FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Operation Bagration
Belorussian Offensive
Part of the Eastern Front of World War II

The Eastern Front at the time of Operation Bagration, which is shown in purple. (click to enlarge)
Date June 22, 1944August 19, 1944
Location Belorussian SSR, USSR
Result Decisive Soviet victory
Combatants

Germany

Soviet Union
Commanders
Ernst Busch (to 28 June), Walter Model (Army Group Centre)
Georg-Hans Reinhardt (Third Panzer Army)
Hans Jordan (Ninth Army)
Kurt von Tippelskirch (Fourth Army)
Walter Weiss (Second Army)
Georgy Zhukov
Konstantin Rokossovsky (3rd Belorussian Front)
Hovhannes Bagramyan (1st Baltic Front)
Ivan Chernyakhovsky (1st Belorussian Front)
Gyorgy Zakharov (2nd Belorussian Front)
Strength
800,000 1,700,000
Casualties
Soviet est.: 400,000 killed, 158,000 POWs, 590,000 wounded
German est.: 260,000 killed, 250,000 wounded 116,000 POWs
60,000 KIA/MIA, 110,000 WIA/sick

Operation Bagration (Russian: Oперация Багратион, Operatsiya Bagration) was the codename for the Soviet Belorussian Offensive[1] during World War II, which cleared German forces from the Belorussian SSR and eastern Poland between 22 June, 1944 and 19, August, 1944. Combatants Soviet Union,[1] Poland, Tannu Tuva (until 1944 incorporation with USSR), Mongolia Germany,[2] Italy (to 1943), Romania (to 1944), Finland (to 1944), Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, Spain (to 1943, unofficial) Commanders Joseph Stalin, Aleksei Antonov, Ivan Konev, Rodion Malinovsky, Ivan Bagramyan, Kirill Meretskov, Ivan Petrov, Alexander Rodimtsev, Konstantin Rokossovsky... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Download high resolution version (1201x921, 283 KB)Soviet advances on the Eastern Front (WWII), 1943-08-01 to 1944-12-31 Drawn by User:Gdr File links The following pages link to this file: Siege of Leningrad Operation Bagration Eastern Front (World War II) Talk:Eastern Front (World War II... The Eastern Front was the theatre of combat between Nazi Germany and its allies against the Soviet Union during World War II. It was somewhat separate from the other theatres of the war, not only geographically, but also for its scale and ferocity. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... language None. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany_1933. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Ernst Busch (6 July 1885 - 17 July 1945) was a German field marshal during World War II. He was born in Essen-Steele, Germany, and was educated at the Groß Lichterfelde Cadet Academy. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Otto Moritz Walter Model (IPA: ) (24 January 1891 – 21 April 1945) was a German general and later field marshal during World War II. He is noted for his defensive battles in the latter half of the war, mostly on the Eastern Front but also in the west, and for his... Army Group Centre (Heeresgruppe Mitte in German) was created on 22 June 1941 when Army Group B was renamed Army Group Centre. ... Georg-Hans Reinhardt (March 1st, 1887 to November 23rd, 1963)) was Colonel General of the German Third Reichs Panzer Group 3, 3rd Panzer Army, Army Group Center. ... The German Third Panzer Army (German: ) was a German panzer army that saw action during World War II. The Third Panzer Army was a constituent of Army Group Centre and fought in the Battle of Moscow in late 1941 and early 1942. ... The German Ninth Army (German: ) was a World War II field army. ... Kurt von Tippelskirch (October 9, 1891 - May 10, 1957) was a general in the German Army during World War II. // Kurt von Tippelskirch was born on 9th October, 1891 in Berlin (Charlottenburg). ... The German Fourth Army (German: ) was a field army that fought in World War II. The Fourth Army was activated on December 1, 1938 with Field Marshal Günther von Kluge in command. ... The German Second Army (German: ) was a World War II field army. ... Marshal of the Soviet Union Georgy Zhukov Georgy Konstantinovich Zhukov, GCB (Russian: ) (December 1, 1896 [O.S. November 19]–June 18, 1974), was a Soviet military commander who, in the course of World War II, led the Red Army to liberate the Soviet Union from the Nazi occupation, to overrun... Marshal of the Soviet Union Konstantin Rokossovsky Konstantin Konstantinovich Rokossovskiy (Russian: Константин Константинович Рокоссовский, Polish: Konstanty Rokossowski) (December 21, 1896 – August 3, 1968) was a Soviet military commander and Polish Defence Minister. ... The 3rd Belorussian Front (alternative spellings are 3rd Belarusian Front) was one of the Soviet Army fronts during the World War II. At various times, it was commanded by Marshal of the Soviet Union Aleksandr Vasilevsky and General Ivan Chernyakhovsky. ... Hovhannes Khachatury Bagramyan (Armenian: ; Russian: ; December 2 [O.S. November 20] 1897 – September 21, 1982) was a Soviet Armenian military commander and Marshal of the Soviet Union. ... The First Baltic Front was a Front of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... Ivan Danilovich Chernyakhovsky, (Cherniakhovsky), 1906 - 1945, Russian General of the Army (the youngest ever to have this rank), twice Hero of the Soviet Union, brilliant commander of the 3rd Belorussian Front, died from wounds received outside Königsberg at age 39. ... The 1st Belorussian Front (alternative spellings are 1st Byelorussian Front and 1st Belarusian Front) was a military subdivision (Front) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... The 2nd Belorussian Front (alternative spellings are 2nd Byelorussian Front and 2nd Belarusian Front) was a military subdivision (Front) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... Combatants Soviet Union,[1] Poland, Tannu Tuva (until 1944 incorporation with USSR), Mongolia Germany,[2] Italy (to 1943), Romania (to 1944), Finland (to 1944), Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, Spain (to 1943, unofficial) Commanders Joseph Stalin, Aleksei Antonov, Ivan Konev, Rodion Malinovsky, Ivan Bagramyan, Kirill Meretskov, Ivan Petrov, Alexander Rodimtsev, Konstantin Rokossovsky... Combatants Germany Romania Finland Italy Hungary Slovakia  Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb Fedor von Bock Gerd von Rundstedt Heinz Guderian Günther von Kluge Franz Halder Ion Antonescu C.G.E. Mannerheim Giovanni Messe, CSIR Italo Garibaldi, ARMIR Iosef Stalin Kliment Voroshilov Semyon Timoshenko Fyodor Kuznetsov... Battle of the Baltic concerns the German and Soviet battle for the control of the Baltic sea during World War II. Categories: | | | | | ... Combatants Germany Spanish Blue Division Soviet Union Commanders Wilhelm von Leeb Georg von Küchler Agustín Muñoz Grandes Kliment Voroshilov Georgiy Zhukov Strength 725,000 930,000 Casualties Unknown Red Army: 332,059 KIA 24,324 non-combat dead 111,142 missing 16,470 civilians 1 million civilians... Combatants Germany Romania Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Ivan Petrov Filipp Oktyabrskiy Strength 350,000+ 106,000 Casualties at least 100,000 killed, wounded or captured (Including Romanians) 95,000 captured, 11,000 killed The Battle of Sevastopol was fought from October 30, 1941 to July 4, 1942 between... Combatants Nazi Germany Soviet Union Commanders Fedor von Bock, Heinz Guderian Georgy Zhukov, Aleksandr Vasilevsky Strength As of October 1: 1,000,000 men, 1,700 tanks, 14,000 guns, 950 planes[1] As of October 1: 1,250,000 men, 1,000 tanks, 7,600 guns, 677 planes[2... The formation of the Rzhev salient during the winter of 1941-1942. ... Combatants Germany Soviet Union Commanders Fedor von Bock, Friedrich Paulus Semyon Timoshenko Strength 300,000 men, 1000 tanks, 1500 aircraft 640,000 men, 1200 tanks, 1000 aircraft Casualties 20,000 killed, wounded or captured 207,057 killed, wounded or captured, 652 tanks, 1,646 guns, 3,278 mortars, 57,626... Case Blue (German: ) was the German Wehrmachts codename for the 1942 summer offensive. ... Combatants  Germany Romania Italy Hungary  Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Friedrich Paulus # Erich von Manstein Petre Dumitrescu Constantin Constantinescu Italo Garibaldi Gusztav Jany Vasiliy Chuikov Aleksandr Vasilyevskiy Georgiy Zhukov Semyon Timoshenko Konstantin Rokossovskiy Rodion Malinovskiy Andrei Yeremenko Strength Army Group B: German Sixth Army # German Fourth Panzer Army Romanian Third... Combatants Germany Soviet Union Commanders Kurt von der Chevallerie M. A. Purkayev Strength ~20,000 (on 19 Nov) 100,000 (on 19 Nov) Casualties 17,000 killed or wounded, 3,000 captured 30,000 killed or wounded Situation after the initial Soviet advance. ... The eastern front at the time of the Second Rzhev-Sychevka Offensive. ... Combatants Nazi Germany Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Günther von Kluge Hermann Hoth Walther Model Georgiy Zhukov Konstantin Rokossovskiy Nikolay Vatutin Ivan Konyev Strength 2,700 tanks 800,000 infantry 2,000 aircraft 3,600 tanks 1,300,000 infantry and supporting troops 2,400 aircraft Casualties German... Combatants Axis Soviet Union Commanders Günther von Kluge Andrei Yeremenko, Vasily Sokolovsky Strength 850,000 men, 8,800 guns, 500 tanks, 700 planes[1] 1,253,000 men, 20,640 guns, 1,430 tanks, 1,100 planes[1] Casualties (Soviet est. ... Combatants Axis Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Konstantin Rokossovsky, Ivan Konev Strength 1,250,000 men 12,600 guns 2,100 tanks 2,000 planes 2,650,000 men 51,000 guns 2,400 tanks 2,850 planes Casualties Low est. ... The 1943 Battle of Kiev resulted in a Soviet victory, forcing the German invaders of the Soviet Union to retreat further. ... Combatants Germany Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein, Wilhelm Stemmerman (Gruppe Stemmerman), Hermann Breith, III Panzerkorps Georgi Zhukov, Nikolai Vatutin (1st Ukrainian Front), Ivan Konev (2nd Ukrainian Front), Strength 56,000 70 tanks and assault guns In packet only but much large with relief troops 200,000 500 tanks Casualties... Combatants Germany Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein (Army Group South) Hans-Valentin Hube (First Panzer Army) Georgi Zhukov Nikolai Vatutin (1st Ukrainian Front) Ivan Koniev (2nd Ukrainian Front) Strength 200,000 500,000 Casualties  ?  ? 357 tanks The Battle of the Kamenets-Podolsky Pocket, also known as Hubes Pocket... Combatants Soviet Union Germany Commanders Soviet STAVKA German OKW Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties 260,000 all causes Unknown The Baltic Offensive, also formally referred to as the Baltic Strategic Offensive Operation[1][2][3][4] as it was called by the Red Army who undertook it, denotes the battle between... Combatants Germany Soviet Union Commanders Josef Harpe (Heeresgruppe Nordukraine) Ivan Koniev (1st Ukrainian Front) Strength 370,000 men 340 AFVs 4,800 guns 1,200,000 men 1,979 AFVs 11,265 guns Casualties 350,000 men 520 AFVs 198,000 men 1,285 AFVs The Lvov-Sandomierz Offensive[1... Combatants Nazi Germany Romania Soviet Union Commanders Ferdinand Schorner (until July 23) Johannes Friessner (from July 25) (Heeresgruppe Sudukraine) Günther Blumentritt (until June 28) Walter Model (until August 16) Georg Hans Reinhardt (Army Group Centre) Konstantin Rokossovsky (1st Belorussian Front) Strength  ?  ? Casualties  ?  ? Lublin-Brest Offensive is covered in the... Combatants Soviet Union Germany Romania Commanders Rodion Malinovsky Fyodor Tolbukhin Johannes Friessner Ion Antonescu Strength 1,341,200, 1,874 tanks and assault guns ca. ... Budapest Offensiv, together with other Soviet Balkan offensivesm is covered by the green area in the south. ... Combatants Wehrmacht i. ... WWII Eastern Front during 1945 The East Prussian Offensive was an offensive by the Red Army in its fight against the German Wehrmacht on the Eastern Front (World War II). ... WWII Eastern Front during 1945 The East Pomeranian Offensive was an offensive by the Red Army in its fight against the German Wehrmacht on the Eastern Front (World War II). ... WWII Eastern Front during 1945 Eastern Front Barbarossa – Baltic Sea – Finland – Leningrad and Baltics – Crimea and Caucasus – Moscow – 1st Rzhev-Vyazma – 2nd Kharkov – Blue – Stalingrad – Velikiye Luki – 2nd Rzhev-Sychevka – Kursk – 2nd Smolensk – Dnieper – 2nd Kiev – Korsun – Hubes Pocket – Baltic – Bagration – Lvov-Sandomierz – Lublin-Brest – Balkans (Iassy-Kishinev) – Balkans... Combatants Soviet Union Poland Nazi Germany Commanders 1st Belorussian Front – Georgiy Zhukov 2nd Belorussian Front – Konstantin Rokossovskiy 1st Ukrainian Front – Ivan Konev Army Group Vistula – Gotthard Heinrici then Kurt von Tippelskirch[2] Army Group Centre – Ferdinand Schörner Berlin Defense Area – Helmuth Reymann then Helmuth Weidling #[3] Strength 2,500... Combatants Germany Soviet Union Czech Insurgents Commanders Ferdinand Schörner Ivan Konev Strength 900,000 2,000,000 Casualties Unknown 11,997 killed or missing, 40,501 wounded or sick (52,498 casualties[1]) The Prague Offensive (Russian:Пражская наступательная операция, Prazhskaya nastupatelnaya operacia, Prague Offensive Operation) was the last major battle of... The Vienna Offensive was launched by the Soviet 3rd Ukrainian Front against Vienna, Austria. ... A code name or cryptonym is a word or name used clandestinely to refer to another name or word. ... CCCP redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... language None. ...


