FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Oriel College, Oxford
Oriel College, Oxford
                     
College name Oriel College
Named after Blessed Virgin Mary
Established 1324
Sister College Clare College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Dublin
Provost Sir Derek Morris
JCR President Frank Hardee
Undergraduates 304
Graduates 158
Homepage Boatclub

Oriel College (in full: The House of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford commonly called Oriel College, of the Foundation of Edward the Second of famous memory, sometime King of England), located in Oriel Square, Oxford, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom and the last all-male college to admit women (1985). Oriel College, Oxford, 2004-01-24, Copyright Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Blessed Virgin Mary A traditional Catholic picture sometimes displayed in homes. ... Events Publication of Defensor pacis by Marsilius of Padua Mansa Kankan Musa I, ruler of the Mali Empire arrives in Cairo on his hajj or pilgrimage to Mecca. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... Full name Clare College Motto - Named after Elizabeth de Clare Previous names University Hall (1326), Clare Hall (1338), Clare College (1856) Established 1326 Sister College Oriel College St Hughs College Master Prof. ... The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin or more commonly Trinity College, Dublin was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, and is the only constituent college of the University of Dublin, Irelands oldest university. ... This article is about the higher education title of provost. ... Sir Derek Morris is former Chairman of the Competition Commission (formerly the Monopolies and Mergers Commission) and as of October 1, 2003 is the Provost of Oriel College, Oxford. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... The term college (Latin collegium) is most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... This article is about the year. ...

Contents


History

Founded in 1324 by Adam de Brome, Rector of the University Church. Under the patronage of Edward II, he diverted the revenue of St Mary's to his college, which thereafter was responsible for appointing the vicar. De Brome's foundation of 1324 was confirmed by Edward II in a charter of 1326. Oriel is the fifth oldest of Oxford's colleges, and the oldest college that doesn't habitually claim it is the oldest college. The official name of the College is ‘the House of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford commonly called Oriel College', the name Oriel being used from about 1349 which probably originated from a tenement known as Seneschal Hall or La Oriole granted to the college in 1327. The word oriel probably referred to either a balcony or oriel window forming a feature of the earlier property. Events Publication of Defensor pacis by Marsilius of Padua Mansa Kankan Musa I, ruler of the Mali Empire arrives in Cairo on his hajj or pilgrimage to Mecca. ... Nothing is known of Adam de Bromes life before 1315, when he appears in the records as rector of Hanworth, Middlesex. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Osman I (1299-1326) to Orhan I (1326-1359) Aradia de Toscano, is initiated into a Dianic cult of Italian Witchcraft (Stregheria), and discovers through a vision that she is the human incarnation of the goddess Aradia. ... // Events August 24 - Black Death outbreak in Elbing (modern-day Elblag in Poland) October 20 - Pope Clement VI publishes a papal bull that condemns the Flagellants The bubonic plague is spread to Norway when an English ship with everyone dead on board floats to Bergen Births September 9 - Duke Albert... Events January 25 - Edward III becomes King of England. ... Oriel windows are a form of window commonly found in Gothic revival architecture, which jut out from the main wall of the building but do not reach to the ground. ...


In the 1830s, intellectually eminent Fellows of Oriel, John Keble, Thomas Arnold, and John Henry Newman, supported by Canon Pusey of Christ Church and others, formed a group known as the Oxford Movement, alternatively as the Tractarians, or familiarly as the Puseyites. The group were disgusted by the indolence prevailing in the Church, and they sought to revive the spirit of early Christianity. // Events and Trends Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Dutch-speaking farmers known as Voortrekkers emigrate northwards from the Cape Colony Croquet invented in Ireland Railroad construction begins in earnest in the United States Egba refugees fleeing the Yoruba civil wars found the city of Abeokuta in south-west Nigeria... John Keble John Keble (April 25, 1792- March 29, 1866) was an English churchman, one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement, and gave his name to Keble College, Oxford (1870). ... Thomas Arnold (June 13, 1795 – June 12, 1842) was a famous schoolmaster and historian, head of Rugby School from 1828 to 1841. ... J H Newman age 23 when he preached his first Sermon John Henry Newman (February 21, 1801 – August 11, 1890) was an English convert to Catholicism, later made a cardinal. ... Edward Bouverie Pusey (August 22, 1800 - September 16, 1882), was an English churchman, and one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement. ... Christ Church (in full: The Cathedral Church of Christ in Oxford of the Foundation of King Henry VIII) is one of the largest and wealthiest of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... For the 20th century Oxford Movement or Group see Moral Rearmament The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Laziness Look up Laziness in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Laziness is the lack of desire to act or work in general or to do an act or work that is expected of the person. ... The Early Christians is a term used to refer to the early followers of Jesus of Nazareth, before the emergence of established Christian orthodoxy. ...


First Quadrangle

Nothing survives of the original buildings, which were demolished when the quadrangle was built in the 17th Century. The south and west ranges and the clock tower were built around 1620 to 1622, the north and east ranges and the chapel buildings date from 1637 to 1642. King Charles I is commemorated on the portico of the hall entrance which has pierced stonework stating "REGNANTE CAROLO" (in the reign of Charles) and was completely rebuilt in 1897. The main facade is a classical E shape comprising the college chapel, hall and undercroft. High above the entrance to hall stands a statue of the Virgin Mary above two Kings: Edward II on the left, it is disputed who the other King is, but is probably either Charles I or James I. The oriel above the chapel door was used by John Henry Newman during his time as a fellow of the college, it now has modern stained glass commemorating Newman and his life. The chapel was consecrated in 1642 and still retains nearly all of its original fittings. In architecture a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad (especially at Oxford University), is a space on a college or university campus usually but not always enclosed on four sides by buildings, although this enclosing may be more or less loosely defined. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Events September 6 - English emigrants on the Mayflower depart from Plymouth, England for the future New England and arrive at the end of the year. ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ... Charles I (19 November 1600–30 January 1649) was King of Scotland, England and Ireland from 27 March 1625, until his execution. ... 1897 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... James VI of Scotland and James I of England and Ireland (occasionally known as King James the Vain) (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was King of England, King of Scotland, and King of Ireland. ... Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ...


