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Encyclopedia > Order of the Thistle
James VII ordained the modern Order.
James VII ordained the modern Order.

The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle is an order of chivalry associated with Scotland. While its original date of foundation is unknown, James VI1 (also King of England as James I1) instituted the modern Order in 1687. The Order consists of the Sovereign and sixteen Knights and Ladies, as well as certain "extra" knights (members of the British Royal Family and foreign monarchs). The Sovereign alone grants membership of the Order; he or she is not advised by the Government, as occurs with most other Orders. king james ii of england This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... king james ii of england This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... See also Orders of Chivalry in the British honours system After the failure of the crusades, the crusading military orders became idealized and romanticized, resulting in the late medieval notion of chivalry, as reflected in the Arthurian romances of the time. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 6 February 1685. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is a group of people closely related to the British monarch. ...


The Order's primary emblem is the thistle, the national flower of Scotland. The motto is Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin for "No one provokes me with impunity"); the same motto also appears on the Scottish Royal Arms and on some pound coins. The patron saint of the Order is St Andrew. Species See text Thistles are perennial flowering plants of the genus Cirsium. ... Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom for use in Scotland Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No-one provokes me with impunity) is the royal Scottish motto, used historically for the Kingdom of Scotland where it appeared on the Royal Arms of Scotland. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom for general purpose. ... This article discusses the British One Pound circulating coin issued since 1983, only. ... Saint Andrew (Greek: Andreas, manly), called in the Orthodox tradition Protocletos, or the First-called, is a Christian Apostle, brother of Saint Peter. ...


Most British orders of chivalry cover the entire kingdom, but the three most exalted ones each pertain to one constituent nation only. The Order of the Thistle, which pertains to Scotland, is the second-most senior in precedence. Its equivalent in England, The Most Noble Order of the Garter, is the oldest documented order of chivalry in the United Kingdom, dating to the middle fourteenth century. In 1783 an Irish equivalent, The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick, was founded; since the independence of the greater part of Ireland the Order has fallen dormant (its last surviving knight died in 1974). Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages None official English de facto Capital None official London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001... The Garter is the most recognizable insignia of the Order of the Garter. ... The Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick is an order of chivalry associated with Ireland. ...

Contents


History

The insignia of a Knight of The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle.
The insignia of a Knight of The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle.

The original date of the Order's foundation is unknown. According to legend, Achaius, King of Scots, while engaged in battle with the Saxon King Athelstan, saw in the heavens the cross of St Andrew. After he won the battle, Achaius is said to have established the Order of the Thistle, dedicating it to the saint, in 787. The tale is not credible, not only because of the unlikeliness of the alleged miracle, but also because the two individuals purported to have fought each other did not even reign during the same century. Another story states that Achaius founded the Order in 809 to commemorate an alliance with the Emperor Charlemagne, which is a little less implausible given the Scottish bodyguards employed by Charlemagne. There is, in addition, a tradition that it was instituted, or re-instituted, on the battlefield by Robert I at Bannockburn. Many credit James III, who adopted the thistle as the royal plant badge and issued coins depicting thistles, with founding the Order during the fifteenth century. Others state that James V, who had been admitted to the Order of the Garter in England, the Order of St Michael in France and the Order of the Golden Fleece in the Holy Roman Empire, established the Order of the Thistle in 1540 because he was embarrassed that he had no honour to confer on foreign monarchs. He allegedly conferred membership of the "Order of the Burr or Thissil" on Francis I, King of France. Image File history File links Order_of_the_ThistleInsignia. ... Image File history File links Order_of_the_ThistleInsignia. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Athelstan or Æþelstan (c. ... Charlemagne (742 or 747 – 28 January 814) (also Charles the Great[1]; from Latin, Carolus Magnus or Karolus Magnus), son of King Pippin the Short and Bertrada of Laon, was the king of the Franks from 768 to 814 and king of the Lombards from 774 to 814. ... Charlemagne (742 or 747 – 28 January 814) (also Charles the Great[1]; from Latin, Carolus Magnus or Karolus Magnus), son of King Pippin the Short and Bertrada of Laon, was the king of the Franks from 768 to 814 and king of the Lombards from 774 to 814. ... Robert I, (Roibert a Briuis in medieval Gaelic, Raibeart Bruis in modern Scottish Gaelic and Robert de Brus in Norman French), usually known in modern English today as Robert the Bruce (July 11, 1274 – June 7, 1329), was King of Scotland (1306 – 1329). ... Telfords circular roadbridge over the Bannock Burn Bannockburn is a village immediately south of the city of Stirling in Scotland. ... James III of Scotland (1451/ 1452 – June 11, 1488), son of James II and Mary of Gueldres, created Duke of Rothesay at birth, king of Scotland from 1460 to 1488. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... James V (April 10, 1512 – December 14, 1542) was king of Scotland (September 9, 1513 – December 14, 1542). ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages None official English de facto Capital None official London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001... This page is about the Germanic empire. ... Francis I (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – July 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (French: le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ...


