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Encyclopedia > Ophiuchus
Ophiuchus
Ophiuchus
Click for larger image
List of stars in Ophiuchus
Abbreviation: Oph
Genitive: Ophiuchi
Symbology: the snake-holder / the healer
Right ascension: 17 h
Declination:
Area: 948 sq. deg. (11th)
Main stars: 10
Bayer/Flamsteed stars: 59
Stars with known planets: 2
Bright stars: 5
Nearby stars: 8
Brightest star: α Oph (Ras Alhague) (2.1m)
Nearest star: Barnard's Star (5.96 ly)
Messier objects: 7
Meteor showers: Ophiuchids
Northern May Ophiuchids
Southern May Ophiuchids
Theta Ophiuchids
Bordering constellations: Hercules
Serpens Caput
Libra
Scorpius
Sagittarius
Serpens Cauda
Aquila
Visible at latitudes between +80° and −80°
Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of July

Ophiuchus (IPA: [ˌoʊfiˈjukəs]), formerly referred to as Serpentarius (IPA: [ˌsɚpənˈtʰeɹiəs]), the former originating in the Greek language and the latter in the Latin language, both meaning "serpent-holder," is one of the 88 constellations and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. It is a large constellation located in the southern hemisphere near the center of the Milky Way, between Scorpius to the west and Sagittarius to the east. Of the 13 zodiacal constellations (constellations that contain the Sun during the course of the year), Ophiuchus is the only one not counted as an astrological sign. This is a celestial map of the constellation Ophiuchus, the Serpent Holder. ... This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Ophiuchus, sorted by decreasing brightness. ... The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun. ... blue: sea snakes, black: land snakes Superfamilies and Families Henophidia Aniliidae Anomochilidae Boidae Bolyeriidae Cylindrophiidae Loxocemidae Pythonidae Tropidophiidae Uropeltidae Xenopeltidae Typhlopoidea Anomalepididae Leptotyphlopidae Typhlopidae Xenophidia Acrochordidae Atractaspididae Colubridae Elapidae Hydrophiidae Viperidae A snake is a scaly, limbless, elongate reptile from the order Squamata. ... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... Equatorial Coordinates Right ascension (abbrev. ... In astronomy, declination (abbrev. ... Here is a list of the 88 modern constellations by their area in the sky, measured in square degrees. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Flamsteed designations for stars are similar to Bayer designations, except that they use numbers instead of Greek letters. ... Ras Alhague is the α star in the constellation of Ophiuchus Ras Alhague (Bayer designation Alpha Ophiuchus) is the brightest star in the constellation Ophiuchus. ... The apparent magnitude (m) of a star, planet or other celestial body is a measure of its apparent brightness as seen by an observer on Earth. ... Barnards Star is a very low-mass star in the constellation Ophiuchus which was discovered by the astronomer E. E. Barnard in 1916. ... A light-year or lightyear (symbol: ly) is a unit of measurement of length, specifically the distance light travels in vacuum in one year. ... The Messier objects are a set of astronomical objects catalogued by Charles Messier in his catalogue of Nebulae and Star Clusters first published in 1774. ... The Taurids Meteor Shower A meteor shower, some of which are known as a meteor storm or meteor outburst, is a celestial event where a group of meteors are observed to radiate from one point in the sky. ... Hercules (IPA: ) is the fifth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Serpens (the snake) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... Libra (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , Unicode ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Scorpius (, and Latin for scorpion) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... For other uses, see Sagittarius. ... Serpens (the snake) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... Aquila (IPA: , Latin: ; sometimes named the Vulture), is one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, also mentioned by Eudoxus (4th century BC) and Aratus (3rd century BC) and now also part of the list of 88 constellations acknowledged by the IAU. It lies roughly at the celestial equator. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Greek ( IPA: or IPA: — Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in that language family. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A medieval artists rendition of Claudius Ptolemaeus Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: ; ca. ... It has been suggested that Andromeda-Milky Way collision be merged into this article or section. ... Scorpius (Latin for scorpion, symbol , Unicode ♏) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... For other uses, see Sagittarius. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... In astrology, the Signs of the Zodiac represent twelve equal segments or divisions of the zodiac. ...


Ophiuchus is depicted as a man supporting a serpent; the interposition of his body divides the snake into two parts, Serpens Caput and Serpens Cauda, which are nonetheless counted as one constellation. Serpens (the snake) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ...

Contents

Notable features

The brightest stars in Ophiuchus include α Ophiuchi, called Rasalhague (at the figure's head), and λ Ophiuchi, a triple star (at his elbow). Ras Alhague is the α star in the constellation of Ophiuchus Ras Alhague (Bayer designation Alpha Ophiuchus) is the brightest star in the constellation Ophiuchus. ... Marfik (also Marsik) is the name of the star Lambda Ophiuchi. ...


