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Encyclopedia > Oregon Constitution

The Oregon Constitution is a U.S. state constitution, the governing document of the American state of Oregon. It was ratified on November 9, 1857, and took effect when Oregon achieved statehood on February 14, 1859. In the context of the United States of America, a state constitution is the governing document of a U.S. state, comparable to the U.S. Constitution which is the governing document of the United States. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia, form the United States of America. ... State nickname: Beaver State Other U.S. States Capital Salem Largest city Portland Governor Ted Kulongoski Official languages None Area 255,026 km² (9th)  - Land 248,849 km²  - Water 6,177 km² (2. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia, form the United States of America. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ...

Contents


Differences

  • The Oregon Constitution is easier to amend than its Federal counterpart. Amending the U.S. Constitution requires a two-thirds vote in Congress and ratification by three fourths of the states. Oregon only requires a simple majority to vote in favor of an amendment once it has been referred to the voters either by a simple majority of the legislature or through an initiative petition. In the case of a petition, signatures of 8% of the number of voters participating in the last governor's election are required to get it on the ballot, a third higher than the 6% required for a change in statute. See: List of Oregon ballot measures
  • The right to free speech in Oregon is broader than that enjoyed at the federal level. Article I, Section 8 reads;
No law shall be passed restraining the free expression of opinion, or restricting the right to speak, write, or print freely on any subject whatever; but every person shall be responsible for the abuse of this right.
The Oregon Supreme Court has cited this right against parts of Oregon's disorderly conduct statute, against content-based restrictions on billboards and murals, and against laws restricting the sale of pornography.

Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... In political science, the initiative (also known as popular or citizens initiative) provides a means by which a petition signed by a certain minimum number of registered voters can force a public vote on a proposed statute, constitutional amendment, charter amendment or ordinance. ... The following is a partial list of Oregon ballot measures, dating back to 1990. ... The Oregon Supreme Court is the highest state court in the Oregon judicial department (branch of government). ... Pavonazzeto marble sculpture, see Erotic art in Pompeii Pornography (from Greek πορνογραφια pornographia — literally writing about or drawings of harlots) is the representation of the human body or human sexual behaviour with the goal of sexual arousal, similar to, but (according to some) distinct from, erotica. ...

Article I

Article I of the state's constitution is a bill of rights for its citizens. As of 2003, it addresses the following topics: A bill of rights is a statement of certain rights that citizens and/or residents of a free and democratic society have (or ought to have) under the laws of that society. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Events January events January 1 Luíz Inácio Lula Da Silva becomes the 37th President of Brazil. ...

  1. Natural rights inherent in people
  2. Freedom of worship
  3. Freedom of religious opinion
  4. No religious qualification for office
  5. No money to be appropriated for religion
  6. No religious test for witnesses or jurors
  7. Manner of administering oath or affirmation
  8. Freedom of speech and press
  9. Unreasonable searches or seizures
  10. Administration of justice
  11. Rights of Accused in Criminal Prosecution (amended 1932, 1934)
  12. Double jeopardy; compulsory self-incrimination
  13. Treatment of arrested or confined persons
  14. Bailable offenses
  15. Foundation principles of criminal law (amended 1996)
  16. Excessive bail and fines; cruel and unusual punishments; power of jury in criminal case
  17. Jury trial in civil cases
  18. Private property or services taken for public use (amended 1920, 1924)
  19. Imprisonment for debt
  20. Equality of privileges and immunities of citizens
  21. Ex-post facto laws; laws impairing contracts; laws depending on authorization in order to take effect; laws submitted to electors
  22. Suspension of operation of laws
  23. Habeas corpus
  24. Treason
  25. Corruption of blood or forfeiture of estate
  26. Assemblages of people; instruction of representatives; application to legislature
  27. Right to bear arms; military subordinate to civil power
  28. Quartering soldiers
  29. Titles of nobility; hereditary distinctions
  30. Emigration
  31. Rights of aliens; immigration to state (repealed 1970)
  32. Taxes and duties; uniformity of taxation (amended 1917)
  33. Enumeration of rights not exclusive
  34. Slavery or involuntary servitude
  35. Restrictions on rights of certain persons (repealed 1926)
  36. Liquor prohibition (adopted 1914, repealed 1933); Prohibition of importation of liquors (adopted 1916, repealed 1933); Capital punishment (adopted 1914, repealed 1920)
  37. Penalty for murder in first degree (adopted 1920, repealed 1964)
  38. Laws abrogated by amendment abolishing death penalty revived (adopted 1920, repealed 1964)
  39. Sale of liquor by individual glass (adopted 1952)
  40. Penalty for aggravated murder (adopted 1984)
  41. Work and training for corrections institution inmates; work programs; limitations; duties of corrections director (adopted 1994; amended 1997, 1999)
  42. Rights of victim in criminal prosecutions and juvenile court delinquency proceedings (adopted 1999)
  43. Rights of victim and public to protection from accused person during criminal proceedings; denial of pretrial release (adopted 1999)
  44. Term of imprisonment imposed by court to be fully served; exceptions (adopted 1999)
  45. Person convicted of certain crimes not eligible to serve as juror on grand jury or trial jury in criminal case (adopted 1999)

Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Freedom of religion is a modern legal concept of being free as a matter of right, while freedom of worship is based upon the free expression of that right. ... A public demonstration Freedom of speech is the liberty to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related liberty to hear what others have stated. ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public speech often through a state constitution for its citizens, and associations of individuals extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... Double jeopardy is a procedural defense (and, in the United States, a constitutional right) that forbids a defendant from being tried a second time for a crime, after having already been tried for the same crime. ... Traditionally, bail is some form of property which is deposited or pledged to a court in order to persuade it to release a suspect from jail, on the understanding that the suspect will return for trial or forfeit the bail (skipping bail is also illegal). ... The statement that the government shall not inflict cruel and unusual punishment for crimes is found in the English Bill of Rights signed in 1689 by William of Orange and Queen Mary II who were then the joint rulers of England following the Glorious Revolution of 1688. ... A jury trial (not to be confused with grand jury proceedings) is a trial where the judge(s) are supplemented by a jury, which is made of citizens who are not, in general, justice professionals. ... A taking is an action by a government depriving a person of private property without the payment of just compensation. ... Debt is that which is owed. ... In common law jurisdictions, habeas corpus, or more precisely habeas corpus ad subjiciendum, is a prerogative writ (judicial mandate) to a prison official ordering that an inmate be brought to the court so it can be determined whether or not that person is imprisoned lawfully and whether or not he... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Look up Slavery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Slavery is a condition of control over a person against their will, enforced by violence or other forms of coercion. ... Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ...

Other Articles

II Suffrage and Elections
III Distribution of Powers
IV Legislative Department
V Executive Department
VI Administrative Department
VII Judicial Department
VIII Education and School Lands
IX Finance
X The Militia
XI Corporations and Internal Improvements
XII State Printing
XIII Salaries (repealed 1956)
XIV Seat of Government
XV Miscellaneous
XVI Boundaries
XVII Amendments and Revisions
XVIII Schedule

 

Constitutions within the United States (edit)
Constitutions of United States States
Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | Florida | Georgia | Hawai'i | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Navada | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahomo | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconson | Wyoming
Constitutions of United States Territories
American Samoa | Guam Territory | Northern Mariana Islands Territory | Puerto Rico Territory | United States Virgin Islands

In the context of the United States of America, a state constitution is the governing document of a U.S. state, comparable to the U.S. Constitution which is the governing document of the United States. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia, form the United States of America. ... The Alabama Constitution is the basic governing document of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... The Arkansas Constitution is the governing document of the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... The Connecticut Constitution is the the basic governing document of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... The Great Seal of the State of Florida The Florida Constitution is the document that establishes and describes the duties, powers, structure and function of the government of the U.S. state of Florida, and establishes the basic law of the state. ... The Louisiana Constitution is the document that describes the structure and function of the government of the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... The Great Seal of Maryland The current Constitution of Maryland, which was ratified by the people of the state on September 18, 1867, forms the basic law for the U.S. state of Maryland. ... The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the fundamental governing document of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... The Constitution of the State of Minnesota was initially approved by the residents of Minnesota Territory in a special election held on October 13, 1857, and was ratified by the United States Senate on May 11, 1858, marking the admittance of Minnesota to the Union. ... …Guy M… (soapbox) July 3, 2005 05:12 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The North Carolina Constitution is the governing document of North Carolina. ... The South Carolina Constitution is the governing document of South Carolina. ... The Tennessee State Constitution is the basic document of governance for the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The Texas Constitution is the document that describes the structure and function of the government of Texas. ... The Vermont Constitution is the governing document of the U.S. state of Vermont. ... The Constitution of Virginia is a United States state constitution. ... United States territory is any land and territorial (of the land) and adjacent (next to it) waters and airspace under the jurisdiction of the federal government of the United States of America (USA), especially those under the exclusive jurisdiction of the United States Government. ...

External links and references

  • Oregon State Constitution
  • More information

  Results from FactBites:
 
Oregon Blue Book: Constitution of Oregon: 2005 Version (263 words)
The Oregon Constitution was framed by a convention of 60 delegates chosen by the people.
The Act of Congress admitting Oregon into the Union was approved February 14, 1859, and on that date the Constitution went into effect.
The text of the original signed copy of the Constitution filed in the office of the Secretary of State is retained unless it has been repealed or superseded by amendment.
Oregon Blue Book: Constitution of Oregon: 2005 Version (263 words)
The Oregon Constitution was framed by a convention of 60 delegates chosen by the people.
The Act of Congress admitting Oregon into the Union was approved February 14, 1859, and on that date the Constitution went into effect.
The text of the original signed copy of the Constitution filed in the office of the Secretary of State is retained unless it has been repealed or superseded by amendment.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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