Some Scottish order of chivalry definitely existed during the sixteenth century, but had lapsed by its conclusion. James VI1 issued letters patent "reviving and restoring the Order of the Thistle to its full glory, lustre and magnificency" in 1687. Eight knights, out of a maximum of twelve, were appointed, but the King was deposed in 1688. His successors, the joint monarchs William and Mary, did not make any further appointments to the Order, which consequently fell into desuetude. In 1703, however, Anne once again revived the Order of the Thistle, which survives to this day. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal document which is an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as a corporation. ... The phrase William and Mary usually refers to the joint sovereignty over the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland of King William III and his wife Queen Mary II. Their joint reign began in February, 1689, when they were called to the throne by Parliament, replacing James II... Anne Stuart Oldenburg (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702. ...


Composition

The Kings of Scotland—later the Kings of Great Britain and of the United Kingdom—have served as Sovereigns of the Order. When James VII revived the Order, the statutes stated that the Order would "consist of the Sovereign and twelve Knights-Brethren in allusion to the Blessed Saviour and his Twelve Apostles." In 1827, George IV augmented the Order to sixteen members. Women (other than Queens regnant) were originally excluded from the Order; Elizabeth II, however, allowed the admission of Ladies of the Thistle in 1987. Jesus (8-2 BC/BCE– 29-36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... The Twelve Apostles (in Koine Greek απόστολος apostolos [1], someone sent forth/sent out, an emissary) were probably Galilean Jewish men (10 names are Aramaic, 4 names are Greek) chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth by Jesus of Nazareth to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born on 21 April 1926, is Queen of sixteen independent nations known as the Commonwealth Realms. ...


From time to time, individuals may be admitted to the Order by special statutes. Such members are known as "Extra Knights" and do not count towards the sixteen-member limit. Members of the British Royal Family are normally admitted through this procedure; the first to be so admitted was a younger son of George III, HRH The Prince William Henry (later William IV). Olav V, King of Norway, the first foreigner to be admitted to the Order, was also admitted by special statute in 1962. George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738–29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... William IV (William Henry) (21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... His Majesty King Olav V (July 2, 1903 - January 17, 1991) reigned as King of Norway from 1957 to 1991. ...


The Sovereign has historically had the power to choose Knights and Ladies of the Order. From the eighteenth century onwards, the Sovereign made his or her choices upon the advice of the Government. George VI felt that the Orders of the Garter and the Thistle had been used only for political patronage, rather than to reward actual merit. Therefore, with the agreement of the Prime Minister (Clement Attlee) and the Leader of the Opposition (Winston Churchill) in 1946, the Order of the Thistle returned to the personal gift of the Sovereign. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George Windsor) (14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883–8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. ...


