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Encyclopedia > Open University

Open University

Motto Learn and Live
Established 1969
Type Public
Chancellor Lord Puttnam[1]
Vice-Chancellor Prof Brenda Gourley[2]
Students 168,850 [3]
Undergraduates 151,385 [3]
Postgraduates 17,465 [3]
Location (various), United Kingdom
Campus Distance Learning
Colours
                           
Affiliations Alliance of Non-Aligned Universities, Association of Commonwealth Universities, European Association of Distance Teaching Universities, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
Website http://www.open.ac.uk/
corporate logo

The Open University (OU) is the UK's 'open' learning university. It was established in 1969, and the first students started in January 1971.[4] The majority of students are based in the UK, but its courses are also studied in the rest of Europe, in North and South America, in Africa and in Australasia/Asia.[5] The administration is based at Walton Hall, Milton Keynes in Buckinghamshire, but has regional centres in each of its thirteen regions around the UK. The university awards undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, diplomas and certificates. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... David Puttnam receiving his BAFTA Fellowship, 19 February 2006 David Terence Puttnam, Baron Puttnam of Queensgate, CBE is a film producer and politician. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor Brenda Gourley was appointed as the fourth vice chancellor of the Open University in 2002. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The Alliance of Non-Aligned Universities was formed to lobby on research funding and other higher education issues. ... The Association of Commonwealth Universities represents over 480 universities from Commonwealth countries. ... The European Association of Distance Teaching Universities - EADTU - is the representative organisation of both the European open and distance learning universities and of the national consortia of higher education institutions active in the field of distance education and e-learning. ... The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools is a voluntary, peer based, non-profit association dedicated to the educational excellence and improvement through peer evaluation and accreditation. ... A Web site (or colloquially, Website) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... Walton Hall is a district in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire and is the location of the campus and offices of the Open University. ... Milton Keynes is a large town in northern Buckinghamshire, in South East England, about 45 miles/75 km north-west of London, and roughly halfway between London and Birmingham. ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ... A B.A. issused as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... Diploma from Mexico City College, 1948 (in Latin) A diploma (from Greek δίπλωµα diploma) is a certificate or deed issued by an educational institution, such as a university, that testifies that the recipient has successfully completed a particular course of study, or confers an academic degree. ... A certificate is an official document affirming some fact. ...


With more than 180,000 students enrolled, including more than 25,000 students studying overseas,[6] it is the largest academic institution in the UK by student number, and qualifies as one of the world's mega universities. Since it was founded, more than 3 million students have studied its courses. It was rated top University in England and Wales for student satisfaction in the 2005[7] and 2006[8] UK government national student satisfaction survey. A mega university is a university with a large number of enrolled students in which distance learning techniques are used to deliver courses to them, which also makes the courses particularly cost-effective. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2006 estimate... This article is about the country. ...

Contents

Aims

The OU aims to provide a university education for those wishing to pursue higher education on a part-time or distance learning basis, including disabled people, who are officially a priority group within the University. The British Government asked the Open University to continue the work of the Council for National Academic Awards (CNAA) when it was dissolved. The CNAA formerly awarded degrees at the polytechnics which have since become universities. The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... // Distance Education is a field of expertise exploring situations in which the learner and the teacher are separated in time, space or both. ... The term disability, as it is applied to humans, refers to any condition that impedes the completion of daily tasks using traditional methods. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... The Council for National Academic Awards (CNAA) was a degree awarding authority, from the 1965, in the United Kingdom until 1992. ... The term polytechnic, from the Greek πολύ polú meaning many and τεχνικός tekhnikós meaning arts, is commonly used in many countries to describe an institution that delivers vocational or technical education and training, other countries do not use the term and use alternative terminology. ...


Foundation

The Open University was founded by the Labour government of Harold Wilson, based on the vision of Michael Young (later Lord Young of Dartington). Planning commenced in 1965 under Minister of State for Education Jennie Lee, who led an advisory committee consisting of university vice-chancellors, educationalists and broadcasters.The BBC's Assistant Director of Engineering at the time, James Redmond had obtained most of his qualifications at night school, and his natural enthusiasm for the project did much to overcome the technical difficulties of using television to broadcast teaching programmes. The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... Michael Young, Baron Young of Dartington (August 9, 1915, Manchester - January 14, 2002) was a British sociologist, social activist and politician. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... The Secretary of State for Education and Skills is the chief minister of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom government. ... Jennie Lee (November 3, 1904 - 1988) was born Janet Lee in Lochgelly, in Fife, Scotland. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... Sir James Redmond (8 November 1918–17 October 1999) was one of the pioneers of modern public service broadcasting in the United Kingdom. ...


