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Encyclopedia > Orders of magnitude (time)
Orders of
magnitude (time)

in E notation

Planck time
1 E-25 s
1 E-24 s
1 E-21 s
1 E-18 s
1 E-17 s
1 E-16 s
1 E-15 s
1 E-14 s
1 E-13 s
1 E-12 s
1 E-11 s
1 E-10 s
1 E-9 s
1 E-8 s
1 E-7 s
1 E-6 s
1 E-5 s
1 E-4 s
1 E-3 s
1 E-2 s
1 E-1 s Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Scientific notation, also known as standard form, is a notation for writing numbers that is often used by scientists and mathematicians to make it easier to write large and small numbers. ... In physics, the Planck time (tP), is the unit of time in the system of natural units known as Planck units. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−24 seconds (1 yoctosecond) and lower See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−24 seconds and 10−21 seconds (1 yoctosecond to 1 zeptosecond) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10-21 seconds and 10-20 seconds (1 zeptosecond to 10 zeptoseconds) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−18 seconds and 10−15 seconds (1 attosecond and 1 femtoseconds) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10-17 seconds and 10-16 seconds (10 attoseconds and 100 attoseconds) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10-16 seconds and 10-15 seconds (100 attoseconds and 1 femtosecond) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−15 seconds and 10−12 seconds (1 femtosecond and 1 picosecond). ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10-14 seconds and 10-13 seconds (10 femtoseconds and 100 femtoseconds) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10-13 seconds and 10-12 seconds (100 femtoseconds and 1 picosecond) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−12 seconds and 10−11 seconds (1 picosecond and 10 picoseconds) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times, this page lists times between 10-11 seconds and 10-10 seconds (10 picosecond and 100 picoseconds) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times, this page lists times between 10-10 seconds and 10-9 seconds (100 picosecond and 1 nanosecond) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10-9 seconds and 10-8 seconds (1 nanosecond and 10 nanoseconds) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−8 seconds and 10−7 seconds (10 to 100 nanoseconds). ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−7 seconds and 10−6 seconds (0. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10-6 seconds and 10-5 seconds (1. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−5 seconds and 10−4 seconds (10 to 100 microseconds). ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10-4 seconds and 10-3 seconds (0. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−3 seconds and 10−2 seconds (1. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−2 seconds and 10−1 seconds (10 to 100 milliseconds). ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 10−1 seconds and 100 seconds (0. ...

1 E0 s
1 E1 s
1 E2 s
1 E3 s
1 E4 s
1 E5 s
1 E6 s
1 E7 s
1 E8 s
1 E9 s
1 E10 s
1 E11 s
1 E12 s
1 E13 s
1 E14 s
1 E15 s
1 E16 s
1 E17 s
1 E18 s
1 E19 s and more To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 100 seconds and 101 seconds (1 to 10 seconds). ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times, this page lists times between 101 seconds and 102 seconds (10 to 100 seconds). ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 102 seconds and 103 seconds (100 seconds to 16. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 103 seconds (a kilosecond) and 104 seconds (16. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 104 seconds and 105 seconds (2. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 105 seconds and 106 seconds (27. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 106 seconds (a megasecond) and 107 seconds (11. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 116 days and 1157 days or 3. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 3. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 109 seconds (a gigasecond) and 1010 seconds (32 years and 320 years). ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 1010 seconds and 1011 seconds (320 years and 3200 years). ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 1011 seconds and 1012 seconds (3,200 years and 32,000 years) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 32 000 years and 320 000 years (1012 seconds—a terasecond—and 1013 seconds). ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 320 000 years and 3 200 000 years (1013 seconds and 1014 seconds) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 3. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 1015 seconds (a petasecond) and 1016 seconds (32 million years and 320 million years) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 1016 seconds (320 million years) and 1017 seconds (3200 million years). ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 1017 seconds and 1018 seconds (3. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 1018 seconds (also known as an exasecond) and 1019 seconds (32 000 million years and 320 000 million years) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different times, this page lists times longer than 1019 seconds (317 billion years) See also times of other orders of magnitude. ...