RS Ophiuchi is part of a strange class called recurrent novae, whose brightness increase at irregular intervals by hundreds of times in a period of just a few days. It is thought to be at the brink of becoming a type-1a supernova.[1] RS Ophiuchi (RS Oph) is a nova approximately 1,950 light-years away in the constellation Ophiuchus. ... Artists conception of a white dwarf star accreting hydrogen from a larger companion A nova (pl. ... Multiwavelength X-ray image of the remnant of Keplers Supernova, SN 1604. ...


Barnard's Star, one of the nearest stars to the Solar System (the only stars closer are the Alpha Centauri binary system and Proxima Centauri), lies in Ophiuchus. (It is located to the left of β and straight up from ν in the chart.) Barnards Star is a very low-mass star in the constellation Ophiuchus which was discovered by the astronomer E. E. Barnard in 1916. ... This list of the nearest stars to Earth is ordered by increasing distance out to a maximum of 5 parsecs (16. ... Alpha Centauri (α Cen / α Centauri, also known as Rigil Kentaurus), is the brightest star system in the southern constellation of Centaurus. ... The red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, part of the Alpha Centauri star system, is the nearest star to the Sun at a distance of 4. ...


In April 2007, astronomers announced that the Swedish-built Odin satellite had made the first detection of clouds of molecular oxygen in space, following observations in the constellation Ophiuchus.[1]


Notable deep-sky objects

Ophiuchus contains several star clusters, such as IC 4665, NGC 6633, M9, M10, M12, M14, M19, M62, and M107, as well as the nebula IC 4603-4604. The unusual galaxy merger remnant NGC 6240 is also in Ophiuchus. Open Cluster IC 4665 (or simply IC 4665) is an open cluster in the Ophiuchus constellation. ... NGC 6633 is an open cluster that was, according to the Webb Society Deep-Sky Observers Handbook, Volume 3 (Open and Globular Star Clusters), p. ... Globular Cluster M9 (also known as Messier Object 9, Messier 9, M9, or NGC 6333) is a globular cluster in the Ophiuchus constellation. ... Globular Cluster M10 (also known as Messier Object 10, Messier 10, M10, or NGC 6254) is a globular cluster in the Ophiuchus constellation. ... Globular Cluster M12 (also known as Messier Object 12, Messier 12, M12, or NGC 6218) is a globular cluster in the Ophiuchus constellation. ... Globular Cluster M14 (also known as Messier Object 14, Messier 14, M14, or NGC 6402) is a globular cluster in the Ophiuchus constellation. ... Globular Cluster M19 (also known as Messier Object 19, Messier 19, M19, or NGC 6273) is a globular cluster in the Ophiuchus constellation. ... Globular Cluster M62 (also known as Messier Object 62, Messier 62, M62, or NGC 6266) is a globular cluster in the Ophiuchus constellation. ... Globular Cluster M107 (also known as Messier Object 107, Messier 107, M107 or NGC 6171) is a very loose globular cluster in the Ophiuchus constellation. ... Chandra image of NGC 6420. ...


Mythology

There exist a number of theories as to whom the figure represents.


The most recent interpretation is that the figure represents the healer Asclepius, who learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another (which Asclepius himself had fatally wounded) healing herbs. To prevent the entire human race from becoming immortal under Asclepius's care, Zeus killed him with a bolt of lightning, but later placed his image in the heavens to honor his good works. It has also been noted that the constellation Ophiuchus is in close proximity in the sky to that of Sagittarius, which has at times been believed to represent Chiron (the mentor of Asclepius and many other Greek demigods), though Chiron was originally associated with the constellation Centaurus. Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Sagittarius. ... Chiron and Achilles In Greek mythology, Chiron (hand) — sometimes transliterated Cheiron or rarely Kiron — was held as the superlative centaur among his brethren. ... Centaurus (Latin for centaur) was one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, and counts also among the 88 modern constellations. ...


Another possibility is that the figure represents the Trojan priest Laocoön, who was killed by a pair of sea serpents sent by the gods after he warned the Trojans not to accept the Trojan Horse. This event was also memorialized by the sculptors Agesander, Athenodoros, and Polydorus in the famous marble sculpture Laocoön and his Sons, which stands in the Vatican Museums. Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... Laocoön (Greek Λαοκοων, pronounced roughly La-oh-koh-on), son of Acoetes, was allegedly a priest of Poseidon (or of Apollo, by some accounts) at Troy; he is famous for warning the Trojans in vain against accepting the Trojan Horse from the Greeks... // For other uses, see Trojan Horse (disambiguation). ... Agesander, a Rhodian sculptor, whose title to fame is that he is mentioned by Pliny (Nat. ... Athenodoros or Athenodorus (Greek: ̉Αθηνόδωρος) was the name of several figures in the ancient Hellenistic world: Athenodoros of Kleitor (fl late 5th-early 4th century BCE) was a sculptor who made statues of Zeus and Apollo which the Lacedaemonians erected at Delphi in thanks for the Spartan victory in the Battle... In Greek mythology, Polydorus referred to three different people. ... The statue of Laocoön and His Sons, also called the Laocoön Group, is a monumental marble sculpture, now in the Vatican Museums, Rome. ... Entrance to the museum Staircase of the Vatican Museum The Vatican Museums (Musei Vaticani) are the public art and sculpture museums in the Vatican City, which display works from the extensive collection of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