This action resulted in the almost complete destruction of the German Army Group Centre and three of its component armies: Fourth Army, Third Panzer Army and Ninth Army. The Soviet armies directly involved in Operation Bagration were the 1st Baltic Front under Hovhannes Bagramyan, the 1st Belorussian Front commanded by Marshal Konstantin Rokossovsky, the 2nd Belorussian Front commanded by Colonel-General G.F. Zakharov, and the 3rd Belorussian Front commanded by Colonel-General Ivan Chernyakhovsky. This battle was possibly the single greatest defeat for the German Army (Wehrmacht Heer) during the war. Army Group Centre (Heeresgruppe Mitte in German) was created on 22 June 1941 when Army Group B was renamed Army Group Centre. ... The German Fourth Army (German: ) was a field army that fought in World War II. The Fourth Army was activated on December 1, 1938 with Field Marshal Günther von Kluge in command. ... The German Third Panzer Army (German: ) was a German panzer army that saw action during World War II. The Third Panzer Army was a constituent of Army Group Centre and fought in the Battle of Moscow in late 1941 and early 1942. ... The German Ninth Army (German: ) was a World War II field army. ... The First Baltic Front was a Front of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... Hovhannes Khachatury Bagramyan (Armenian: ; Russian: ; December 2 [O.S. November 20] 1897 – September 21, 1982) was a Soviet Armenian military commander and Marshal of the Soviet Union. ... The 1st Belorussian Front (alternative spellings are 1st Byelorussian Front and 1st Belarusian Front) was a military subdivision (Front) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... Marshal of the Soviet Union Konstantin Rokossovsky Konstantin Konstantinovich Rokossovskiy (Russian: Константин Константинович Рокоссовский, Polish: Konstanty Rokossowski) (December 21, 1896 – August 3, 1968) was a Soviet military commander and Polish Defence Minister. ... The 2nd Belorussian Front (alternative spellings are 2nd Byelorussian Front and 2nd Belarusian Front) was a military subdivision (Front) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... The 3rd Belorussian Front (alternative spellings are 3rd Belarusian Front) was one of the Soviet Army fronts during the World War II. At various times, it was commanded by Marshal of the Soviet Union Aleksandr Vasilevsky and General Ivan Chernyakhovsky. ... Ivan Danilovich Chernyakhovsky, (Cherniakhovsky), 1906 - 1945, Russian General of the Army (the youngest ever to have this rank), twice Hero of the Soviet Union, brilliant commander of the 3rd Belorussian Front, died from wounds received outside Königsberg at age 39. ... The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, a stylized version of the Iron Cross, the emblem of the Wehrmacht. ...


The operation was named after 18th–19th century Georgian Prince Pyotr Bagration, general of the Russian army who received a mortal wound at the Battle of Borodino. Prince Pyotr Bagration (Пётр Иванович Багратион) (1765 - September 12, 1812), a descendant of the Georgian Royal family of the Bagrations, served as a Russian general. ... Combatants First French Empire Russian Empire Commanders Napoleon I Mikhail Kutuzov Strength 82,400 infantry 26,700 cavalry 14,900 artillery troops with 587 guns[1] 72,000 infantry 17,300 cavalry 14,500 artillery troops with 637 guns[2] Casualties ~6,600 killed ~21,400 wounded [3] ~43,000...

