cassiopeia (pronounced , colloquially ) is a northern constellation which Greek mythology considered to represent the vain queen Cassiopeia who boasted about her unrivaled beauty. ... Centaurus (Latin for centaur) was one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, and counts also among the 88 modern constellations. ... Cepheus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation named after King Cepheus in Greek mythology, and is considered to represent a king. ... Cetus (pronounced , latinized form of Ancient Greek κῆτος - kētos, “whale, any sea-monster or huge fish”) is a constellation of the northern winter sky, in the region known as the Water, near other watery constellations like Aquarius, Pisces, and Eridanus. ... Corona Australis (IPA: ) or Corona Austrina (IPA: , Latin: ) was one of Ptolemys 48 constellations, and also counts among the 88 modern constellations. ... Corona Borealis (Latin for northern crown) is a small northern constellation whose main stars form a semicircular arc. ... Corvus (pronounced , Latin: ) is a small southern constellation with only 11 stars visible to the naked eye (brighter than magnitude 5. ... Crater (Latin for cup) is one of the 88 modern constellations and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... Cygnus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ... For other uses, see Delphinus (disambiguation). ... Draco (IPA: , Latin: ) is a far northern constellation that is circumpolar for many northern hemisphere observers. ... Equuleus (IPA: , Latin: Despite its smallness and lack of bright stars (none are brighter than fourth magnitude), it was also one of Ptolemys 48 constellations. ... Eridanus (IPA: , the ancient Greek name for the Po River (now in Italy), in the mythology associated with Phaëton) is the sixth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Gemini (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac known as the twins. It is part of the winter sky, lying between Taurus to the west and the dim Cancer to the east, with Auriga and the near-invisible Lynx to the north and Monoceros and Canis... Hercules (pronounced ) is the fifth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Hydra (IPA: ) is the largest of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy. ... Leo (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Lepus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a constellation, lying just south of the Celestial equator, below the constellation Orion, and possibly representing a hare being chased by Orion the hunter. ... Libra (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , Unicode ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Lupus (Latin for Wolf) is a southern constellation. ... For other uses, see Lyra (disambiguation). ... Ophiuchus (IPA: ), formerly referred to as Serpentarius (IPA: ), the former originating in the Greek language and the latter in the Latin language, both meaning serpent-holder, is one of the 88 constellations and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... Pegasus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation, named after the mythological winged horse Pegasus. ... Perseus is a northern constellation, named after the Greek hero who slew the monster Medusa. ... For other uses, see Pisces. ... Piscis Austrinus or Piscis Australis (both of which are Latin for Southern Fish) was one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, and is also one of the 88 modern constellations. ... This article is about the constellation; for the trigonometric function, see versine. ... For other uses, see Sagittarius. ... This article is about the constellation. ... Serpens (the snake) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... Taurus (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Triangulum is a small northern constellation whose three brightest stars, of third and fourth magnitude, form an elongated triangle. ... This article is about the constellation. ... Block quote :See also Ursa Minor Alpha a place in The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ... Virgo (pronounced , Latin: , symbol , ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Apus (Latin for bird of paradise) is a faint southern constellation, not visible to the ancient Greeks. ... For other uses of the word, see chameleon (disambiguation) Chamaeleon (Latin for chameleon) is a minor southern constellation. ... Coma Berenices (IPA: , Latin: ) is a traditional asterism that has since become a constellation. ... This article is about a constellation in the sky. ... Grus (Latin for Crane) is a southern constellation. ... Hydrus (Latin for Hydra, also referred to as male Hydra or little Hydra) is a minor southern constellation. ... Indus (IPA: ) is a southern constellation that is supposed to represent an American Indian. ... Musca (Latin for Fly) is one of the minor southern constellations. ... Pavo, being Latin for Peacock, is a southern constellation. ... Phoenix (IPA: ) is a