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Encyclopedia > Order of the Bath
Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division)
Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division)
Ribbon of the Order of the Bath
Ribbon of the Order of the Bath

The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly The Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on May 18, 1725.[2] The name derives from the medieval ceremony for creating a knight, which involved bathing (as a symbol of purification) as one of its elements. The knights so created were known as Knights of the Bath.[3] George I "erected the Knights of the Bath into a regular Military Order".[4] He did not (as is often stated) revive the Order of the Bath, since it had never previously existed as an Order, in the sense of a body of knights who were governed by a set of statutes and whose numbers were replenished when vacancies occurred.[5][6] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (587x886, 63 KB)The obverse, or front, of the badge of a Companion of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath (Military Division). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (587x886, 63 KB)The obverse, or front, of the badge of a Companion of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath (Military Division). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... See also Orders of Chivalry in the British honours system After the failure of the crusades, the crusading military orders became idealized and romanticized, resulting in the late medieval notion of chivalry, as reflected in the Arthurian romances of the time. ... George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 8 - Catherine I became empress of Russia February 20 - The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans takes place in New Hampshire colony. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... Children bathing in a small metal bathtub Bathing is the immersion of the body in fluid, usually water, or an aqueous solution. ...


The Order consists of the Sovereign (the British Sovereign), the Great Master (currently HRH The Prince of Wales),[7] and three Classes of members:[8] The British monarchy is a shared monarchy; this article describes the monarchy from the perspective of the United Kingdom. ... The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George[2]; born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ...

  • Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GCB)
  • Knight Commander or Dame Commander (KCB or DCB)
  • Companion (CB)

Members belong to either the Civil or the Military Division.[9] Prior to 1815 the order had only a single class, Knights Companion (KB), which no longer exists.[10] Recipients of the Order are now usually senior military officers or senior civil servants.[11][12] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The Order of the Bath is the fourth-most senior of the British Orders of Chivalry, after The Most Noble Order of the Garter, The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, and The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick.[13] The last of the aforementioned Orders, which relates to Ireland, still exists but has been in disuse since the formation of the Irish Free State.[14] The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... James VII ordained the modern Order. ... The Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick is an order of chivalry associated with Ireland. ... Territory of the Irish Free State Capital Dublin Language(s) Irish, English Government Constitutional monarchy Monarch  - 1922–1936 George V  - 1936–1936 George VI President of the Executive Council  - 1922–1932 W.T. Cosgrave  - 1932–1937 Eamon de Valera Legislature Oireachtas  - Upper house Seanad Éireann  - Lower house Dáil Éireann...

Contents

History

Knights of the Bath

A painting by Edmund Leighton depicting a fictional scene of a knight receiving the accolade
A painting by Edmund Leighton depicting a fictional scene of a knight receiving the accolade

In the Middle Ages knighthood was often conferred with elaborate ceremonies. These usually involved the knight-to-be taking a bath (possibly symbolic of spiritual purification)[15] during which he was instructed in the duties of knighthood by more senior knights. He was then put to bed in order to dry. Clothed in a special robe, he was led with music to the chapel where he spent the night in a vigil. At dawn he made confession and attended Mass, then retired to his bed to sleep until it was fully daylight. He was then brought before the King, who after instructing two senior knights to buckle the spurs to the knight-elect's heels, fastened a belt around his waist, then struck him on the neck (with either a hand or a sword), thus making him a knight.[16] It was this "accolade" which was the essential act in creating a knight, and a simpler ceremony developed, conferring knighthood merely by striking or touching the knight-to-be on the shoulder with a sword,[17] or "dubbing" him, as is still done today. In the early medieval period the difference seems to have been that the full ceremonies were used for men from more prominent families.[15] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (514x900, 108 KB) Summary The Accolade - Edmund Blair Leighton (1853-1922) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Knight Edmund Leighton ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (514x900, 108 KB) Summary The Accolade - Edmund Blair Leighton (1853-1922) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Knight Edmund Leighton ... The Accolade Edmund Blair Leighton (September 21, 1853—September 1, 1922) was a British painter of medieval scenes of chivalry. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A vigil (from the Latin vigilia, wakefulness) is a period of sleeplessness, an occasion for devotional watching or observance. ... Modern confessional in the Church of the Holy Name, Dunedin, New Zealand. ... A Medieval Low Mass by a bishop. ... A spur is a metal instrument composed of a shank, neck, and prick, rowel (sharp-toothed wheel), or blunted end fastened to the heel of a horseman. ...


From the coronation of Henry IV in 1399 the full ceremonies were restricted to major royal occasions such as coronations, investitures of the Prince of Wales or royal Dukes, and royal weddings,[18] and the knights so created became known as Knights of the Bath.[15] Knights Bachelor continued to be created with the simpler form of ceremony. The last occasion on which Knights of the Bath were created was the coronation of Charles II in 1661.[19] Henry IV (3 April 1367 – 20 March 1413) was the King of England and France and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ...


From at least 1625,[20] and possibly from the reign of James I, Knights of the Bath were using the motto Tria iuncta in uno (Latin for "Three joined in one"), and wearing as a badge three crowns within a plain gold oval.[21] These were both subsequently adopted by the Order of the Bath; a similar design of badge is still worn by members of the Civil Division. Their symbolism however is not entirely clear. The 'three joined in one' may be a reference to the kingdoms of England, Scotland and either France or Ireland, which were held (or claimed in the case of France) by British monarchs. This would correspond to the three crowns in the badge.[22] Another explanation of the motto is that it refers to the Holy Trinity.[11] Nicolas quotes a source (although he is skeptical of it) who claims that prior to James I the motto was Tria numina iuncta in uno, (three powers/gods joined in one), but from the reign of James I the word numina was dropped and the motto understood to mean Tria [regna] iuncta in uno (three kingdoms joined in one).[23] James Stuart (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English (de facto)1; Gaelic[1]2 and Scots3 (recognised minority... This article concerns the holy Trinity of Christianity. ...

Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister, who used the Order of the Bath as a source of political patronage
Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister, who used the Order of the Bath as a source of political patronage

Download high resolution version (434x601, 26 KB)Robert Walpole This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (434x601, 26 KB)Robert Walpole This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...