Walter Perry (later Lord Perry) was appointed the OU's first vice-chancellor in January 1969. The election of the new Conservative government of Edward Heath in 1970 led to budget cuts under Chancellor of the Exchequer Iain Macleod (who had earlier called the idea of an Open University "blithering nonsense"). However the OU accepted its first 25,000 students in 1971, adopting a radical open entry policy and, for a university, radical[citation needed] teaching methods. At the time, the total 'traditional' University population in the UK was around 130,000. Walter Laing MacDonald Perry, Lord Perry of Walton (June 16, 1921 - July 17, 2003) was a distinguished academic. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... The Right Honourable Iain Macleod, PC (1913 – 1970) was a UK Conservative politician. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ...


Since its foundation, the OU has inspired the creation of many similar institutions around the world.


Students

People from all walks of life and all ages take advantage of the OU; for most courses there are no entry requirements other than the ability to study at an appropriate level, though students may be refused further registration for non-progress,[citation needed] and most postgraduate courses require evidence of previous study or equivalent life experience. College admissions or university admission is the process through which students enter post-secondary education at universities and colleges. ...


Approximately 70 percent of students are in full-time employment, often working towards a first (or additional) degree or qualification to progress or change their career, with over 50,000 being sponsored by their employer. The University is also popular with those who cannot physically attend a traditional university because they are disabled (many universities have poor disabled access), abroad, in prison, serving in the armed forces, or looking after family members. About 10,000 students have disabilities.[6] For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... The term disability, as it is applied to humans, refers to any condition that impedes the completion of daily tasks using traditional methods. ... Pretorian Guards, Roman Soldiers A military or military force generally refers to a permanent, professional and structured force of soldiers or guerrillas trained exclusively for the purpose of warfare. ...


While most of those studying are mature students, the reduction in financial support for those attending traditional universities has also led to an influx of young undergraduates to the OU. In the 2003–2004 academic year, around 20 percent of undergraduates were under 25 years old,[9] up from 12.5 percent in 1996–1997 (the year before top-up fees were announced). The OU works with some schools to introduce A Level students to OU study. A mature student (aka adult student) in tertiary education (at a university or a college) is normally classified as an (undergraduate) student who is at least 21 years old (23 years old in Ireland) at the start of their course and usually having been away from school for at least... Most United Kingdom universities can be classified into 5 main categories, Ancient universities - universities founded before the 19th century Red Brick universities - universities founded in the 19th and early 20th centuries. ... An academic term is the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... Top-up fees (not their official name) are a new way of charging tuition to undergraduate and PGCE students who study at universities in the United Kingdom from the 2006-2007 academic year onwards. ... The A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education qualification in the United Kingdom, usually taken by students in the final two years of secondary education (commonly called the Sixth Form), or in College (not to be mistaken with the college term some countries such as...


Unlike other universities, where students register for a programme, at the OU students register separately for individual modules (which may be 10, 15, 20, 30 or 60 CATs points), and are known as 'courses' in the OU context. These courses may then be linked into degree programmes. Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme (CATS) is used by many universities in the United Kingdom to monitor, record and reward passage through a modular degree course and to facilitate movement between courses and institutions. ...


The students' union is the Open University Students Association, usually abbreviated to OUSA. A students union, student government, student leadership,or student council is a student organization present in many elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities. ... The Open University Students Association is the students union for the Open University. ...


Teaching methods

Open University programming on the BBC in 1985.

The OU uses a variety of methods for distance learning, including written and audio materials, the internet, disc-based software and television programmes on DVD disks. Course-based television broadcasts by the BBC, which started on 3 January 1971, ceased on 15 December 2006[10]. Materials are composed of originally-authored work by in-house and external academic contributors, and from third-party materials licensed for use by OU students. For most courses, students are supported by tutors ('Associate Lecturers') who provide feedback on their work and are generally available to them at face-to-face tutorials, by telephone, and/or on the internet. A number of short courses worth ten points are now available that do not have an assigned tutor but offer an online conferencing service (Internet Forum) where help and advice is offered through conferencing 'Moderators'. Image File history File links BBC-ou1985. ... Image File history File links BBC-ou1985. ... Distance Learning is learning carried out apart from the usual classroom setting; in an asynchronous setting. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme (CATS) is used by many UK universities to monitor passage through a modular degree course and to facilitate movement between courses and institutions. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


Some courses have mandatory day schools. These are day-long sessions which a student must attend in order to pass the course. One example of such a course is the K301 - Advanced Certificate in Health Promotion - which has two mandatory day schools/workshops, focussing on communication skills, counselling and practical issues related to health promotion. Nevertheless, it is possible to seek excusal upon the basis of ill-health (or other extenuating circumstances), and many courses have no mandatory face-to-face component.


