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Encyclopedia > Operation Ore

Operation Ore is a large-scale international police operation that commenced in 1999 intending to prosecute thousands of users of websites featuring child pornography. In the United Kingdom, it has led to 7,250 suspects identified, 4,283 homes searched, 3,744 arrests, 1,848 charged, 1,451 convictions, 493 cautioned, 879 investigations underway, 140 children removed from suspected dangerous situations[1] and at least 35 suicides.[2] While Ore did catch a number of sex offenders, the guilt of a significant number of the British defendants is not clear (see Controversies below). A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Child pornography refers to pornographic material depicting children being sexually abused. ...


Operation Ore succeeded the similar crackdown in the United States, called Operation Avalanche, though in the U.S. only 100 people were charged from the 35,000 US access records available[3]. The U.S. legal cases are generally accepted as valid, because the U.S. FBI gathered additional evidence for prosecution and thus avoided the errors that UK police made in handling the investigations.[citation needed] Operation Avalanche was a major U.S. investigation of child pornography on the Internet. ...

Contents

Origins

In April 1999, United States Postal Inspection Service of Texas had received an internal complaint via postal inspector Robert Adams. Adams had received a tip from an acquaintance in Saint Paul, Minnesota, Ronnie Miller, who provided information in relation to a website advertising child pornography. On September 8, 1999, federal agents raided the Fort Worth, Texas, home and offices of Thomas and Janice Reedy. The Reedys operated an internet business called Landslide Productions, Inc., which the FBI believed had sold subscriptions to websites offering child pornography. Landslide was, in actuality, an adult pornography empire stretching across three continents, some 250,000 subscribers in 60 countries. [4] The United States Postal Inspection Service (or USPIS) is the law enforcement arm of the United States Postal Service. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... Fort Worth is the sixth-largest city in the state of Texas, located about 30 miles west of Dallas on the West Fork Trinity River and forming part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Operation Avalanche was a major U.S. investigation of child pornography on the Internet. ... Operation Avalanche was a major U.S. investigation of child pornography on the Internet. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... This article is about the political and historical term. ...


Later independent investigations questioned Thomas Reedy's intention to provide child pornography[5] , but on August 6, 2001, Reedy was convicted of trafficking in child pornography and sentenced to 1,335 years in prison (later reduced to 180 years on appeal). His accomplice, Janice Reedy, was sentenced to 14 years. This marked the beginning of Operation Avalanche. Operation Avalanche was a major U.S. investigation of child pornography on the Internet. ...


Landslide Productions

Landslide provided payment systems for adult webmasters. These systems were automated; webmasters could sign up to the system online and people accessing the websites would go through the payment or login system before being granted access. The principal systems were AVS for Adult Verification System and Keyz because it operated via the keyz.com domain name owned by Landslide. An Adult Verification System is a computing system used by a website to confirm that the user attempting to access their website is of the age required (usually by law) to view the websites content, which could include sex, nudity, violence or profanity. ...


An adult classified section of the Landslide website allegedly included postings offering to trade Keyz passwords. USPIS and Dallas Police brought their investigation to the attention of Terri Moore, an assistant district attorney.


The operation led to the seizure of user information of thousands of persons who were alleged to have accessed a child pornography website with their credit cards. It also resulted in the arrests of several prominent individuals, ranging from police officers and judges to The Who's guitarist Pete Townshend (who accepted a police caution but was later found to have accessed a site unrelated to child pornography).[6], and Massive Attack's Robert Del Naja (against whom no further action was taken, as the site he accessed also had nothing to do with child pornography).[7] The actor and writer Chris Langham is among those convicted. [8] The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... A police caution is an alternative to prosecution available to be administered by the police in the United Kingdom to less serious offenders. ... Massive Attack are an English trip hop band. ... Robert Del Naja (born 21 January 1965, in Bristol, England), also known as 3D, is an English artist and musician. ... Christopher Langham (born 14 April 1949) is a British writer, actor, comedian and as such is most famous for playing MP Hugh Abbot in BBC Four sitcom The Thick of It and as presenter Roy Mallard in People Like Us, first on BBC Radio 4 and later on its transfer...


Controversies

Since 2003 Operation Ore has come under closer scrutiny, and the police forces in the UK have been criticised for their poor handling of the operation. The most common criticism is that they failed to determine whether or not the owners of credit cards in Landslide's database actually accessed any sites containing child porn, unlike in the U.S. where it was determined in advance whether or not credit card subscribers had purchased child porn. Investigative journalist Duncan Campbell exposed these flaws in a series of articles in 2005 and 2007.[9][10][11] Duncan Campbell is a freelance investigative journalist and television producer who has specialised in intelligence issues, was prosecuted under the Official Secrets Act in the ABC Trial in 1978 and made the controversial series Secret Society for the BBC in 1987 (see Zircon affair). ...


