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Encyclopedia > Orangery
Orangery in Kuskovo, Moscow (1760s).
Orangery in Kuskovo, Moscow (1760s).

An Orangery was a building frequently found in the grounds of fashionable residences from the 17th to the 19th century. Similar to a greenhouse or conservatory. The name is derived from the original use of the building as a place where citrus trees were often grown in tubs and wintered under cover. The orangery originated from the Renaissance gardens of Italy, when glass-making technology enabled sufficient expanses of clear glass to be produced. Image File history File links Kuskovo_orangerie. ... Image File history File links Kuskovo_orangerie. ... View of Kuskovo in 1839 Kuskovo is an extensive estate, or manor, of the Counts Sheremetev, originally situated several miles to the east of Moscow but now forming a part of the East District of that city. ... Moscow (Moskva) (Russian: , romanised: Moskva, IPA: see also other names) is the capital of Russia and the countrys economic, financial, educational, and transportation centre. ... The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken. ... A traditional conservatory at the Horniman Museum in London A modern Conservatory. ... See also subsistence gardening, the art and craft of growing plants, considered as a circumscribed form of individual agriculture. ...


The Orangerie at the Palace of the Louvre, 1617, inspired imitations that were not eclipsed until the development of the modern greenhouse in the 1840s, which was quickly overshadowed by the architecture in glass of Joseph Paxton. Notable for his design of the Crystal Palace, his "great conservatory" at Chatsworth House was an orangery and glass house of monumental proportions. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sir Joseph Paxton (1803–1865) was an English gardener and architect of The Crystal Palace. ... The 1851 Great Exhibition in Hyde Park . ... A view of Chatsworth from the south-west circa 1880. ...


The orangery, however, was not just a greenhouse but a symbol of prestige and wealth and a feature of the garden, in the same way as a summerhouse, folly or "Grecian temple". Owners would conduct their guests there on tours of the garden to admire not only the fruits within but the architecture without. Often the orangery would contain fountains, grottos, and an area in which to entertain in inclement weather. A Summerhouse is a small roofed building of varying forms in gardens or parks designed to provide cool shady places of relaxation or retreats from summer heat. ... Broadway Tower, Worcestershire, England The folly at Wimpole Hall, Cambridgeshire, England, built in the 1700s to resemble Gothic-era ruins In architecture, a folly is an extravagant, useless, or fanciful building, or a building that appears to be something other than what it is. ...

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Continental European Orangeries

The Orangerieschloss built by Frederick William IV of Prussia in Potsdam in the mid-19th century, in imitation of the Italian Renaissance style [citation needed]
The orangerie of the Royal Castle of Laeken (ca.1820) are the eldest part of the monumental Royal Greenhouses of Laeken.
The orangerie of the Royal Castle of Laeken (ca.1820) are the eldest part of the monumental Royal Greenhouses of Laeken.

Download high resolution version (990x724, 215 KB)Orangerieschloss in Potsdam. ... Download high resolution version (990x724, 215 KB)Orangerieschloss in Potsdam. ... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... Potsdam is the capital city of the federal state of Brandenburg in Germany. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 183 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 183 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Royal Castle of Laeken The Royal Castle of Laeken (Château Royal de Laeken / Koninklijk kasteel van Laken), is the official residence of the King of the Belgians. ... The Serre du Congo or Congoserre (left) and the Grote wintertuin or Grand Jardin dhiver (right) part of the Royal Greenhouses of Laeken The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken (in Dutch: Koninklijke Serres van Laken, in French: Serres Royales de Laeken), are a vast complex of monumental heated greenhouses in... The Château de Versailles, or simply Versailles, is a royal château in Versailles, France. ... Up to 1871 the Tuileries Palace was a palace in Paris, France, on the right bank of the River Seine. ... Schönbrunn can refer to Schönbrunn Palace in Vienna, Austria the municipality Schönbrunn (Baden) in the Rhein-Neckar district, Baden-Württemberg, Germany the municipality Schönbrunn (Steigerwald) in the district Bamberg, Bavaria, Germany Schönbrunn (Fichtelgebirge) , part of Wunsiedel in the district of Fichtegelberge A part of... Peterhof: the Samson Fountain and Sea Channel Peterhof (Russian: , Petergof, originally Piterhof, Dutch for Peters Court) is a series of palaces and gardens, laid out on the orders of Peter the Great, and sometimes called the Russian Versailles. It is located about twenty kilometers west and six kilometers south... Tsarskoye Selo (Царское Село in Russian, may be translated as “Tsar’s Village”), a former residence of the royal families and visiting nobility 24 km south of St. ... View of Kuskovo in 1839 Kuskovo is an extensive estate, or manor, of the Counts Sheremetev, originally situated several miles to the east of Moscow but now forming a part of the East District of that city. ... Moscow (Moskva) (Russian: , romanised: Moskva, IPA: see also other names) is the capital of Russia and the countrys economic, financial, educational, and transportation centre. ... Potsdam is the capital city of the federal state of Brandenburg in Germany. ... The Serre du Congo or Congoserre (left) and the Grote wintertuin or Grand Jardin dhiver (right) part of the Royal Greenhouses of Laeken The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken (in Dutch: Koninklijke Serres van Laken, in French: Serres Royales de Laeken), are a vast complex of monumental heated greenhouses in... The Royal Castle of Laeken The Royal Castle of Laeken (Château Royal de Laeken / Koninklijk kasteel van Laken), is the official residence of the King of the Belgians. ... Fulda is a city in Hesse, Germany; it is located on the Fulda River and is the administrative seat of the Fulda district (Kreis). ... This article is about the city of Kassel in Hessen, Germany. ... Gera is the largest Town in the east of Thuringia, Germany. ... City flag City coat of arms Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Alsace Department Bas-Rhin (67) Intercommunality Urban Community of Strasbourg Mayor Fabienne Keller  (UMP) City Statistics Land area¹ 78. ... Hanover(i) (German: , IPA: ), on the river Leine, is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... The Herrenhausen Gardens (German: Herrenhäuser Gärten), located in Lower Saxonys capital of Hanover are made up of the Great Garden (Großer Garten), the Berggarten, the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten. ...

