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Encyclopedia > Order of the British Empire

The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are See also Orders of Chivalry in the British honours system After the failure of the crusades, the crusading military orders became idealized and romanticized, resulting in the late medieval notion of chivalry, as reflected in the Arthurian romances of the time. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...

  • Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE)
  • Knight Commander or Dame Commander (KBE or DBE)
  • Commander (CBE)
  • Officer (OBE)
  • Member (MBE)

Only the two highest ranks entail admission into knighthood allowing the recipient to use the title 'Sir' (male) or 'Dame' (female) before his or her name, so long as he/she is a national of a realm where the Queen is Head of State. If not, the recipient may use the honour but not the title before their name. A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary [1]; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, and their respective overseas territories and dependencies. ... Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State of 16 countries including: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand and the Bahamas, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ...


There is also a related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are not members of the Order, but who are nonetheless affiliated with the Order. This medal is no longer conferred in the United Kingdom or its dependencies, but is still used by the Cook Islands and by some other Commonwealth nations. The British Empire Medal (Medal of the Order of the British Empire for Meritorious Service) is a British medal awarded for meritorious civil or military service worthy of recognition by the crown. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The Order's motto is For God and the Empire. It is the most junior of the British orders of chivalry and has more members than any other.

Contents

History

King George V founded the Order to fill gaps in the British honours system: The Most Honourable Order of the Bath which honoured only senior military officers and civil servants; The Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George honoured diplomats; and the Royal Victorian Order honoured those who had personally served the Royal Family. In particular, King George V wished to honour the many thousands of people who served in numerous non-combatant capacities during the First World War. Originally, the Order included only one division; however, in 1918, soon after its foundation, it was formally divided into Military and Civil Divisions. George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division) The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly The Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... Queen Victoria founded the Royal Victorian Order. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is a shared royal family. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


This Order of Knighthood has a more democratic character than the exclusive orders of the Bath or Saint Michael and Saint George, and in its early days was not held in high esteem. This changed over the years.


Composition

Lieutenant General Sir Robert Fulton KBE
Lieutenant General Sir Robert Fulton KBE

The British monarch is Sovereign of the Order and appoints all other members of the Order (by convention, on the advice of the Government). The next-most senior member is the Grand Master, of which there have been three: Edward, Prince of Wales (19171936), Queen Mary (19361953) and the current Grand Master is HRH The Duke of Edinburgh (1953–present). Image File history File linksMetadata Gog_06. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Gog_06. ... Lieutenant General Sir Robert Fulton KBE September 2006 Lieutenant General Sir Robert Fulton, KBE, RM (born 1948) is a British Royal Marines career military officer, and the Governor of Gibraltar since September 2006. ... The British monarchy is a shared monarchy; this article describes the monarchy from the perspective of the United Kingdom. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on 20... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India and Queen of Ireland. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sleeping Beauty character (actually spelled Phillip), see Sleeping Beauty (1959 film). ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Order is limited to 100 Knights and Dames Grand Cross, 845 Knights and Dames Commander, and 8960 Commanders. There are no limits on the total number of members of the fourth and fifth classes, but no more than 858 Officers and 1464 Members may be appointed per year. Appointments are made on the advice of the governments of the United Kingdom and some Commonwealth realms. By convention, female judges of the High Court of England and Wales are created Dames Commander after appointment. Male judges, however, are created Knights Bachelor. Her Majestys High Court of Justice (known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of Judicature in England and Wales: see Courts of England and Wales. ... The dignity of Knight Bachelor is a part of the British honours system. ...


Although the Order of the British Empire has by far the highest number of members of the British Orders of Chivalry, there are fewer appointments to knighthoods than in other orders. Most Knights Commander are honorary members or British subjects living abroad, with only a handful being residents of the United Kingdom. The grade of Dame Commander, on the other hand, is the most common grade of dame in the British honours system and is awarded in circumstances where men would be created Knights Bachelor.