Similarly, many courses have traditionally offered week long summer schools offering an opportunity for students to remove themselves from the general distractions of their life and focus on their study for a short time. Anecdotally speaking, it seems common for students not to be keen to attend these schools whilst in retrospect they often come to appreciate the intensive tutoring they receive as well as the close and prolonged contact with other like-minded students, regarding the schools as a highlight of their Open University experience. The social life at residential schools is renowned.


Over the past ten years the university has adopted a policy of separating residential courses from distance-taught courses. Exemption from attendance at residential schools, always an option as an Alternative Learing Experience (ALE), is available for disabled students and others who find it impossible to attend in person (See "Qualifications-Undergraduate" section.)


In the 1970s, TV was typically used to provide lectures, and the image of the OU lecturer in brown 'kipper-tie' and flared corduroy trousers became something of a national icon. OU programmes are generally now much more innovative, using documentary styles. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979. ...


The OU now produces mainstream television and radio programming aimed at bringing learning to a wider audience. Most of this programming, including series such as Rough Science and "Battle of the Geeks", are broadcast at peak times, while older programming is carried in the BBC Learning Zone. But in 2004 the OU announced it was to stop its late night programmes on BBC2, and the last such programme was broadcast at 5.30am on 16 December 2006. The OU now plans to focus on mainstream programmes. Rough Science is a UK factual television series made by the BBC in collaboration with the Open University and has, as of 2005, had six series. ... BBC Learning Zone is mostly an Open University sponsored block of academic programmes shown during the late night - early morning on BBC Two. ... BBC Two (or BBC2 as it was formerly styled) was the second UK television station to be aired by the BBC. History The channel was scheduled to begin at 7:20pm on April 20, 1964 and show an evening of light entertainment, starting with the comedy show The Alberts and... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Teaching at the OU has been rated as "excellent"[11] by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. The English national survey of student satisfaction has twice put the Open University in first place. The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) was established in 1997 to provide an integrated quality assurance service for United Kingdom higher education. ...


In October 2006 the OU joined the Open educational resources movement with the launch of OpenLearn. A growing selection of current and past distance learning course materials will be released for free access, including downloadable versions for educators to modify (under a Creative Commons licence), plus free collaborative learning-support tools. The term Open Educational Resources was first adopted at UNESCOs 2002 Forum on the Impact of Open Courseware for Higher Education in Developing Countries funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. ... The Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative work available for others legally to build upon and share. ...


Assessment methods

The Open University offers courses that are generally[12] assessed using an equal weighting of examinations and coursework. The coursework component normally takes the form of two or more tutor marked assignments (TMAs) and, occasionally, may also include multiple-choice computer marked assignments (CMAs). The examinable component is usually a three hour paper regardless of the course size, but may also be an ECA (End of Course Assessment) which is similar to a TMA, in that it is completed at home, but is regarded as an exam for grading purposes. Course results are issued on a graded basis, consisting of pass grades 1 (threshold 85%,a distinction), 2 (70-84%), 3 (55-69%) & 4 (40-54%), and fail (below 40%). This grade is calculated from the overall continuous assessment score (OCAS) and overall examination score (OES).


These grades can be weighted according to their level, and combined to calculate the classification of a degree. An undergraduate degree will weight level 3 courses twice as much as level 2, and in postgraduate programmes all M level courses are equally weighted.


