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Encyclopedia > Oread
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Titans and Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities
Nymphs

In Greek mythology, Oreads (ὄρος, "mountain") were a type of nymph that lived in mountains, valleys, ravines, and differ from each other according to their dwelling. The Idae were from Mount Ida, Peliades from Mount Pelia, etc... They were with Artemis since the goddess, when she went out hunting, preferred mounts and rocky precipices. The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Titans (Greek Τιτάν, plural Τιτάνες) were a race of powerful deities that ruled during the legendary Golden Age. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think, from which mind and mental are also derived[1]) are nine goddesses or spiritual guides who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... In Greek mythology, LÄ“tṓ (Greek: , Lato in Dorian Greek, the hidden one) is a daughter of the Titans Coeus and Phoebe. ... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros (a statue of a male youth), was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery... The Diana of Versailles, a Roman copy of a sculpture by Leochares (Louvre Museum) Artemis (Greek: nominative , genitive ) in Greek mythology the daughter of Zeus and of Leto and the twin sister of Apollo was one of the most widely venerated of the gods and manifestly one of the oldest... Pan (Greek , genitive ) is the Greek god of nature who watches over shepherds and their flocks. ... In a draw in a mountainous region, a shepherd guides a flock of about 20 sheep amidst scrub and olive trees. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... Alseid - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The names of the species of the nymphs varied according to their natural abode. ... In Greek mythology, the Crinaeae were a type of nymph associated with fountains. ... The Dryad by Evelyn De Morgan Dryads are female tree spirits in Greek mythology. ... Categories: Mythology stubs | Nymphs ... For the ancient Greek city Hesperides see Benghazi. ... In Greek mythology, the Limnades were a type of nymph. ... In Greek mythology, the Meliae were nymphs of the manna-ash tree. ... Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893 In Greek mythology, the Naiads (from the Greek νάειν, to flow, and νἃμα, running water) were a type of nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, streams, and brooks, as river gods embodied rivers, and some very... In Greek mythology, the Napaeae (νάπη, a wooded dell) were a type of shy but mirthful nymph. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are blue-haired sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, the Pegaeae were a type of nymph that lived in springs. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... The Diana of Versailles, a Roman copy of a sculpture by Leochares (Louvre Museum) Artemis (Greek: nominative , genitive ) in Greek mythology the daughter of Zeus and of Leto and the twin sister of Apollo was one of the most widely venerated of the gods and manifestly one of the oldest...


Oreads

  1. Britomartis
  2. Cynosura
  3. Cyllene or Kyllene
  4. Echo
  5. Nomia
  6. Oenone
  7. Pitys
  8. Pleiades
    1. Celaeno
    2. Alcyone
    3. Electra
    4. Maia
    5. Sterope
    6. Taygete
    7. Merope


"Oread" is also the title of a poem by Hilda Doolittle. In Greek mythology, Britomartis (sweet maid, good maiden, sweet virgin) was a nymph (an Oread) also known as Aphaea and Diktynna. ... In Greek mythology, Cynosura was a nymph (an Oread) on Mount Ida, Crete. ... There are several places on the Peloponnesus peninsula in Greece named Kyllíni (classically transliterated as Cyllene or Kyllênê): Mount Kyllini (Cyllene), the mythological birthplace of Hermes (also called Mount Ziria). ... Echo and Narcissus, by John William Waterhouse. ... In Greek mythology, Nomia was a naiad. ... In Greek mythology, Oenone (wine woman) was the first wife of Paris. ... In Greek mythology, Pitys (pine) was a nymph who was pursued by Pan. ... THE TITLE IS WRONG MUST BE = Pleiades (Greek Mythology) Greek myths is not the only or more important for be considered as whole. ... In Greek mythology, Celaeno referred to several different beings. ... Alcyone was a Greek demi-goddess, sometimes regarded as one of the Pleiades. ... The Pleiade, or Oceanid, Electra of Greek mythology was one of the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione. ... Maia, in Greek mythology, is the eldest of the Pleiades, the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione. ... In Greek mythology, Sterope (Greek Στεροπη), also called Asterope, was one of the seven Pleiades (the daughters of Atlas and Pleione, born to them at Cyllene in Arcadia) and the wife of Oenomaus (or, according to some accounts, his mother by Ares). ... In Greek mythology, Taygete (Greek: Ταϋγέτη, in Modern Greek Taygeti, Taigeti) was a nymph, one of the Pleiades according to Apollodorus (3. ... In Greek mythology, several unrelated women went by the name Merope (bee-mask later reinterpreted as honey-like or eloquent), which may, therefore, have denoted a position in the cult of the Great Mother rather than a mere individuals name: Merope, one of the Heliades Merope, foster mother of...


Hilda Doolittle published her first poems under the name H. D. Imagiste (the 'e' was meant to suggest the French poets to whom Imagism owed such a debt). Later, she dropped the artificial surname and wrote as just plain 'H. D.'. H.D. in the mid 1910s Hilda Doolittle (September 10, 1886 - September 27, 1961), better known by the pen name H.D., was an American poet, novelist and memoirist. ...


Oread, one of her earliest and best-known poems, which was first published in the 1915 anthology, serves to illustrate this early style well.


The title Oread was added after the poem was first written, to suggest that a Nymph was ordering up the sea...

Oread
Whirl up, sea—
Whirl your pointed pines.
Splash your great pines
On our rocks.
Hurl your green over us—
Cover us with your pools of fir.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Oread Daily: 2006-09-03 (8336 words)
The Oread Daily provides progressive news and analysis from around the US and the world.
The Oread Daily has since summer 2007 posted a series of articles meant to be of interest to everyday Americans and not just a bunch of lefties.
Thanks for reading the Oread Daily these many years...and if it ever returns, you'll be the first to know.
On "Oread" (2826 words)
The center of "Oread," as the title indicates, is not the sea; it is instead the perceptions and emotions of an oread, a nymph of the mountains, as she regards the sea aroused in a whirling passion of intensity.
The oread is the land and consequently identifies with the shore and addresses the waves as "you," As the spirit of the land, she understandably perceives her fluid opposite in her own terms: waves are pointed pines that whirl up, crash, and make pools of fir.
The oread, a nymph of the forest, demands of the sea an action which rises in crescendo from "whirl" to "splash" to "hurl," then settles into senescence with "cover." It is sexual, suicidal, and it connects the speaker to the sea in an intense, intimate manner.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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