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Contents

An order of magnitude is the class of scale or magnitude of any amount, where each class contains values of a fixed ratio to the class preceding it. ... Categories: Orders of magnitude (area) ... To help compare different orders of magnitude, the following list describes various angular velocity levels between 1×10−7 rad·s−1 and 1×107 rad·s−1. ... This is a list of orders of magnitude for data (or information), measured in bits. ... Conversion Calculator for Units of Density PICKLES Category: ... To help compare different orders of magnitude, the following list describes various frequencies. ... Categories: | ... To help compare different orders of magnitude, the following list describes various mass levels between 10−36 kg and 1053 kg. ... This list compares various sizes of positive numbers, including counts of things, dimensionless numbers and probabilities. ... This page lists examples of the power in watts produced by various different sources of energy. ... 1 At earth mean sea level. ... This is a table of specific energy densities by magnitude. ... This is a table of specific heat capacities by magnitude. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude, the following list describes various speed levels between 1. ... Circumstances where water naturally occurs in liquid form are shown in light grey. ... The pages linked in the right-hand column contain lists of volumes that are of the same order of magnitude (power of ten). ... Conversion of units refers to conversion factors between different units of measurement for the same quantity. ... The definition, agreement and practical use of units of measurement have played a crucial role in human endeavour from early ages up to this day. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The SI system of units defines seven SI base units: physical units defined by an operational definition. ... SI derived units are part of the SI system of measurement units and are derived from the seven SI base units. ... An SI prefix (also known as a metric prefix) is a name or associated symbol that precedes a unit of measure (or its symbol) to form a decimal multiple or submultiple. ... In physics, Planck units are physical units of measurement defined exclusively in terms of the five universal physical constants shown in the table below in such a manner that all of these physical constants take on the numerical value of one when expressed in terms of these units. ...

Seconds

Orders of magnitude (time)
Factor (s) Multiple Symbol Definition Comparative examples & common units Orders of magnitude
10−44 tP Planck time is the unit of time of the natural units system known as Planck units.[1] The shortest or earliest meaningful interval of time that theoretical physics can describe and consequently the youngest the known universe can be measured. ≈ 5.4×10−44 s. 10−44 s
10−24 1 yoctosecond ys[2] Yoctosecond, (yocto + second), is one quadrillionth (in the long scale) or one septillionth (in the short scale) of a second. 0.3 ys: mean life of the W and Z bosons.[citation needed]
1 ys: time for top quark decay.[citation needed]
91 ys: half-life of lithium-4.[citation needed]
1 ys and less, 10 ys, 100 ys
10−21 1 zeptosecond zs Zeptosecond, (zepto + second), is one trillionth of one billionth of one second. 7 zs: half-life of helium-9's outer neutron in the second nuclear halo.
17 zs: approximate period of electromagnetic radiation at the boundary between gamma rays and X-rays.
300 zs: approximate typical cycle time of X-rays, on the boundary between hard and soft X-rays
1 zs, 10 zs, 100 zs
10−18 1 attosecond 100 attoseconds: shortest measured period of time.[3][4] 1 as, 10 as, 100 as
10−15 1 femtosecond fs cycle time for 390 nanometre light, transition from visible light to ultraviolet 1 fs, 10 fs, 100 fs
10−12 1 picosecond half-life of a bottom quark 1 ps, 10 ps, 100 ps
10−9 1 nanosecond ns 1 ns: Time to execute one instruction in a personal computer
1 ns: Light travels 12 inches (30 cm)
1,000,000,000 nanoseconds: 1 second
1 ns, 10 ns, 100 ns
10−6 1 microsecond µs & µsec sometimes abbreviated as "µs" (from µ and second) or "µsec" 1 µs, 10 µs, 100 µs
10−3 1 millisecond ms blink of an eye ~ 50 to 80 ms 1 ms, 10 ms, 100 ms
100 1 second s 60 s: 1 minute 1 s, 10 s, 100 s
103 1 kilosecond
(16.7 minutes)
ks 3.6 ks: 3600 s or 1 hour
86.4 ks: 86 400 s or 1 day
604.8 ks: 1 week
103 s, 104 s, 105 s
106 1 megasecond
(11.6 days)
Ms month = 2.6 x 106 s
year = 31.6 Ms = 107.50 s ≈ π x 107 s
106 s, 107 s, 108 s
109 1 gigasecond
(32 years)
Gs century = 3.16 Gs ≈ π×109 s
millennium = 31.6 Gs ≈ π×1010 s
109 s, 1010 s, 1011 s
1012 1 terasecond
(32 000 years)
Ts eon = 31.6 Ts ≈ π×1013 s 1012 s, 1013 s, 1014 s
1015 1 petasecond
(32 million years)
aeon = 31.6 Ps ≈ π×1016 s
4.3×1017 s ≈ 13.7 billion years, the approximate age of the universe
1015 s, 1016 s, 1017 s
1018 1 exasecond
(32 billion years)
1018 s, 1019 s, 1020 s
1021 1 zettasecond
(32 trillion years)
1021 s, 1022 s, 1023 s
1024 1 yottasecond
(32 quadrillion years)
1024 s, 1025 s, 1026 s and more