Qualifications

Undergraduate

An OU undergraduate degree requires 300 credit points (360 for honours), with each course being attributed a number of points (usually 30 or 60) depending on the content in line with the UK credit accumulation transfer system. One point is generally considered to correspond to ten hours of student time (studying, attending optional lectures, and revising). Courses are also rated as levels 1, 2 or 3, roughly equating to first, second or third, and final year courses at traditional universities. Students generally do not undertake more than 60 points per year, meaning that an undergraduate degree will take at least six years to complete. With the exception of some degrees in fast moving areas (such as computing) there is generally no limit on the time which a student may take, although courses cannot be counted after a great number of years. 120 points is considered the equivalent of a year of full-time study. Students need special permission to take more than 120 points at any time;[13] such permission is not always granted. A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts three or four years. ... Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme (CATS) is used by many universities in the United Kingdom to monitor, record and reward passage through a modular degree course and to facilitate movement between courses and institutions. ...


Many OU faculties have now introduced short courses worth ten points. Most of these courses are taught online, and start on different dates throughout the year. They typically provide an introduction to their subject studied over a period of ten weeks. A few ten-point courses consist of one-week residential schools, with preparatory work, and a follow-up assignment after the school. Some science courses, which in themselves require only home study, have such residential courses associated with them in order to allow the student to gain practical experience in that field; typically, an award of degree or diploma will require attendance at both, but it is up to the student to decide whether he or she wishes to attend them in the same year.


Different courses are run at different times of the year, but, typically, a 30 or 60 point course will run from February through to October. Assessment is by both continual assessment (with, normally, four or eight assignments during the year) plus, for most, an examination at the end. Residential courses are often timed during vacations at conventional universities in order to take advantage of their facilities.


In addition to traditional academic degrees, the OU has a number of specialist courses for industry and the professions including accountancy and the law. Chartered Accountant (CA) is the title of members of a certain professional accountancy associations in the Commonwealth countries and Ireland. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries other than the United States, where it has been replaced by the Juris Doctor degree. ...


Postgraduate

The Open University provides the opportunity to study for a PhD on a part time distance, or a full time on site basis in a wide range of disciplines. The university also offers a limited range of Masters levels courses, as well as the professional PGCE qualification and a number of postgraduate diplomas and certificates. The University offers "Advanced Diplomas" that involve 60 credits at undergraduate level and 60 credits at postgraduate level - these are designed as "bridges" between undergraduate and postgraduate study. PhD usually refers to the academic title Doctor of Philosophy PhD can also refer to the manga Phantasy Degree This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... The Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) is a one-year course in the UK for existing bachelors degree holders leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which is needed to become a teacher in maintained (state or local authority) schools. ...


Academic divisions

Faculties

The university has Faculties of Arts, Education & Language Studies, Health & Social Care, Law, Mathematics & Computing, Science, Social Science, Technology and a Business School. There is no School of Medicine. The faculties of Mathematics & Computing and Technology are currently in the process of being merged into a mega-faculty.


Business school

The Open University Business School is the largest provider of MBAs in the UK, producing more graduates than all the rest of the business schools in the UK put together. Its courses are recognised by AMBA, EQUIS and AACSB. Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a masters degree in business administration, which attracts people from a wide range of academic disciplines. ... AMBA is an international organisation that accredits mostly international elite business schools and MBAs, similar to the AACSB in the US. Among the schools accredited by AMBA are: indian institute of management, Aberystwyth Ashridge University of Auckland University of Bath University of Birmingham Bocconi University University of Cambridge, The Judge... Equis may refer to: European Quality Improvement System (or EQUIS) a school accreditation system without recognition from the US Department of Education or any foreign government oversight. ... The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) - is the USA based body which awards accreditation following a review of the quality of Scotts site can be found at Degree programmes delivered by Management Schools. ...


Although the majority of students at the Business School are in the UK the courses are also available throughout most of the world. Students can also study online for a Certificate or Diploma in Management and MBA programmes.


The first Diploma courses were developed from 1983, however the School did not become a separate entity until 1988; when development of the first MBA courses was started. The first MBA students were enrolled in 1989, and the School almost immediately became the largest business school in Europe.


Research

Like other UK universities, the OU actively engages in research. The OU's Planetary Sciences Research Institute has become particularly well known to the public through the disastrous Beagle 2 Mars space probe project led by Professor Colin Pillinger, head of the Institute. Beagle 2 as it would have looked on Mars Beagle 2 was an unsuccessful British landing spacecraft that formed part of the European Space Agencys 2003 Mars Express mission. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Colin Pillinger (born May 9, 1943) is a planetary scientist at the Open University in the UK. He graduated with a BSc and a Ph. ...