Foundation of the Order

The prime mover in the establishment of the Order of the Bath was John Anstis, Garter King of Arms, England's highest heraldic officer. Sir Anthony Wagner, a recent holder of the office of Garter, wrote of Anstis's motivations: Painting of Garter Anstis from around 1725 John Anstis (29 August 1669 – 4 March 1744) was an English officer of arms and antiquarian. ... Garter Principal King of Arms is the senior King of Arms, and the senior Officer of Arms of the College of Arms. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... Sir Anthony Richard Wagner KCB KCVO FSA (6 September 1908–1995) was a long-serving officer of arms at the College of Arms in London. ...

It was Martin Leake's[24] opinion that the trouble and opposition Anstis met with in establishing himself as Garter so embittered him against the heralds that when at last in 1718 he succeeded, he made it his prime object to aggrandise himself and his office at their expense. It is clear at least that he set out to make himself indispensable to the Earl Marshal, which was not hard, their political principles being congruous and their friendship already established, but also to Sir Robert Walpole and the Whig ministry, which can by no means have been easy, considering his known attachment to the Pretender and the circumstances under which he came into office ... The main object of Anstis's next move, the revival or institution of the Order of the Bath was probably that which it in fact secured, of ingratiating him with the all-powerful Prime Minister Sir Robert Walpole.[25]

The use of honours in the early 18th century differed considerably from the modern honours system in which hundreds, if not thousands, of people each year receive honours on the basis of deserving accomplishments. The only honours available at that time were hereditary (not life) peerages and baronetcies, knighthoods and the Order of the Garter (or the Order of the Thistle for Scots), none of which were awarded in large numbers (the Garter and the Thistle are limited to 24 and 16 living members respectively.) The political environment was also significantly different from today: Heralds, wearing tabards, in procession to St. ... Earl Marshal (alternatively Marschal or Marischal) is an ancient chivalric title used separately in England, Ireland and the United Kingdom. ... Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, KG, KB, PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745) was a British statesman who is generally regarded as having been the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ... This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... Look up peer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a hereditary title awarded by the British Crown known as a baronetcy. ... James VII ordained the modern Order. ...

The Sovereign still exercised a power to be reckoned with in the eighteenth century. The Court remained the centre of the political world. The King was limited in that he had to choose Ministers who could command a majority in Parliament, but the choice remained his. The leader of an administration still had to command the King's personal confidence and approval. A strong following in Parliament depended on being able to supply places, pensions, and other marks of Royal favour to the government's supporters.[26]

The attraction of the new Order for Walpole was that it would provide a source of such favours to strengthen his political position.[27] George I having agreed to Walpole's proposal, Anstis was commissioned to draft statutes for the Order of the Bath. As noted above, he adopted the motto and badge used by the Knights of the Bath, as well as the colour of the riband and mantle, and the ceremony for creating a knight. The rest of the statutes were mostly based on those of the Order of the Garter, of which he was an officer (as Garter King of Arms).[28] The Order was founded by letters patent under the Great Seal dated 18 May 1725, and the statutes issued the following week.[29][30] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... The Great Seal of the Realm is a British institution by which the monarch can authorise official documents without having to sign each document individually. ...


The Order initially consisted of the Sovereign, a Prince of the blood Royal as Principal Knight, a Great Master and thirty-five Knights Companion.[31] Seven officers (see below) were attached to the Order. These provided yet another opportunity for political patronage, as they were to be sinecures at the disposal of the Great Master, supported by fees from the knights. Despite the fact that the Bath was represented as a military Order, only a few military officers were among the initial appointments (see List of Knights Companion of the Order of the Bath). They may be broken down into categories as follows (note that some are classified in more than one category):[32] A sinecure (from Latin sine, without, and cura, care) means an office which requires or involves little or no responsibility, labour, or active service. ... This is a list of those men who were made Knights Companion of the Order of the Bath from the date of the Orders revival by King George I of Great Britain, 18 May 1725, to its reorganisation on 2 January 1815. ...

  • Members of the House of Commons: 14
  • The Royal Household or sinecures: 11
  • Diplomats: 4
  • The Walpole family, including the Prime Minister: 3
  • Naval and Army Officers: 3
  • Irish Peers: 2
  • Country gentlemen with Court Appointments: 2
Admiral George Rodney (appointed a Knight Companion in 1780) wearing the riband and star of the Order

The majority of the new Knights Companion were knighted by the King and invested with their ribands and badges on 27 May 1725.[33] Although the statutes set out the full medieval ceremony which was to be used for creating knights, this was not performed, and indeed was possibly never intended to be, as the original statutes contained a provision[34] allowing the Great Master to dispense Knights Companion from these requirements. The original knights were dispensed from all the medieval ceremonies with the exception of the Installation, which was performed in the Order's Chapel, the Henry VII Chapel in Westminster Abbey, on June 17. This precedent was followed until 1812, after which the Installation was also dispensed with, until its revival in the twentieth century.[35] The ceremonies however remained part of the Statutes until 1847.[36] Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... In all the medieval monarchies of western Europe the general system of government sprang from, and centred in, the royal household. ... Download high resolution version (700x929, 90 KB)Admiral Lord George Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney, 1719–1792 by Jean-Laurent Mosnier, painted 1791 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term... Download high resolution version (700x929, 90 KB)Admiral Lord George Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney, 1719–1792 by Jean-Laurent Mosnier, painted 1791 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term... Admiral Lord George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney, 1719–1792 by Jean-Laurent Mosnier, painted 1791, George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney (February 1718 – May 24, 1792), was a British naval officer. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 8 - Catherine I became empress of Russia February 20 - The first reported case of white men scalping Native Americans takes place in New Hampshire colony. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


Although the initial appointments to the Order were largely political, from the 1770s appointments to the Order were increasingly made for naval, military or diplomatic achievements. This is partly due to the conflicts Britain was engaged in over this period.[37][19] The Peninsular War resulted in so many deserving candidates for the Bath that a statute was issued allowing the appointment of Extra Knights in time of war, who were to be additional to the numerical limits imposed by the statutes, and whose number was not subject to any restrictions.[38] Another statute, this one issued some 80 years earlier, had also added a military note to the Order. Each knight was required, under certain circumstances, to supply and support four men-at-arms for a period not exceeding 42 days in any year, to serve in any part of Great Britain.[39] This company was to be captained by the Great Master, who had to supply four trumpeters, and was also to appoint eight officers for this body, however the statute was never invoked.[33] Events and Trends For more events, see 18th century United States Declaration of Independence ratified by the Continental Congress (July 4, 1776). ... Combatants Kingdom of Spain, United Kingdom, Kingdom of Portugal French Empire The Peninsular War or Spanish War of Independence (Guerra de la Independencia Española) was a war in the Iberian Peninsula. ...