minor southern constellation, introduced by Dutch navigators Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman, and popularized by Johann Bayers Uranometria in 1603. ... Triangulum Australe is a small southern constellation whose three brightest stars, of second and third magnitude, form an approximately equilateral triangle. ... Tucana (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Volans constellation ... Vulpecula (IPA: , Latin: ) is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. ... Camelopardalis, Latin for giraffe, is the name of a large but faint northern constellation first recorded by Jakob Bartsch in 1624, but probably created earlier by Petrus Plancius. ... Monoceros (IPA: , Greek: ) is a faint constellation on the winter night sky, surrounded by Orion to the east, Gemini to the north, Canis Major to the south and Hydra to the west. ... Columba, Latin for dove, is a small constellation just south to Canis Major and Lepus, it was cut out of the constellation Canis Major by Augustin Royer, in 1679. ... CRUX is a lightweight, i686-optimized Linux distribution targeted at experienced Linux users. ... Canes Venatici (Latin for Hunting dogs) is a small northern constellation that was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. ... Lacerta, being Latin for Lizard, is one of the 88 official constellations acknowledged by the International Astronomical Union. ... Leo Minor (Latin for Small Lion) is a rather dim constellation that can barely be recognized as a triangle and lies between the easily discerned constellations Ursa Major and Leo. ... Lynx (IPA: ) is a constellation of the northern hemisphere, introduced in the 17th century by Johannes Hevelius. ... Scutum (Latin for shield) is a small constellation. ... For the Ancient Roman coin denomination, see sextans (coin). ... Vulpecula (IPA: , Latin: ) is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. ... Antlia (IPA: , Latin: ) is a relatively new constellation as it was only created in the 18th century, being too faint to be acknowledged by the ancient Greeks. ... Caelum (IPA: ; earlier Cæla Sculptoris (Latin: ) is a minor southern constellation introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. ... Canes Venatici (Latin for Hunting dogs) is a small northern constellation that was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. ... Carina (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation which forms part of the old constellation of Argo Navis. ... Circinus, Latin for Compass, is one of the small southern (declination −50 to −60 degrees) constellations. ... Fornax (pronounced , Latin: ) is a southern constellation which was first introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille under the name Fornax Chemica (Latin for chemical furnace), representing a small solid-fuel heater formerly used for heating chemical experiments. ... Horologium (Latin for clock) is one of the lesser southern constellations (declination around -60 degrees). ... Mensa (Latin for Table) is a southern constellation which was first introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille under the name Mons Mensae (Latin for table mountain). ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations ... Norma (IPA: , Latin: ), is a small and inconspicuous [penis] that lies in the southern hemisphere between Scorpius and Centaurus. ... Octans (Latin for octant) is an inconspicuous constellation introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. ... Pictor (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the minor southern (declination -50° to -60°) constellations. ... Puppis (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Pyxis constellation | Argo Navis constellation ... Reticulum (Latin for reticle), is one of the minor southern (declination -60 degrees) constellations. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Sculptor constellation ... Telescopium (Latin for Telescope) is a minor southern constellation identified and named by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille, the 18th century French astronomer, a student of the southern skies. ... Vela (pronounced , Latin: ) is a southern constellation, one of the four parts into which Argo Navis was split (the others being Carina, Puppis and Pyxis). ... The former constellation Argo Navis Former constellations are constellations that are no longer recognized by the International Astronomical Union for various reasons. ... Vulpecula (IPA: , Latin: ) is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. ... Antinous was a constellation south of Aquila. ... The constellation Argo Navis drawn by Johannes Hevelius in 1690 Argo Navis (or simply Argo) was a large southern constellation representing the Argo, the ship used by Jason and the Argonauts in Greek mythology. ... Canes Venatici (Latin for Hunting dogs) is a small northern constellation that was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. ... Cancer Minor, Latin: lesser crab, was a