Years

Orders of magnitude (time)
Factor (a) Multiple common units orders of magnitude
10−50 Planck time, the shortest physically meaningful interval of time ≈ 1.71×10−50 a 10−50 a
10−24 1 yoctoannum -- 1 ya and less, 10 ya, 100 ya
10−21 1 zeptoannum -- 1 za, 10 za, 100 za
10−18 1 attoannum -- 1 aa, 10 aa, 100 aa
10−15 1 femtoannum -- 1 fa, 10 fa, 100 fa
10−12 1 picoannum -- 1 pa, 10 pa, 100 pa
10−9 1 nanoannum 1 second = 3.17 × 10-8 a ≈ 10-7.50 a 1 na, 10 na, 100 na
10−6 1 microannum 1 minute = 1.90 × 10-6 a
1 hour = 1.40 × 10-4 a
1 ua, 10 ua, 100 ua
10−3 1 milliannum 1 day = 2.73 × 10-3 a
1 week = 1.91 × 10-2 a
1 ma, 10 ma, 100 ma
100 1 annum year = 1 annum
decade = 10 anna
century = 100 anna
1 a, 10 a, 100 a
103 1 kiloannum millennium = 1000 anna 103 a, 104 a, 105 a
106 1 megaannum epoch = 1,000,000 anna 106 a, 107 a, 108 a
109 1 gigaannum aeon = 1,000,000,000 anna
1.37×1010 a ≈ 13.7 billion years, the approximate age of the universe
109 a, 1010 a, 1011 a
1012 1 teraannum --- 1012 a, 1013 a, 1014 a
1015 1 petaannum --- 1015 a, 1016 a, 1017 a
1018 1 exaannum -- 1018 a, 1019 a, 1020 a
1021 1 zettaannum -- 1021 a, 1022 a, 1023 a
1024 1 yottaannum -- 1024 a, 1025 a, 1026 and more


The pages linked in the right-hand column contain lists of times that are of the same order of magnitude (power of ten). Rows in the table represent increasing powers of a thousand (3 orders of magnitude). An order of magnitude is the class of scale or magnitude of any amount, where each class contains values of a fixed ratio to the class preceding it. ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Annum is a Latin noun meaning year. ... An order of magnitude is the class of scale or magnitude of any amount, where each class contains values of a fixed ratio to the class preceding it. ... In physics, the Planck time (tP), is the unit of time in the system of natural units known as Planck units. ... Annum is a Latin noun meaning year. ... An order of magnitude is the class of scale or magnitude of any amount, where each class contains values of a fixed ratio to the class preceding it. ...


Conversion from year to second is year × 31 557 600 using the Julian year. Conversion from log10 year to log10 second is approximately log10 year + 7.50. Example conversion; 1 year = 100 year = 100 + 7.50 seconds = 100.50 + 7s = 3.16 * 107s. Conversion of units refers to conversion factors between different units of measurement for the same quantity. ... A year (from Old English gÄ“r) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ...