A third possibility is Apollo wrestling with the Python to take control of the oracle at Delphi. Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros (a beardless youth), was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery and also a... In Greek mythology Python was the earth-dragon of Delphi, always represented in the vase-paintings and by sculptors as a serpent. ... Consulting the Oracle by John William Waterhouse, showing eight priestesses in a temple of prophecy An oracle is a person or persons considered to be the source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ... Delphi (Greek Δελφοί, [ðe̞lˈfi]) is an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece on the south-western spur of Mount Parnassus in a valley of Phocis. ...


There is also the story of Phorbas, a Thessalonikan who rescued the people of the island of Rhodes from a plague of serpents and was granted a place in the sky in honor of this deed. When the people of the island of Rhodes fell victim to a plague of masses of serpents (may have been dragons or simly snakes), an oracle directed them to call on a man named Phorbas. ... Rhodes (Greek: Ρόδος (pron. ...


History

Johannes Kepler's drawing depicting the location of the stella nova in the foot of Ophiuchus.

This constellation, known from antiquity, is one of the 48 constellations described by Ptolemy. It has also been known as Serpentarius, a Latin form of its name. Download high resolution version (499x754, 220 KB)Illustration by Kepler from his book De Stella Nova in Pede Serpentarii (On the New Star in Ophiuchuss Foot) indicating the location of the 1604 supernova. ... Download high resolution version (499x754, 220 KB)Illustration by Kepler from his book De Stella Nova in Pede Serpentarii (On the New Star in Ophiuchuss Foot) indicating the location of the 1604 supernova. ... Johannes Kepler (December 27, 1571 – November 15, 1630) was a German Lutheran mathematician, astronomer and astrologer, and a key figure in the 17th century astronomical revolution. ... A medieval artists rendition of Claudius Ptolemaeus Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: ; ca. ...


The most important historical event in Ophiuchus was the Supernova of 1604, whose explosion was first observed on October 9, 1604, near θ Ophiuchi. Johannes Kepler saw it first on October 16 and studied it so extensively that the supernova was subsequently called Kepler's Supernova. He published his findings in a book titled De stella nova in pede Serpentarii (On the New Star in Ophiuchus's Foot). Galileo used its brief appearance to counter the Aristotelian dogma that the heavens are changeless. Supernova 1604, also known as Keplers Supernova or Keplers Star, was a supernova in the Milky Way, in the constellation Ophiuchus. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 14 – Hampton Court conference with James I of England, the Anglican bishops and representatives of Puritans September 20 – Capture of Ostend by Spanish forces under Ambrosio Spinola after a three year siege. ... Johannes Kepler (December 27, 1571 – November 15, 1630) was a German Lutheran mathematician, astronomer and astrologer, and a key figure in the 17th century astronomical revolution. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... Galileo Galilei (15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who is closely associated with the scientific revolution. ... Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ...


It occurred only 32 years after another supernova in Cassiopeia that had been observed by Tycho Brahe; the last supernova before then had occurred in 1054 (see Crab Nebula), and after Kepler's, no further naked-eye supernovae were observed until 1987 (see Supernova 1987a.) Cassiopeia (IPA: ) is a northern constellation which Greek mythology considered to represent a vain queen who boasted about her unrivaled beauty. ... Tycho Brahe Monument of Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler in Prague Tycho Brahe, born Tyge Ottesen Brahe (December 14, 1546 – October 24, 1601), was a Danish nobleman from the region of Scania (in modern-day Sweden), best known today as an early astronomer, though in his lifetime he was also... Events Cardinal Humbertus, a representative of Pope Leo IX, and Michael Cerularius, Patriarch of Constantinople, decree each others excommunication. ... The Crab Nebula (catalogue designations M 1, NGC 1952, Taurus A) is a supernova remnant in the constellation of Taurus. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Beaded ring brightens from 2003 and 2005 SN 1987A was a supernova in the outskirts of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a nearby dwarf galaxy. ...




Astrology

In the 2nd century, Ptolemy listed 29 stars in Ophiuchus. He recognised that most of those stars were north of the ecliptic (the path of the Sun through the sky); however, four of them (today known as 36 Oph, 42 θ Oph, 44 Oph, and 51 Oph) he recognized as being south of the ecliptic. Therefore, the Sun passed through the constellation of Ophiuchus as it was recognised by Ptolemy. The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... The plane of the ecliptic is well seen in this picture from the 1994 lunar prospecting Clementine spacecraft. ...