Second Quadrangle

Originally a garden, the demand for more accommodation resulted in two free standing blocks being built between 1720 and 1729. Further building were erected in the late 19th Century. The north range houses the Palladian library and senior common rooms - designed by James Wyatt, it was built between 1788 and 1796. // Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A villa with a superimposed portico, from Book IV of Palladios I Quattro Libri dellArchitettura, in a modestly priced English translation published in London, 1736. ... Fonthill Abbey. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ...


St Mary Hall/Third Quadrangle

The mediaeval rectory house of St Mary’s Church served as an annex to Oriel College upon its foundation. It steadily developed into an independent entity and in 1545 the door between St Mary Hall and Oriel College was blocked up. The Hall took on its own lecturers but the Principals of St Mary Hall continued to be Fellows of Oriel for another hundred years. By 1875 its undergraduate body had risen to 60, a large number at that time. In 1902, the Hall was incorporated into Oriel College, though some remnants of the relationship still exist - the post of Vicar of St Mary's Church carries dining rights at Oriel. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The rectory is the title usually given to the building inhabited, or formerly inhabited, by the rector of a parish. ... Events February 27 - Battle of Ancrum Moor - Scots victory over superior English forces December 13 - Official opening of the Council of Trent (closed 1563) Battle of Kawagoe - between two branches of Uesugi families and the late Hojo clan in Japan. ... St Mary Hall was a college of the University of Oxford from 1326 until 1902 when it merged with Oriel College. ... Lecturer is the name given to university teachers in most of the English-speaking world (but not at most universities in the US or Canada) who do not hold a professorship. ... A principal is: The head of an educational institution. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The building pictured in the infobox is the Rhodes Building, built in 1911. It was designed by Basil Champneys and stands squarely on the site of the Principal's house, on the High Street. Champney's first proposal for the building included an open arcade to the High Street, a domed central feature and ballustraded parapet. The left hand block and much of the centre centre was to be given up to a new Provost's Lodging, and the five windows on the first floor above the arcade were to light a gallery belonging to the Lodging. The college eventually decided to retain the existing Provost's Lodging and demanded detailing "more in accordance with the style which has become traditional in Oxford". It became the last building of the Jacobean revival style in Oxford. 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Basil Champneys (1842-1935) Champneys was the architect for Newnham College, Cambridge, Manchesters John Rylands Library and Oriel College, Oxfords Rhodes Building. ... Arcade can mean several things: Arcade (architecture) - A passage or walkway, often including retailers. ... St Peters Basilica, Rome A dome is a common structural element of architecture that resembles the hollow upper half of a sphere. ... A parapet consists of a dwarf wall along the edge of a roof, or round a lead flat, terrace walk, etc. ... Anthony Salvins Harlaxton Manor, 1837 – 1855, defines the Jacobethan taste. ...


The "Island" site

A triangle of buildings, bordered by Oriel Street, King Edward Street (created by the college between 1872 and 1873), and Oriel Square. The site took six hundred years to acquire. Previously let for commercial ventures, it now is dominated by student accommodation. The Harris Building (formerly a real tennis court where King Charles I played tennis with his nephew Prince Rupert in December 1642 and King Edward VII had his first tennis lesson in 1859), is now given over to student accommodation and a fully functional theatre. 1872 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... Real tennis is the original racquet sport from which the modern game of lawn tennis, or tennis, is descended. ... for the city in British Columbia, see Prince Rupert, British Columbia Prince Rupert of the Rhine (1619-1682), soldier and inventor, was a younger son of Frederick V, Elector Palatine and Elizabeth Stuart, and the nephew of King Charles I of England. ... Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


James Mellon Hall

James Mellon Hall (JMH) is Oriel's modern annexe, situated on Rectory Road and bordered by the Cowley Road. It was opened by Queen Elizabeth II on November 8, 2000. The site incoprorates a former nunnery, neighbouring buildings on Rectory Road and impressive purpose built halls of residence. Principally the choice of digs for Oriel's graduates and finalists, the site also has its own common rooms, squash court, gymnasium and support staff. Cowley Road is an arterial road in the city of Oxford, England, following a southerly route from the city centre through the inner city area of East Oxford, and into the industrial suburb of Cowley. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda... This article is about an abbey as a religious building. ... Gymnasium can have following meanings: Gymnasium (ancient Greece)—an educational and sporting institution in Ancient Greece Gymnasium—a school of secondary education found in several European countries (approx. ...


Oriel Street

The name "Oriel Street" was in use by 1850, from 1210 it was called "Schidyard Street", and between 1542 and 1772 it was known as St Mary Hall Lane. 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Tsuchimikado, emperor of Japan Emperor Juntoku ascends to the throne of Japan Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor excommunicated by Pope Innocent III for invading southern Italy in 1210 Gottfried von Strassburg writes his epic poem Tristan about 1210 Beginning of Delhi Sultanate Births... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... 1772 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The College arms

Oriel College coat of arms
Oriel College coat of arms
The badge of the Prince of Wales
The badge of the Prince of Wales

In heraldic terminology: gules three lions passant guardant or within a bordure engrailed argent File links The following pages link to this file: Oriel College, Oxford ... File links The following pages link to this file: Oriel College, Oxford ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Oriel College, Oxford ... File links The following pages link to this file: Oriel College, Oxford ... The Prince of Wales Feathers. This Heraldic badge of the Heir Apparent is derived from the ostrich feathers borne by Edward, the Black Prince. ... Heraldry is the science and art of describing coats-of-arms (also referred to as armorial bearings or simply as arms). Its origins lie in the need to distinguish participants in battles or jousts and to describe the various devices they carried or painted on their shields. ...