Knights and Ladies of the Thistle may also be admitted to the Order of the Garter. Formerly, many, but not all, Knights elevated to the senior Order would resign from the Order of the Thistle. The first to resign from the Order of the Thistle was John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll in 1710; the last to take such an action was Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland in 1872. Knights and Ladies of the Thistle may also be deprived of their knighthoods. The only individual to have suffered such a fate was John Erskine, 6th Earl of Mar who lost both the knighthood and the earldom after participating in the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715. John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll and 1st Duke of Greenwich (October 10, 1678 - October 4, 1743) was a Scottish soldier and nobleman. ... Thomas Dundas, 2nd Earl of Zetland, KG (February 5, 1795) - (May 6, 1873) was a British politician and nobleman. ... John Erskine, 6th (or 11th) Earl of Mar (1675 - May, 1732), Scottish Jacobite, was the eldest son of Charles, the 5th earl (1650-1689), from whom he inherited estates which were heavily loaded with debt. ... This article is not about the Jacobite Orthodox Church, nor is it about Jacobinism or the earlier Jacobean period. ...


The Order has four officers: the Dean, the Chancellor, the Usher, the King of Arms and the Secretary. The Dean is normally a cleric of the Church of Scotland. The Chancellor is normally one of the knights, though not necessarily the most senior. The Usher of the Order is the Gentleman Usher of the Green Rod (unlike his Garter equivalent, the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, he does not have another function assisting the House of Lords). The King of Arms of the Order, responsible for heraldry, is the Lord Lyon King of Arms, the head of Scottish Heraldry. The Lord Lyon often—but not invariably—also serves as the Secretary. The Dean of the Thistle is an office of the Order of the Thistle, established in 1687. ... The Gentleman Usher of the Green Rod is the Usher to the Order of the Thistle, established in 1687. ... The Church of Scotland (C of S, also known informally as The Kirk; until the 17th century officially the Kirk of Scotland) is the Christian national church of Scotland. ... The Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, generally shortened to just Black Rod, is an official of a figure in the parliaments of a number of Commonwealth countries. ... Heraldry is the science and art of designing, displaying, describing and recording coats of arms and badges, as well as the formal ceremonies and laws that regulate the use and inheritance of arms. ... Arms of the Office of the Lord Lyon The Lord Lyon King of Arms, the head of Lyon Court, is the most junior of the Great Officers of State in Scotland and is the Scottish official with responsibility for regulating heraldry in that kingdom, issuing new grants of arms, and...


Vestments and accoutrements

For the Order's great occasions, such as its annual service each June or July, as well for coronations, the Knights and Ladies wear an elaborate costume: British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ...

  • The mantle is a green robe worn over their suits or military uniforms. The mantle is lined with white taffeta; it is tied with green and gold tassels. On the left shoulder of the mantle, the star of the Order (see below) is depicted.
  • The hat is made of black velvet and is plumed with white osprey feathers.
  • The collar is made of gold and depicts thistles and sprigs of rue. It is worn over the mantle.
  • The St Andrew, also called the badge-appendant, is worn suspended from the collar. It comprises a gold enamelled depiction of St Andrew, wearing a green gown and purple coat, holding a white saltire. Gold rays are shown emanating from St Andrew's head.

Aside from these special occasions, however, much simpler insignia are used whenever a member of the Order attends an event at which decorations are worn. Binomial name Pandion haliaetus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is a medium large raptor which is a specialist fish-eater with a worldwide distribution. ... Species Between 8-40 species, including: Ruta angustifolia- Egyptian Rue Ruta chalepensis- Fringed Rue Ruta corsica- Corsican Rue Ruta graveolens- Common Rue Ruta montana- Mountain Rue Rue (Ruta) is a genus of strongly scented evergreen subshrubs 20-60 cm tall, in the family Rutaceae, native to the Mediterranean region, Macaronesia...

  • The star of the Order consists of a silver St Andrew's saltire, with clusters of rays between the arms thereof. In the centre is depicted a green circle bearing the motto of the Order in gold majuscules; within the circle, there is depicted a thistle on a gold field. It is worn pinned to the left breast. (Since the Order of the Thistle is the second-most senior chivalric order in the UK, a member will wear its star above that of other orders to which he or she belongs, except that of the Order of the Garter; up to four orders' stars may be worn.)
  • The broad riband is a dark green sash worn across the body, from the left shoulder to the right hip.
  • At the right hip of the Riband, the badge of the Order is attached. On the obverse, the badge depicts St Andrew in the same form as the star. On the reverse, it depicts a thistle, on a green ground and surrounded by the Order's motto.

