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Encyclopedia > Orator
Look up orator in
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Orator is an originally Latin word for (public) speaker. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


Definitions of orator on the Web:


A person who delivers a speech or oration.[1] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Someone who speaks eloquently in public.[2] Public speaking is the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner intended to inform, influence, or entertain the listeners. ...


Someone who gives a formal address to an audience- usually a gifted speaker.[citation needed]


These speeches were usually held in forums (marketplaces).

Contents

Word history

It is recorded in English since c.1374, meaning "one who pleads or argues for a cause," from Anglo-French oratour, from Old French orateur (14c.), from Latin orator "speaker," from orare "speak before a court or assembly, plead," from a Proto-IndoEuropean base *or- "to pronounce a ritual formula". The modern meaning "public speaker" is attested from c.1430.


The derived word oration, originally used for prayer since c.1375, now means (recorded since 1502) any formal speech, as on a ceremonial occasion or delivered in similar high-flown or pompous manner. Also another word for oratist.


Its etymological doublet orison is recorded since c.1175, from Anglo-French oreison, Old French oraison "oration" (12c.), from Latin oratio "speech, oration," notably in Church Latin "prayer, appeal to God," from orare as above, but retained its devotional specialisation.


One meaning of the word oratory is abstract: the art of public speaking. Oratory is the art of eloquent speech. ...


There is also the equivalent word "Rhetor" of Greek origin, hence the abstract noun rhetoric. Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of spoken language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ...


History

In ancient Rome, the art of speaking in public (Ars Oratoria) was a professional competence especially cultivated by politicians and lawyers. As the Greeks were still seen as the masters in this field, as in philosophy and most sciences, the leading Roman families often either sent their sons to study these things under a famous master in Greece (as was the case with the young Julius Caesar) or engaged a Greek teacher (under pay or as a slave). Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... A lawyer, according to Blacks Law Dictionary, is a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person licensed to practice law. ... Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC or 102 BC – March 15, 44 BC), was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ...


It later was developed into rhetoric. Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of spoken language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ...


In the 18th century, 'Orator' John Henley was famous for his eccentric sermons. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... John Henley (August 3, 1692 - October 13, 1759), English clergyman, commonly known as Orator Henley, and one of the first entertainers and a precursor to the talk show hosts of today. ...


In the 19th century, orators and lecturers, such as Mark Twain, Charles Dickens, and Col. Robert G. Ingersoll were major providers of popular entertainment. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A lecture on linear algebra at the Helsinki University of Technology A lecture is an oral presentation intended to teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, writer, and lecturer. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ...


Formal titles

In the young revolutionary French republic, Orateur (French for Orator, but compare the Anglosaxon parliamentary speaker) was the term for the delegated members of the Tribunat to the Corps législatif to motivate their ruling on a presented bill. It has been suggested that Speakers of the House be merged into this article or section. ... Tribunat is the (french) name, somewhat confusingly derived from the Latin tribunatus (office or term of a Roman tribunus) of a collective organ of the young revolutionary French republic composed of members styled tribun (tribune) but, despite the apparent reference to one of ancient Romes prestigious magistratures, not holding... The Corps législatif was a part of the French legislature during the French Revolution and beyond. ...


In some universities the title 'Orator' is given to the official whose task it is to give speeches on ceremonial occasions, such as the presentation of honorary degrees. Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ...


Grand Orator is a high rank in the Grand Lodges of Freemasonry in certain US states (including Alabama, Arizona, ,California (where 'The Grand Orator shall deliver an address at each Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge upon matters appertaining to the Craft and deliver such other addresses as the Grand Master may request.' - California Masonic Code #3050), Missouri, North Carolina) A Grand Lodge, or Grand Orient, is the usual governing body of Craft, or Blue Lodge, Freemasonry in a particular jurisdiction. ... The Masonic Square and Compasses. ...


Pulpit orator

This term denotes Christian authors, often clergymen, who are renowned for their ability to write and/or deliver (from the pulpit in church, hence the word) rhetorically skilled religious sermons. For other uses of Ambo, see Ambo, Ethiopia, Kom Ombo, ambulance Ambo (band). ... A sermon is an oration by a prophet or member of the clergy. ...


Examples are:

William Lindsay Alexander (August 24, 1808 - December 20, 1884), was a Scottish church leader. ... Jean-Nicolas Beauregard (born Metz, Lorraine, France 4 December 1733, died Gröningen, Germany, 27 July, 1804) was a Jesuit preacher, pulpit orator and émigré priest following the French revolution, when he fled to London. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Henry Whitney Bellows (June 11, 1814 - January 30, 1882), American clergyman, was born in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet, Hyacinthe Rigaud, Louvre Jacques-Benigne Bossuet (September 27, 1627 - April 12, 1704) was a French bishop, theologian, and renowned pulpit orator and court preacher. ... Louis Bourdaloue (August 20, 1632 - May 13, 1704), French Jesuit and preacher, was born at Bourges. ... Charles de Bouvens was a French pulpit orator who had to flee the French Revolution due to his conservative views. ... Athanase Laurent Charles Coquerel (7 August 1795–1868) was a French Protestant divine, born in Paris. ... Thomas Guthrie (1803 - 1873), divine and philanthropist, born at Brechin, studied for the Church, and became a minister in Edinburgh. ... Robert Hall (2 May 1764 - 21 February 1831) was an English Baptist minister. ... Vincent Houdry was a French Jesuit preacher and writer on ascetics. ... Bishop Thomas Ken Thomas Ken (July 1637 – 19 March 1711), English churchman, was the most eminent of the English non-juring bishops, and one of the fathers of modern English hymnology // Ken was born at Little Berkhampstead, Herts, the son of Thomas Ken of Furnivals Inn, who belonged to... Henri-Dominique Lacordaire at the convent of Sainte-Sabine in Rome, by Théodore Chassériau (1840), Musée du Louvre Jean-Baptiste Henri Lacordaire, Father Henri-Dominique Lacordaire, born 12 May 1802 at Recey-sur-Ource (Côte-dOr), died 21 November 1861 at Sorèze (Tarn), a... William Jay (6 May 1769 - 27 December 1853) was an English Nonconformist divine. ... Hugh Latimer (d. ... Archbishop William Laud (October 7, 1573 – January 10, 1645) was Archbishop of Canterbury and a fervent supporter of King Charles I of England, whom he encouraged to believe in divine right. ... James Martineau (April 21, 1805 - January 11, 1900) was an English philosopher. ... Timoléon Cheminais de Montaigu was a French Jesuit pulpit orator. ... David Moriarty was an Irish Roman Catholic bishop and pulpit orator. ... Giovanni Paolo Oliva, S.J. (October 4, 1600 - 26 November 1681) was Superior General of the Society of Jesus. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Peter Pazmany. ... Berthold of Ratisbon was a Franciscan of the monastery of Ratisbon and the most powerful preacher of repentance in the thirteenth century. ... Father Abram J. Ryan Abram Joseph Ryan (February 5, 1838 or August 15, 1839 - April 22, 1886) was an American poet, an active proponent of the Confederate States of America, and a Roman Catholic priest. ... Girolamo Savonarola by Fra Bartolomeo, c. ... Georg Scherer (1540 — November 30, 1605) was a Roman Catholic pulpit orator and controversialist. ... Robert South (September, 1634 - July 8, 1716), was an English churchman. ... Valentin Thalhofer was a German Roman Catholic clergyman and theologian. ... Gioacchino Ventura (dei Baroni) di Raulica was an Italian Roman catholic pulpit orator, patriot, philosopher and writer. ... Antonio Vieira (February 6, 1608 _ 1697), Portuguese Jesuit and writer, the prince of Catholic pulpit-orators of his time, was born in Lisbon. ... Nikolaus von Dinkelsbühl was an Austrian Roman Catholic clergyman, pulpit orator and theologian. ... Kaiserberg Johann Geiler von Kaisersberg (Schaffhausen, March 16, 1445 – Strasburg March 10, 1510), was a Swiss-born preacher, considered one of the greatest of the popular preachers of the 15th century. ... Friedrich Ludwig Zacharias Werner (November 18, 1768 - January 17, 1823), was a German poet, dramatist and preacher. ...