The arms of the College are basically those of the founder Edward II, the three gold lions of England. However, as no-one can bear another's arms unaltered, a silver border was added 'for difference'. This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


The three feathers, often adopted by members of the College, can be found in decorations around college and is the motif on the college crested tie. It probably represents Edward, the Black Prince; however, it has been suggested that it stands for King Charles I, who was Prince of Wales when the college was rebuilt in the 17th century. Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales, KG, known as the Black Prince (June 15, 1330 – June 8, 1376) was the eldest son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. ... Charles I (19 November 1600–30 January 1649) was King of Scotland, England and Ireland from 27 March 1625, until his execution. ... The Prince of Wales Feathers. This Heraldic badge of the Heir Apparent is derived from the ostrich feathers borne by Edward, the Black Prince. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


College colours are two white stripes on navy.


The College grace

"Benedicte Deus, qui pascis nos a iuventute nostra et praebes cibum omni carni, reple gaudio et laetitia corda nostra, ut nos, affatim quod satis est habentes, abundemus in omne opus bonum. Per Jesum Christum Dominum Nostrum, cui Tecum et Spiritu Sancto sit omnis honos, laus et imperium in saecula saeculorum. Amen."


"Blessed God, who feeds us from our youth and provides food for all flesh, fill our hearts with joy and gladness, that we, having enough to satisfy us, may abound in every good work. Through Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom with You and the Holy Spirit, be all honour, praise and power for all ages. Amen."


Student life

Oriel has a reputation for its success in rowing, in particular the two college rowing events Torpids and Eights Week. In 2005 they kept "Head of the River" in Torpids and rowed over second in Eights Week. A coxless pair, sweep-oar rowing to the left of the photo; the bowside rower (or the starboard one, although the British term applied on this occasion) is further towards the bow of the boat. ... At Oxford University, Torpids is one of two bumping races held in the year, the other being Eights. ... At Oxford University, Eights Week constitutes the main intercollegiate rowing event of the year, and happens in May. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Head of the River race is a rowing race, held as a procession race against the clock, with the winning crew receiving the title of Head of the River. ... At Oxford University, Torpids is one of two bumping races held in the year, the other being Eights. ... At Oxford University, Eights Week constitutes the main intercollegiate rowing event of the year, and happens in May. ...


Since 2001, Oriel College students have chosen not to be affiliated to the University-wide Students' Union, OUSU. The college has a reputation for students to be more Right-leaning than the other Oxford colleges. This is no longer the case. 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... The Oxford University Student Union is the official student government of the University of Oxford. ...


As well as rooms for accommodation, the buildings of Oriel include the Chapel, Hall, two libraries, a bar, and common rooms for dons, graduates and undergraduates. There are also sportsground and boat-house facilities.


Accommodation is provided for all undergraduates, and for some graduates, though some accommodation is off-site. Members are generally expected to dine in hall, where there are two sittings every evening, one informal and one formal (where jackets, ties and gowns are worn). The Bar, situated underneath the Hall, serves food from mid morning and drinks in the evening. There is both a Junior Common Room (JCR), between Second and Third Quad, and a Middle Common Room (MCR), on the Island Site.


The college lending library supplements the university libraries (many of which are non-lending), with over 100,000 volumes, it is one of the largest college libraries in the university. The library will purchase any book needed for the course. Most undergraduate tutorials are carried out in the college, though for some specialist papers undergraduates may be sent to tutors in other colleges. Modern-style library In the traditional sense of the word, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ...


Croquet may be played in St Mary Quad in the summer as can bowls in the First Quad. The sportsground is mainly used for cricket, tennis, rugby and soccer. Rowing is carried out by the boat-house across Christ Church Meadow. Croquet is a recreational game and, latterly, a competitive sport that involves hitting wooden or plastic balls with a mallet through hoops embedded into the grass playing arena. ... Men playing bowls Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Bowls Bowls (also known as Lawn Bowls or Lawn Bowling) is a precision sport where the goal is to roll slightly radially asymmetrical balls (called bowls) closer to a smaller white ball (the jack or kitty) than ones opponent is... Cricket is a team sport played between two teams of eleven players each. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... Argentina-France Rugby Union match Rugby football refers to sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School. ... henry f is the best footy player in the world Football is the name given to a number of different team sports. ... Christ Church Meadow is a famous water meadow, and popular walking and picnic spot in Oxford, England. ...


Notable former students

See also Former students of Oriel College.