Most members are citizens of the United Kingdom or other Commonwealth realms of which the Queen is Head of State. Citizens of other countries, however, may be admitted as "honorary members". They do not count towards the numerical limits aforementioned, nor are holders of the GBE, KBE or DBE addressed as "Sir" or "Dame". They may be made full members if they subsequently become British citizens or citizens of other realms of the Queen. See List of honorary British Knights. Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State of 16 countries including: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand and the Bahamas, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ... This is an incomplete list of people who have been created honorary Knights (or Dames) by the British crown, as well as those who have been raised to the two comparable Orders of Chivalry (Order of Merit and Order of the Companions of Honour) and the Royal Victorian Chain, which...


At the foundation of the Order, the "Medal of the Order of the British Empire" was instituted. In 1922, it was renamed the "British Empire Medal". Recipients, who are not members of the Order itself, are grouped into the Civil and Military Divisions. Only junior government and military officials are awarded the medal; senior officials are directly appointed to the Order of the British Empire. The United Kingdom's Government has not recommended the awarding of the medal since 1992, though some Commonwealth realms continue the practice. Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Order has six officials: the Prelate, the Dean, the Secretary, the Registrar, the King of Arms and the Usher. The Bishop of London, a senior bishop in the Church of England, serves as the Order's Prelate. The Dean of St Paul's is ex officio the Dean of the Order. The Order's King of Arms is not a member of the College of Arms, like many other heraldic officers. The Usher of the Order is known as the Gentleman Usher of the Purple Rod; he does not, unlike his Order of the Garter equivalent (the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod), perform any duties related to the House of Lords. Arms of the Bishop of London The Bishop of London is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Dean of St Pauls is the head of the Chapter of St Pauls Cathedral in London, England and an extremely influential position in the Church of England. ... The King of Arms of the Order of the British Empire is the herald of the Order of the British Empire, established in 1917 and effective since 1918. ... The entrance of the College of Arms. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... The Gentleman Usher of the Purple Rod is the Usher to the Order of the British Empire, established in 1917 and effective since 1918. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... The Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, generally shortened to just Black Rod, is an official in the parliaments of a number of Commonwealth countries. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ...


Vestments and accoutrements

Badge of Members of the Order of the British Empire, front and reverse
Badge of Members of the Order of the British Empire, front and reverse
Ribbon of the Civil Division of the Order
Ribbon of the Military Division of the Order

Members of the Order wear elaborate costumes on important occasions (such as quadrennial services and coronations), which vary by rank (the designs underwent major changes in 1937): Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) medal, front and obverse Image by ChrisO File links The following pages link to this file: Order of the British Empire Categories: GFDL images ... Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) medal, front and obverse Image by ChrisO File links The following pages link to this file: Order of the British Empire Categories: GFDL images ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...

  • The mantle, worn only by Knights and Dames Grand Cross, was originally made of purple satin lined with white silk, but is now made of rose pink satin lined with pearl grey silk. On the left side is a representation of the star (see below).
  • The collar, also worn only by Knights and Dames Grand Cross, is made of gold. It consists of six medallions depicting the Royal Arms, alternating with six medallions depicting the Royal and Imperial Cypher of George V ("GRI", which stands for "Georgius Rex Imperator"). The medallions are linked with gold cables depicting lions and crowns.

On certain "collar days" designated by the Sovereign, members attending formal events may wear the Order's collar over their military uniform, formal day dress, or evening wear. When collars are worn (either on collar days or on formal occasions such as coronations), the badge is suspended from the collar. Collars are returned upon the death of their owners, but other insignia may be retained.


At less important occasions, simpler insignia are used:

  • The star is an eight-pointed silver star used only by Knights and Dames Grand Cross and Knights and Dames Commander. It is worn pinned to the left breast. The Star, which varies in size depending on class, bears a crimson ring bearing the motto of the Order. Within the ring, a figure of Britannia was originally shown. Since 1937, however, the effigies of George V and his wife Queen Mary have been shown instead.
  • The badge is the only insignia used by all members of the Order. Until 1937 it was suspended on a purple ribbon, with a red central stripe for the military division; since then the ribbon has been rose pink with pearl grey edges, plus a pearl grey central stripe for the military division. Knights and Dames Grand Cross wear it on a riband or sash, passing from the right shoulder to the left hip. Knights Commander and male Commanders wear the badge from a ribbon around the neck; male Officers and Members wear the badge from a ribbon on the left chest; all females (other than Dames Grand Cross) wear it from a bow on the left shoulder. The badge is in the form of a cross patonce, the obverse of which bears the same field as the star (that is, either Britannia or George V and Queen Mary); the reverse bears George V's Royal and Imperial Cypher. Both are within a ring bearing the motto of the Order. The size of the badges varies by rank: the higher classes have slightly larger badges. The badges of Knights and Dames Grand Cross, Knights and Dames Commander and Commanders are enamelled with pale blue crosses and crimson rings; those of Officers are plain gold; those of Members are plain silver.
  • In 1957, it was decided that any individual made a member of the Order for gallantry could wear an emblem of two crossed silver oak leaves on the same riband, ribbon or bow as the badge. Since 1974, however, appointments for gallantry have not been made; instead, a separate Queen's Gallantry Medal has been awarded.
  • The British Empire Medal is made of silver. On the obverse is an image of Britannia surrounded by the motto, with the words "For Meritorious Service" at the bottom; on the reverse is George V's Imperial and Royal Cypher, with the words "Instituted by King George V" at the bottom. The name of the recipient is engraved on the rim. This medal is nicknamed "the Gong," and comes in both a full-sized and miniature version--the latter for formal white-tie and informal black-tie affairs.
  • A lapel pin for everyday wear was first announced at the end of December 2006 and will soon become available to recipients of all levels of the Order as well as holders of the British Empire Medal. The pin design is not unique to any level. The pin features the badge of the Order, enclosed in a circle of ribbon of its colours of pink and grey. Lapel pins must be purchased separately by a member of the Order at the price of £15.00.[1] The creation of such a pin was recommended in Sir Hayden Phillips' review of the honours system in 2004[2] and brings the British more in line with the honour systems in other commonwealth realms such as Canada and Australia, which have used lapel pins for many years.

Britannia on a 2005 £2 coin. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Queens Gallantry Medal (QGM) is the third level civil decoration of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth. ... A variety of award pins, the largest of which is only 1 inch (2. ... The British Empire Medal (Medal of the Order of the British Empire for Meritorious Service) is a British medal awarded for meritorious civil or military service worthy of recognition by the crown. ...

Chapel

The chapel of the order is in the far eastern end of the crypt of St Paul's Cathedral, but it holds its great services upstairs in the main body of the cathedral. (The Cathedral also serves as the home of the chapel of The Most Distinguished Order of St Michael and St George.) Religious services for the whole Order are held every four years; new Knights and Dames Grand Cross are installed at these services. The chapel was dedicated in 1960. This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Precedence and privileges

Members of all classes of the Order are assigned positions in the order of precedence. Wives of male members of all classes also feature on the order of precedence, as do sons, daughters and daughters-in-law of Knights Grand Cross and Knights Commander; relatives of Ladies of the Order, however, are not assigned any special precedence. As a general rule, individuals can derive precedence from their fathers or husbands, but not from their mothers or wives (see order of precedence in England and Wales for the exact positions). The Order of precedence in England and Wales as of 12 April 2006: Names in italics indicate higher precedence elsewhere in the table: e. ...


Knights Grand Cross and Knights Commander prefix "Sir", and Dames Grand Cross and Dames Commander prefix "Dame", to their forenames (never surnames, so Sir Antony Sher can be shortened to Sir Antony, but not Sir Sher). Wives of Knights may prefix "Lady" to their surnames, but no equivalent privilege exists for husbands of Dames. Such forms are not used by peers and princes, except when the names of the former are written out in their fullest forms. Clergy of the Church of England do not use the titles of "Sir" or "Dame" and do not receive the accolade (i.e. are not dubbed knight with a sword, as are other knights, but not dames), although they do append the post-nominal letters. Sir Antony Sher KBE (born 14 June 1949) is an actor, novelist and painter. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Post-nominal letters also called Post-nominal initials or Post-nominal titles are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, educational degree, accreditation, office, or honour. ...