However, on certain "collar days" designated by the Sovereign, members attending formal events may wear the Order's collar over their military uniform, formal wear, or other costume. They will then substitute the broad riband of another order to which they belong (if any), since the Order of the Thistle is represented by the collar.


Upon the death of a Knight or Lady, the insignia must be returned to the Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood. The badge and star are returned personally to the Sovereign by the nearest relative of the deceased.


Officers of the Order also wear green robes. The Gentleman Usher of the Green Rod also bears, as the title of his office suggests, a green rod. Lord Lyon wears a tabard depicting the Royal Arms. A tabard worn over armour A tabard is a short coat, either sleeveless, or with short sleeves or shoulder pieces, emblazoned on the front and back with the arms of the sovereign, and worn, as their distinctive garment, by heralds and pursuivants. ...


Chapel

When James VII revived the Order in 1687, he directed that the Abbey Church at the Palace of Holyroodhouse be converted to a Chapel for the Order of the Thistle, perhaps copying the idea from the Order of the Garter (whose chapel is located in Windsor Castle). James VII, however, was deposed by 1688; the Chapel, meanwhile, had been destroyed during riots. The Order did not have a Chapel until 1911, when one was added onto St Giles High Kirk in Edinburgh. Each year, the Sovereign resides at the Palace of Holyroodhouse for a week in June or July; during the visit, a service for the Order is held. Any new Knights or Ladies are installed at annual services. A 19th century view of Holyrood Palace from Calton Hill. ... Windsor Castle: The Round Tower or keep dominating the castle, as seen from the River Thames. ... St Giles Cathedral A prominent feature of the Edinburgh skyline, St Giles Cathedral decorates the midpoint of the Royal Mile with its rounded hollow-crown tower. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ...


Each member of the Order, including the Sovereign, is allotted a stall in the choir of the Chapel, above which his or her heraldic devices are displayed. Perched on the pinnacle of a knight's stall is his helm, decorated with a mantling and topped by his crest. Under the laws of heraldry, women other than monarchs do not bear helms or crests; instead, the coronet appropriate to the Lady's rank is used (see coronet). Unlike other British Orders, the armorial banners of Knights and Ladies of the Thistle are not hung in the chapel. The Thistle Chapel does, however, bear the arms of members living and deceased on stall plates. These pieces of brass are affixed to the back of the stall and display its occupant's name, arms, and date of admission into the Order. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Coin showing a coronet A coronet is a small crown consisting of ornaments fixed on a metal ring. ... Armory is the study of coats of arms. ... A banner is a flag or other piece of cloth bearing a symbol, logo, slogan or other message. ...


Upon the death of a Knight, helm, mantling, crest (or coronet or crown) and sword are taken down. The stall plates, however, are not removed; rather, they remain permanently affixed somewhere about the stall, so that the stalls of the chapel are festooned with a colourful record of the Order's Knights (and now Ladies) since 1911.


Precedence and privileges

The Royal arms encircled by the circlet and collar of the Order. The badge of the Order is depicted suspended from the collar. Knights and Ladies of the Thistle may also use the circlet, collar and badge on their arms.
The Royal arms encircled by the circlet and collar of the Order. The badge of the Order is depicted suspended from the collar. Knights and Ladies of the Thistle may also use the circlet, collar and badge on their arms.

Knights and Ladies of the Thistle are assigned positions in the order of precedence, ranking above all others of knightly rank, and above baronets. Wives, sons, daughters and daughters-in-law of Knights of the Thistle also feature on the order of precedence; relatives of Ladies of the Thistle, however, are not assigned any special precedence. (Generally, individuals can derive precedence from their fathers or husbands, but not from their mothers or wives.) (See order of precedence in Scotland for the exact positions.) Image File history File links Uploaded by Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason. ... Image File history File links Uploaded by Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason. ... The Order of precedence in Scotland was fixed by Royal Warrant in 1905. ...


Knights of the Thistle prefix "Sir," and Ladies prefix "Lady," to their forenames. Wives of Knights may prefix "Lady" to their surnames, but no equivalent privilege exists for husbands of Ladies. Such forms are not used by peers and princes, except when the names of the former are written out in their fullest forms.