William Allen (1532 - October 16, 1594) was an English cardinal. ... Events January 16 - Grand Duke Ivan IV of Muscovy becomes the first Tsar of Russia. ... // Events The Edict of Orleans suspends the persecution of the Huguenots. ... Events February 7 - Julius III becomes Pope. ... // Events The Edict of Orleans suspends the persecution of the Huguenots. ... Events January 16 - Abdication of Emperor Charles V. His son, Philip II becomes King of Spain, while his brother Ferdinand becomes Holy Roman Emperor January 23 - The Shaanxi earthquake, the deadliest earthquake in history, occurs with its epicenter in Shaanxi province, China. ... // Events The Edict of Orleans suspends the persecution of the Huguenots. ... The word cardinal comes from the Latin cardo for hinge and usually refers to things of fundamental importance, as in cardinal rule or cardinal sins. ... Thomas Arundel (1353-1414) was Archbishop of Canterbury in 1397 and from 1399 until his death, an outspoken opponent of the Lollards. ... Events Bristol is made an independent county. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan The Fair Maid of Kent. He was born at Bordeaux and became his fathers heir when his elder brother died in infancy. ... Henry IV (April 3, 1367 – March 20, 1413) was born at Bolingbroke Castle in Lincolnshire, hence the other name by which he was known, Henry of Bolingbroke. His father, John of Gaunt was the third and oldest surviving son of King Edward III of England, and enjoyed a position of... Bernard James Tindal Bosanquet (October 13, 1877 - October 12, 1936) was an English cricketer, perhaps most renowned as the inventor of the googly. ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... A University Sporting Blue is earned by sportsmen at Cambridge University and Oxford University and some other universities in a designated sports (e. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... Test cricket is the longest form of the sport of cricket. ... Alexander Hugh Bruce, 6th Lord Balfour of Burleigh, KT, GCMG (January 13, 1849) - (July 6, 1921) was a Scottish Conservative politician and statesman. ... Scottish Executive - official site of the Scottish Executive Scottish Parliament - official site of The Scottish Parliament BBC Scotland - Scottish history, news and travel pages from BBC The Gazetteer for Scotland - Extensive guide to the places and people of Scotland, by the Royal Scottish Geographical Society and University of Edinburgh Scotland... Brummell, engraved from a miniature portrait. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 - June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist and philosopher. ... // Events July 24 - Spanish treasure fleet of ten ships under admiral Ubilla leave Havana, Cuba for Spain. ... // Events July 21 - Treaty of Passarowitz signed November 22 - Off the coast of Virginia, English pirate Edward Teach (best known as Blackbeard) is killed in battle when a British boarding party cornered and then shot and stabbed him more than 25 times. ... Events February 12 - British colonist James Oglethorpe founds Savannah, Georgia. ... The Bishop of Bristol heads the Church of England Diocese of Bristol in the Province of Canterbury, in England. ... In religious terminology, a dean is a title accorded to persons holding cartain positions of authority within a religious heirarchy. ... St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London, England April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex... Nathaniel Clements, 2nd Earl of Leitrim, KP (May 9, 1768 - December 31, 1854) was an Irish nobleman. ... The Right Honourable Sir Peter Frank Hannibal Emery (February 27, 1926–December 9, 2004) was a Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... Thomas Fairfax, 6th Lord Fairfax of Cameron, the friend and patron of George Washingtons early life, born in Leeds Castle, Kent, England, 1692; died at his seat at Greenway Court, Clarke County, Virginia, December 12, 1781; son of Thomas Fairfax, 5th Lord Fairfax of Cameron, and of Catharine, daughter... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ... // Events April 11 - War of the Spanish Succession: Treaty of Utrecht June 23 - French residents of Acadia given one year to declare allegiance to Britain or leave Nova Scotia Canada first Orrery built by George Graham Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected twice. ... Rev. ... 1889 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... James Anthony Froude (April 23, 1818 - October 20, 1894) was an English historian, the brother of William Froude, the engineer and naval architect. ... A historian is a person who studies history. ... The Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Oxford is an old-established professorial position. ... 1894 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... George Joachim Goschen, 1st Viscount Goschen (10 August 1831 - 7 February 1907) was a British statesman and businessman ironically best remembered for being forgotten by Lord Randolph Churchill. ... William Grant (19 June 1909 - 19 November 1972) was a Scottish Unionist politician and judge. ... William Gerard Hamilton (January 28, 1729 - July 16, 1796), English statesman, popularly known as Single Speech Hamilton, was born in London, the son of a Scottish bencher of Lincolns Inn. ... The Chief Secretary was the most important position for determining British policy in Ireland after the Lord Lieutenant, and was frequently a cabinet level position in the 19th and early twentieth centuries. ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Renn Dickson Hampden (1793 - April 23, 1868), English divine, was born in Barbados, where his father was colonel of militia, in 1793, and was educated at Oriel College, Oxford. ... The Bishop of Hereford is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Hereford in the Province of Canterbury. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... James Hannington (1847-1885) was an Anglican missionary, and a Christian saint and martyr. ... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... The Rt Hon. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... A statue of Thomas Hughes at Rugby School For the recipient of the Victoria Cross see Thomas Hughes, VC Thomas Hughes (October 20, 1822 – March 22, 1896) was an English lawyer and author. ... take you to calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... An author is the person who creates a written work, such as a book, story, article or the like. ... Tom Browns Schooldays, first published in 1857, is a novel by Thomas Hughes, set at a public school, Rugby School for Boys, in the 1830s when Hughes himself had been a student there. ... Christian Socialism generally refers to those on the Christian left whose politics are both Christian and socialist and who see these two things as being interconnected, perhaps because one derives from the other. ... Richard Arthur Warren Hughes (19 April 1900-28 April 1976) was a British professional writer of poems, short stories, novels and plays. ... Sir Francis Kynaston or Kinaston (1587 - 1642) was an English courtier and poet, noted for his translation of Geoffrey Chaucers Troilus and Criseyde into Latin verse (as rime royal, Amorum Troili et Creseidae Libri Quinque, 1639); he also provided a Latin translation of Henrysons The Testament of Cresseid... Events February 8 - Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, rebels against Elizabeth I of England - revolt is quickly crushed February 25 - Robert Devereux beheaded Jesuit Matteo Ricci arrives in China Bad harvest in Russia due to rainy summer Dutch troops drive Portuguese from Málaga Battle of Kinsale, Ireland Births... Eugene Lee-Hamilton was a late Victorian English poet (1845 - 1907). ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of Great Britain is considered the height of the British industrial revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Poets are authors of poems, or of other forms of poetry such as dramatic verse. ... J.L. Mackie John Leslie Mackie (1917–1981) was a philosopher, originally from Sydney, Australia. ... -1... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... A philosopher is a person devoted to studying and producing results in philosophy. ... James Edward Meade (June 23, 1907, Swanage, Dorset – December 22, 1995, Cambridge) was an English economist and winner of the 1977 Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel jointly with the Norwegian Bertil Ohlin for their Pathbreaking contribution to the theory of international trade and... 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... An economist is someone who studies Economics. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Herman Merivale (November 8, 1806 - February 8, 1874) was n English civil servant and author. ... Thomas Mozley (1806 - June 17, 1893), was an English clergyman and writer, associated with the Oxford Movement. ... The Right Honourable Paul Peter Murphy (born November 25, 1948) is a British politician for the Labour Party. ... The post of Secretary of State for Wales came into existence in October of 1964, the first incumbent being Jim Griffiths, MP for Llanelli. ... The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is the British cabinet minister who has responsibility for the government of Northern Ireland. ... Wilfrid Guild Normand (1884 – 5 October 1962), Baron Normand of Aberdour was a Scottish politician and judge. ... Mark Pattison (October 10, 1813 - July 30, 1884) was an English author and rector of Lincoln College, Oxford. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... College name Lincoln College Named after Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln Established 1427 Sister College Downing College Rector Prof. ... Reginald Pecock (or Peacock) (c. ... Arms of the Bishop of Chichester The Bishop of Chichester is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Chichester in the Province of Canterbury. ... Robert Pierrepont, 1st Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull (1584 - July 25, 1643), second son of Sir Henry Pierrepont of Holme Pierrepont, Nottinghamshire, was member of parliament for Nottingham in 1601, and was created Baron Pierrepont and Viscount Newark in 1627, being made earl of Kingston-upon-Hull in the following... Events February 5 - 26 catholics crucified in Nagasaki, Japan. ... Events Swedish King Sigismund III Vasa is replaced by his brother Charles IX of Sweden. ... The title of Earl Manvers was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1806 for Charles Pierrepont, 1st Viscount Newark. ... Events A Dutch ship makes the first recorded sighting of the coast of South Australia. ... The Dukedom of Kingston-upon-Hull was created in 1715 and became extinct in 1773. ... Events March 1 - writs were issued in February 1628 by Charles I of England that every county in England (not just seaport towns) pay ship tax by this date. ... Alternatively, Professor Walter Raleigh was a scholar and author circa 1900. ... Events January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... Events April 14 - Battle of Mookerheyde. ... Cecil Rhodes Cecil Rhodes Cecil John Rhodes (July 5, 1853 – March 26, 1902) was an English businessman and the effective founder of the state of Rhodesia (which was named after him). ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... External links Yahoo! Finance Aggregates some really good business articles Categories: | | | ... National motto: Sit Nomine Digna (Latin: May she be worthy of the name} Official language English Capital Salisbury Political system Parliamentary system Form of government Republic - Last President John Wrathall - Prime Minister Ian Smith Area  - Total  - % water 390 580 km² 1% Population  - 1978 est. ... A. L. Rowse ( December 4, 1903 – October 3, 1997) was a British historian best known for his poetry about Cornwall and his work on Elizabethan England. ... Eric Schlosser (born 1959) is an American journalist and author. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Sir William Scroggs (c. ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... Events December 1 - Portugal regains its independence from Spain and João IV of Portugal becomes king. ... The Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales is the second-highest judge of the Courts of England and Wales, after the Lord Chancellor, and the presiding judge of Criminal Division of the Court of Appeal, and of the Queens Bench Division of the High Court. ... The Popish Plot was an alleged Catholic conspiracy. ... Walter Carruthers Sellar (1898 - June 11, 1951) and Robert Julian Yeatman (1898 - July 13, 1968) were British humourists who wrote for Punch, and are best known for their book 1066 and All That (1930, ISBN 0413772705), a tongue-in-cheek guide to all the history you can remember. Sellar was... Walter Carruthers Sellar (1898 - June 11, 1951) and Robert Julian Yeatman (1898 - July 13, 1968) were British humourists who wrote for Punch, and are best known for their book 1066 and All That (1930, ISBN 0413772705), a tongue-in-cheek guide to all the history you can remember. Sellar was... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... A humorist is an author who specializes in short, humorous articles or essays. ... 1066 and All That is a work of tongue-in-cheek fake history by W. C. Sellar and R. J. Yeatman. ... Thomas Henry Sutton Sotheron Estcourt (4 April 1801 - 6 January 1876) was a British Conservative politician. ... The Home Secretary (official full title Secretary of State for the Home Department) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... John Innes Mackintosh Stewart (1906–1994) was a Scottish novelist and academic. ... Michael Innes was the pseudonym of an Oxford academic, J. I. M. Stewart (1906–1994), under which name he wrote about forty crime novels between 1936 and 1986. ... Hugh Edwin Strickland (March 2, 1811 - September 14, 1853), was an English geologist, ornithologist and systemist. ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A geologist is a contributor to the science of geology. ... Ornithology (from the Greek ornis = bird and logos = word/science) is the branch of zoology concerned with the scientific study of birds and it includes observations on the structure and classification of birds, and on their habits, song and flight. ... Ronald Syme Sir Ronald Syme (11 March 1903 – 4 September 1989), New Zealand-born historian, was the preeminent classicist of the 20th century. ... The Ancient Library American Philological Association LAnnée philologique Bibliotheca Augustana Classical associations worldwide at the Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge. ... Charles Talbot, 1st Baron Talbot of Hensol (1685 - February 14, 1737) Great Britain, was the eldest son of William Talbot, bishop of Durham, a descendant of the 1st earl of Shrewsbury. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times Chancellor of England, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... Christopher Rice Mansel Talbot (10 May 1803- January 1890) was a wealthy south Wales landowner, industrialist (and Liberal Member of Parliament for Glamorgan from 1830 until his death) who saw the potential of his familys estates as a site for an extensive ironworks, served by railways and a port... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Glamorgan or Morgannwg is a maritime traditional county of Wales, UK, and was previously a medieval kingdom or principality. ... Alan John Percivale Taylor (March 25, 1906–September 7, 1990) was a renowned British historian of the 20th century. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Right Honourable Alexander Robert Todd, Baron Todd, OM, FRS (2 October 1907–10 January 1997) was a British biochemist whose research on the structure and synthesis of nucleotides, nucleosides, and nucleotide coenzymes gained him the 1957 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Look up chemist on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sir Henry Unton (or Umpton) (c. ... Henry IV of France (French: Henri IV de France; December 13, 1553–May 14, 1610), was the first of the Bourbon kings of France, reigning from 1589 until his death. ... Joseph Warton (April, 1722 - February 23, 1800) was an English academic and literary critic. ... Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... Gilbert White (July 18, 1720 – June 26, 1793) was a pioneering naturalist and ornithologist. ... Events January 1 - Bouvet Island is discovered by French explorer Jean-Baptiste Charles Bouvet de Lozier. ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A photo of Samuel Wilberforce by Lewis Carroll Samuel Wilberforce (September 7, 1805 - July 19, 1873), English bishop, third son of William Wilberforce, was born at Clapham Common, London. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1826 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Bishop of Oxford is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Oxford in the Province of Canterbury. ... Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... In his lifetime Charles Darwin gained international fame as a controversial and influential scientist. ... A speculatively rooted phylogenetic tree of all living things, based on rRNA gene data, showing the separation of the three domains, bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, as described initially by Carl Woese. ... Thomas Huxley Thomas Henry Huxley F.R.S. (May 4, 1825 - June 29, 1895) was a British biologist, known as Darwins Bulldog for his defence of Charles Darwins theory of evolution. ... Sandy Wilson (born May 19, 1924) is a British composer and lyricist, best known for his musical, The Boyfriend (1954). ... A lyricist is an author of song lyrics. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... The Boyfriend (or The Boy Friend) is a musical by Sandy Wilson, first performed in the West End in 1954. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Wood (born Michael David Wood, July 23, 1948 in Manchester) is a popular British historian and broadcaster, presenter of numerous television documentary series. ... Note: broadcasting is also the old term for hand sowing. ...