Contents

Background

Army Group Centre had previously proved a tough nut to crack as Zhukov's defeat in Operation Mars had shown. But by June 1944, despite shortening its front line, it had been exposed following the crushing of Army Group South in the battles that followed the Battle of Kursk, the Liberation of Kiev and the Liberation of the Crimea in the late summer, autumn and winter of 1943–44 — the so-called third period of the Great Patriotic War. Operation Suvorov had seen Army Group Centre itself forced to retreat westwards from Smolensk during the autumn of 1943. Army Group Centre (Heeresgruppe Mitte in German) was created on 22 June 1941 when Army Group B was renamed Army Group Centre. ... Marshal of the Soviet Union Georgy Zhukov Georgy Konstantinovich Zhukov, GCB (Russian: ) (December 1, 1896 [O.S. November 19]–June 18, 1974), was a Soviet military commander who, in the course of World War II, led the Red Army to liberate the Soviet Union from the Nazi occupation, to overrun... Operation Mars, or 2nd Rzhev-Sychevka Offensive was a World War II strategic offensive launched in November-December of 1942 by Soviet forces against a German salient in the vicinity of Moscow. ... Army Group South (Heeresgruppe Süd in German) was a German Army Group during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ... Combatants Nazi Germany Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Günther von Kluge Hermann Hoth Walther Model Georgiy Zhukov Konstantin Rokossovskiy Nikolay Vatutin Ivan Konyev Strength 2,700 tanks 800,000 infantry 2,000 aircraft 3,600 tanks 1,300,000 infantry and supporting troops 2,400 aircraft Casualties German... The 1943 Battle of Kiev resulted in a Soviet victory, forcing the German invaders of the Soviet Union to retreat further. ... Combatants Red Army Wehrmacht 17. ... The Eastern Front1 was the theatre of combat between Nazi Germany and its allies against the Soviet Union during World War II. It was somewhat separate from the other theatres of the war, not only geographically, but also for its scale and ferocity. ... Combatants Axis Soviet Union Commanders Günther von Kluge Andrei Yeremenko, Vasily Sokolovsky Strength 850,000 men, 8,800 guns, 500 tanks, 700 planes[1] 1,253,000 men, 20,640 guns, 1,430 tanks, 1,100 planes[1] Casualties (Soviet est. ... A view of Smolensk in 1912. ...


By the middle of June 1944 the distance that the Western Allies from the Cotentin Peninsula and the Soviets from the Vitebsk Gate to Berlin was just over 650 miles for the former and just under 750 for the latter, so for the Third Reich the strategic threats were about the same.[2] Hitler underestimated the threat posed by Soviet troops facing Army Group Centre and had redeployed one third of Army Group Centre's artillery, half their tank destroyers and 88% of their tanks to the Southern front where the German high command expected the next major Soviet offensive.[2] The Western Allies were the democracies and their colonial peoples, within the broader coalition of Allies during World War II. The term is generally understood to refer to the countries of the British Commonwealth of Nations and Poland (from 1939), exiled forces from Occupied Europe (from 1940), the United States... The Cotentin Peninsula juts out into the English Channel from Normandy towards England, forming part of the north-west coast of France. ... Coat of arms of Vitebsk. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... For other uses, see Artillery (disambiguation). ... A self-propelled anti-tank gun, or tank destroyer, is a type of armoured fighting vehicle. ...


Bagration, in combination with the neighbouring Lvov-Sandomierz Operation launched a few weeks later in Ukraine, allowed the Soviet Union to recapture practically all the territories within its 1941 borders, advance into German East Prussia, and reach the outskirts of Warsaw after gaining control of Poland east of the Vistula river. Combatants Germany Soviet Union Commanders Josef Harpe (Heeresgruppe Nordukraine) Ivan Koniev (1st Ukrainian Front) Strength 368,000 men 340 AFVs 4,800 guns 1,200,000 men 1,979 AFVs 11,265 guns Casualties 37,400 men 520 AFVs 198,000 men 1,285 AFVs The Lvov-Sandomierz Operation was... East Prussia (German: Ostpreu en; Polish: Prusy Wschodnie; Russian: Восточная Пруссия — Vostochnaya Prussiya) was a province of Kingdom of Prussia, situated on the territory of former Ducal Prussia. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vistula (disambiguation). ...


The battle has been described as the triumph of the Soviet theory of "the operational art"—because of the complete co-ordination of all front movements and signals traffic to fool the enemy about the target of the offensive. Despite the huge forces involved, Soviet front commanders left their opposite numbers completely confused about the main axis of attack until too late. Operational art is the act of applying military art to the operational art of war. ... A Front (фронт) was a major military organization in the Soviet Army, roughly equivalent to an army or army group in British or American military terminology. ...


Prelude to the battle

The Maskirovka campaign

The Oberkommando des Heeres expected the Soviets to launch a major Eastern Front offensive in the summer of 1944. The scenarios examined included attacks towards the Baltic against Army Group North, an offensive against Army Group Centre through the Belorussian SSR towards Warsaw, and an attack on Army Group North Ukraine towards the Carpathians. It was decided that the former two possibilities were unlikely, in part due to the easily defensible terrain in these sectors. The Oberkommando der Heeres (OKH) was Germanys Army High Command from 1936 to 1945. ... Combatants Soviet Union,[1] Poland, Tannu Tuva (until 1944 incorporation with USSR), Mongolia Germany,[2] Italy (to 1943), Romania (to 1944), Finland (to 1944), Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, Spain (to 1943, unofficial) Commanders Joseph Stalin, Aleksei Antonov, Ivan Konev, Rodion Malinovsky, Ivan Bagramyan, Kirill Meretskov, Ivan Petrov, Alexander Rodimtsev, Konstantin Rokossovsky... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Baltic (disambiguation). ... Army Group North (Heeresgruppe Nord in German) was a high level command grouping of military units operating for Germany during World War II. The army group coordinated the operations of attached army corps, reserve formations, and direct-reporting units. ... language None. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... Army Group South (German: Heeresgruppe Süd) was the name of a number of German Army Groups during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ... Satellite image of the Carpathians. ...


Stavka had in fact decided on an offensive against Army Group Centre: a pincer movement which would punch through German lines and close on Minsk, liberating large swathes of territory and trapping much of Army Group Centre in a huge encirclement reminiscent of those achieved by German forces at the start of Operation Barbarossa, three years earlier. In order to maximise the chances of success, a major campaign of deception — maskirovka — was undertaken to convince the German High Command that the summer offensive would, in fact, be against Army Group North Ukraine. False concentrations of forces were created, and German reconnaissance flights selectively allowed into Soviet airspace to photograph them; radio silence was imposed to frustrate the intelligence efforts of Fremde Heere Ost. Stavka (Ставка) was the General Headquarters of armed forces in late Imperial Russia and in the Soviet Union. ... A pincer movement whereby the red force envelops the advancing blue force. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... Encirclement is a military term for the situation when one sides force or target is isolated and surrounded by other sides forces. ... Combatants Germany Romania Finland Italy Hungary Slovakia  Soviet Union Commanders Adolf Hitler Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb Fedor von Bock Gerd von Rundstedt Heinz Guderian Günther von Kluge Franz Halder Ion Antonescu C.G.E. Mannerheim Giovanni Messe, CSIR Italo Garibaldi, ARMIR Iosef Stalin Kliment Voroshilov Semyon Timoshenko Fyodor Kuznetsov... Army Group South (German: Heeresgruppe Süd) was the name of a number of German Army Groups during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ... This is a list of words, terms, concepts, and slogans that were used by the German military during World War II. Some have also been used in other times, and some are still in use today. ...


Though at corps level, several German commanders noted concerns about increased Soviet activity opposite Army Group Centre, German forces were transferred southwards to Army Group North Ukraine throughout the summer, in order to meet an attack there. This left Army Group Centre dangerously weakened, as Stavka had intended. This article is about a military unit. ... Stavka (Ставка) was the General Headquarters of armed forces in late Imperial Russia and in the Soviet Union. ...


Operations Rail War and Concert

The first phase of Operation Bagration involved the many partisan formations in the Belorussian SSR, which were instructed to restart their campaigns of targeting railways and communications behind German lines. From 19 June, large numbers of explosive charges were placed on rail tracks, and though many were cleared, they had a significant disruptive effect. The partisans would also be used to mop up encircled German forces once the breakthrough and exploitation phases of the operation were completed. Belorussian guerrillas liquidated, injured and took prisoner some 1. ... language None. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Deployments during Operation Bagration. The encirclements of Fourth Army east of Minsk and Ninth Army near Bobruisk are clearly shown, as is the encirclement of the LIII Corps of Third Panzer Army in Vitebsk.
Deployments during Operation Bagration. The encirclements of Fourth Army east of Minsk and Ninth Army near Bobruisk are clearly shown, as is the encirclement of the LIII Corps of Third Panzer Army in Vitebsk.