Restructuring in 1815

In 1815, with the end of the Napoleonic Wars, the Prince Regent (later George IV) expanded the Order of the Bath Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Spain[3] Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[5] Saxony[6] Denmark [7] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich Gebhard von Blücher Duke of Brunswick Prince of...

to the end that those Officers who have had the opportunities of signalising themselves by eminent services during the late war may share in the honours of the said Order, and that their names may be delivered down to remote posterity, accompanied by the marks of distinction which they have so nobly earned.[10]

The Order was now to consist of three classes: Knights Grand Cross, Knights Commander, and Companions. The existing Knights Companion (of which there were 60)[40] became Knight Grand Cross; this class was limited to 72 members, of which twelve could be appointed for civil or diplomatic services. The military members had to be of the rank of at least Major-General or Rear Admiral. The Knights Commander were limited to 180, exclusive of foreign nationals holding British commissions, up to ten of whom could be appointed as honorary Knights Commander. They had to be of the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel or Post-Captain. The number of Companions was not specified, but they had to have received a medal or been mentioned in despatches since the start of the war in 1803. A list of about 500 names was subsequently published.[41] Two further officers were appointed, an "Officer of arms attendant on the Knights Commander and Companions", and a "Secretary appertaining to the Knights Commanders and Companions"[10] The large increase in numbers caused some complaints that such an expansion would reduce the prestige of the Order.[11] For the Patrick OBrian novel, see Post Captain (novel). ...

Knights Grand Cross wear their mantles over suits in modern times. During the nineteenth century, as depicted above, they wore them over imitations of seventeenth century dress.
Knights Grand Cross wear their mantles over suits in modern times. During the nineteenth century, as depicted above, they wore them over imitations of seventeenth century dress.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1364x2048, 623 KB) Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1364x2048, 623 KB) Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require restructuring. ...

The Victorian era

In 1847 Queen Victoria issued new statutes eliminating all references to an exclusively military Order. As well as removing the word 'Military' from the full name of the Order, this opened up the grades of Knight Commander and Companion to civil appointments, and the Military and Civil Divisions of the Order were established. New numerical limits were imposed, and the opportunity also taken to regularise the 1815 expansion of the Order.[42][43] The 1847 statutes also abolished all the medieval ritual, however they did introduce a formal Investiture ceremony, conducted by the Sovereign wearing the Mantle and insignia of the Order, attended by the Officers and as many GCBs as possible, in their Mantles.[44] Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ...


In 1859 a further edition of the Statutes was issued; the changes related mainly to the costs associated with the Order. Prior to this date it had been the policy that the insignia (which were provided by the Crown) were to be returned on the death of the holder; the exception had been foreigners who had been awarded honorary membership. In addition foreigners had usually been provided with stars made of silver and diamonds, whereas ordinary members had only embroidered stars. The decision was made to award silver stars to all members, and only require the return of the Collar. The Crown had also been paying the fees due to the officers of the Order for members who had been appointed for the services in the recent war. The fees were abolished and replaced with a salary of approximately the same average value. The offices of Genealogist and Messenger were abolished, and those of Registrar and Secretary combined.[45]


The 20th century

In 1910 after his accession to the throne George V ordered the revival of the Installation ceremony,[19] perhaps prompted by the first Installation ceremony of the more junior Order of St Michael and St George, held a few years earlier,[46] and the building of a new chapel for the Order of the Thistle in 1911.[47] The Installation ceremony took place on July 22, 1913 in the Henry VII Chapel,[48][49] and Installations have been held at regular intervals since. Prior to the 1913 Installation it was necessary to adapt the chapel to accommodate the larger number of members. An appeal was made to the members of the Order, and following the Installation a surplus remained. A Committee was formed from the Officers to administer the 'Bath Chapel Fund', and over time this committee has come to consider other matters than purely financial ones.[50] George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ...


Another revision of the statutes of the Order was undertaken in 1925, to consolidate the 41 additional statutes which had been issued since the 1859 revision.[51]


Women were admitted to the Order in 1971.[19] In 1975, Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester, an aunt of Elizabeth II, became the first to reach the highest rank, Dame Grand Cross.[19] Princess Alice (whose maiden name was Lady Alice Douglas-Montagu-Scott) was a direct descendant of the Order's first Great Master,[52] and her husband, who had died the previous year, had also held this office. Princess Alice of Gloucester The Lady Alice Christabel Montagu-Douglas-Scott, later Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester GCB CI GCVO GBE (December 25, 1901 – October 29, 2004) was the wife of Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester — the third son of King George V and Queen Mary. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ...


Senior civil servants, such as permanent secretaries, and senior members of the armed forces, such as generals, are often appointed to the order. Civil servants associated with the Foreign Office, including ambassadors, are usually appointed to the Order of St. Michael and St. George. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for promoting the interests of the United Kingdom abroad. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ...


Composition

Sovereign

The British Sovereign is the Sovereign of the Order of the Bath. As with all honours except those in the Sovereign's personal gift,[53] the Sovereign makes all appointments to the Order on the advice of the Government. The British monarchy is a shared monarchy; this article describes the monarchy from the perspective of the United Kingdom. ...