Other famous orators

Ancient and medieval orators

For the Shakespeare play, see Pericles, Prince of Tyre Pericles (c. ... The ten Attic orators were considered the greatest orators and logographers of the classical era (5th century BC–4th century BC). ... Demosthenes (384–322 BC, Greek: Δημοσθένης, DÄ“mosthénÄ“s) was a prominent Greek statesman and orator of ancient Athens. ... A philippic is a fiery, damning speech delivered to condemn a particular political actor. ... Aeschines (389 - 314 BC), Greek statesman and one of the ten Attic orators, was born at Athens. ... Andocides, or Andokidès , (440–390 BC) one of the ten Attic orators. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Dinarchus, (c. ... Hypereides (c. ... Lysias (d. ... Isaeus (fl. ... Isocrates (436–338 BC), Greek rhetorician. ... Lycurgus (in Greek Λυκουργος; 396–323 BC), an Attic orator, was born at Athens about 396 BC, and was the son of Lycophron, who belonged to the noble family of the Eteobutadae. ... Statue of Harmodius and Aristogeiton, Naples. ... Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC or 102 BC – March 15, 44 BC), was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in world history. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus Roman provinces on the eve of the assassination of Julius Caesar, c. ... Claudius Aelianus (c. ... Decimus Magnus Ausonius (c. ... Cicero at about age 60, from an ancient marble bust Marcus Tullius Cicero (IPA:Classical Latin pronunciation: , usually pronounced in American English or in British English; January 3, 106 BC – December 7, 43 BC) was a Roman statesman, lawyer, political theorist, philosopher, widely considered one of Romes greatest orators... Domitius Afer (died 60) was a Roman orator and advocate, born at Nemausus (Nîmes) in Gallia Narbonensis. ... Eumenius (c. ... From the c. ... Gaius Scribonius Curio was the name of a father and son who lived in the late Roman Republic. ... Hegesippus was a statesman and orator, nicknamed knot, probably from the way in which he wore his hair. ... Hermagoras, of Temnos, Greek rhetorician of the Rhodian school and teacher of oratory in Rome, flourished during the first half of the 1st century BC. He obtained a great reputation among a certain section and founded a special school, the members of which called themselves Hermagorei. ... Marcus Porcius Cato (Latin: M·PORCIVS·M·F·CATO[1]) (234 BC, Tusculum–149 BC) was a Roman statesman, surnamed the Censor (Censorius), Sapiens, Priscus, or the Elder (Major), to distinguish him from Cato the Younger (his great-grandson). ... Gaius Licinius Macer Calvus (82 BC - c. ... Marcus Licinius Crassus (Latin: M·LICINIVS·P·F·P·N·CRASSVS[1]) (c. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus Roman provinces on the eve of the assassination of Julius Caesar, c. ... Nazarius, (4th century AD), Latin rhetorician and panegyrist, was, according to Ausonius, a professor of rhetoric at Burdigala (Bordeaux). ... Saint Paul the Apostle (born ca. ... The Twelve Apostles (in Koine Greek απόστολος apostolos [1], someone sent forth/sent out, an emissary) were probably Galilean Jewish men (10 names are Aramaic, 4 names are Greek) chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth by Jesus of Nazareth to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles... Peter the Hermit shows the crusaders the way to Jerusalem. ... Quintus Hortensius (114 - 50 BC), surnamed Hortalus, was a Roman orator and advocate. ... Quintilian(c. ... Lucius, or Marcus, Annaeus Seneca, known as Seneca the Elder and Seneca the Rhetorician (ca. ...

Modern orators

“Lenin” redirects here. ... `Abd al_Qādir al_Jazāirī. `Abd al_Qādir al_Jazāirī (6 September 1808 - 26 May 1883) was an Algerian military leader who led a struggle against the French invasion in the mid-nineteenth century, for which he is seen as a Algerian national hero. ... Samuel Ladoke Akintola (July 10, 1910 January 15, 1966) was a Nigerian politician. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, soldier in the British Army, orator, and strategist, and is studied as part of the modern British and world history. ... Henry Clay, Sr. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century, best known as a spokesman for slavery, nullification and the rights of electoral minorities, such as slave-holders. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Frederick Douglass, ca. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... Edward Everett (April 11, 1794 – January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. ... George Galloway (born 16 August 1954 in Dundee) is a Scottish politician and author noted for his left wing views, confrontational style, and rhetorical skill. ... Paul Joseph Goebbels (German pronunciation: IPA: ) (29 October 1897 – 1 May 1945) was a German politician and Minister for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda during the National Socialist regime from 1933 to 1945. ... John Henley (August 3, 1692 - October 13, 1759), English clergyman, commonly known as Orator Henley, and one of the first entertainers and a precursor to the talk show hosts of today. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Nazi propaganda poster. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ NAHNERZ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Alan Gabriel Ludwig García Pérez (born May 23, 1949 in Lima) is the current President of Peru after winning the 2006 elections on June 4, 2006 in a run-off against Union for Peru candidate Ollanta Humala. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... General of the Army Douglas MacArthur KCB (January 26, 1880 – April 5, 1964), was an American general and Field Marshal of the Philippines Army. ... Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini (July 29, 1883 – April 28, 1945) was the prime minister and dictator of Italy from 1922 until 1943, when he was overthrown. ... Duce is an Italian word meaning leader, derived from Latin word dux of the same meaning, of which Duke is a derivation. ... Gamal Abdel Nasser (Arabic: - ; Masri: جمال عبد الناصر - also transliterated as Jamal Abd al-Naser, Jamal Abd an-Nasser and other variants; January 15, 1918 – September 28, 1970) was the President of Egypt from 1954 until his death in 1970. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Patrick Henry Pearse (known to Irish nationalists as Pádraig Pearse; Irish: ; 10 November 1879 – 3 May 1916) was a teacher, barrister, poet, writer, nationalist and political activist who was one of the leaders of the Easter Rising in 1916. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the fortieth President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the thirty-third Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... FDR redirects here. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, also known as Detroit Red and Al-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Omaha, Nebraska, May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965 in New York City) was a Muslim Minister and National Spokesman for the Nation of Islam. ... Hassan Nasrallah (Arabic: ) (b. ... William Lloyd Garrison William Lloyd Garrison (December 12, 1805–May 24, 1879) was a prominent United States abolitionist, journalist, and social reformer. ... Sukarno (June 6, 1901 – June 21, 1970) was the first President of Indonesia. ...

Notes

  1. ^ WordNet Search - 3.0. Cognitive Science Laboratory Princeton University. Retrieved on 2007-05-23.
  2. ^ Industry Terms and Definitions. AEI Speakers Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-05-23.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources and references

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