The reason that Ophiuchus is not a part of the western astrological zodiac is because that zodiac is defined on the basis of the sun spending an equal amount of time in twelve astrological signs starting at the vernal equinox in the northern hemisphere — this is called the tropical zodiac. There is also a sidereal zodiac, which is based on the actual location of the stars in the sky, and which is used by Hindu and some Western astrologers. At present, the sun is in Ophiuchus from November 30 to December 17. It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... In astrology, the Signs of the Zodiac represent twelve equal segments or divisions of the zodiac. ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox The vernal equinox (or spring equinox) marks the beginning of astronomical spring. ... The tropical zodiac is a zodiac based upon tropical time, or the apparent motion of the Sun across the sky over the course of a year. ... Sidereal astrology is the practice by some western and all Indian astrologers of basing their study of the sky on the actual position of the planets in relation to the starry background. ... November 30 is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  1. ^ Star 'soon to become supernova'
  • Ian Ridpath and Wil Tirion (2007). Collins Stars and Planets Guide, HarperCollins, London. ISBN 978-0007251209.

External links

The 88 modern Constellations
Andromeda • Antlia • Apus • Aquarius • Aquila • Ara • Aries • Auriga • Boötes • Caelum • Camelopardalis • Cancer • Canes Venatici • Canis Major • Canis Minor • Capricornus • Carina • Cassiopeia • Centaurus • Cepheus • Cetus • Chamaeleon • Circinus • Columba • Coma Berenices • Corona Australis • Corona Borealis • Corvus • Crater • Crux • Cygnus • Delphinus • Dorado • Draco • Equuleus • Eridanus • Fornax • Gemini • Grus • Hercules • Horologium • Hydra • Hydrus • Indus • Lacerta • Leo • Leo Minor • Lepus • Libra • Lupus • Lynx • Lyra • Mensa • Microscopium • Monoceros • Musca • Norma • Octans • Ophiuchus • Orion • Pavo • Pegasus • Perseus • Phoenix • Pictor • Pisces • Piscis Austrinus • Puppis • Pyxis • Reticulum • Sagitta • Sagittarius • Scorpius • Sculptor • Scutum • Serpens • Sextans • Taurus • Telescopium • Triangulum • Triangulum Australe • Tucana • Ursa Major • Ursa Minor • Vela • Virgo • Volans • Vulpecula