Notable former academics/teachers

Caricature from Punch, 1881: Admit that Homer sometimes nods, That poets do write trash, Our Bard has written Balder Dead, And also Balder-dash Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was an English poet and cultural critic, who worked as an inspector of schools. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Arnold (June 13, 1795 – June 12, 1842) was a famous schoolmaster and historian, head of Rugby School from 1828 to 1841. ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... In the UK and elsewhere, a head teacher is the most senior teacher in a school. ... A view of Rugby School from the rear, including the playing field, where according to legend Rugby was invented Rugby School, located in the town of Rugby in Warwickshire, is one of the oldest public schools in the United Kingdom and is perhaps one of the top co-educational boarding... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... take you to calendar). ... The Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Oxford is an old-established professorial position. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Edward Brown OKW (May 5, 1830 - October 29, 1897), British poet, scholar and divine, was born at Douglas, Isle of Man and educated at King Williams College. ... Photograph of James Bryce The Right Honourable James Bryce, 1st Viscount Bryce, OM , FRS , PC (1838-1922), was a British jurist, historian and politician. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... John William Burgon (August 21, 1813 - August 4, 1888), English divine, was born at Smyrna, the son of a Turkey merchant, who was a skilled numismatist and afterwards became an assistant in the antiquities department of the British Museum. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Chichester Cathedral today Chichester Cathedral in Chichester, Sussex, England has superposed Norman (English Romanesque) arcades in the nave and choir, with much Early English (Early Gothic) building. ... Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1841 - 1915), English divine and Biblical critic, was born in London, and educated at Merchant Taylors School and Oxford. ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Arthur Hugh Clough (January 1, 1819 – November 13, 1861) was an English poet, and the brother of Anne Jemima Clough. ... Sir Zelman Cowen The Right Honourable Sir Zelman Cowan, A.K., G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O., K.St. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Michael Jeffery, Governor-General of Australia The Governor-General of Australia is the representative in Australia of Australias head of state, Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia, who lives in the United Kingdom. ... George Anthony Denison (11 December 1805 - 21 March 1896) was an English churchman. ... James Fraser (August 18, 1818- October 22, 1885) was a reforming Anglican bishop of Manchester, England. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Arms of the Bishop of Manchester Categories: Bishops ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Richard Hurrell Froude (25 March 1803-28 February 1836) was an Anglican priest and an early leader of the Oxford Movement. ... For the 20th century Oxford Movement or Group see Moral Rearmament The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... Robert Alfred Cloyne Godwin-Austen (March 17, 1808-November 25, 1884) was an English geologist. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Geology (from Greek γη- (ge-, the earth) and λογος (logos, word, reason)) is the science and study of the Earth, its composition, structure, physical properties, history, and the processes that shape it. ... Professor Sir Michael Eliot Howard, OM , CH , KBE , MC (November 29, 1922-) is a retired British military historian, formerly the Regius Professor of Modern History at Oxford University. ... The Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Oxford is an old-established professorial position. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Keble John Keble (April 25, 1792- March 29, 1866) was an English churchman, one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement, and gave his name to Keble College, Oxford (1870). ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... College name Keble College Named after John Keble Established 1870 Sister College Selwyn College Warden Prof. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Raymond Klibansky (born October 15, 1905) is a Canadian professor of philosophy. ... Richard Mant (February 12, 1776 - 1848) was an English churchman and writer. ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... J H Newman age 23 when he preached his first Sermon John Henry Newman (February 21, 1801 – August 11, 1890) was an English convert to Catholicism, later made a cardinal. ... Frederick York Powell (January 4, 1850- May 8, 1904), English historian and scholar, was born in Bloomsbury, London. ... The Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Oxford is an old-established professorial position. ... 1894 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1904 (MCMIV) is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Edward Bouverie Pusey (August 22, 1800 - September 16, 1882), was an English churchman, and one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement. ... William Young Sellar (February 22, 1825 - October 12, 1890), Scottish classical scholar, was born at Morvich, Sutherland. ... John Robinson (November 7, 1650 - April 11, 1723), English diplomatist and prelate, a son of John Robinson (d. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity is the Anglican cathedral in the English city of Bristol and is commonly known as Bristol Cathedral. ... Arms of the Bishop of London The Bishop of London is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury. ... Richard Whately (February 1, 1787 - October 8, 1863), English logician and theological writer, archbishop of Dublin, was born in London. ... A logician is a philosopher, mathematician, or other whose topic of scholarly study is logic. ... Primate of Ireland is a title possessed by the Roman Catholic and Church of Ireland (Anglican) Archbishops of Dublin. ...