Great Master

The next-most senior member of the Order is the Great Master, of which there have been nine:

Originally a Prince of the Blood Royal, as the Principal Knight Companion, ranked next after the sovereign.[59] This position was joined to that of the Great Master in the statutes of 1847.[60] The Great Master and Principal Knight is now either a descendant of George I or "some other exalted personage"; the holder of the office has custody of the seal of the order and is responsible for enforcing the statutes.[61] John Montagu, 2nd Duke of Montagu (1689 - 1749), in 1745 raised a cavalry regiment known as Montagus Carabineers, which, however, was disbanded after Culloden. ... The Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (Frederick Augustus) (16 August 1763 - 5 January 1827) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest child, and second son of King George III. From 1820 until his death in 1827, he was the heir presumptive to his elder... William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... Portrait of Prince Augustus Frederick by Louis Gauffier Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex (27 January 1773 – 21 April 1843), was the sixth son of King George III of the United Kingdom and his consort, Queen Charlotte. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (in full Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel) (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (Arthur William Patrick Albert; 1 May 1850 – 16 January 1942) was a member of the British Royal Family, a son of Queen Victoria. ... The Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester (Henry William Frederick Albert; 31 March 1900 – 10 June 1974) was a member of the British Royal Family, the third son of George V of the United Kingdom and Queen Mary, and thus uncle to Elizabeth II. He was appointed regent for his niece... The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George[2]; born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ...


Members

Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns, wearing the star, riband and badge of a military Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath
Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns, wearing the star, riband and badge of a military Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath

The statutes also provide for the following:[19] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (592x1348, 242 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Order of the Bath Air Chief Marshal Richard Johns ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (592x1348, 242 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Order of the Bath Air Chief Marshal Richard Johns ... Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns, GCB CBE LVO FRAeS RAF has been Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle since 2000. ...

  • 120 Knights or Dames Grand Cross (GCB), (of whom the Great Master is the First and Principal)
  • 355 Knights Commander (KCB) or Dames Commander (DCB)
  • 1,925 Companions (CB).

Regular membership is limited to citizens of the United Kingdom and of Commonwealth countries. Members appointed to the Civil Division must "by their personal services to [the] crown or by the performance of public duties have merited ... royal favour."[62] Appointments to the Military Division are restricted by the rank of the individual. GCBs must hold the rank of Rear Admiral, Major General or Air Vice Marshal.[63] KCBs must hold the rank of Captain in the Navy, Colonel in the Army or Marines, or Group Captain in the Air Force.[64] CBs must be of the rank of Lieutenant Commander, Major or Squadron Leader, and in addition must have been mentioned in despatches for distinction in a command position in a combat situation. Non-line officers (e.g. engineers, medics) may be appointed only for meritorious service in war time.[65] The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... An Air Vice Marshals sleeve/shoulder insignia An Air Vice Marshals command flag Air Vice Marshal is the third most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the inactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... A Group Captains sleeve/shoulder insignia A Group Captains command flag Group Captain is a senior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... In the Royal Navy, United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a lieutenant commander (lieutenant-commander or Lt Cdr in the RN) is a commissioned officer superior to a lieutenant and inferior to a commander. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... A Squadron Leaders sleeve/shoulder insignia Squadron Leader (Sqn Ldr in the RAF, SQNLDR in the RNZAF and RAAF and S/L in the former RCAF) is a commissioned rank in some air forces. ...


Non-Commonwealth foreigners may be made Honorary Members.[66] Queen Elizabeth II has established the custom of awarding an honorary GCB to visiting heads of state, for example Gustav Heinemann (in 1972),[67] Ronald Reagan (in 1989), Lech Wałęsa (in 1991)[19] and George H. W. Bush (in 1993).[68] Foreign generals are also often given honorary appointments to the Order, for example Dwight D. Eisenhower and Douglas MacArthur after World War II,[69] and Norman Schwarzkopf[70] and Colin Powell[71] after the Gulf War. A more controversial member of the Order is Robert Mugabe. UK Foreign Affairs Select Committee called for the removal of this honour in 2003, but no action has been taken.[72] Gustav Walter Heinemann (July 23, 1899 - July 7, 1976) was a German politician. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 - June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Lech WaÅ‚Ä™sa (IPA: ; born September 29, 1943, Popowo, Poland) is a Polish politician, a former trade union and human rights activist, and also a former electrician. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... General of the Army Douglas MacArthur KCB (January 26, 1880 – April 5, 1964), was an American general and Field Marshal of the Philippines Army. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Norman Schwarzkopf can refer to: Herbert Norman Schwarzkopf, Sr. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Combatants United States Saudi Arabia Egypt United Kingdom & US-led Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf Khalid bin Sultan Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 240 killed in action, 776 wounded, 30 taken prisoner At least 183,000 victims of the Gulf War syndrome Est. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe KCB (born on February 21, 1924) is the President of Zimbabwe. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Honorary members do not count towards the numerical limits in each class.[73] In addition the statutes allow the Sovereign to exceed the limits in time of war or other exceptional circumstances.[74]


Officers

The Order of the Bath now has six officers:

  • the Dean
  • the King of Arms
  • the Registrar and Secretary
  • the Deputy Secretary
  • the Genealogist
  • the Gentleman Usher of the Scarlet Rod
Queen Elizabeth II presents former American President Ronald Reagan with the Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath.

The office of Dean is held by the Dean of Westminster. The King of Arms, responsible for heraldry, is known as the Bath King of Arms; he is not, however, a member of the College of Arms, like many heralds. The Order's Usher is known as the Gentleman Usher of the Scarlet Rod; he does not, unlike his Order of the Garter equivalent (the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod) perform any duties in the House of Lords. The King of Arms of the Order of the Bath is the herald of the Order of the Bath. ... The Gentleman Usher of the Scarlet Rod is the Gentleman Usher to the Order of the Bath, established in 1725. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... The presidential seal is a well-known symbol of the presidency. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 - June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... The Abbey at night, from Deans Yard. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... The entrance of the College of Arms. ... The Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, generally shortened to just Black Rod, is an official in the parliaments of a number of Commonwealth countries. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ...


There were originally seven officers, each of whom was to receive fees from the Knights Companion both on appointment and annually thereafter. The office of Messenger was abolished in 1859.[75] The office of Genealogist was abolished at the same time, but revived in 1913.[76] The offices of Registrar and Secretary were formally merged in 1859, although the two positions had been held concurrently for the previous century.[77] An Officer of Arms and a Secretary for the Knights Commander and Companions were established in 1815,[10] but abolished in 1847.[78] The office of Deputy Secretary was created in 1925.


Under the Hanoverian kings certain of the officers also held heraldic office. The office of Blanc Coursier Herald of Arms was attached to that of the Genealogist, Brunswick Herald of Arms to the Gentleman Usher, and Bath King of Arms was also made Gloucester King of Arms with heraldic jurisdiction over Wales.[79] This was the result of a move by Anstis to give the holders of these sinecures greater security; the offices of the Order of the Bath were held at the pleasure of the Great Master, while appointments to the heraldic offices were made by the King under the Great Seal and were for life.[80]


Vestments and accoutrements

The insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the civil division of the order.
The insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the civil division of the order.