See also

Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... The geologic time scale is used by geologists and other scientists to describe the timing and relationships between events that have occurred during the history of the Earth. ... This is a table of time periods and frequencies relevant to human beings. ... A logarithmic timeline, based on logarithmic scale, was developed by Heinz von Foerster, the philosopher and physicist. ... Life on Earth  â€¢  â€¢  | Axis scale: millions of years ago. ... A graphical timeline is available here: Graphical timeline of the Big Bang This box:      This timeline of the Big Bang describes the events that have occurred and will occur according to the scientific theory of the Big Bang, using the cosmological time parameter of comoving coordinates. ... The definition, agreement and practical use of units of measurement have played a crucial role in human endeavour from early ages up to this day. ... In physics, Planck units are physical units of measurement defined exclusively in terms of the five universal physical constants shown in the table below in such a manner that all of these physical constants take on the numerical value of one when expressed in terms of these units. ... This article is about the unit of time. ... Annum is a Latin noun meaning year. ...

External links

  • Exploring Time from Planck time to the lifespan of the universe

In physics, the Planck time (tP), is the unit of time in the system of natural units known as Planck units. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Wikipedia contributors. Planck time. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. December 7, 2007, 05:55 UTC. Available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Planck_time&oldid=176315682. Accessed December 19, 2007.
  2. ^ The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000. Available at: http://www.bartleby.com/61/21/Y0022100.html. Accessed December 19, 2007. note: abbr. ys or ysec
  3. ^ Shortest time interval measured. BBC News (25 February 2004).
  4. ^ Fastest view of molecular motion. BBC News (4 March 2006).
A tropical year is the length of time that the Sun, as viewed from the Earth, takes to return to the same position along the ecliptic (its path among the stars on the celestial sphere). ... For other uses, see Equinox (disambiguation). ... “Summer solstice” redirects here. ... This article is about days of the week. ... This article details various mathematical algorithms to calculate the day of the week for any particular date in the past or future. ... The days of the year are sometimes designated letters A, B, C, D, E, F and G in a cycle of 7 as an aid for finding the day of week of a given calendar date and in calculating Easter. ... The International Commission on Stratigraphy concerns itself with stratigraphy on a global scale. ... // For other uses, see time scale. ... Dating material drawn from the archaeological record can made by a direct study of a artifact or may be deduced by association with materials found in the context the item is drawn from or inferred by its point of discovery in the sequence relative to datable contexts. ... The precession of Earths axis of rotation with respect to inertial space is also called the precession of the equinoxes. ... Sidereal time is time measured by the apparent diurnal motion of the vernal equinox, which is very close to, but not identical with, the motion of stars. ... // Galactic time NGC 4414, a typical spiral galaxy alike our Milky Way Galactic time, not to confuse with siderial time, is the time that is described by our spin relative to the center of the galaxy. ... The Furlong/Firkin/Fortnight (FFF) system is a set of units that uses impractical and outdated measurements. ... A fortnight is a unit of time equal to two weeks: that is 14 days, or literally 14 nights. ... The term jiffy (or jiffie) is used in different applications for various different short periods of time, usually 1/60 of a second. ... Lustrum was a sacrifice for expiation and purification offered by one of the censors of Rome in name of the Roman people at the close of the taking of the census, and which took place after a period of five years, so that the name came to denote a period... A saeculum is a length of time roughly equal to the lifetime of a person, or about 90 years. ... A shake is an informal unit of time equal to 10 nanoseconds, or 10-8 seconds. ... A tide is an obsolete or archaic term for time, period or season, such as eventide, shrovetide, Eastertide, etc. ... For the novel by Michael Crichton, see Timeline (novel). ... A duration is an amount of time or a particular time interval. ... // Definition and history Psychologists have investigated mental chronometry for over 100 years. ... The time value of money is the premise that an investor prefers to receive a payment of a fixed amount of money today, rather than an equal amount in the future, all else being equal. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Orders of magnitude (time) (2262 words)
An order of magnitude is the class of scale or magnitude of any amount, where each class contains values of a fixed ratio to the class preceding it.
A yoctosecond is an SI unit of time equal to one septillionth (10-24) of a second.
Orders of magnitude (time) The geologic timescale is used by geologists and other scientists to describe the timing and relationships between events that have occured during the history of the Earth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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