Knights and Ladies use the post-nominal letters "KT" and "LT," respectively. When an individual is entitled to use multiple post-nominal letters, "KT" or "LT" appears before all others, except "Bt" or "Btss" (Baronet or Baronetess), "VC" (Victoria Cross), "GC" (George Cross) and "KG" or "LG" (Knight or Lady of the Garter). A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt), is the holder of an hereditary title awarded by the British Crown, known as a baronetcy. ... A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt), is the holder of an hereditary title awarded by the British Crown, known as a baronetcy. ... Victoria Cross medal, ribbon, and bar. ... George Cross The George Cross (GC) is the highest Commonwealth decoration awarded for acts of conspicuous gallantry not in the face of the enemy and is equal to the Victoria Cross. ...


Knights and Ladies may encircle their arms with the circlet (a green circle bearing the Order's motto) and the collar of the Order; the former is shown either outside or on top of the latter. The badge is depicted suspended from the collar. The Royal Arms depict the circlet, superimposed over the collar, of the Thistle only in Scotland; they show the Garter in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.


Knights and Ladies are also entitled to receive heraldic supporters. This high privilege is only shared by members of the Royal Family, peers, Knights and Ladies of the Garter, and Knights and Dames Grand Cross and Knights Grand Commanders of the junior orders. In heraldry, supporters are figures placed on either side of the shield and depicted holding it up. ...


Current members and officers

Sovereign

Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born on 21 April 1926, is Queen of sixteen independent nations known as the Commonwealth Realms. ...

Knights and Ladies Companion

Francis David Charteris, 12th Earl of Wemyss and 8th Earl of March (b 19 January 1912) succeeded his grandfather in 1937, and was made a Knight of the Thistle in 1966. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Sir Walter Francis John Montagu Douglas Scott, 9th Duke of Buccleuch, (b. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Andrew Douglas Alexander Thomas Bruce, 11th Earl of Elgin and 15th Earl of Kincardine, KT, CD (born 17 February 1924), styled Lord Bruce before 1968, is a Scottish nobleman. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... George Morgan Thomson, Baron Thomson of Monifieth, KT PC, (16 January 1921 - ) is a former journalist and Labour politician. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... David George Coke Patrick Ogilvy, 8th (or 13th) Earl of Airlie was born on 17 May 1926. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Sir Iain Mark Tennant,KT (b 11 March 1919) is a Scottish businessman. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... The Right Honourable John Campbell Arbuthnott, 16th Viscount of Arbuthnott, KT, CBE, DSC, FRSE, FRICS (born 26 October 1924) is the son of Robert Keith Arbuthnott, 15th Viscount of Arbuthnott. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Robert Alexander Lindsay (b. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Lady Marion Anne Fraser, LT (born 17 October 1932) is a figure of note in Scotland, particularly in church and music circles. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Norman Somerville Macfarlane, Baron Macfarlane of Bearsden 5 March 1926 - ) is a Scottish industrialist and Conservative member of the House of Lords. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... James Peter Hymers Mackay, Baron Mackay of Clashfern, KT, PC (born July 2, 1927), is a Scottish lawyer and former Lord Chancellor (1987 - 1997). ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... The Right Honourable David Clive Wilson, Baron Wilson of Tillyorn, KT, GCMG (born 14 February 1935) was a British administrator, diplomat and Sinologist. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Stewart Ross Sutherland, Baron Sutherland of Houndwood, KT, FRSE, FBA (born February 25, 1941) is a Scottish academic and public servant. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Sir William Eric Kinloch Anderson, KT (born 27 May 1936) is provost of Eton College. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... David Martin Scott Steel, Baron Steel of Aikwood KT PC KBE (born March 31, 1938) is a British and Scottish politician and a Liberal Democrat member of the UK House of Lords. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... George Robertson pictured at The Pentagon in June 2001 The Right Honourable George Islay MacNeill Robertson, Baron Robertson of Port Ellen, KT, GCMG, FRSA, PC (born 12 April 1946, in Port Ellen, Isle of Islay, Scotland) was the Secretary-General of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, between October 1999 and... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ...