This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Andromeda (IPA: ) is a constellation named for the princess Andromeda (which is Greek for Ruler over men), a character in Greek mythology. ... Antlia (IPA: , Latin: ) is a relatively new constellation as it was only created in the 18th century, being too faint to be acknowledged by the ancient Greeks. ... Apus (Latin for bird of paradise) is a faint southern constellation, not visible to the ancient Greeks. ... Aquarius (IPA: , Latin: ) is the eleventh sign of the zodiac, situated between Capricornus and Pisces. ... Aquila (IPA: , Latin: ; sometimes named the Vulture), is one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, also mentioned by Eudoxus (4th century BC) and Aratus (3rd century BC) and now also part of the list of 88 constellations acknowledged by the IAU. It lies roughly at the celestial equator. ... Ara (Latin for Altar) is a faint southerly constellation between the constellations Centaurus and Lupus. ... Aries (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Auriga (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ... Boötes (IPA: ), a name deriving from Egypt, is one of the 88 modern constellations and was also one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy. ... Caelum (IPA: ; earlier Cæla Sculptoris (Latin: ) is a minor southern constellation introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. ... Camelopardalis, Latin for giraffe, is the name of a large but faint northern constellation first recorded by Jakob Bartsch in 1624, but probably created earlier by Petrus Plancius. ... Cancer (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the thirteen constellations of the zodiac. ... Canes Venatici (Latin for Hunting dogs) is a small northern constellation that was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. ... Canis Major (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... Canis Minor (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... Capricornus ( or , Unicode: ♑), a name meaning Horned Goat or That which has horns like a goats in Latin, is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Carina (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation which forms part of the old constellation of Argo Navis. ... Cassiopeia (IPA: ) is a northern constellation which Greek mythology considered to represent a vain queen who boasted about her unrivaled beauty. ... Centaurus (Latin for centaur) was one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, and counts also among the 88 modern constellations. ... Cepheus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation named after King Cepheus in Greek mythology, and is considered to represent a king. ... Cetus (a name from Greek mythology, referring to a Whale or Sea monster, see Ceto) is a constellation of the southern sky, in the region known as the Water, near other watery constellations like Aquarius, Pisces, and Eridanus. ... For other uses of the word, see chameleon (disambiguation) Chamaeleon (Latin for chameleon) is a minor southern constellation. ... Circinus, Latin for Compass, is one of the small southern (declination −50 to −60 degrees) constellations. ... Columba, Latin for dove, is a small constellation just south to Canis Major and Lepus, it was cut out of the constellation Canis Major by Augustin Royer, in 1679. ... Coma Berenices (IPA: , Latin: ) is a traditional asterism that has since become a constellation. ... Corona Australis (IPA: ) or Corona Austrina (IPA: , Latin: ) was one of Ptolemys 48 constellations, and also counts among the 88 modern constellations. ... Corona Borealis (Latin for northern crown) is a small northern constellation whose main stars form a semicircular arc. ... Corvus (Latin for Raven/Crow) is a small southern constellation with only 11 stars visible to the naked eye (brighter than magnitude 5. ... Crater (Latin for cup) is one of the 88 modern constellations and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... CRUX is a lightweight, i686-optimized Linux distribution targeted at experienced Linux users. ... Cygnus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ... Delphinus, being Latin for Dolphin, is a rather small (ranked 69th) northern constellation very close to the celestial equator. ... This article is about a constellation in the sky. ... Draco (IPA: , Latin: ) is a far northern constellation that is circumpolar for many northern hemisphere observers. ... Equuleus (IPA: , Latin: Despite its smallness and lack of bright stars (none are brighter than fourth magnitude), it was also one of Ptolemys 48 constellations. ... Eridanus is the sixth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Fornax (Latin for furnace) is a southern constellation which was first introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille under the name Fornax Chemica (Latin for chemical furnace). ... Gemini (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac known as the twins . It is part of the winter sky, lying between Taurus to the west and the dim Cancer to the east, with Auriga and the near-invisible Lynx to the north and Monoceros and Canis... Grus (Latin for Crane) is a southern constellation. ... Hercules (IPA: ) is the fifth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Horologium (Latin for clock) is one of the lesser southern constellations (declination around -60 degrees). ... Hydra (IPA: ) is the largest of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy. ... Hydrus (Latin for Hydra, also referred to as male Hydra or little Hydra) is a minor southern constellation. ... Indus (IPA: ) is a southern constellation that is supposed to represent an American Indian. ... Lacerta, being Latin for Lizard, is one of the 88 official constellations acknowledged by the International Astronomical Union. ... Leo (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Leo Minor (Latin for Small Lion) is a rather dim constellation that can barely be recognized as a triangle and lies between the easily discerned constellations Ursa Major and Leo. ... Lepus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a constellation, lying just south of the Celestial equator, below the constellation Orion, and possibly representing a hare being chased by Orion the hunter. ... Libra (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , Unicode ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Lupus (Latin for Wolf) is a southern constellation. ... Lynx (IPA: ) is a constellation of the northern hemisphere, introduced in the 17th century by Johannes Hevelius. ... For other uses, see Lyra (disambiguation). ... Mensa (Latin for Table) is a southern constellation which was first introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille under the name Mons Mensae (Latin for table mountain). ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations ... Monoceros (IPA: , Greek: ) is a faint constellation on the winter night sky, surrounded by Orion to the east, Gemini to the north, Canis Major to the south and Hydra to the west. ... Musca (Latin for Fly) is one of the minor southern constellations. ... Norma (IPA: , Latin: ), is a small and inconspicuous [penis] that lies in the southern hemisphere between Scorpius and Centaurus. ... Octans (Latin for octant) is an inconspicuous constellation introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. ... Orion (IPA: ), a constellation often referred to as The Hunter, is a prominent constellation, one of the largest and perhaps the best-known and most conspicuous in the sky. ... Pavo, being Latin for Peacock, is a southern constellation. ... Pegasus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation, named after the mythological winged horse Pegasus. ... Perseus is a northern constellation, named after the Greek hero who slew the monster Medusa. ... Phoenix (IPA: ) is a minor southern constellation, introduced by Dutch navigators Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman, and popularized by Johann Bayers Uranometria in 1603. ... Pictor (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the minor southern (declination -50° to -60°) constellations. ... For other uses, see Pisces. ... Piscis Austrinus or Piscis Australis (both of which are Latin for Southern Fish) was one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, and is also one of the 88 modern constellations. ... Puppis (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Pyxis constellation | Argo Navis constellation ... Reticulum (Latin for reticle), is one of the minor southern (declination -60 degrees) constellations. ... This article is about the constellation; for the trigonometric function, see versine. ... For other