Notable former Provosts

Events January 4 - Christopher Columbus leaves the New World. ... // Events The western continent is named America on the maps of Martin Waldseemüller. ... Alexander Barclay (c. ... Events March 1 - the city of Rio de Janeiro is founded April 27 - Cebu City is established becoming the first Spanish settlement in the Philippines. ... Roger Marbeck (1536-1605), son of organist John Marbeck, was a noted classical scholar, was appointed public orator in the university of Oxford in 1564, and in 1565 became a canon of Christ Church and was elected provost of Oriel; he left Oxford on account of an unfortunate marriage, and... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... David Binning Monro (November 16, 1836 – August 22, 1905) was an Scottish Homeric scholar. ... Bust of Homer in the British Museum For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ...

Academics/teachers

See also Fellows of Oriel College

Mark Almond is a writer and Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Prof. ... Dr Robert Anthony Beddard is the Cowen Fellow and Tutor in Modern History, Oriel College, Oxford. ... Dr Anton Bitel M.A. (Oxon), D.Phil (Oxon) Non Stipendiary Lecturer in Classics, Oriel College, Oxford Australian born, resident in Oxford. ... Dr Lauchlann Glenn Black is Pro-Vice Chancellor (academic), Oxford University and Senior Subject Tutor, Oriel College, Oxford, teaching the main period papers (1500-1832). ... Dr Derek Blake D.Phil (B.Sc. ... Dr Jeremy Catto M.A. D.Phil Fellow and Lecturer (CUF) in Modern History, Oriel College, Oxford Dr Cattos research interests lie in the politics and religion of later medieval England. ... Dr David O.M. Charles is a Fellow in Philosophy and Director of Graduate Studies at Oriel College, Oxford. ... Dr. Richard Alan Cross is Tutor in Theology and Dean of Degrees at Oriel College, Oxford and holds a Masters degree (M.A.) and a doctorate (D.Phil). ... Professor Sir John Huxtable Elliott (June 6, 1930 - ) is an eminent historian, Regius Professor Emeritus in the University of Oxford and Honorary Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford and Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Robert John Weston Evans is FBA Regius Professor of Modern History at Oriel College, Oxford. ... Dr W. B. Henry M.A., D. Phil. ... Dr George Gordon MacPherson is Reader in Experimental Pathology, Turnbull Fellow and Tutor in Medicine and Senior Tutor at Oriel College, Oxford. ... Dr Teresa Morgan is Nancy Bissell Turpin Fellow and Tutor in Ancient History at Oriel College, Oxford and Lecturer in Classical Languages, Faculty of Classics, Oxford University. ... Graham F. Vincent-Smith MA DPhil is a Fellow of Mathematics at Oriel College, University of Oxford. ...

External links

  • Oriel College - the main college website
  • Oriel JCR - the undergraduate body of the college
  • Oriel MCR - the graduate body of the college
  • Virtual Tour explore the buildings in and around Oriel
  • Alumni - contact list of Oriel alumni
  • Multimap - location of the college


Colleges of the University of Oxford

Arms of the University The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ...