At the commencement of the offensive, the Soviets had committed approximately 1,700,000 combat and support troops, approximately 24,000 artillery pieces and mortars, 4,080 tanks and assault guns and 6,334 aircraft. German strength at the outset was approximately 800,000 combat and support troops, 9,500 artillery pieces, but only 553 tanks and assault guns and 839 aircraft. In particular, Army Group Centre was seriously short of mobile reserves: the demotorized 14th Infantry Division was the only substantial reserve formation available, though the 20th Panzer Division was positioned in the south near Bobruisk and the understrength Panzergrenadier-Division Feldherrnhalle was also held in reserve. The relatively static lines in Belorussia had, however, enabled the Germans to construct extensive field fortifications, with multiple trench lines to a depth of several kilometres and heavily mined defensive belts. Download high resolution version (1256x956, 334 KB)Operation Bagration -- June 22 - August 19, 1944 Source: US ARMY License: US Government document. ... Download high resolution version (1256x956, 334 KB)Operation Bagration -- June 22 - August 19, 1944 Source: US ARMY License: US Government document. ... The 14th Infantry Division was a German military unit which fought during World War II. // The division was formed in 1934 in Leipzig, by expanding the 11th Saxon Infantry Regiment of the 4th Division of the old Reichswehr. ... The 20th Panzer Division was formed on October 15, 1940 in Erfurt, Germany. ... The city of Babruysk (Belarusian: Бабру́йск; Russian: Бобру́йск) is located in Mahilyow voblast of Belarus on the Berezina river. ... Honorary cufftitle worn on the left cuff of all Feldherrnhalle personnel. ... “km” redirects here. ...


First phase

Operation Bagration began on 22 June 1944, with probing attacks throughout the German lines. The main offensive began in the early morning of 23 June, with an artillery bombardment of unprecedented scale against the defensive works. Within hours, some sectors of the German defences were in danger of being breached. is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Northern sector — Vitebsk

Army Group Centre's northern flank was defended by the Third Panzer Army under the command of Georg-Hans Reinhardt; the lines ran through marshy terrain in the north, through a salient round the city of Vitebsk, to a sector north of the main MoscowMinsk road, held by the Fourth Army. It was opposed by the 1st Baltic Front of Hovhannes Bagramyan, and Chernyakhovsky's 3rd Belorussian Front, who were given the task of breaking through the defences to the north and south of Vitebsk and cutting off the salient. The German Third Panzer Army (German: ) was a German panzer army that saw action during World War II. The Third Panzer Army was a constituent of Army Group Centre and fought in the Battle of Moscow in late 1941 and early 1942. ... Georg-Hans Reinhardt (March 1st, 1887 to November 23rd, 1963)) was Colonel General of the German Third Reichs Panzer Group 3, 3rd Panzer Army, Army Group Center. ... In military terms, a salient is a battlefield feature that projects into enemy territory. ... Location of Vitebsk, shown within the Vitebsk Voblast Coordinates: , Country Subdivision Founded 974 Government  - Mayor Population (2004)  - Total 342,381 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Area code(s) +375-15 License plate 2 Website: [2]] Vitebsk, also known as Vitsyebsk (Belarusian: Ві́цебск, IPA: ; Yiddish: װיטעבסק; Polish: Witebsk... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... The German Fourth Army (German: ) was a field army that fought in World War II. The Fourth Army was activated on December 1, 1938 with Field Marshal Günther von Kluge in command. ... The First Baltic Front was a Front of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... Hovhannes Khachatury Bagramyan (Armenian: ; Russian: ; December 2 [O.S. November 20] 1897 – September 21, 1982) was a Soviet Armenian military commander and Marshal of the Soviet Union. ... Ivan Danilovich Chernyakhovsky, (Cherniakhovsky), 1906 - 1945, Russian General of the Army (the youngest ever to have this rank), twice Hero of the Soviet Union, brilliant commander of the 3rd Belorussian Front, died from wounds received outside Königsberg at age 39. ... The 3rd Belorussian Front (alternative spellings are 3rd Belarusian Front) was one of the Soviet Army fronts during the World War II. At various times, it was commanded by Marshal of the Soviet Union Aleksandr Vasilevsky and General Ivan Chernyakhovsky. ... Location of Vitebsk, shown within the Vitebsk Voblast Coordinates: , Country Subdivision Founded 974 Government  - Mayor Population (2004)  - Total 342,381 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Area code(s) +375-15 License plate 2 Website: [2]] Vitebsk, also known as Vitsyebsk (Belarusian: Ві́цебск, IPA: ; Yiddish: װיטעבסק; Polish: Witebsk...


It was in this sector that Soviet forces had their greatest initial gains. The Soviet 43rd Army broke the defences of the German IX Corps, to the north of Vitebsk, within hours, pushing towards the Dvina river. South of the city, the VI Corps' 299th and 197th Infantry Divisions simply disappeared beneath an overwhelming Soviet assault, with a particularly effective breakthrough by the 5th Army at the junction of the 299th and 256th Infantry Divisions' sectors.[3] By June 24, the German position in Vitebsk itself, held by the central LIII Corps of four divisions, was already serious, as Soviet forces were clearly intending to encircle the city, but no reserves were available to shore up the collapsing defences, and requests to withdraw German troops to the second defense lines, the 'Tiger' line, were denied by the Oberkommando des Heeres. Location of Vitebsk, shown within the Vitebsk Voblast Coordinates: , Country Subdivision Founded 974 Government  - Mayor Population (2004)  - Total 342,381 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Area code(s) +375-15 License plate 2 Website: [2]] Vitebsk, also known as Vitsyebsk (Belarusian: Ві́цебск, IPA: ; Yiddish: װיטעבסק; Polish: Witebsk... Two rivers are referred to as Dvina: Western Dvina (also known as Daugava) Northern Dvina This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The German 299th Infantry Division (German: ) was a World War II infantry formation, which fought in France and the Russian Front until February 1945. ... The Soviet Fifth Red Banner Army was a Soviet field army of World War II, and is today a Russian Ground Forces formation in the Far East Military District. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Oberkommando der Heeres (OKH) was Germanys Army High Command from 1936 to 1945. ...


By June 25, Third Panzer Army was disintegrating. In the north, IX Corps had been broken and pushed over the Dvina, blowing the bridges during its retreat. In the south much of the VI Corps had been annihilated, and its southernmost divisions (the 299th and 256th Infantry Divisions) had become separated from the remainder of Third Panzer Army by heavy attacks around Bogushevsk, where they attempted to make a final stand in the 'Hessen' line, the third defence zone. The Soviet 43rd and 39th Armies were now converging behind Vitebsk, trapping the entire LIII Corps. LIII Corps' commander, Friedrich Gollwitzer, had transferred the 4th Luftwaffe Field Division south-west of the city in order to spearhead a breakout, while the 246th Infantry Division attempted to hold open the Dvina crossings. OKH however, denied all requests for complete evacuation: the 206th Infantry Division was ordered to stay in the city and fight to the last man. is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The German Third Panzer Army (German: ) was a German panzer army that saw action during World War II. The Third Panzer Army was a constituent of Army Group Centre and fought in the Battle of Moscow in late 1941 and early 1942. ... Two rivers are referred to as Dvina: Western Dvina (also known as Daugava) Northern Dvina This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The German 299th Infantry Division (German: ) was a World War II infantry formation, which fought in France and the Russian Front until February 1945. ... The 4th Luftwaffe Field Division was a German infantry formation which fought during World War II. // The division was formed in 1942 in the area of Third Air Command (Berlin). ... The Oberkommando der Heeres (OKH) was Germanys Army High Command from 1936 to 1945. ... The German 206th Infantry Division, or 206. ...


Soviet plans in this sector met with overwhelming success. The 4th Luftwaffe Field Division was cut off and destroyed by the 39th Army on the evening of the 25 June, and by the next day the 246th Infantry and 6th Luftwaffe Field Divisions, fighting their way along the road from Vitebsk, had also been encircled. Hitler insisted that a staff officer be parachuted into Vitebsk to remind Gollwitzer that the trapped 206th Infantry Division should not withdraw; Third Panzer Army's commander, Reinhardt, was only able to get this decision reversed by insisting on being parachuted in himself if Hitler continued to order it. By the evening Soviet forces were fighting their way into the city and Gollwitzer finally ordered the garrison to withdraw too, in defiance of OKH orders. is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 6th Luftwaffe Field Division was a German infantry formation which fought during World War II. // The division was formed in 1942 in the area of Third Air Command (Berlin), with the following organisation: I.-IV. Bataillon Panzerjäger-Abteilung Artillerie-Abteilung Flak-Abteilung Radfahr-Kompanie Pionier-Kompanie Luftnachrichten-Kompanie... Hitler redirects here. ... The German Third Panzer Army (German: ) was a German panzer army that saw action during World War II. The Third Panzer Army was a constituent of Army Group Centre and fought in the Battle of Moscow in late 1941 and early 1942. ... The Oberkommando der Heeres (OKH) was Germanys Army High Command from 1936 to 1945. ...

Soviet soldiers on the heights above Vitebsk, where the German 206th Infantry Division was encircled in late June.
Soviet soldiers on the heights above Vitebsk, where the German 206th Infantry Division was encircled in late June.