Knights and Dames Grand Cross use the post-nominal "GBE", Knights Commander "KBE", Dames Commander "DBE", Commanders "CBE", Officers "OBE" and Members "MBE". The post-nominal for the British Empire Medal is "BEM".


Knights and Dames Grand Cross and Knights and Dames Commander who are not subjects of the Queen (i.e., not citizens of the United Kingdom or another country ruled by the Queen) are not entitled to the prefix "Sir" or "Dame", but may still use the post-nominal abbreviations. For example, American Bill Gates was made a Knight Commander, yet he is not entitled "Sir William" or "Sir William Gates III", but he may use "William Henry Gates III, KBE". Honorary knights do not receive the accolade. If recipients later become subjects of the Queen then they are entitled to begin using the Sir prefix as well. Irish broadcaster Terry Wogan was appointed a KBE in 2005, and is now entitled to use the name "Sir Terry Wogan" since taking dual British and Irish nationality. William Henry Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is an American entrepreneur and the co-founder, chairman, former chief software architect, and former CEO of Microsoft, the worlds largest software company. ... Sir Michael Terence Wogan, KBE DL (born August 3, 1938, in Limerick, County Limerick, Ireland), more commonly known as Terry Wogan, is a radio and television broadcaster who has worked for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) in the United Kingdom (UK) for most of his career. ...


Knights and Dames Grand Cross are also entitled to receive heraldic supporters. They may, furthermore, encircle their arms with a depiction of the circlet (a circle bearing the motto) and the collar; the former is shown either outside or on top of the latter. Knights and Dames Commander and Commanders may display the circlet, but not the collar, surrounding their arms. The badge is depicted suspended from the collar or circlet. The Coat of Arms of Prince Edward Island uses two foxes as supporters. ...


Revocation

  • 1921: Cecil Malone was stripped of his OBE (awarded 1919), following his conviction under the Defence of the Realm (Acquisition of Land) Act 1920.[3]
  • 1940: Vidkun Quisling was stripped of his CBE (awarded 1929), following his collaboration with Nazi Germany in the occupation of Norway.
  • 1949: Man Wai Wong was stripped of his OBE (awarded 1947), following his conviction for outlawry in Malaya.[4]
  • 1965: Kim Philby was stripped of his OBE (awarded 1946), following his exposure as a double agent.[5]
  • 1975: The Lord Spens was stripped of his MBE (awarded 1954), following his conviction for theft.[6]
  • 1980: Albert Henry was stripped of his KBE (awarded 1974), following his conviction for electoral fraud.[7]
  • 1988: Lester Piggott was stripped of his OBE (awarded 1975), following his conviction for tax fraud.[8]
  • 2006: Michael Eke was stripped of his MBE (awarded 2003) following his conviction for theft and deception.[9]
  • 2006: Naseem Hamed was stripped of his MBE (awarded 1999) following his conviction for dangerous driving.[10]

Below is a list of revocations of appointments to the Order of the British Empire: 1921: Ernest Middleton was stripped of his MBE (awarded 1919) [1] 1921: Basil John Blenkinsop Coulson was stripped of his CBE (awarded 1919) [2] 1921: Harry William John Wilkinson was stripped of his MBE (awarded... Cecil John LEstrange Malone OBE (7 September 1890 – 8 June 1965), usually known as Cecil LEstrange Malone, was a left wing member of the United Kingdom House of Commons and Britains first communist Member of Parliament. ... Vidkun Abraham Lauritz Jonssøn Quisling, (July 18, 1887 – October 24, 1945) was a Norwegian army officer and fascist politician. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Map of Peninsular Malaysia Peninsular Malaysia (Malay: Semenanjung Malaysia) is the part of Malaysia which lies on the Malay Peninsula, and shares a land border with Thailand in the north. ... Harold Adrian Russell Kim Philby or H.A.R. Philby (OBE: 1946-1965), (1 January 1912 – 11 May 1988) was a high-ranking member of British intelligence, a communist, and spy for the Soviet Unions NKVD and KGB. In 1963, Philby was revealed as a member of the spy... A double agent pretends to spy on a target organization on behalf of a controlling organization, but in fact is loyal to the target organization. ... Albert Royle Henry was a pioneer in Cook Islands politics, and a driving force behind Cook Islands self-government, which it obtained on 4 August 1965. ... Electoral fraud is illegal interference with the process of an election. ... Lester Piggott video, 2000 Lester Keith Piggott (born 5 November 1935) is a retired English jockey, considered to be the best of his generation and one of the greatest flat jockeys of all time, with 4,493 career wins, including nine Derby victories. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... Everyday instance of theft: the bike which fits on this wheel has disappeared. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Naseem redirects here. ...