Members of the Order wear elaborate costumes on important occasions (such as its quadrennial installation ceremonies and coronations), which vary by rank: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1344x1972, 452 KB) Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1344x1972, 452 KB) Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ...

  • The mantle, worn only by Knights and Dames Grand Cross, is made of crimson satin lined with white taffeta. On the left side is a representation of the star (see below). The mantle is bound with two large tassels.[81]
  • The hat, worn only by Knights and Dames Grand Cross and Knights and Dames Commanders, is made of black velvet; it includes an upright plume of feathers.[82]
  • The collar, worn only by Knights and Dames Grand Cross, is made of gold and weighs 30 troy ounces (933 g). It consists of depictions of nine imperial crowns and eight sets of flowers (roses for England, thistles for Scotland and shamrocks for Ireland), connected by seventeen silver knots.[81]

On lesser occasions, simpler insignia are used: Satin used in bedding Look up Satin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Taffeta (sometimes spelled taffety) is a crisp, smooth woven fabric made from silk or synthetic fibers. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Velvet is a type of tufted fabric in which the cut threads are very evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it its distinct feel. ... Two feathers Feathers are one of the epidermal growths that form the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on birds. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Standard atomic weight 196. ... Troy weight is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals and gemstones. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Milk thistle flowerhead Thistledown a method of seed dispersal by wind. ... The Shamrock Oxalis acetosella as The Shamrock The shamrock, an unofficial symbol of Ireland and Boston, Massachusetts, is a three-leafed old white clover, sometimes (rarely nowadays) Trifolium repens (white clover, known in Irish as seamair bhán) but more usually today Trifolium dubium (lesser clover, Irish: seamair bhuí). However...

  • The star is used only by Knights and Dames Grand Cross and Knights and Dames Commanders. Its style varies by rank and division; it is worn pinned to the left breast:
    • The star for military Knights and Dames Grand Cross consists of a Maltese Cross on top of an eight-pointed silver star; the star for military Knights and Dames Commander is an eight-pointed silver cross pattée. Each bears in the centre three crowns surrounded by a red ring bearing the motto of the Order in gold letters. The circle is flanked by two laurel branches and is above a scroll bearing the words Ich dien (older German for "I serve") in gold letters.[81]
    • The star for civil Knights and Dames Grand Cross consists of an eight-pointed silver star, without the Maltese cross; the star for civil Knights and Dames Commanders is an eight-pointed silver cross pattée. The design of each is the same as the design of the military stars, except that the laurel branches and the words Ich dien are excluded.[81]
The insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the military division of the order.
The insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the military division of the order.
  • The badge varies in design, size and manner of wearing by rank and division. The Knight and Dame Grand Cross' badge is larger than the Knight and Dame Commander's badge, which is in turn larger than the Companion's badge;[83] however, these are all suspended on a crimson ribbon. Knights and Dames Grand Cross wear the badge on a riband or sash, passing from the right shoulder to the left hip.[81] Knights Commanders and male Companions wear the badge from a ribbon worn around the neck. Dames Commanders and female Companions wear the badge from a bow on the left side:
    • The military badge is a gold Maltese Cross of eight points, enamelled in white. Each point of the cross is decorated by a small gold ball; each angle has a small figure of a lion. The centre of the cross bears three crowns on the obverse side, and a rose, a thistle and a shamrock, emanating from a sceptre on the reverse side. Both emblems are surrounded by a red circular ring bearing the motto of the Order, which are in turn flanked by two laurel branches, above a scroll bearing the words Ich dien in gold letters.[81]
    • The civil badge is a plain gold oval, bearing three crowns on the obverse side, and a rose, a thistle and a shamrock, emanating from a sceptre on the reverse side; both emblems are surrounded by a ring bearing the motto of the Order.[81]

On certain "collar days" designated by the Sovereign, members attending formal events may wear the Order's collar over their military uniform or eveningwear. When collars are worn (either on collar days or on formal occasions such as coronations), the badge is suspended from the collar.[81] The Maltese Cross (✠) has been the symbol of the Christian warrior since the First Crusade. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1404x2040, 565 KB) Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1404x2040, 565 KB) Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Milk thistle flowerhead Thistledown a method of seed dispersal by wind. ... The Shamrock Oxalis acetosella as The Shamrock The shamrock, an unofficial symbol of Ireland and Boston, Massachusetts, is a three-leafed old white clover, sometimes (rarely nowadays) Trifolium repens (white clover, known in Irish as seamair bhán) but more usually today Trifolium dubium (lesser clover, Irish: seamair bhuí). However... A sceptre or scepter is a symbolic ornamental staff held by a ruling monarch, a prominent item of kingly regalia. ... Milk thistle flowerhead Thistledown a method of seed dispersal by wind. ... The Shamrock Oxalis acetosella as The Shamrock The shamrock, an unofficial symbol of Ireland and Boston, Massachusetts, is a three-leafed old white clover, sometimes (rarely nowadays) Trifolium repens (white clover, known in Irish as seamair bhán) but more usually today Trifolium dubium (lesser clover, Irish: seamair bhuí). However... A sceptre or scepter is a symbolic ornamental staff held by a ruling monarch, a prominent item of kingly regalia. ...


The collars and badges of Knights and Dames Grand Cross are returned to the Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood upon the decease of their owners. All other insignia may be retained by their owners.[81] This is a small office within the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom responsible for the administration of Orders of Chivalry and some aspects of honours in general. ...


Chapel

Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath, by Canaletto, 1749.
Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath, by Canaletto, 1749.