By 27 June LIII Corps had been dispersed, its 30,000 men being almost all killed or taken prisoner; a group of several thousand from the 6th Luftwaffe Field Division initially managed to break out, but was liquidated in the forests west of Vitebsk. The remnants of IX Corps were retreating to the west, falling back on Polotsk with the 6th Guards Army in pursuit: VI Corps was also largely destroyed. Third Panzer Army had been effectively shattered within days, and Vitebsk liberated: even more significantly, a huge gap had been torn in the German lines to the north of Fourth Army in the former VI Corps sector. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 405 pixelsFull resolution‎ (888 × 450 pixels, file size: 133 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 405 pixelsFull resolution‎ (888 × 450 pixels, file size: 133 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Polatsk (Belarusian: По́лацак, По́лацк; Polish: Połock, also spelt as Polacak; Russian: По́лоцк, also transliterated as Polotsk, Polotzk, Polock) is the most historic city in Belarus, situated on the Dvina... The German Third Panzer Army (German: ) was a German panzer army that saw action during World War II. The Third Panzer Army was a constituent of Army Group Centre and fought in the Battle of Moscow in late 1941 and early 1942. ... Location of Vitebsk, shown within the Vitebsk Voblast Coordinates: , Country Subdivision Founded 974 Government  - Mayor Population (2004)  - Total 342,381 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Area code(s) +375-15 License plate 2 Website: [2]] Vitebsk, also known as Vitsyebsk (Belarusian: Ві́цебск, IPA: ; Yiddish: װיטעבסק; Polish: Witebsk...


Central sector — Orsha and Mogilev

The central sector of Soviet operations was against the long front of Fourth Army, which was under the overall command of Kurt von Tippelskirch. Soviet plans envisaged the bulk of it, the XXXIX Panzer Corps and XII Corps, being encircled while pinned down by attacks from the 2nd Belorussian Front. By far the most important Soviet objective, however, was in the north of the sector: the main MoscowMinsk road and the town of Orsha, which the southern wing of Chernyakhovsky's 3rd Belorussian Front was ordered to take. A breakthrough in this area, against General Paul Völckers' XXVII Corps, would form the northern 'pincer' of the encirclement aimed at destroying Fourth Army. The Minsk road was protected by extensive defensive works manned by the 78th Sturm Division, a specially reinforced unit with extra artillery and assault gun support. Orsha itself had been designated a Fester Platz or strongpoint under 78th Sturm Division's commander, with the 25th Panzergrenadier Division holding the lines to the south. As a result of the strong defenses in this sector, Soviet plans included the commitment of heavily-armed engineer units to assist in a breakthrough. The German Fourth Army (German: ) was a field army that fought in World War II. The Fourth Army was activated on December 1, 1938 with Field Marshal Günther von Kluge in command. ... Kurt von Tippelskirch (October 9, 1891 - May 10, 1957) was a general in the German Army during World War II. // Kurt von Tippelskirch was born on 9th October, 1891 in Berlin (Charlottenburg). ... XXXIX.Panzerkorps (XXXIX.Armeekorps (mot)) was a German panzer corps which saw action on the Western and Eastern Fronts during World War II. // Generaloberst Rudolf Schmidt (1 Feb 1940 - 10 Nov 1941) Generaloberst Hans-Jürgen von Arnim (11 November 1941 - 30 Nov 1942) General der Artillerie Robert Martinek (1... The 2nd Belorussian Front (alternative spellings are 2nd Byelorussian Front and 2nd Belarusian Front) was a military subdivision (Front) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... Orsha (Belarusian: Во́рша; Russian: О́рша; Polish: Orsza) is a city in Belarus, an important railway node along the Minsk–Moscow line. ... Ivan Danilovich Chernyakhovsky, (Cherniakhovsky), 1906 - 1945, Russian General of the Army (the youngest ever to have this rank), twice Hero of the Soviet Union, brilliant commander of the 3rd Belorussian Front, died from wounds received outside Königsberg at age 39. ... The 3rd Belorussian Front (alternative spellings are 3rd Belarusian Front) was one of the Soviet Army fronts during the World War II. At various times, it was commanded by Marshal of the Soviet Union Aleksandr Vasilevsky and General Ivan Chernyakhovsky. ... The 78th Infantry Division was raised in August 1939. ... Sturmgeschütz III Sturmgeschütz is a German word for assault gun, usually abbreviated StuG. They were widely used to provide fire support for infantry, panzer and panzergrenadier units. ...


Galitsky's 11th Guards Army attacked towards Orsha on 23 June but intially made little headway. By the next day, the Soviet 1st Guards Rifle Division was able to break through the German lines in a marshy, thinly-held area to the north of the 78th Sturm Division, which was ordered back to the 'Hessen' line, the third defence zone. It was now struggling to maintain contact with the 25th Panzergrenadier Division to the south. Chernyakhovsky, encouraged by the 1st Guards Rifle Division's progress, pushed a mixed cavalry / mechanised exploitation force into the breach in the German lines. On 25 June, the German defences began to rupture; a counter-attack at Orekhovsk failed. is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Völckers' position was further threatened by the near-collapse of the Third Panzer Army's VI Corps, immediately to the north. At 11:20 on 25 June the VI Corps, which had been cut off from its parent formation, was reassigned to Fourth Army.[4] Part of its reserve, the 14th Infantry Division was brought up to try and slow the Soviet advance north of Orsha. By midnight, however, the 11th Guards Army had shattered the remnant of VI Corps in the 'Hessen' line, and the 78th Sturm Division's situation was becoming untenable: 26 June saw the German forces in retreat. Soviet tank forces of the 2nd Guards Tank Corps were able to push up the road towards Minsk at speed, with a subsidiary force breaking off to encircle Orsha, which was liberated on the evening of 26 June. The main exploitation force, Pavel Rotmistrov's 5th Guards Tank Army, was then committed through the gap torn in the German lines. VI Corps finally crumbled completely, its rear elements falling back towards Borisov in disarray: its commander, General Georg Pfeiffer, was killed on 28 June after losing contact with his divisions. Völckers was ordered to hold fast, but lacked the necessary resources despite shifting his 260th Infantry Division northwards and moving the 286th Security Division into the lines.[5] The 14th Infantry Division was a German military unit which fought during World War II. // The division was formed in 1934 in Leipzig, by expanding the 11th Saxon Infantry Regiment of the 4th Division of the old Reichswehr. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... Orsha (Belarusian: Во́рша; Russian: О́рша; Polish: Orsza) is a city in Belarus, an important railway node along the Minsk–Moscow line. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chief Marshal of Armoured Troops Pavel Rotmistrov (Russian: ) (06 July 1901 – 06 April 1982) was a commander of armoured troops in the Red Army during and following World War II. // Pre-War Rotmistrov joined the Red Army in 1919, and served during the Russian Civil War when he was involved... The 5th Guards Tank Army was a Soviet Guards armoured formation which fought in many notable actions during World War II. The 5th Guards Tank Army was formed on 10 February 1942. ... Barysaw (Belarusian: also transliterated as Barysau, IPA: ; Russian: ) (population 150,700 as of 1999) is a town in Belarus situated near the Berezina River. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 286th Security Division was a German military formation which fought in World War II. // The 286th Security Division was formed on 15 March 1941 around elements of the 213th Infantry Division. ...


To the south of XXVII Corps' sector, the remainder of Fourth Army was suffering serious difficulties, but was not officially permitted to disengage. General Robert Martinek's XXXIX Panzer Corps (made up of the 31st, 12th, 337th and 110th Infantry Divisions) attempted to hold its lines, but the reserve Panzergrenadier-Division Feldherrnhalle was ordered forward to take up positions on the Dnepr in preparation to cover an inevitable withdrawal by the frontline divisions. The southernmost corps, General Vincenz Muller's XII Corps (with the 18th Panzergrenadier Division, 57th and 267th Infantry Divisions) also began to fall back to the second defensive line. Mogilev, along with much of the 12th Infantry Division who had been instructed to defend the town at all costs, fell into Soviet hands on 27 June, and by 28 June both XII Corps and XXXIX Panzer Corps (whose commander, Martinek, was killed that evening in an air attack) were falling back towards the Berezina crossings. As the roads were clogged with fleeing civilians and military units, and were under heavy air attack, progress was slow. The German Fourth Army (German: ) was a field army that fought in World War II. The Fourth Army was activated on December 1, 1938 with Field Marshal Günther von Kluge in command. ... Robert Martinek was an artillery officer in the Austro-Hungarian Army during World War I, the Austrian Bundesheer and, during World War II, in the Wehrmacht Heer, who came to be regarded as one of the most skilled artillerymen of his generation. ... XXXIX.Panzerkorps (XXXIX.Armeekorps (mot)) was a German panzer corps which saw action on the Western and Eastern Fronts during World War II. // Generaloberst Rudolf Schmidt (1 Feb 1940 - 10 Nov 1941) Generaloberst Hans-Jürgen von Arnim (11 November 1941 - 30 Nov 1942) General der Artillerie Robert Martinek (1... The German 12th Infantry Division, later known as the 12th Volksgrenadier Division, was formed in 1934 under the cover name of Infanterieführer II, and did not assume its bona-fide designation until the creation of the Wehrmacht was announced in October 1935. ... The 110th Infantry division was formed in April 1940 in Lüneburg, Germany under the 11. ... Honorary cufftitle worn on the left cuff of all Feldherrnhalle personnel. ... The Dnieper River (Belarusian: Дняпро/Dnyapro; Russian: Днепр/Dnepr; Ukrainian: Днiпро/Dnipro; Polish: Dniepr; Latin: Borysthenes, Danaper) is a river (2290 km length) which flows from Russia through Belarus and then Ukraine. ... German 18th Infantry Division (September 1939 – November 1940) Redesignated German 18th Motorised Infantry Division (November 1940 – June 1943) Redesignated German 18th Panzergrenadier Division (June 1943 – May 1945) // Commander: Lieutenant-General Friedrich Karl Cranz 1 September 1939 - 1 November 1940 From September 1939 until May 1940 the division fought in Invasion... Mogilev, or Mahilyow (Belarusian: ; Russian: , translit. ... The German 12th Infantry Division, later known as the 12th Volksgrenadier Division, was formed in 1934 under the cover name of Infanterieführer II, and did not assume its bona-fide designation until the creation of the Wehrmacht was announced in October 1935. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Rivers of Belarus | Belarus-related stubs ...