constellation composed from a stars in Gemini adjacent to Cancer. ... Cerberus was a constellation created by Hevelius. ... Canes Venatici (Latin for Hunting dogs) is a small northern constellation that was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. ... Custos Messium (Latin for harvest-keeper) was a constellation created by Jérôme Lalande in 1775. ... Felis (Latin for cat) was a constellation created by Jérôme Lalande in 1805. ... Frederici Honores or Honores Friderici or Gloria Frederici (Latin for Glory of Frederick) was a constellation created by Johann Bode in 1787 to honor Frederick the Great, the king of Prussia who had died in the previous year. ... Gallus (the cockerel) was a constellation invented by Petrus Plancius in the early 17th century. ... Globus Aerostaticus (Latin for hot air balloon) was a constellation created by Jérôme Lalande in 1798. ... Jordanus (the Jordan River) was a constellation invented by Petrus Plancius in the early 17th century. ... Lochium Funis (Latin for the log and line) was a constellation created by Johann Bode from the stars which Nicolas Louis de Lacaille created the constellation Pyxis. ... Machina Electrica (Latin for electricity generator) was a constellation created by Johann Bode in 1800. ... Malus (Latin for mast) was a constellation that formed part of the Argo Navis constellation. ... Mons Maenalus (the Mountain) was a constellation created by Johannes Hevelius. ... Musca Borealis (Latin for northern fly) was a constellation located between the constellations of Aries and Perseus. ... Noctua (Latin for owl) was a constellation located between the constellations of Hydra and Libra. ... Officina Typographica (Latin for printing office) was a constellation located east of Sirius. ... Polophylax (Greek: guardian of the pole) was a southern constellation introduced by Petrus Plancius in the early 17th century. ... Psalterium Georgii (also Harpa Georgii) (Latin for Georges harp) was a constellation created by Maximilian Hell in 1781 to honor George II of Great Britain. ... Quadrans Muralis (Latin for mural quadrant) was a constellation created by Jérôme Lalande in 1795. ... Ramus Pomifer (Latin for apple branch) was a constellation located between Hercules and Lyra. ... Robur Carolinum (Latin for Charles oak) was a constellation created by the English astronomer Sir Edmund Halley in 1679. ... Sceptrum Brandenburgicum (Latin for scepter of Brandenburg) was a constellation created in 1688 by Gottfried Kirch, astronomer of Prussian Royal Society of Sciences. ... Sceptrum et Manus Iustitiae (Latin for scepter and hand of justice) was a constellation created by Augustin Royer in 1679 to honor king Louis XIV of France. ... Solarium (Latin for sundial) was a constellation located between the constellations of Horologium, Dorado and Hydrus. ... Tarandus vel Rangifer or Tarandus or Rangifer (the Reindeer) was a small constellation located between the constellations of Cassiopeia and Camelopardalis. ... Taurus Poniatovii (Latin for Poniatowskis bull) was a constellation created by Martin Poczobut in 1777 to honor Stanislaus Poniatowski, king of Poland. ... Telescopium Herschelii (Latin for Herschels telescope) was a constellation created by Maximilian Hell in 1781 to honor the famous English astronomer Sir William Herschel. ... Testudo (Latin for turtle) was a constellation located between the constellations of Cetus and Pisces. ... River Tigris or Tigris (named after the Tigris river) was a constellation, invented by Jakob Bartsch in the 17th century (or by Petrus Plancius). ... Triangulum Minor or Triangulum Minus (Latin for lesser triangle) was a constellation created by Hevelius. ... Hiren is gay. ... The constellation Lyra (Latin for Lyre) already formed part of Ptolemys list of 48 constellations and is also one of the 88 modern constellations approved by the IAU. Lyra is not very big but still easy to find because its principal star, Vega, is also a vertex of the... Apis (Latin for bee) was a constellation located south of constellation Crux. ... Grus (Latin for Crane) is a southern constellation. ... Ophiuchus (IPA: ), formerly referred to as Serpentarius (IPA: ), the former originating in the Greek language and the latter in the Latin language, both meaning serpent-holder, is one of the 88 constellations and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... Vespa (Latin for wasp) was a constellation created by Jakob Bartsch in the 17th century. ... This article is about a constellation in the sky. ...

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NASA - Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (720 words)
Orion orbits the moon with disc-shaped solar arrays tracking the sun to generate electricity.
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Orion as a constellation is the head of a constellation family, located in the equatorial region of the sky and belongs certainly to the most famous constellations.
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