The Chapel of the Order is Henry VII Lady Chapel in Westminster Abbey.[84] Every four years, an installation ceremony, presided over by the Great Master, and a religious service are held in the Chapel; the Sovereign attends every alternate ceremony. The last such service was in May 2006 and was attended by the Sovereign.[19] The Sovereign and each knight who has been installed is allotted a stall in the choir of the chapel. Since there are a limited number of stalls in the Chapel, only the most senior Knights and Dames Grand Cross are installed. A stall made vacant by the death of a military Knight Grand Cross is offered to the next most senior uninstalled military GCB, and similarly for vacancies among civil GCBs.[84] Waits between admission to the Order and installation may be very long; for instance, Marshal of the Air Force Lord Craig of Radley was created a Knight Grand Cross in 1984, but was not installed until 2006.[19] Download high resolution version (1008x984, 184 KB)Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath, by Canaletto, 1749. ... Download high resolution version (1008x984, 184 KB)Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath, by Canaletto, 1749. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... The Stonemasons Yard, painted 1726-30. ... The Henry VII Lady Chapel is a large chapel at the far eastern end of Westminster Abbey. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Amiens floorplan: massive piers support the west end towers; transepts are abbreviated; seven radiating chapels form the chevet reached from the ambulatory This article discusses cathedral diagrams. ... Marshal of the Royal Air Force David Craig, Baron Craig of Radley GCB OBE (born 17 September 1929) is a retired Royal Air Force officer and member of the House of Lords. ...


Above each stall, the occupant's heraldic devices are displayed. Perched on the pinnacle of a knight's stall is his helm, decorated with a mantling and topped by his crest. Under English heraldic law, women other than monarchs do not bear helms or crests; instead, the coronet appropriate to the dame's rank (if she is a peer or member of the Royal family) is used.[84] Coin showing a coronet A coronet is a small crown consisting of ornaments fixed on a metal ring. ...


Above the crest or coronet, the knight's or dame's heraldic banner is hung, emblazoned with his or her coat of arms. At a considerably smaller scale, to the back of the stall is affixed a piece of brass (a "stall plate") displaying its occupant's name, arms and date of admission into the Order. A banner is a flag or other piece of cloth bearing a symbol, logo, slogan or other message. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... For other uses, see Brass (disambiguation). ...


Upon the death of a Knight, the banner, helm, mantling and crest (or coronet or crown) are taken down. The stall plates, however, are not removed; rather, they remain permanently affixed somewhere about the stall, so that the stalls of the chapel are festooned with a colourful record of the Order's Knights (and now Dames) throughout history.


When the grade of Knight Commander was established in 1815 the regulations specified that they too should have a banner and stall plate affixed in the chapel.[10] This was never implemented (despite some of the KCBs paying the appropriate fees) primarily due to lack of space,[85] although the 1847 statutes allow all three classes to request the erection of a plate in the chapel bearing the member's name, date of nomination, and (for the two higher classes) optionally the coat of arms.[86]


Precedence and privileges

Members of the Order of the Bath are assigned positions in the order of precedence.[87] Wives of male members also feature on the order of precedence, as do sons, daughters and daughters-in-law of Knights Grand Cross and Knights Commanders; relatives of female members, however, are not assigned any special precedence. Generally, individuals can derive precedence from their fathers or husbands, but not from their mothers or wives. (See order of precedence in England and Wales for the exact positions.) The Order of precedence in England and Wales as of 12 April 2006: Names in italics indicate higher precedence elsewhere in the table: e. ...


Knights Grand Cross and Knights Commanders prefix "Sir," and Dames Grand Cross and Dames Commanders prefix "Dame," to their forenames.[88] Wives of Knights may prefix "Lady" to their surnames, but no equivalent privilege exists for husbands of Dames. Such forms are not used by peers and princes, except when the names of the former are written out in their fullest forms. Furthermore, honorary members and clergymen do not receive the accolade of knighthood.


Knights and Dames Grand Cross use the post-nominal "GCB"; Knights Commanders use "KCB"; Dames Commanders use "DCB"; Companions use "CB".[89] Post-nominal letters are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, office, or honour. ...


Knights and Dames Grand Cross are also entitled to receive heraldic supporters.[90] Furthermore, they may encircle their arms with a depiction of the circlet (a red circle bearing the motto) with the badge pendant thereto and the collar; the former is shown either outside or on top of the latter.


Knights and Dames Commanders and Companions may display the circlet, but not the collar, around their arms. The badge is depicted suspended from the collar or circlet. Members of the Military division may encompass the circlet with "two laurel branches issuant from an escrol azure inscribed Ich dien", as appears on the badge.


Revocation

It is possible for membership in the Order to be revoked. Under the 1725 statutes the grounds for this were heresy, high treason, or fleeing from battle out of cowardice. Knights Companion could in such cases be degraded at the next Chapter meeting. It was then the duty of the Gentleman Usher to "pluck down the escocheon [i.e. stallplate] of such knight and spurn it out of the chapel" with "all the usual marks of infamy".[91] Only two people were ever degraded — Lord Cochrane in 1813 and General Sir Eyre Coote in 1816, both for political reasons, rather than any of the grounds given in the statute. Lord Cochrane was subsequently reinstated, Coote had died a few years after his degradation.[92] Rear Admiral Thomas Alexander Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, Marquês do Maranhão GCB RN (14 December 1775 – 31 October 1860), styled Lord Cochrane between 1778 and 1831[1], was a radical politician and naval officer. ... General Sir Eyre Coote, (1762-1823) was a British soldier. ...


Under Queen Victoria's 1847 statutes a member "convicted of treason, cowardice, felony, or any infamous crime derogatory to his honour as a knight or gentleman, or accused and does not submit to trial in a reasonable time, shall be degraded from the Order by a special ordinance signed by the sovereign". The Sovereign was to be the sole judge, and also had the power to restore such members.[93]


The situation today is that membership may be cancelled or annulled, and the entry in the register erased, by an ordinance signed by the Sovereign and sealed with the seal of the Order, on the recommendation of the appropriate Minister. Such cancellations may be subsequently reversed.[94]


William Pottinger, a senior civil servant, lost both his Order of the Bath and Royal Victorian Order in 1975 when he was jailed for corruptly receiving gifts from the architect John Poulson.[citation needed] John Garlick Llewellyn Poulson (April 14, 1910 - January 31, 1993) was a British architect who caused a major political scandal when his use of bribery and connections to senior politicians were disclosed in 1972. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

For people who have been appointed to the Order of the Bath, see the following categories: Image File history File links Order_of_the_Bath. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