uses, see Sagittarius. ... Scorpius (Latin for scorpion, symbol , Unicode ♏) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Sculptor constellation ... Scutum (Latin for shield) is a small constellation. ... Serpens (the snake) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... For the Ancient Roman coin denomination, see sextans (coin). ... Taurus (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Telescopium (Latin for Telescope) is a minor southern constellation identified and named by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille, the 18th century French astronomer, a student of the southern skies. ... Triangulum is a small northern constellation whose three brightest stars, of third and fourth magnitude, form an elongated triangle. ... Triangulum Australe is a small southern constellation whose three brightest stars, of second and third magnitude, form an approximately equilateral triangle. ... Tucana (Latin for Toucan) is a southern constellation. ... Ursa Major (IPA: ) is a constellation visible throughout the year in most of the northern hemisphere. ... Ursa Minor (IPA: ) is a constellation in the northern sky, the name of which means Smaller Bear in Latin. ... Vela (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation, one of the four parts into which Argo Navis was split (the others being Carina, Puppis and Pyxis). ... Virgo (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Volans constellation ... Vulpecula (IPA: , Latin: ) is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. ... A medieval artists rendition of Claudius Ptolemaeus Claudius Ptolemaeus (Greek: ; ca. ... Andromeda (IPA: ) is a constellation named for the princess Andromeda (which is Greek for Ruler over men), a character in Greek mythology. ... Aquarius (IPA: , Latin: ) is the eleventh sign of the zodiac, situated between Capricornus and Pisces. ... Aquila (IPA: , Latin: ; sometimes named the Vulture), is one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, also mentioned by Eudoxus (4th century BC) and Aratus (3rd century BC) and now also part of the list of 88 constellations acknowledged by the IAU. It lies roughly at the celestial equator. ... Ara (Latin for Altar) is a faint southerly constellation between the constellations Centaurus and Lupus. ... The constellation Argo Navis drawn by Johannes Hevelius in 1690 Argo Navis (or simply Argo) was a large southern constellation representing the Argo, the ship used by Jason and the Argonauts in Greek mythology. ... Aries (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Auriga (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ... Boötes (IPA: ), a name deriving from Egypt, is one of the 88 modern constellations and was also one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy. ... Cancer (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the thirteen constellations of the zodiac. ... Canis Major (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... Canis Minor (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also in Ptolemys list of 48 constellations. ... Capricornus ( or , Unicode: ♑), a name meaning Horned Goat or That which has horns like a goats in Latin, is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Cassiopeia (IPA: ) is a northern constellation which Greek mythology considered to represent a vain queen who boasted about her unrivaled beauty. ... Centaurus (Latin for centaur) was one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, and counts also among the 88 modern constellations. ... Cepheus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation named after King Cepheus in Greek mythology, and is considered to represent a king. ... Cetus (a name from Greek mythology, referring to a Whale or Sea monster, see Ceto) is a constellation of the southern sky, in the region known as the Water, near other watery constellations like Aquarius, Pisces, and Eridanus. ... Corona Australis (IPA: ) or Corona Austrina (IPA: , Latin: ) was one of Ptolemys 48 constellations, and also counts among the 88 modern constellations. ... Corona Borealis (Latin for northern crown) is a small northern constellation whose main stars form a semicircular arc. ... Corvus (Latin for Raven/Crow) is a small southern constellation with only 11 stars visible to the naked eye (brighter than magnitude 5. ... Crater (Latin for cup) is one of the 88 modern constellations and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... Cygnus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ... Delphinus, being Latin for Dolphin, is a rather small (ranked 69th) northern constellation very close to the celestial equator. ... Draco (IPA: , Latin: ) is a far northern constellation that is circumpolar for many northern hemisphere observers. ... Equuleus (IPA: , Latin: Despite its smallness and lack of bright stars (none are brighter than fourth magnitude), it was also one of Ptolemys 48 constellations. ... Eridanus is the sixth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Gemini (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac known as the twins . It is part of the winter sky, lying between Taurus to the west and the dim Cancer to the east, with Auriga and the near-invisible Lynx to the north and Monoceros and Canis... Hercules (IPA: ) is the fifth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Hydra (IPA: ) is the largest of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy. ... Leo (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Lepus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a constellation, lying just south of the Celestial equator, below the constellation Orion, and possibly representing a hare being chased by Orion the hunter. ... Libra (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , Unicode ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Lupus (Latin for Wolf) is a southern constellation. ... For other uses, see Lyra (disambiguation). ... Orion (IPA: ), a constellation often referred to as The Hunter, is a prominent constellation, one of the largest and perhaps the best-known and most conspicuous in the sky. ... Pegasus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation, named after the mythological winged horse Pegasus. ... Perseus is a northern constellation, named after the Greek hero who slew the monster Medusa. ... For other uses, see Pisces. ... Piscis Austrinus or Piscis Australis (both of which are Latin for Southern Fish) was one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, and is also one of the 88 modern constellations. ... This article is about the constellation; for the trigonometric function, see versine. ... For other uses, see Sagittarius. ... Scorpius (Latin for scorpion, symbol , Unicode ♏) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Serpens (the snake) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. ... Taurus (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is one of the constellations of the zodiac. ... Triangulum is a small northern constellation whose three brightest stars, of third and fourth magnitude, form an elongated triangle. ... Ursa Major (IPA: ) is a constellation visible throughout the year in most of the northern hemisphere. ... Ursa Minor (IPA: ) is a constellation in the northern sky, the name of which means Smaller Bear in Latin. ... Virgo (IPA: , Latin: , symbol , ) is a constellation of the zodiac. ... Apus (Latin for bird of paradise) is a faint southern constellation, not visible to the ancient Greeks. ... For other uses of the word, see chameleon (disambiguation) Chamaeleon (Latin for chameleon) is a minor southern constellation. ... Coma Berenices (IPA: , Latin: ) is a traditional asterism that has since become a constellation. ... This article is about a constellation in the sky. ... Grus (Latin for Crane) is a southern constellation. ... Hydrus (Latin for Hydra, also referred to as male Hydra or little Hydra) is a minor southern constellation. ... Indus (IPA: ) is a southern constellation that is supposed to represent an American Indian. ... Musca (Latin for Fly) is one of the minor southern constellations. ... Pavo, being Latin for Peacock, is a southern constellation. ... Phoenix (IPA: ) is a minor southern constellation, introduced by Dutch navigators Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman, and popularized by Johann Bayers Uranometria in 1603. ... Triangulum Australe is a small southern constellation whose three brightest stars, of second and third magnitude, form an approximately equilateral triangle. ... Tucana (Latin for Toucan) is a southern constellation. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Volans constellation ... Vulpecula (IPA: , Latin: ) is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. ... Camelopardalis, Latin for giraffe, is the name of a large but faint northern constellation first recorded by Jakob Bartsch in 1624, but probably created earlier by Petrus Plancius. ... Monoceros (IPA: , Greek: ) is a faint constellation on the winter night sky, surrounded by Orion to the east, Gemini to the north, Canis Major to the south and Hydra to the west. ... Columba, Latin for dove, is a small constellation just south to Canis Major and Lepus, it was cut out of the constellation Canis Major by Augustin Royer, in 1679. ... CRUX is a lightweight, i686-optimized Linux distribution targeted at experienced Linux users. ... Canes Venatici (Latin for Hunting dogs) is a small northern constellation that was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. ... Lacerta, being Latin for Lizard, is one of the 88 official constellations acknowledged by the International Astronomical Union. ... Leo Minor (Latin for Small Lion) is a rather dim constellation that can barely be recognized as a triangle and lies between the easily discerned constellations Ursa Major and Leo. ... Lynx (IPA: ) is a constellation of the northern hemisphere, introduced in the 17th century by Johannes Hevelius. ... Scutum (Latin for shield) is a small constellation. ... For the Ancient Roman coin denomination, see sextans (coin). ... Vulpecula (IPA: , Latin: ) is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. ... Antlia (IPA: , Latin: ) is a relatively new constellation as it was only created in the 18th century, being too faint to be acknowledged by the ancient Greeks. ... Caelum (IPA: ; earlier Cæla Sculptoris (Latin: ) is a minor southern constellation introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. ... Canes Venatici (Latin for Hunting dogs) is a small northern constellation that was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. ... Carina (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation which forms part of the old constellation of Argo Navis. ... Circinus, Latin for Compass, is one of the small southern (declination −50 to −60 degrees) constellations. ... Fornax (Latin for furnace) is a southern constellation which was first introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille under the name Fornax Chemica (Latin for chemical furnace). ... Horologium (Latin for clock) is one of the lesser southern constellations (declination around -60 degrees). ... Mensa (Latin for Table) is a southern constellation which was first introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille under the name Mons Mensae (Latin for table mountain). ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations ... Norma (IPA: , Latin: ), is a small and inconspicuous [penis] that lies in the southern hemisphere between Scorpius and Centaurus. ... Octans (Latin for octant) is an inconspicuous constellation introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. ... Pictor (IPA: , Latin: ) is one of the minor southern (declination -50° to -60°) constellations. ... Puppis (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Pyxis constellation | Argo Navis constellation ... Reticulum (Latin for reticle), is one of the minor southern (declination -60 degrees) constellations. ... Categories: Astronomy stubs | Modern constellations | Constellations | Sculptor constellation ... Telescopium (Latin for Telescope) is a minor southern constellation identified and named by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille, the 18th century French astronomer, a student of the southern skies. ... Vela (IPA: , Latin: ) is a southern constellation, one of the four parts into which Argo Navis was split (the others being Carina, Puppis and Pyxis). ... The former constellation Argo Navis Former constellations are constellations that are no longer recognized by the International Astronomical Union for various reasons. ... Vulpecula (IPA: , Latin: ) is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. ... Antinous was a constellation south of Aquila. ... The constellation Argo Navis drawn by Johannes Hevelius in 1690 Argo Navis (or simply Argo) was a large southern constellation representing the Argo, the ship used by Jason and the Argonauts in Greek mythology. ... Canes Venatici (Latin for Hunting dogs) is a small northern constellation that was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. ... Cancer Minor, Latin: lesser crab, was a constellation composed from a stars in Gemini adjacent to Cancer. ... Cerberus was a constellation created by Hevelius. ... Canes Venatici (Latin for Hunting dogs) is a small northern constellation that was introduced by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. ... Custos Messium (Latin for harvest-keeper) was a constellation created by Jérôme Lalande in 1775. ... Felis (Latin for cat) was a constellation created by Jérôme Lalande in 1805. ... Frederici Honores or Honores Friderici or Gloria Frederici (Latin for Glory of Frederick) was a constellation created by Johann Bode in 1787 to honor Frederick the Great, the king of Prussia who had died in the previous year. ... Gallus (the cockerel) was a constellation invented by Petrus Plancius in the early 17th century. ... Globus Aerostaticus (Latin for hot air balloon) was a constellation created by Jérôme Lalande in 1798. ... Jordanus (the Jordan River) was a constellation invented by Petrus Plancius in the early 17th century. ... Lochium Funis (Latin for the log and line) was a constellation created by Johann Bode from the stars which Nicolas Louis de Lacaille created the constellation Pyxis. ... Machina Electrica (Latin for electricity generator) was a constellation created by Johann Bode in 1800. ... Malus (Latin for mast) was a constellation that formed part of the Argo Navis constellation. ... Mons Maenalus (the Mountain) was a constellation created by Johannes Hevelius. ... Musca Borealis (Latin for northern fly) was a constellation located between the constellations of Aries and Perseus. ... Noctua (Latin for owl) was a constellation located between the constellations of Hydra and Libra. ... Officina Typographica (Latin for printing office) was a constellation located east of Sirius. ... Polophylax (Greek: guardian of the pole) was a southern constellation introduced by Petrus Plancius in the early 17th century. ... Psalterium Georgii (also Harpa Georgii) (Latin for Georges harp) was a constellation created by Maximilian Hell in 1781 to honor George II of Great Britain. ... Quadrans Muralis (Latin for mural quadrant) was a constellation created by Jérôme Lalande in 1795. ... Ramus Pomifer (Latin for apple branch) was a constellation located between Hercules and Lyra. ... Robur Carolinum (Latin for Charles oak) was a constellation created by the English astronomer Sir Edmund Halley in 1679. ... Sceptrum Brandenburgicum (Latin for scepter of Brandenburg) was a constellation created in 1688 by Gottfried Kirch, astronomer of Prussian Royal Society of Sciences. ... Sceptrum et Manus Iustitiae (Latin for scepter and hand of justice) was a constellation created by Augustin Royer in 1679 to honor king Louis XIV of France. ... Solarium (Latin for sundial) was a constellation located between the constellations of Horologium, Dorado and Hydrus. ... Tarandus vel Rangifer or Tarandus or Rangifer (the Reindeer) was a small constellation located between the constellations of Cassiopeia and Camelopardalis. ... Taurus Poniatovii (Latin for Poniatowskis bull) was a constellation created by Martin Poczobut in 1777 to honor Stanislaus Poniatowski, king of Poland. ... Telescopium Herschelii (Latin for Herschels telescope) was a constellation created by Maximilian Hell in 1781 to honor the famous English astronomer Sir William Herschel. ... Testudo (Latin for turtle) was a constellation located between the constellations of Cetus and Pisces. ... River Tigris or Tigris (named after the Tigris river) was a constellation, invented by Jakob Bartsch in the 17th century (or by Petrus Plancius). ... Triangulum Minor or Triangulum Minus (Latin for lesser triangle) was a constellation created by Hevelius. ... Hiren is gay. ... The constellation Lyra (Latin for Lyre) already formed part of Ptolemys list of 48 constellations and is also one of the 88 modern constellations approved by the IAU. Lyra is not very big but still easy to find because its principal star, Vega, is also a vertex of the... Apis (Latin for bee) was a constellation located south of constellation Crux. ... Grus (Latin for Crane) is a southern constellation. ... Vespa (Latin for wasp) was a constellation created by Jakob Bartsch in the 17th century. ... This article is about a constellation in the sky. ...