Criticism

The order has attracted some criticism for its connection with the idea of the British Empire. The poet Benjamin Zephaniah publicly rejected an OBE in 2003 because he said it reminds him of "thousands of years of brutality—it reminds me of how my foremothers were raped and my forefathers brutalised".[11] In 2007, Joseph Corre - co-founder of Agent Provocateur - rejected an MBE because he said he found then Prime Minister, Tony Blair "morally corrupt".[12] The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Benjamin Obadiah Iqbal Zephaniah (born 15 April 1958, Coles Hill, Birmingham, England) is a British Rastafarian writer and dub poet, and is well known in contemporary English literature. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Agent Provocateur in Broadwick Street, Soho Agent Provocateur is a well known lingerie brand based in the United Kingdom. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency...


Others have declined honours but tended, at the request of the Prime Minister's office, not to reveal it until some years later. In 2004, a House of Commons Select Committee recommended changing the name of the award to the "Order of British Excellence", and changing the rank of "Commander" to "Companion" as the former was said to have a "militaristic ring".[13][14] The following is a partial list of people who have declined a British honour, such as a knighthood or an honour usually within the Order of the British Empire. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A Select Committee is a committee made up of a small number of parliamentary members appointed to deal with particular areas or issues originating in the Westminster System of parliamentary democracy. ...


There was also some criticism of the system after cricketer Paul Collingwood was awarded an MBE for his role in the 2005 Ashes series, which consisted of playing in one Test match and making the below-par scores of 7 and 10. Cynics (notably within the civil service) also joke that OBE stands for 'Other Buggers' Effort', implying that senior civil servants who receive the award usually benefit from the hard work of their subordinates. Paul David Collingwood MBE (born 26 May 1976, Shotley Bridge, Durham), is an English cricketer. ... Teams England Australia Captains Michael Vaughan Ricky Ponting Most Runs Kevin Pietersen (473) Marcus Trescothick (431) Andrew Flintoff (402) Justin Langer (394) Ricky Ponting (359) Michael Clarke (335) Most Wickets Andrew Flintoff (24) Simon Jones (18) Steve Harmison (17) Shane Warne (40) Brett Lee (20) Glenn McGrath (19) The Ashes...


John Lennon once criticised military membership in the order, saying: John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ...


"Lots of people who complained about us receiving the MBE received theirs for heroism in the war - for killing people. We received ours for entertaining other people. I'd say we deserve ours more."