Southern sector — Bobruisk

In the southern sector of operations, where the 1st Belorussian Front under Konstantin Rokossovsky faced Hans Jordan's Ninth Army, the main Soviet objective was Bobruisk and the southern crossings of the Berezina, which would open up the route for the southern 'pincer' of the main encirclement. (Army Group Centre's southernmost flank was covered by Second Army in the Pripet Marshes, but this area was largely bypassed by the Soviet offensive.) Ninth Army headquarters had in fact argued particularly strongly that a major attack against Army Group Centre was imminent, and General Jordan had bitterly complained about the high command's refusal to sanction tactical withdrawals, but the Army Group commander, Field Marshal Busch, had brushed these concerns aside. The 1st Belorussian Front (alternative spellings are 1st Byelorussian Front and 1st Belarusian Front) was a military subdivision (Front) of the Soviet Army during the Second World War. ... Marshal of the Soviet Union Konstantin Rokossovsky Konstantin Konstantinovich Rokossovskiy (Russian: Константин Константинович Рокоссовский, Polish: Konstanty Rokossowski) (December 21, 1896 – August 3, 1968) was a Soviet military commander and Polish Defence Minister. ... The German Ninth Army (German: ) was a World War II field army. ... The city of Babruysk (Belarusian: Бабру́йск; Russian: Бобру́йск) is located in Mahilyow voblast of Belarus on the Berezina river. ... Categories: Rivers of Belarus | Belarus-related stubs ... The German Second Army (German: ) was a World War II field army. ... Pinsk Marshes (Пинские болота) or Pripyat Marshes (Pripet Marshes, Припятские болота) is a vast territory of wetlands along the Pripyat River and its tributaries from... Ernst Busch (6 July 1885 - 17 July 1945) was a German field marshal during World War II. He was born in Essen-Steele, Germany, and was educated at the Groß Lichterfelde Cadet Academy. ...


Rokossovsky's attack, when it came, was overwhelming. Two days of heavy artillery preparation against strong German defences eventually resulted in a collapse of the 134th Infantry Division to the north of the sector, as the Soviet 3rd Army pushed forward; the 20th Panzer Division began to counter-attack, but Jordan then ordered it to turn southwards and confront a new breakthrough by the Soviet 65th Army under Batov. The Soviet Third Army was an important Soviet Red Army field formation during World War II. The Third Army was created in 1939 in the Special Belorussian Military District as part of Vitebsk Army Group. ... The 20th Panzer Division was formed on October 15, 1940 in Erfurt, Germany. ... Pavel Ivanovich Batov (1897–1985) was a Red Army officer during the Second World War and afterwards. ...


By 27 June, Soviet forces were converging near Bobruisk, trapping the five divisions of Ninth Army's northernmost corps, Lieutenant-General von Lützow's XXXV Corps, east of the Berezina. Elements of the central XXXXI Panzer Corps, along with the overstretched 20th Panzer, were also trapped. The disorganised German forces commenced a series of desperate attempts to break out of the pocket, but Soviet air attack and artillery crushed them, inflicting appalling casualties. In the meantime, Hitler had relieved Jordan of command due to his confusing instructions to 20th Panzer; Ninth Army was dealt another blow when its main communications headquarters was destroyed by bombing. On the following day, reinforcements arrived behind German lines in the form of 12th Panzer Division, whose commander was greeted by Ninth Army's chief of staff with the words "Good to see you — Ninth Army no longer exists!"[6] is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The city of Babruysk (Belarusian: Бабру́йск; Russian: Бобру́йск) is located in Mahilyow voblast of Belarus on the Berezina river. ... The German Ninth Army (German: ) was a World War II field army. ... Categories: Rivers of Belarus | Belarus-related stubs ... 2nd Infantry Division 2nd Motorized Infantry Division 12th Panzer Division The German 2nd Infantry Division was created from components of the Reichswehrs old 2nd Division in 1934, at first under the cover name Wehrgauleitung Stettin and later Artillerieführer II; it did not take its real name until October...


Faced with Ninth Army's imminent collapse, OKH authorised a withdrawal. Lieutenant-General Adolf Hamann, Commander (Commandant) of Bobruisk, was ordered to hold the town with one division, Lieutenant-General Edmund Hoffmeister's 383rd Infantry Division. Thousands of wounded were abandoned in the citadel. The remnants of 20th Panzer Division, with a handful of tanks and assault guns, formed a spearhead for the breakout attempt, while 12th Panzer Division attacked from the Svisloch River to meet the retreating troops. Though a breakout was achieved through positions held by the Soviet 356th Rifle Division of 65th Army, the German forces were again subjected to intense artillery bombardment and air attack as they attempted to make their way along the roads south of Minsk. The Oberkommando der Heeres (OKH) was Germanys Army High Command from 1936 to 1945. ... Adolf Hamann (born 1885; died 1945) was an officer in the German Army (Wehrmacht Heer) during World War II. In 1944, Lieutenant-General (Generalleutnant) Hamann was the Commander (Commandant) of Bobruisk during Operation Bagration. ... The city of Babruysk (Belarusian: Бабру́йск; Russian: Бобру́йск) is located in Mahilyow voblast of Belarus on the Berezina river. ... Edmund Hoffmeister was an officer in the German Army (Wehrmacht Heer) during World War II. Colonel (Oberst) Hoffmeister, as commander of Infantry Regiment 21 of the German 17th Infantry Division, was scheduled to link up with a 131-man Brandenburger commando team during Operation Sealion (Unternehmen Seelöwe) and push... Babruysk fortress in 1811 General Carl Operman at the construction of the Babruysk fortress. ... The 20th Panzer Division was formed on October 15, 1940 in Erfurt, Germany. ... ÅšvisÅ‚ač (pronounce: â–¶ (help·info), Belarusian: , Russian: ) is a river in Belarus, a right tributary of the Biarezina river. ...

Street fighting in Bobruisk on 28th or 29th June
Street fighting in Bobruisk on 28th or 29th June

Bobruisk, in ruins and with much of its population killed during the German occupation, was liberated on 29 June, the 383rd Infantry Division commencing withdrawal towards dawn: no further elements of Ninth Army would escape from east of the Berezina. The German breakout had allowed around 12,000 troops from the pocket east of Bobruisk to get out, but the Soviets claimed 20,000 taken captive. A further 50,000 were dead: Soviet accounts speak of the area being carpeted with bodies and littered with abandoned materiel. The Soviet writer, Vasily Grossman, entered Bobruisk shortly after the end of the battle: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The city of Babruysk (Belarusian: Бабру́йск; Russian: Бобру́йск) is located in Mahilyow voblast of Belarus on the Berezina river. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Vasily Semyonovich Grossman (first name alternatively spelled as Vassily or Vasiliy, Russian: ), December 12, 1905 – September 14, 1964, was a prominent Soviet-era writer and journalist. ...

"Men are walking over German corpses. Corpses, hundreds and thousands of them, pave the road, lie in ditches, under the pines, in the green barley. In some places, vehicles have to drive over the corpses, so densely they lie upon the ground [...] A cauldron of death was boiling here, where the revenge was carried out"[7]

Ninth Army had been decisively defeated, and the southern route to Minsk was open. Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ...