Astronomy | Constellations of the Zodiac | Astrology A giant Hubble mosaic of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant Astronomy is the science of celestial objects (such as stars, planets, comets, and galaxies) and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere (such as auroras and cosmic background radiation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ...

Aries Taurus Gemini Cancer Leo Virgo Libra Scorpio Sagittarius Capricorn Aquarius Pisces
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Ophiuchus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (924 words)
Ophiuchus is depicted as a man supporting a Serpens; the interposition of his body divides the snake into two parts, Serpens Caput and Serpens Cauda, which are nonetheless counted as one constellation.
The reason why Ophiuchus is not a part of the western astrological zodiac is because that zodiac is defined on the basis of the sun spending an equal amount of time in twelve astrological signs starting at the vernal equinox in the northern hemisphere — this is called the tropical zodiac.
At present, the sun is in Ophiuchus from November 30 to December 19.
Ophiuchus - definition of Ophiuchus in Encyclopedia (599 words)
Ophiuchus (the serpent bearer) is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy.
Ophiuchus is depicted as a man supporting a snake, Serpens; the interposition of his body divides the snake into two parts, Serpens Caput and Serpens Cauda, which are nonetheless counted as one constellation.
Most of Ophiuchus is north of the ecliptic - however, in Al Magest, Ptolemy recognised 4 stars (today known as 36 Oph, 42 θ Oph, 44 Oph and 51 Oph) as being south of the ecliptic.
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