This is a list of those men who were made Knights Companion of the Order of the Bath from the date of the Orders revival by King George I of Great Britain, 18 May 1725, to its reorganisation on 2 January 1815. ... The following is a partial list of people who have declined a British honour, such as a knighthood or an honour usually within the Order of the British Empire. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The word 'Military' was removed from the name by Queen Victoria in 1847. Letters Patent dated April 14, 1847, quoted in Statutes 1847
  2. ^ Statutes 1725, although Risk says 11 May
  3. ^ Anstis, Observations, p4
  4. ^ Letters patent dated 18 May 1725, quoted in Statutes 1725
  5. ^ Wagner, Heralds of England, p 357, referring to John Anstis, who proposed the Order, says: "He had the happy inspiration of reviving this ancient name and chivalric associations, but attaching it, as it never had been before, to an Order or company of knights."
  6. ^ Perkins, The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, p1 "It can scarcely be claimed that a properly constituted Order existed at any time during the preceding centuries [prior to the reign of Charles II]"
  7. ^ a b The London Gazette, 10 December 1974
  8. ^ Statutes 1925, article 2
  9. ^ Statutes 1925, article 5
  10. ^ a b c d e Supplement to the London Gazette of January 3 1815, reprinted in The Times, 5 January 1815, p2
  11. ^ a b c www.royal.gov.uk article on the Order of the Bath as part of the Honours System. Retrieved on 2006-09-09.
  12. ^ Statutes 1925, articles 8–12
  13. ^ See, for example, the order of wear for orders and decorations, the Royal Warrant defining precedence in Scotland (The London Gazette, 14 March 1905, p3) or the discussion of precedence at http://www.heraldica.org/topics/britain/order_precedence.htm
  14. ^ www.royal.gov.uk article on the Order of St Patrick. Retrieved on 2006-09-09.
  15. ^ a b c Risk, History of the Order of the Bath, p6
  16. ^ The Manner of making Knights after the custom of England in time of peace and at the Coronation, that is Knights of the Bath, quoted in Perkins, pp 5–14
  17. ^ According to Anstis (Observations, p73) such knights were sometimes known as Knights of the Sword or Knights of the Carpet
  18. ^ Anstis, p66
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i www.royal.gov.uk feature article on the Order of the Bath. Retrieved on 2006-09-09.
  20. ^ Risk, p114
  21. ^ Nicolas, History of the orders of knighthood of the British empire, p38–9
  22. ^ The later usage by the Order of the Bath does not make things any clearer. The presence of the rose, thistle and shamrock (symbols of England, Scotland and Ireland respectively) in the Collar supports the above claim. The shamrocks however were not added until the 19th century, probably as a result of a suggestion of Sir Joseph Banks, who in his proposal observed that the presence of the shamrock would "greatly augment the meaning of the motto" (Risk, p 115). A further explanation for the crowns is provided in the 1725 statutes of the Order. The coat of arms which was to appear on the Order's seal (Azure three imperial crowns Or, that is, three gold imperial crowns on a blue background) was described as being anciently attributed to King Arthur.
  23. ^ Nicolas, p 38, quoting Bishop Kennet Register and Chronicle Ecclesiastical and Civil from the Restoration of King Charles II faithfully taken from the manuscripts of the Lord Bishop of Peterborough, (1728) p410
  24. ^ Garter King of Arms from 1754 to 1773, and an officer of arms for some 25 years before that
  25. ^ Wagner, pp348, 357
  26. ^ Risk, p2
  27. ^ In the words of his son, Horace Walpole, "The Revival of the Order of the Bath was a measure of Sir Robert Walpole, and was an artful bank of favours in lieu of places. He meant to stave off the demand for Garters, and intended that the Red [i.e. the Order of the Bath] should be a step to the Blue [the Order of the Garter]; and accordingly took one of the former for himself." Horace Walpole, Reminiscences (1788)
  28. ^ Nicolas, p237–8, Footnote
  29. ^ Risk, p4
  30. ^ Statutes 1725
  31. ^ Statutes 1725, article 2
  32. ^ Risk, p15,16
  33. ^ a b Risk, p16
  34. ^ Statutes 1725, article 6, the same article which state "[the Great Master shall] take especial care that ... the antient Rituals belonging to this Knighthood be observed with the greatest Exactness"
  35. ^ No Installation had been held between 1812 and the coronation of George IV in 1821, by which time the number of knights exceeded the number of stalls in the chapel. In order to allow the knights to wear their collars at the coronation (which they could not do until installed) they were dispensed from the Installation, and this precedent was subsequently followed. (Risk, p43)
  36. ^ Risk, p10
  37. ^ Risk, p20
  38. ^ Statute dated 8 May 1812, quoted in Statutes 1847
  39. ^ Statute dated 20 April 1727, quoted in Statutes 1847
  40. ^ The Times, 10 January 1815, p3
  41. ^ The London Gazette,16 September 1815, reprinted in The Times, 18 September 1815, p4
  42. ^ Letters Patent dated 14 April 1847
  43. ^ The document by which the Prince Regent modified the structure of the Order in 1815 was a Warrant under the Royal sign-manual. This is of lesser authority than Letters Patent under the Great Seal, by which the Order and its Statutes were originally established. It had been questioned on a number of occasions whether the Statutes of the Order could be modified by anything less than such Letters Patent. The 1847 Letters Patent retroactively confirmed the validity of the 1815 document and the subsequent appointments to the Order
  44. ^ Risk, p61
  45. ^ Risk, p70
  46. ^ Risk, p89
  47. ^ Perkins, p122
  48. ^ Risk, p92
  49. ^ Perkins, p124–131
  50. ^ Risk, p95–6
  51. ^ 16 in Queen Victoria's reign, 6 in Edward VII's and 19 in George V's. (Risk, p97)
  52. ^ Risk, p102
  53. ^ The Order of the Garter, the Order of the Thistle, the Order of Merit and the Royal Victorian Order
  54. ^ Nicolas, Appendix p. lxx gives the first four Great Masters, although he considers the latter three to have only been acting Great Masters
  55. ^ Prince Albert was appointed acting Great Master sometime in 1843, and the appointment was made substantive by the 1847 Statutes, article 4. Risk says that he was appointed acting Great Master on March 31, 1843, however The Times, reporting the death of the Duke of Sussex (April 22 1843, pp4–5) says that the office of acting Great Master became vacant on his death. At any rate when the executors of the Duke of Sussex delivered his insignia together with the seal and statutes to the Queen on June 20 (The Times, 21 June 1843, p6) Prince Albert was then acting Great Master.
  56. ^ The Times, 22 June 1897, p10
  57. ^ The London Gazette, 26 February 1901, p4
  58. ^ The Times, 25 February 1942, p7
  59. ^ Statutes 1725, article 4
  60. ^ Letters Patent dated 14 April 1847, quoted in Statutes 1847
  61. ^ Statutes 1925, article 5
  62. ^ Statutes 1925, article 9
  63. ^ Statutes 1925, article 8
  64. ^ Statutes 1925, article 10
  65. ^ Statutes 1925, article 12
  66. ^ Statutes 1925, article 15
  67. ^ The Times, 25 October 1972, p21
  68. ^ The Times, 1 December 1993, p24
  69. ^ The Times, May 27, 1943, p4
  70. ^ The Times, 21 May 1991
  71. ^ Biography of Colin Powell. Retrieved on 2006-09-09.
  72. ^ Daily Mail The battle to ban Mugabe's men retrieved July 7, 2007
  73. ^ Statutes 1925, article 18
  74. ^ "In the event of any future wars or of any action or services civil or military meriting peculiar honour and reward...to increase the numbers in any of the said classes and in any of the said divisions". Statutes 1925, article 17
  75. ^ Risk, p70
  76. ^ Risk, p93
  77. ^ Risk, pp13, 70
  78. ^ Statutes 1847, article 15
  79. ^ Statute dated 17 January 1726 (according to Risk, p14). Both the 1812 and 1847 editions of the Statutes give the date as 17 January 1725, but this is most probably a misprint since the Order was not founded until May 1725, and the additional statute also specified the office holders by name.
  80. ^ Risk, p14
  81. ^ a b c d e f g h i Statutes 1925, article 23
  82. ^ The hat was formerly of white satin (Statutes 1725, article 8), but was changed to black velvet at the command of George IV for his coronation (Nicolas, p198). The hat is not explicitly specified in the 1847 or 1925 statutes
  83. ^ Statutes 1925, articles 23,24,25
  84. ^ a b c Statutes 1925, article 21
  85. ^ Risk, p40
  86. ^ Statutes 1847, article 18
  87. ^ Statutes 1925, article 22
  88. ^ Statutes 1925, article 20
  89. ^ www.honours.gov.uk summary of the Orders of Chivalry. The postnominal letters are not mentioned in the Statutes of the Order
  90. ^ Statutes 1925, article 28
  91. ^ Statutes 1725 art 3
  92. ^ Risk, p30
  93. ^ Statutes 1847, article 26
  94. ^ Statutes 1925, article 30