All Souls | Balliol | Brasenose | Christ Church | Corpus Christi | Exeter | Green | Harris Manchester | Hertford | Jesus | Keble | Kellogg | Lady Margaret Hall | Linacre | Lincoln | Magdalen | Mansfield | Merton | New College | Nuffield | Oriel | Pembroke | Queen's | St Anne's | St Antony's | St Catherine's | St Cross | St Edmund Hall | St Hilda's | St Hugh's | St John's | St Peter's | Somerville | Templeton | Trinity | University | Wadham | Wolfson | Worcester All Souls College (in full: The College of All Souls of the Faithful Departed, of Oxford) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister College St Johns Master Andrew Graham JCR President Jack Hawkins Undergraduates 403 Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... College name Brasenose College Named after Bronze door knocker Established 1509 Sister College Gonville and Caius College Principal Prof. ... College name Christ Church Named after Established 1546 Sister College Trinity College Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR President William Dorsey Undergraduates 426 Graduates 154 Homepage Christ Church, called in Latin Ædes Christi (i. ... College name Corpus Christi College Named after Corpus Christi, Body of Christ Established 1517 Sister College Corpus Christi College President Sir Tim Lankester JCR President Binyamin Even Undergraduates 239 Graduates 126 Homepage Corpus Christi College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... College name Exeter College Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister College Emmanuel College Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR President Emily Pull Undergraduates 299 Graduates 150 Homepage Boatclub Exeter College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Green College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Harris Manchester College, formerly Manchester College, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom; it has the emphasis on mature students. ... College name Hertford College Named after Elias de Hertford Established 1282 Sister College None Principal Dr John Landers JCR President Stephanie Johnston Undergraduates 376 Graduates 224 Homepage Boatclub Hertford College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... College name Jesus College Named after Jesus of Nazareth Established 1571 Sister College Jesus College, Cambridge Principal Sir John Krebs JCR President Simon Hacking Undergraduates 344 Graduates 134 Homepage Boatclub Jesus College (in full: Jesus College in the University of Oxford of Queen Elizabeths Foundation) is one of the... College name Keble College Named after John Keble Established 1870 Sister College Selwyn College Warden Prof. ... Kellogg College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... College name Lady Margaret Hall Named after Lady Margaret Beaufort Established 1878 Sister College Newnham College Principal Dr Frances Lannon JCR President Joe Collenette Undergraduates 424 Graduates 148 Homepage Lady Margaret Hall is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Linacre College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, currently offering graduate entry only. ... College name Lincoln College Named after Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln Established 1427 Sister College Downing College Rector Prof. ... College name Magdalen College Named after Mary Magdalene Established 1458 Sister College Magdalene College President Professor David Clary FRS JCR President Iain Anstess Undergraduates 395 Graduates 230 Homepage Boatclub Magdalen College (pronounced ) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Mansfield College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... College name The House of Scholars of Merton Named after Walter de Merton Established 1264 Sister College Cock Warden Prof Dame Jessica Rawson and Tom de Furlong esq. ... College name New College Named after Blessed Virgin Mary Established 1379 Sister College Kings College Warden Prof. ... Nuffield College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... College name Pembroke College Named after William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke Established 1624 Sister College Queens College Master Giles Henderson JCR President Tristan de Souza Undergraduates 408 Graduates 94 Homepage Boatclub Pembroke College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... College name The Queens College Named after Queen Philippa of Hainault Established 1341 Sister College Pembroke College Provost Sir Alan Budd JCR President Sushrut Yalamanchili Undergraduates 304 Graduates 133 Homepage Boatclub The Queens College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United... St Annes College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Antonys College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Catherines College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... :::::::: ::: ::: :::::::: ::: ::: :::::::::: ::::::::: :+: :+: :+: :+: :+: :+: :+: :+: :+: :+: :+: +:+ +:+ +:+ +:+ +:+ +:+ +:+ +:+ +:+ +#++:++#++ +#+ +:+ +#+ +#++:++ +#++:++# +#++:++#: +#+ +#+ +#+ +#+ +#+ +#+ +#+ +#+ +#+ +# #+# #+# #+# #+# #+# #+# #+# #+# #+# #+# ######## ######## ### ### ########## ### ### St Cross College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Edmund Hall is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Hildas College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Hughs College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Johns College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St Peters College is a relatively new college of the University of Oxford, Oxford, England. ... Full name Somerville College Motto Donec rursus impleat orbem Named after Mary Somerville Previous Names Somerville Hall Established 1879 Sister College Girton College Principal Dame Fiona Caldicott JCR President Simon Bruegger MCR President Allen Middlebro Location Woodstock Road, Oxford Undergraduates 396 Graduates 88 Homepage Boat Club Somerville College is one... Templeton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... College name Trinity College Named after The Holy Trinity Established 1555 Sister College Churchill College President The Hon. ... University College (in full, the College of the Great Hall of the University, commonly known as University College in the University of Oxford, usually known by its derivative, Univ), is a contender for the claim to be the oldest of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the... Wadham College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... College name Wolfson College Named after Sir Isaac Wolfson Established 1966 Sister College Darwin College President Sir Gareth Roberts JCR President {{{JCR President}}} Undergraduates Wolfson is a postgraduate college Graduates 450 Homepage Boatclub Wolfson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Worcester College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...

Permanent Private Halls at the University of Oxford

Blackfriars | Campion Hall | Greyfriars | Regent's Park College | St Benet's Hall | St Stephen's House | Wycliffe Hall A Permanent Private Hall at the University of Oxford is an educational institution affiliated to the University — not as a full College, but able to award Oxford University degrees. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The English Dominican House of Blackfriars Hall in Oxford, commonly known simply as Blackfriars, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Campion Hall is one of the constituent colleges of the United Kingdom. ... Greyfriars is one of the smallest constituent Halls of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Regents Park College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... St. ... St Stephen’s House, Oxford, is an Anglican theological college and a Hall of the University of Oxford. ... Wycliffe Hall is a Church of England theological college, and one of the constituent institutions of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Oriel College, Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2312 words)
Oriel is the fifth oldest of Oxford's colleges, and the oldest college that doesn't habitually claim it is the oldest college.
The official name of the College is ‘the House of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford commonly called Oriel College', the name Oriel being used from about 1349 which probably originated from a tenement known as Seneschal Hall or La Oriole granted to the college in 1327.
Samuel Wilberforce - Undergraduate 1823 to 1826: Bishop of Oxford and Winchester.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m