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Encyclopedia > Open content

Open content, coined by analogy with "open source", describes any kind of creative work (including articles, pictures, audio, and video) or engineering work (i.e. open machine design) that is published in a format that explicitly allows the copying and the modifying of the information by anyone; not exclusively by a closed organization, firm or individual. The largest open content project is Wikipedia.[1] Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ... A creative work is a tangible manifestation of creative effort such as literature, paintings, software, and this article. ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Wind turbines The scientific definition of a machine is any device that transmits or modifies energy. ... Wikipedia (IPA: , or ( ) is a multilingual, web-based, free content encyclopedia project, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization. ...


Technically, it is royalty free, share alike and may or may not allow commercial redistribution. Content can be either in the public domain or under an open license like one of the Creative Commons licenses. Royalty free pictures It’s said that a picture is worth a thousand words. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Copyleft. ... Look up redistribution in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... To licence or grant licence is to give permission. ... The Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative work available for others legally to build upon and share. ...


It is possible that the first documented case of open content was with the Royal Society, where they aspired toward information sharing across the globe as a public enterprise. The commonality is difficult to dismiss. The words "open content" were first put together in this context by David Wiley, then a graduate student at Brigham Young University, who founded the OpenContent project and put together the first content-specific (non-software) license in 1998 with input from Eric Raymond, Tim O'Reilly, and others . For other uses, see Royal Society (disambiguation). ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... , Brigham Young University Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church). ... Eric S. Raymond (FISL 6. ... Tim OReilly at the MIX06 conference in Las Vegas, Nevada Tim OReilly (born 1954, Cork, Ireland) is the founder of OReilly Media (formerly OReilly & Associates) and supporter of the free software and open source movements. ...


Like the debate between the titles "open source" and "free software", some open content materials can also be described as free content, although technically they describe different things. For example, the Open Directory Project is open content but is not free content. The main difference between licenses is the definition of freedom; some licenses attempt to maximize the freedom of all potential recipients in the future while others maximize the freedom of the initial recipient. Much of the ideals of the free software movement was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).[citation needed] One such application is their Open Courseware. From the early 90s onward, alternative terms for free software have come into common use, with much debate in the free software community. ... This article is about free software as used in the sociopolitical free software movement; for non-free software distributed without charge, see freeware. ... Free content is any kind of functional work, artwork, or other creative content upon which no legal restriction has been placed that significantly interferes with peoples freedom to use, understand, redistribute, improve, and share the content. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... The free software movement, also known as the free software philosophy, began in 1983 when Richard Stallman announced the GNU Project. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... MIT OpenCourseWare (MIT OCW) is an initiative of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to put all of the educational materials from MITs undergraduate- and graduate-level courses online, free and openly available to anyone, anywhere, by the year 2007. ...


With the increased interest in open content, many universities have started offering online video/audio courses to the general public, such as Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Princeton University. . This has resulted in a great increasein open content providers. Keeping track of all of them would be no ordinary task for a user whose only interest is to find a course on a specific topic. This led to the birth of open content search engines. “MIT” redirects here. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


The related term common content is occasionally used to refer to Creative Commons-licensed works. This takes after the Common Content project, which is an attempt to collect as many such works as possible. The Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative work available for others legally to build upon and share. ...


Open access refers to a special category of material, consisting of freely available published peer-reviewed journal articles. Open access (OA) means immediate, free and unrestricted online access to digital scholarly material[1], primarily peer-reviewed research articles in scholarly journals. ...


Licenses

Creative Commons, some rights reserved. ... Design Science License (DSL) is a copyleft license for free content such as text, images, and music. ... “GFDL” redirects here. ... The Open Content License (OPL) is a license designed for distribution of open content material. ... The Open Directory License is a license for open content used by the Open Directory Project. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... The Open Gaming License (also Open Game License or OGL) is an open content license designed for role-playing games. ... Open gaming is the movement within the amateur and professional role-playing game industry that is somewhat analogous to open source movement. ... Wizards of the Coast (often referred to as WotC or simply Wizards) is a publisher of games, primarily based on fantasy and science fiction themes. ... Open Publication License is a license used for creating free and open publications created by the Open Content Project. ... The Open Content Project was a project dedicated to creating Open content. ...

See also

Free content is any kind of functional work, artwork, or other creative content upon which no legal restriction has been placed that significantly interferes with peoples freedom to use, understand, redistribute, improve, and share the content. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... LWN.net is a computing news site with an emphasis on Free/Libre Open Source Software and software for Unix-like operating systems. ...

Major Open content repositories and directories

  • Connexions - A global open-content repository started by Rice University
  • OER Commons - network of open teaching and learning materials, with ratings and reviews
  • OpenContent Initiative - School district initiative to build standards-based Open Content curriculum (2800 + pages and growing)
  • Open directory category: Open Content
  • OpenLearn - free and open educational resources from The Open University
  • Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network (CKAN) - directory/registry of open data/content packages and projects

  Results from FactBites:
 
LIFE Open Content - Home (442 words)
Open content, coined by analogy to open source, describes any kind of creative work (for example, articles, pictures, audio, video, etc.) that is published under a non-restrictive copyright license and format that explicitly allows the copying of the information.
It is an initiative by practitioners interested in open content and education which explores the potential, impact and pitfalls of applying the open content paradigm to education in school, vocational training and university settings.
This website is meant to provide a general introduction to the open content paradigm, and to present some of the challenges it encounters in real-life settings, all by focusing on education.
Open content - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (510 words)
Open content, coined by analogy with "open source" (though technically it is actually share-alike), describes any kind of creative work including articles, pictures, audio, and video that is published in a format that explicitly allows the copying of the information.
It is possible that the first documented case of Open Content was with the Royal Society, where they aspired toward information sharing across the globe as a public enterprise.
The words "open content" were first put together in this context by David Wiley, then a graduate student at Brigham Young University, who founded the OpenContent project and put together the first content-specific (non-software) license in 1998 with input from Eric Raymond, Tim O'Reilly, and others.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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