Second phase — Minsk

By 26 June, OKH had finally realised that this was the main Soviet offensive, and that Minsk was its objective. As a result, the 5th Panzer Division was brought back from Army Group North Ukraine, arriving in Minsk on 27 June with the unenviable job of attempting to halt the Soviet advance and preventing the complete collapse of Army Group Centre. The overall situation was dire: in the Army Group's northern sector, Third Panzer Army had crumbled, with the LIII Corps wiped out, the VI Corps shattered, and the IX Corps being pushed steadily west. In the south, Ninth Army had lost all cohesion, its remaining troops being pounded by artillery and air bombardment. Fourth Army's three corps were now ordered to hold fast, despite being bypassed by Soviet forces on their flanks: Hitler declared Minsk a Fester Platz and instructed the remnants of Ninth Army to reinforce its defence. is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Oberkommando der Heeres (OKH) was Germanys Army High Command from 1936 to 1945. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... The 5th Panzer Division is a German armored unit. ... Army Group South (German: Heeresgruppe Süd) was the name of a number of German Army Groups during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


5th Panzer, which was reorganised on 28 June into a combat group under the command of Dietrich von Saucken, took up positions near Borisov on the main road north-east of Minsk, along which elements of Fourth Army were fleeing from the front. 5th Panzer's main tank regiments, which unlike many German armoured units at the time were at full strength, were concentrated to the north, screening the rail lines being used for evacuation. The road itself was held by a rearguard of infantry, while Heavy Tank Battalion 505, equipped with Tiger Is, held the rail lines at Krupki to the east. The crossing points on the Berezina southwards were defended by several police and security detachments organised as Gruppe Anhalt, and elements of divisions from Muller's XII Corps, which had fallen back on the town of Berezino. is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dietrich von Saucken (1892–1990) was a General in the German Army (Wehrmacht) during World War II. He was born in East Prussia in 1892 and personified all the aristocratic Prussian militarists who despised the braune Bande of Nazis. ... Barysaw (Belarusian: also transliterated as Barysau, IPA: ; Russian: ) (population 150,700 as of 1999) is a town in Belarus situated near the Berezina River. ... The German Fourth Army (German: ) was a field army that fought in World War II. The Fourth Army was activated on December 1, 1938 with Field Marshal Günther von Kluge in command. ... German Heavy Panzer Detachments/Battalions (German: ), were battalion-sized World War II tank units, equipped with Tiger I and Tiger II heavy tanks. ... Tiger I ( ) is the common name of a German heavy tank of World War II. The initial official German designation was Panzerkampfwagen VI Ausführung H (abbreviated PzKpfw VI Ausf. ... Categories: Rivers of Belarus | Belarus-related stubs ... The Wehrmacht Security Divisions (German: Sicherungs-Divisionen) were German military units which operated during World War II. // The Wehrmacht Security Divisions were set up at the beginning of 1941 and were intended to perform policing, security and anti-partisan duties in the rear of the main German field armies, under... BiarezaÅ„ or Bierazino (Belarusian: ) is a town on Biarezina river in the Minsk Province of Belarus. ...


The re-conquest of Minsk

5th Guards Tank Army was now bearing down on Minsk from the north-east (the subordinate 3rd Guards Tank Corps initially suffering some losses to 5th Panzer's heavy tank battalion at Krupki), while the Soviet 2nd Guards Tank Corps approached from the east. The bulk of 5th Guards Tank Army, accompanied by the rifle divisions of 11th Guards Army, attacked straight down the Minsk road, forcing the German infantry back into Borisov by 29 June: a screen of Soviet troops was left on the road to prevent any more elements of Fourth Army escaping into Minsk. 5th Panzer's engineers blew the bridges over the Berezina on 30 June in an attempt to deny the Soviet forces entry into Borisov. The overstretched main elements of Gruppe von Saucken now attempted to screen Minsk from the north-west, where the 5th Guards Tank Army threatened to sever the railway lines. The fall of the city seemed imminent: 65th Army was approaching from the southern route, the 5th Guards Tank Army was making progress from the north, and 2nd Guards Tank Corps had crossed the Berezina. The 5th Guards Tank Army was a Soviet Guards armoured formation which fought in many notable actions during World War II. The 5th Guards Tank Army was formed on 10 February 1942. ... Location of Minsk, shown within the Minsk Voblast Coordinates: Country Subdivision Belarus Minsk Founded 1067 Government  - Mayor Mikhail Pavlov Area  - City 305. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Rivers of Belarus | Belarus-related stubs ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The elements of Army Group Centre holding Minsk began to prepare for withdrawal on 1 July, authorisation finally being given on 2 July. von Saucken and the 5th Panzer Division were ordered to fall back towards Molodechno in the north-west. With substantial elements of Fourth Army still east of the city attempting to withdraw, the 2nd Guards Tank Corps broke through the defences of Minsk in the early hours of 3 July; fighting erupted in the centre of the city at dawn. By the next day, Minsk had been cleared of German rearguard units, while the 65th Army and 5th Guards Tank Army closed the encirclement to the west. The bulk of Fourth Army, and much of the remnant of Ninth Army, were now trapped. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Maladzechna is a city in the Minsk voblast of Belarus. ... The German Fourth Army (German: ) was a field army that fought in World War II. The Fourth Army was activated on December 1, 1938 with Field Marshal Günther von Kluge in command. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The destruction of Fourth Army

Over the next few days, Fourth Army made several attempts to break out of the encirclement, led by those divisions still retaining a coherent organisational structure. The largest group of encircled forces comprised the divisions of XII Corps, which remained relatively intact, along with those elements of XXVII Corps that had successfully retreated from Orsha and which were now trapped near Pekalin. The corps commanders, Muller and Völckers, decided on 5 July that their forces should break out to the north-west and west respectively, accompanied by the remnants of Martinek's former XXXIX Panzer Corps; they were now as much as 100 km behind Soviet lines. The 25th Panzergrenadier Division acted as the spearhead for the breakout at midnight on 5 July, but was scattered, with some elements passing north of Minsk to reach German positions. The 57th Infantry Division and Panzergrenadier-Division Feldherrnhalle attempted to bypass Minsk to the south, but were also dispersed, while the same fate eventually befell the remainder of the 78th Sturm Division and most of the other divisional groupings.[8] Some elements of the 14th Infantry Division under their commander, Lieutenant-General Flörke, managed to link up with remnants of the 31st and 12th Infantry Divisions; Kampfgruppe Flörke, after finding Minsk abandoned and burning, was eventually able to escape the pocket and reach the 12th Panzer Division's positions.[9] In total, around 100,000 troops from Fourth and Ninth Armies were caught in the encirclement, of whom some 40,000 were killed, most of the remainder being captured. Partisans played an important role in locating and mopping up the encircled forces. is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “km” redirects here. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Honorary cufftitle worn on the left cuff of all Feldherrnhalle personnel. ... The 78th Infantry Division was raised in August 1939. ... The German 12th Infantry Division, later known as the 12th Volksgrenadier Division, was formed in 1934 under the cover name of Infanterieführer II, and did not assume its bona-fide designation until the creation of the Wehrmacht was announced in October 1935. ... The Kampfgruppe was a common combat formation used by the German Wehrmacht during the Second World War. ... 2nd Infantry Division 2nd Motorized Infantry Division 12th Panzer Division The German 2nd Infantry Division was created from components of the Reichswehrs old 2nd Division in 1934, at first under the cover name Wehrgauleitung Stettin and later Artillerieführer II; it did not take its real name until October...


Third phase

As German resistance had completely collapsed, Soviet forces were ordered to push on as far as possible beyond the original objective of Minsk: they were now given the task of taking Grodno and Byalistok. 5th Panzer attempted to hold Molodechno, but failed. Walter Model, who had taken over command of Army Group Centre on 28 June when Ernst Busch was sacked, hoped to reestablish a defensive line running through Lida using what was left of Third Panzer and Ninth Armies along with new reinforcements.[10] Even so, his attempt to defend Vilnius with the Third Panzer Army resulted in another encirclement and the loss of another 12,000 troops. Hrodna (or Grodno; Belarusian: Го́радня, Гро́дна; Grodno in Polish, Гродно in Russian, Gardinas in Lithuanian) is a city in Belarus on the Nemunas river, close to the borders of Poland and Lithuania... BiaÅ‚ystok (pronounce: , Belarusian: , Lithuanian: , Yiddish ביאַליסטאָק Byalistok is the largest city (pop. ... Maladzechna is a city in the Minsk voblast of Belarus. ... Otto Moritz Walter Model (IPA: ) (24 January 1891 – 21 April 1945) was a German general and later field marshal during World War II. He is noted for his defensive battles in the latter half of the war, mostly on the Eastern Front but also in the west, and for his... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ernst Busch (6 July 1885 - 17 July 1945) was a German field marshal during World War II. He was born in Essen-Steele, Germany, and was educated at the Groß Lichterfelde Cadet Academy. ... Lida (Belarusian: Лі́да, Russian: Ли́да, Lithuanian: Lyda) is a small city located in western Belarus, approximately 70 km west of Minsk. ... Combatants Red Army, Polish Home Army Wehrmacht Commanders Rainer Stahel The Battle of Vilnius occurred as part of Operation Bagration, the great summer offensive by the Red Army against the Wehrmacht, in June, and July, 1944. ...