This was a serious error, because many of the people making charges at child porn sites were using stolen credit card information (and the police arrested the real owners of the credit cards, not the actual viewers). Plus, thousands of credit card charges were made where there was no access to a site, or access to only a dummy site. When the police finally checked, they found 54,348 occurrences of stolen credit card information in the Landslide database. The British police failed to provide this information to the defendants, and some implied that they had checked and found no evidence of credit card fraud when no such check had been done.


Independent investigators later obtained both the database records and video of the Landslide raid and with this information showed that Michael Mead of the United States Postal Service lied under oath regarding several details relating to the investigation. As a result of these errors, a number of people arrested in Operation Ore filed a class action law suit in 2006 against the detectives behind Operation Ore, alleging false arrest.[12]


Newspaper articles at the time suggested that Prime Minister Tony Blair attempted to minimize damage the Operation Ore investigations might do to ministers of his Labour government by issuing a DA-notice, citing Iraqi war security.[13] In Britain, D-notice is an official request to news editors not to publish items on specified subjects, for reasons of national security. ...


A growing criticism of CEOP and its Chief Executive, is that in defending the operation, they have used vague terms which do not have a recognised meaning within either child protection or law enforcement.[citation needed] When clarity is then sought on the definition of these terms, in order that an assessment of the operation can be made, promises are made that clarity will be given 'very soon'. So far, this does not seem to have materialised despite the passage of some years. This it may be felt, can only heighten the impression that this operation not only had serious flaws, but that some of these may yet remain undisclosed.[original research?]


The operation also resulted in a man being charged when the sole "suspicious" image in his possession was of adult actress Melissa-Ashley.[14] In 2006 the campaign website Inquisition 21st Century was delisted from Google for allegedly manipulating search results[15] but has since been restored.[16] Melissa Ashley may refer to: Melissa Ashley, an American porn actress Melissa Ashley, an Australian poet. ...


References

  1. ^ When will we know whether Operation Ore was a success? | Technology | The Guardian
  2. ^ "CHILD PORN SUSPECTS SET TO BE CLEARED IN EVIDENCE SHAMBLES", Sunday Times 3 July 2005, URL accessed on 23 January 2007.
  3. ^ "Operation Ore exposed", PC Pro magazine, URL accessed on 19 June 2006.
  4. ^ "OPERATION ORE: Tracking child porn", BBC News, 11 November, 2002.
  5. ^ http://ore-exposed.obu-investigators.com/PC_PRO_Operation_Ore_Exposed_2.html Campbell, Duncan. "Sex, Lies and the Missing Videotape", PCPro, April 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  6. ^ http://ore-exposed.obu-investigators.com/PC_PRO_Operation_Ore_Exposed_2.html Campbell, Duncan. "Sex, Lies and the Missing Videotape", PCPro, April 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  7. ^ http://ore-exposed.obu-investigators.com/PC_PRO_Operation_Ore_Exposed_2.html Campbell, Duncan. "Sex, Lies and the Missing Videotape", PCPro, April 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  8. ^ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/08/02/nlangham202.xml Sapsted, David. "Langham: Caught in Operation Ore's net", Daily Telegraph, 2nd August 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-02
  9. ^ Duncan Campbell. "Operation Ore flawed by fraud", The Guardian, 2007-04-19. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  10. ^ Campbell, Duncan. "Operation Ore exposed", PCPro, 2005-07-01. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  11. ^ Campbell, Duncan. "Sex, Lies and the Missing Videotape", PCPro, April 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  12. ^ Howie, Michael. "Accused in child porn inquiry to sue police", The Scotsman, 2006-09-15. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  13. ^ [http://www.counterpunch.org/james01292003.html Blackout in Britain: Alleged Pedophiles Helm Blair's War Room]
  14. ^ ‘Child’ porn star backs Army major
  15. ^ Sheriff, Lucy. "Google erases Operation Ore campaign site", The Register, 2006-09-01. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  16. ^ http://www.google.com/search?q=Inquisition+21st+Century&start=0&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official

This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... Duncan Campbell is a freelance investigative journalist and television producer who has specialised in intelligence issues, was prosecuted under the Official Secrets Act in the ABC Trial in 1978 and made the controversial series Secret Society for the BBC in 1987 (see Zircon affair). ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Current logo of The Register. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

For other events called Operation Avalanche, see Operation Avalanche. ... Child pornography refers to pornographic material depicting children being sexually abused. ... Duncan Campbell is a freelance investigative journalist and television producer who has specialised in intelligence issues, was prosecuted under the Official Secrets Act in the ABC Trial in 1978 and made the controversial series Secret Society for the BBC in 1987 (see Zircon affair). ...

External links

The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Operation Ore - encyclopedia article about Operation Ore. (773 words)
Operation Ore was a large-scale international police operation, commencing in 1999, intended to indict thousands of users of child pornography websites.
The operation followed the liquidation of Landslide Inc., a credit clearance intermediary based in Fort Worth, Texas.
The operation led to the seizure of user information of thousands of persons who were alleged to have accessed child pornography using credit cards.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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