Supernumerary Knights and Ladies

The Duke of Edinburgh The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, KG, KT, OM, GBE, AC, QSO, PC (United Kingdom, Canada), GCL (Philip Mountbatten, formerly Prince Philippos of Greece and Denmark) (born 10 June 1921) is the husband of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... The Prince of Wales The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor) (born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Princess Anne visits the USNS Comfort on July 11, 2002 while the ship was docked in Southampton, England The Princess Anne, Princess Royal, (Anne Elizabeth Alice Louise Laurence, formerly Phillips, née Windsor, later Mountbatten-Windsor, (born August 15, 1950)), is a member of the British Royal Family and the... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ...

Officers

The Dean of the Thistle is an office of the Order of the Thistle, established in 1687. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Sir Walter Francis John Montagu Douglas Scott, 9th Duke of Buccleuch, (b. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... The Gentleman Usher of the Green Rod is the Usher to the Order of the Thistle, established in 1687. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... King of Arms is the title given to a kingdoms chief heralds. ... Robin Blair, appointed February 2001, here proclaiming the Dissolution of Parliament in May 2001 Robin Orr Blair LVO WS, Lord Lyon, is a retired solicitor, was a partner with Dundas and Wilson WS and with Turcan Connell. ... Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ... Arms of the Office of the Lord Lyon The Lord Lyon King of Arms, the head of Lyon Court, is the most junior of the Great Officers of State in Scotland and is the Scottish official with responsibility for regulating heraldry in that kingdom, issuing new grants of arms, and...

See also

The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle was founded in 1687. ... The Dean of the Thistle is an office of the Order of the Thistle, established in 1687. ... The Gentleman Usher of the Green Rod is the Usher to the Order of the Thistle, established in 1687. ... The Chancellor of the Order of the Thistle is an office of the Order of the Thistle, established in 1687. ... The Garter is the most recognizable insignia of the Order of the Garter. ... Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... Victoria founded the Royal Victorian Order. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE) is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these... The following is a partial list of people who have declined a British honour, such as a knighthood or an Order of the British Empire. ...

References

British honours system
Current Orders

Garter - Thistle - Bath - St Michael and St George -
Distinguished Service - Royal Victorian - Merit - Imperial Service - British Empire - Companions of Honour The main hall of The Royal Museum of Scotland The Royal Museum of Scotland is a museum on Chambers Street, in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The Heraldry Society of Scotland was founded in 1977 with the objective of promoting the study of heraldry and encouraging its correct use in Scotland and Overseas. ... The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ... Image File history File links LinkFA-star. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... The Garter is the most recognizable insignia of the Order of the Garter. ... Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... Source: Veterans Affairs Canada The Distinguished Service Order is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and other formerly Commonwealth countries, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. ... Victoria founded the Royal Victorian Order. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... The Imperial Service Order was established by King Edward VII in August 1902. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE) is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ...

Old Orders

St Patrick - Royal Guelphic - Star of India - Indian Empire - Crown of India - Victoria and Albert The Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick is an order of chivalry associated with Ireland. ... The Royal Guelphic Order was a British order of chivalry instituted on 28 April 1815 by the Prince Regent (later George IV). ... The Most Exalted Order of the Star of India is an order of chivalry founded by Victoria in 1861. ... The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire is an order of chivalry founded by Victoria in 1877. ... The Imperial Order of the Crown of India is an order in the British honours system. ... The Royal Order of Victoria and Albert was a British Royal Family Order instituted in 1862 by Queen Victoria. ...

Other Honours and Appointments

Hereditary peer - Life peer - Baronet - Knight - St John - Other orders and decorations
Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-06-08, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt), is the holder of an hereditary title awarded by the British Crown, known as a baronetcy. ... The dignity of Knight Bachelor is a part of the British honours system. ... This page deals with the order after its revival in the 19th century. ... This article concerns British and Commonwealth of Nations orders and decorations awarded by the British Sovereign. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Order of the Garter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3518 words)
The Order of the Garter, which pertains to England, is most senior in both age and precedence; its equivalent in Scotland is The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle.
The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter.
Depictions of the Order's insignia: the garter, the collar, the "lesser George" sash badge, and the star.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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