Ten days after the fall of Minsk, the Red Army reached the pre-war Polish border, pushing on to seize bridgeheads over the Nieman before German forces could react. The subsequent Lublin-Brest and Lvov-Sandomierz Operations further exploited the collapse of Army Group Centre, as German forces were hurriedly transferred back from Army Group North Ukraine, weakening it. The Soviet offensives had been so successful that they halted only when their supply lines were in danger of over-extension. However, controversy still rages about the decision to provide only limited — and late — assistance to the Polish Home Army during the Warsaw Uprising which began just as Soviet forces reached the eastern outskirts of that city. External links Wikimedia Commons has multimedia related to: Neman Categories: Belarus-related stubs | Rivers of Belarus | Rivers of Lithuania | Russian rivers ... Combatants Nazi Germany Romania Soviet Union Commanders Ferdinand Schorner (until July 23) Johannes Friessner (from July 25) (Heeresgruppe Sudukraine) Günther Blumentritt (until June 28) Walter Model (until August 16) Georg Hans Reinhardt (Army Group Centre) Konstantin Rokossovsky (1st Belorussian Front) Strength  ?  ? Casualties  ?  ? Lublin-Brest Offensive is covered in the... Combatants Germany Soviet Union Commanders Josef Harpe (Heeresgruppe Nordukraine) Ivan Koniev (1st Ukrainian Front) Strength 368,000 men 340 AFVs 4,800 guns 1,200,000 men 1,979 AFVs 11,265 guns Casualties 37,400 men 520 AFVs 198,000 men 1,285 AFVs The Lvov-Sandomierz Operation was... Armia Krajowa (the Home Army), abbreviated AK, was the dominant Polish resistance movement in World War II German-occupied Poland. ... For other uses, see Warsaw Uprising (disambiguation). ...


Aftermath

Compared to other battles, this was by far the greatest Soviet victory in numerical terms. The Red Army inflicted nearly 4 times as many losses on the Germans as they sustained, and liberated a vast amount of Soviet territory (whose population had suffered greatly under the brutal German occupation) in a span of 2 months. In order to show the outside world the magnitude of the victory, some 50,000 German prisoners, taken from the encirclement east of Minsk, were paraded through Moscow: even marching quickly and twenty abreast, they took three hours to pass.[11] In a symbolic gesture the streets were washed down afterwards. Belarusian partisan fighters behind German front lines in Belarus in 1943 Occupation of Belarus by Nazi Germany. ...

German prisoners from Fourth Army are marched through the streets of Moscow.
German prisoners from Fourth Army are marched through the streets of Moscow.

The German army never recovered from the matériel and manpower losses sustained during this time, having lost about a quarter of its Eastern Front manpower, similar to the percentage lost at Stalingrad (about 20 full divisions). These losses included many experienced troops, NCOs and officers, which at this stage of the war the Wehrmacht could not replace. A number of generals were also lost: 9 were killed, including 2 corps commanders; 22 captured, including 4 corps commanders; Major-General Hahn, commander of 197th Infantry Division disappeared on 24 June and Lieutenant-General Zutavern of 18th Panzergrenadier Division committed suicide. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Matériel (from the French for equipment or hardware, related to the word material) is a term used in English to refer to the equipment and supplies in military and commercial supply chain management. ... Manpower may refer to: Manpower, the number of personnel available for a task or tasks, also used when referring to such personnel as a resource (e. ... The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, a stylized version of the Iron Cross, the emblem of the Wehrmacht. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... German 18th Infantry Division (September 1939 – November 1940) Redesignated German 18th Motorised Infantry Division (November 1940 – June 1943) Redesignated German 18th Panzergrenadier Division (June 1943 – May 1945) // Commander: Lieutenant-General Friedrich Karl Cranz 1 September 1939 - 1 November 1940 From September 1939 until May 1940 the division fought in Invasion...


Overall the near-total annihilation of Army Group Centre cost the Germans 2,000 tanks and 57,000 other vehicles. German losses are estimated at 300,000 dead, 250,000 wounded, and about 120,000 captured; overall casualties at 670,000. Soviet losses were 60,000 killed, 110,000 wounded, and about 8,000 missing, with 2,957 tanks, 2,447 artillery pieces, and 822 aircraft also lost.


The offensive cut off Army Group North and Army Group North Ukraine from each other, and weakened them as resources were diverted to the central sector. This forced both Army Groups to withdraw from Soviet territory much more quickly when faced with the following Soviet offensives in their sectors. Army Group North (Heeresgruppe Nord in German) was a high level command grouping of military units operating for Germany during World War II. The army group coordinated the operations of attached army corps, reserve formations, and direct-reporting units. ... Army Group South (German: Heeresgruppe Süd) was the name of a number of German Army Groups during World War II. Germany used two army groups to invade Poland in 1939: Army Group North and Army Group South. ...


The final destruction of much of Army Group Centre around Minsk coincided with the destruction of many of the German army's strongest units in France in the Falaise pocket. On both eastern and western fronts, the subsequent Allied exploitation was slowed and halted by supply problems rather than German resistance. However, the Germans were able to transfer armoured units from the Italian front, where they could afford to give ground, to resist the Soviet advance near Warsaw. Combatants North:  United Kingdom  Canada Polish forces South:  United States  Free French Nazi Germany Commanders Omar Bradley Harry Crerar Philippe Leclerc StanisÅ‚aw Maczek Bernard Montgomery George Patton Günther von Kluge Walter Model Strength ~at least 500,000 Casualties Canadian: 1,470 killed Polish: 325 killed ~50,000 killed...


External links

  • Operation Bagration: Soviet Offensive of 1944 Article by Jonathan W. Jordan
  • Map showing the location of different armies and the pockets where the German 4th Army and 9th Army were destroyed

References

  • Adair, Paul (1994-09-22). Hitler's Greatest Mistake: The collapse of Army Group Centre, June, 1944. Weidenfeld Military. ISBN 1854092324. 
  • Beevor, Antony and Vinogradova, Luba (eds), A Writer at War: Vasily Grossman with the Red Army, Pimlico, 2006, ISBN 978-1845950156
  • Dunn, W. Soviet Blitzkrieg: The Battle for White Russia, 1944, Lynne Riener, 2000, ISBN 978-1555878801
  • Glantz, D. Beylorussia 1944—The Soviet General Staff Study
  • Hastings, Max, Armageddon: The Battle for Germany, 1944–1945, Macmillan, 2004, ISBN 0-333-90836-8
  • Hinze, R. Ostfrontdrama 1944: Rückzugskämpfe der Heeresgruppe Mitte
  • Merridale, C. Ivan's War: Inside the Red Army, 1939–45, Faber, 2006, ISBN 978-0571218097
  • Niepold, G. Battle for White Russia
  • Zaloga, S. Bagration 1944: The Destruction of Army Group Centre
  • Ziemke, Earl F., Battle For Berlin: End Of The Third Reich, NY:Ballantine Books, London:Macdomald & Co, 1969.

David M. Glantz is an American military historian and the editor of The Journal of Slavic Military Studies. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Alternative spellings for Belorussian Offensive are Byelorussian Offensive and Belarusian Offensive
  2. ^ a b Ziemke, Earl F., Battle For Berlin: End Of The Third Reich, NY:Ballantine Books, London:Macdomald & Co, 1969. Page 11
  3. ^ Dunn, pp. 1-2
  4. ^ Dunn, p.149
  5. ^ Dunn, pp.149-50
  6. ^ Adair, p.135
  7. ^ Beevor and Vinogradova, p.273
  8. ^ See Adair, pp.151–2
  9. ^ Niepold, p.195
  10. ^ The German Order of Battle for Army Group Centre in mid-July shows the remnants of Ninth Army incorporated in Second Army; Third Panzer Army reduced to Korps-Abteilung G and fragments of IX and XXVI Corps; and Fourth Army consisting of the battered 5th Panzer and 50th Infantry Divisions along with Kampfgruppe Flörke, some remnants of security divisions and part of the Totenkopf (all under the command of Helmuth Weidling, who had previously been commanding a corps of Ninth Army at Bobruisk) plus 7th Panzer (see Hinze, Ostfrontdrama 1944). Though Soviet forces were exhausted and their supply lines dangerously extended, the extremely weak forces arrayed against them encouraged commanders to push on as far as possible.
  11. ^ Merridale, p.241

  Results from FactBites:
 
Operation Bagration - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (830 words)
The operation was named after 18th-19th century Russian general Pyotr Bagration, who died at the Battle of Borodino.
Bagration, in combination with the neighbouring Lvov-Sandomierz Operation launched a few weeks later in Ukraine, allowed the Soviet Union to recapture practically all the territories within its 1941 borders, advance into German East Prussia, and reach the outskirts of Warsaw after gaining control of Poland east of the Vistula river.
The Lvov-Sandomierz Operation was launched on July 17, 1944, and quickly routed the German forces in the Ukraine.
Operation Bagration (916 words)
The operation was named, by the Soviets, after Russian Gen. Petr Bagration, who died in the Battle of Borodino in September 1812, fighting against Napoleon’s forces.
In German military history, Operation Bagration in 1944 was to be recorded as the “Defeat of the Army Group Center”, which reflects the essence of what happened.
The Operation Bagration irreversibly turned the tide of World War II, and the speed and ferocity with which the Germans once embarked upon implementation of their Barbarossa project, meant to subjugate and partially eradicate the “Slavic hordes” inhabiting vast expanses of the Soviet Union, turned against them.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m