April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Joseph Banks, 1st Baronet, PRS (13 February 1743 – 19 June 1820) was an English naturalist, botanist and science patron. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Banners bearing heraldic badges of several officers of arms at the College of Arms in London. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... Royal sign-manual, the autograph signature of the sovereign, by which he expresses his pleasure either by order, commission or warrant. ... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was the first British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

References

  • Anstis, John (1752). Observations introductory to an historical essay, upon the Knighthood of the Bath. London: James Woodman. 
  • Nicolas, Nicholas H. (1842). History of the orders of knighthood of the British empire, Vol iii. 
  • Perkins, Jocelyn (1920). The Most Honourable Order of the Bath : a descriptive and historical account, 2nd edition, London: Faith Press. 
  • Risk, James C. (1972). The History of the Order of the Bath and its Insignia. London: Spink & Son. 
  • (1725) Statutes of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath. 
  • (1812) Statutes of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath. 
  • (1847) Statutes of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath. 
  • (1925) Statutes of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath. 
  • Royal Insight > May 2006 > Focus: The Order of the Bath. Retrieved on 2006-09-09.
  • Monarchy Today > Queen and Public > Honours: The Order of the Bath. Retrieved on 2006-09-09.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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St Patrick | Royal Guelphic | Star of India | Indian Empire | British India | Indian Merit | Crown of India | Victoria and Albert | Burma The Cambridge University Heraldic and Genealogical Society was formed as the result of the merger in 1957 of a previous society of the same name (founded 1950) with the Cambridge University Society of Genealogists (founded 1954). ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... James VII ordained the modern Order. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... DSO medal The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other Commonwealth countries, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. ... Queen Victoria founded the Royal Victorian Order. ... The Order of Merit is a British and Commonwealth Order bestowed by the Monarch. ... The Imperial Service Order was established by King Edward VII in August 1902. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... The Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick is an order of chivalry associated with Ireland. ... The Royal Guelphic Order, sometimes also referred to as the Hanoverian Guelphic Order, was a British order of chivalry instituted on 28 April 1815 by the Prince Regent (later George IV). ... Insignia of a Knight Grand Commander of the Order of the Star of India. ... The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire is an order of chivalry founded by Victoria in 1877. ... Order Of British India First Class Order Of British India Second Class // History The Medal was originally instituted by the East India Company on the 18th of April 1837 for long, faithful and honourable service. ... // History The medal was first introduced by the East India Company in 1837. ... The Imperial Order of the Crown of India is an order in the British honours system. ... The Royal Order of Victoria and Albert was a British Royal Family Order instituted in 1862 by Queen Victoria, and enlarged on 10 October 1864, 15 November 1865 and 15 March 1880. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
The Most Honourable Order of the Bath, its History, Ceremony, Coats of Arms and Crests. (3325 words)
Order of the Garter Order of the Bath Garter Crests Bath Crests
The Princess of Wales was appointed Great Master of the Order on the 28 May 1975, the 250th Anniversary of the re-establishment of the Order of the Bath.
The Stalls and Altar and in the Chapel of the Order of the Bath
The Monarchy Today > Queen and public > Honours > Order of the Bath (797 words)
The Order of Bath is mainly awarded to officers of the Armed Services, as well as to a small number of civil servants.
The Order was revived by George I in 1725 as a regular military order, to serve the purposes of the first Prime Minister, Sir Robert Walpole, who required an additional source for political rewards.
The motto was historically thought to refer either to the Union of England, Scotland and France, or to the Union of England, Scotland and Ireland, or to the Holy Trinity.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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