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Encyclopedia > Orarion

The Orarion is the distinguishing vestment of the deacon in the Eastern Orthodox Church. It is a narrow stole, usually four to five inches wide and about ten feet long, made of brocade with seven crosses embroidered or appliquéd along its length. The deacon wears the orarion over his left shoulder with the front portion draped over his left forearm. He will often take this section in his right hand when leading litanies or drawing attention to a particular liturgical action. Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ... Pentecost - The Birth of the Church The Eastern Orthodox Church (encompassing national Orthodox jurisdictions such as Greek Orthodox, Russian Orthodox, etc. ... The stole (a liturgical vestment of various Christian denominations) is an embroidered band of cloth, formerly usually of silk, about two and one-half to three metres long and seven to ten centimetres wide, whose ends are usually broadened out. ... The traditional form of the Christian cross, known as the Latin cross. ... Gold Embroidery Embroidery is the art or handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with designs stitched in strands of thread or yarn using a needle. ... Applique (or appliqué) is a technique in which pieces of fabric are sewn onto a foundation piece of fabric to create designs. ... A litany, in Christian worship, is a form of prayer used in church services and processions, and consisting of a number of petitions. ...


Deacons may be awarded the double orarion, which is worn over the left shoulder, wrapped around the chest and back, and brought back over the left shoulder to the front. In Greek practice, all deacons wear the double orarion.


When preparing for Communion, the deacon will tie the orarion around his waist, bringing the ends up over his shoulders (forming a cross in back) and then down in front, tucking them under the section around the waist. The Eucharist or Communion or The Lords Supper, is the rite that Christians perform in fulfillment of Jesus instruction, recorded in the New Testament[1], to do in memory of him what he did at his Last Supper. ...


The subdeacon also wears the orarion, but always wrapped around his body in the manner described above. In the Greek tradition, tonsured taper-bearers wear the orarion similarly crossed in back, but with the ends hanging parallel in front. Subdeacon is a title used in various branches of Christianity. ... Tonsure is the practice of some Christian churches of cutting the hair from the scalp of clerics as a symbol of their renunciation of worldly fashion and esteem. ... For the name of the cult from the X-Men series, see Acolytes (comics) In some Christian churches, an acolyte is one who wishes to attain clergyhood. ...


Eastern Catholics follow the same tradition as do their Orthodox counterparts. In Greek-Catholic practice, the double-orarion is worn only over the left shoulder (folded to make up for length) over a cassock if the deacon in question is preaching but not participating otherwise. Subdeacons wear theirs crossing in front and back, and servers wear theirs crossed in back and hanging like an "H" in the front. Byzantine Catholics of Slavic tradition tend not to have their servers wear an orarion. Latinization is mostly to blame for this according to most Greek tradition clergy.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Orarion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (371 words)
The Orarion (Greek: ὀράριον; Slavonic: Ораръ, orar) is the distinguishing vestment of the deacon in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Deacons may be awarded the double orarion, which is worn over the left shoulder, wrapped around the chest and back, and brought back over the left shoulder to the front.
When preparing for Communion, the deacon will tie the orarion around his waist, bringing the ends up over his shoulders (forming a cross in back) and then down in front, tucking them under the section around the waist.
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