See also

The dignity of Knight Bachelor is a part of the British honours system. ... Below is a List of Dames Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire from the Orders creation in 1917 until the present day: // 1917: Katharine Furse, Lady Paget, Hon. ... Below is a List of Dames Commander of the Order of the British Empire from the Orders creation in 1917 until the present day: // 1917: The Baroness Pentland, The Baroness Byron, The Marchioness of Dufferin and Ava, The Marchioness of Londonderry, The Baroness Willingdon, Edith Lyttelton, Sarah Lees 1918... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... The Order of precedence in the United Kingdom is different for each region. ... This is an incomplete list of celebrities who have been awarded the Order of the British Empire. ... This is an incomplete list of people who have been created honorary Knights (or Dames) by the British crown, as well as those who have been raised to the two comparable Orders of Chivalry (Order of Merit and Order of the Companions of Honour) and the Royal Victorian Chain, which... The following is a partial list of people who have declined a British honour, such as a knighthood or an honour usually within the Order of the British Empire. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Emblems for Honours at the Cabinet Office website, Jan 11, 2007.
  2. ^ Reform of the Honours System, Cabinet Office, February 2005. PDF, 648 kb download.
  3. ^ The London Gazette, 24 June 1921.
  4. ^ The London Gazette, 20 December 1949.
  5. ^ The London Gazette, 10 August 1965. Retrieved 28 Feb 2007.
  6. ^ The London Gazette, 18 July 1975. Retrieved 28 Feb 2007.
  7. ^ The London Gazette, 11 April 1980. Retrieved 28 Feb 2007.
  8. ^ The London Gazette, 6 June 1981. Retrieved 28 Feb 2007.
  9. ^ MBE conman is stripped of honour. Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  10. ^ 'Prince' Naseem stripped of MBE after time in jail for car crash. Retrieved on 2007-03-27.
  11. ^ Rasta poet publicly rejects his OBE, Guardian, November 27, 2003. Retrieved 28 Feb 2007.
  12. ^ Lingerie firm founder rejects MBE, BBC News, June 20, 2007.
  13. ^ A Reformed Honours System, Select Committee on Public Administration, 7 July 2004. Retrieved 28 Feb 2007.
  14. ^ Honours system outdated, say MPs. BBC News, 13 July 2004. Retrieved 28 Feb 2007.

January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

References

British honours system
Current Orders
Garter | Thistle | Bath | St Michael and St George | Distinguished Service | Royal Victorian | Merit | Imperial Service | British Empire | Companions of Honour
Old Orders

St Patrick | Royal Guelphic | Star of India | Indian Empire | British India | Indian Merit | Crown of India | Victoria and Albert | Burma The Cambridge University Heraldic and Genealogical Society was formed as the result of the merger in 1957 of a previous society of the same name (founded 1950) with the Cambridge University Society of Genealogists (founded 1954). ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... James VII ordained the modern Order. ... Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division) The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly The Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... DSO medal The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other Commonwealth countries, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. ... Queen Victoria founded the Royal Victorian Order. ... The Order of Merit is a British and Commonwealth Order bestowed by the Monarch. ... The Imperial Service Order was established by King Edward VII in August 1902. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... The Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick is an order of chivalry associated with Ireland. ... The Royal Guelphic Order, sometimes also referred to as the Hanoverian Guelphic Order, was a British order of chivalry instituted on 28 April 1815 by the Prince Regent (later George IV). ... Insignia of a Knight Grand Commander of the Order of the Star of India. ... The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire is an order of chivalry founded by Victoria in 1877. ... Order Of British India First Class Order Of British India Second Class // History The Medal was originally instituted by the East India Company on the 18th of April 1837 for long, faithful and honourable service. ... // History The medal was first introduced by the East India Company in 1837. ... The Imperial Order of the Crown of India is an order in the British honours system. ... The Royal Order of Victoria and Albert was a British Royal Family Order instituted in 1862 by Queen Victoria, and enlarged on 10 October 1864, 15 November 1865 and 15 March 1880. ...

Other Honours and Appointments
Hereditary peer | Life peer | Privy Counsellor | Baronet | Knight | St John | ADC | Other orders and decorations

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Monarchy Today > Queen and public > Honours > Order of the British Empire (394 words)
The Order of the British Empire recognises distinguished service to the arts and sciences, public services outside the Civil Service and work with charitable and welfare organisations of all kinds.
A Chapel for the Order was built in the cathedral crypt (where Nelson, Wellington and Sir Christopher Wren are buried, amongst others).
Its formal dedication in 1969 was attended by The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh (Grand Master of the Order).
Order of the British Empire (230 words)
The first two (Knight Grand Cross Order of the British Empire and Knight of the Order of the British Empire) confer knighthood, the three lower levels are Commander [top left], Officer [top right] and Member [bottom left].
The medals of the order were changed considerably in 1937 when the insignia was redesigned and the colour of the ribbons were changed.
British Empire Medal which is not strictly a part of the Order.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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