Orangeries in the UK

The Orangery at Kew Gardens. It is now used as a restaurant

The orangery at Kew (1761) is the earliest surviving work there by Sir William Chambers. At 28 m (92 ft) long, it was the largest glasshouse in Britain when it was built. Though it was designed as an arcade with end pavilions to winter oranges, the light levels under its solid roof were too low for it to be successful. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 366 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Orangery Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 366 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Orangery Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Kew Gardens is the name of several places: Kew Gardens is a commonly-used name for the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, London, United Kingdom Kew Gardens is the name of a park in The Beaches neighborhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Kew Gardens is also the name of a neighborhood... Kew Gardens is the name of several places: Kew Gardens is a commonly-used name for the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, London, United Kingdom Kew Gardens is the name of a park in The Beaches neighborhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Kew Gardens is also the name of a neighborhood... The central courtyard of Chambers Somerset House in London. ...

  • Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew: The Orangery

The Orangery at Margam Park, Wales, was built between 1787 and 1793 to house a large collection of orange, lemon and citron trees inherited by Thomas Mansel Talbot. The original house has been razed, but the surviving orangery, at 327 feet, is the longest one in Wales. Margam Country Park is a country park estate of around 850 acres in south Wales (grid reference SS803864) once owned by the Mansel Talbot family and now owned and adminstered by the local council, Neath Port Talbot Borough Council. ...

  • Margam Park: Orangery

Sir Christopher Wren designed the orangery at Kensington Palace for Queen Anne in 1702. Christopher Wren. ... The south facade of the main block of Kensington Palace, seen through Jean Tijous wrought iron gates. ... The term Queen Anne, when applied to a style of furniture or architecture, refers to the only British monarch of the name, Anne, who reigned between 1702 and 1714. ...


There is an orangery dating from about 1700 at Kenwood House in London. Kenwood House Kenwood House (also known as the Iveagh Bequest) is a former stately home in Hampstead Heath in London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Orangeries in the US

In the United States the earliest surviving orangery is at the Tayloe house in Mount Airy, Virginia, but today it is an overgrown ruin. A ruined orangery can also be seen at the gardens Eyre Hall in North Hampton County, Virginia. Mount Airy, near Warsaw in Richmond County, Virginia, is a mid-Georgian plantation house, the first built in the manner of a neo-Palladian villa; it was built in 1758-62 for Colonel John Tayloe, perhaps the richest Virginia planter of his generation. ...


A more interesting, and extant, early 18th century orangery can be seen at the Wye Plantation, near Tunis Mills (Easton), Maryland. This orangery sits behind the main house and consists of a large open room with two smaller wings added at some point after the initial construction. The south-facing wall consists of large triple-hung windows. A second story was added as a billiards room, according to the current resident, Ms. Tilghman, a descendent of the Lloyd family. This plantation is also notable as having been the home of Frederick Douglass as a young slave boy. The orangery is described in the book Glass Houses, as is the orangery at the Tayloe house. Frederick Douglass, ca. ...


Ms. Tilghman notes that plants are still stored inside the building in winter, but a frame has been constructed to hold the houseplants, and the whole of the frame is covered with plastic to keep in moisture. In this way, the plants do not have to be watered through the entire winter.


References

  • Mary Woods, Glass Houses: A History of Greenhouses, Orangeries and Conservatories 1996

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Orangeries, Orangery Glass Houses, Conservatories, Conservatory, Timber / Wood (665 words)
Historically an Orangery was a place for the cultivation of oranges and lemons and other exotic plants.
The classic Orangery design had stone built parapet walls containing large vertical sliding sash windows such that the glass area on the sides was in excess of 75%.
The Orangery is now often attached to the main house and used as room as well as for plants.
Orangery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (302 words)
Orangerie in the ground of the Château de Versailles
The Orangerie at the Palace of the Louvre, 1617, inspired imitations that were not eclipsed until the development of the modern greenhouse in the 1840s.
The Orangery at Margam Park, Wales, was built between 1787 and 1793 to house a large collection of orange, lemon and citron trees inherited by Thomas Mansel Talbot.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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