The OU now employs over 500 people engaged in research in over 25 areas, and there are over 1,200 research students. It spends approximately £20 million each year on research, around £6 million from the Higher Education Funding Council for England, the remainder from external funders. The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) is a non-departmental public body of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom which distributes funding to Universities and Colleges of Higher and Further Education in England since 1992. ...


Degree ceremonies

Unlike most UK universities, degree ceremonies at the Open University are not the occasion on which degrees are formally conferred. This happens in absentia at a joint meeting of the University's Council and Senate ahead of the ceremony. The University's ceremonies –- or "Presentations of Graduates" — occur during the long summer throughout Britain and Ireland, as well as one ceremony in Versailles. These ceremonies are presided over by a senior academic at Pro-Vice-Chancellor level or higher, and have the normal ritual associated with a graduation ceremony, including academic dress, procession and mace. Versailles (pronounced in French), formerly de facto capital of the kingdom of France, is now a wealthy suburb of Paris and is still an important administrative and judicial center. ... Academic dress or academical dress (also known in the United States as academic regalia) is traditional clothing worn specifically in academic settings. ... Academic procession on the occasion of the conferment of doctoral degrees at the University of Lund in southern Sweden (1990). ...


Notable current and former academics

See also: Category:Academics of the Open University

Jocelyn Bell Burnell (born Jocelyn Bell, 15 July 1943), British astrophysicist who discovered the first radio pulsars with her thesis advisor Antony Hewish. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Professor Brenda Gourley was appointed as the fourth vice chancellor of the Open University in 2002. ... Stuart Hall (born 1932 in Kingston, Jamaica) is a cultural theorist from the United Kingdom. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Doreen Elizabeth Massey, Baroness Massey of Darwen (born 5 September 1938) is a Labour member of the House of Lords. ... Oliver Penrose (born 1929) is a British mathematician. ... Colin Pillinger (born May 9, 1943) is a planetary scientist at the Open University in the UK. He graduated with a BSc and a Ph. ... Steven Rose Steven P. Rose (born July 4, 1938 in London) is a professor of biology and neurobiology at the Open University and University of London. ... Glenn J. White is currently Professor of Astronomy at the Open University, UK, and Research Group Leader of the Astronomy Group at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. ... The Honourable Robin James Wilson is the son of Harold Wilson, former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ...

Notable graduates

The OU has over 2 million alumni from all walks of life, including: This is a partial list of alumni of the Open University. ...

Craig Brown CBE (born July 1, 1940 in Lanarkshire) is a former Scottish professional football player and is currently employed in a director of football-style role at English club Fulham. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Scotland 11 - 0 Ireland (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 February 1901) Biggest defeat Uruguay 7 - 0 Scotland (Basel, Switzerland; 19 June 1954) World Cup Appearances 8 (First in 1954) Best result Round 1, all European Championship Appearances 2 (First... Lenworth George Henry, CBE, better known as Lenny Henry (born 29 August 1958), is an English entertainer. ... Myra Hindley (23 July 1942 – 15 November 2002) was an English murderer involved in the Moors murders. ... Meles Zenawi (Geez መለስ ዜናዊ meles zēnāwī, b. ...

In fiction

The Open University has been featured in many film and television programmes. The plot of Educating Rita surrounds the working class character aiming to "improve" herself by studying English literature. She attends private tutorials run by alcoholic lecturer Frank. The teaching methods are not an accurate portrayal of contemporary teaching at the OU. Educating Rita is a stage comedy by British playwright Willy Russell which premièred at The Warehouse, London, in 1980; and a film (1983) directed by Lewis Gilbert and starring Julie Walters, Michael Caine, and Maureen Lipman with a screenplay by Russell. ...


Television characters have also followed OU courses. These include Anne Bryce in the BBC sit-com Ever Decreasing Circles, Yvonne Sparrow in Goodnight Sweetheart, and Bulman, in the ITV spin-off from the series Strangers. Sheila Grant (Sue Johnston) was accused of having an affair with her tutor in Brookside. The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... Ever Decreasing Circles was a British sitcom which ran on BBC1 for four series from 1984 to 1987. ... Yvonne Sparrow (Michelle Holmes, series 1-3/Emma Amos, series 3-6) was a character in Goodnight Sweetheart: a six series BBC sitcom that ran between 1993 and 1999. ... Goodnight Sweetheart was a British sitcom starring Nicholas Lyndhurst as Gary Sparrow, an ordinary modern man who discovers a time portal in Stepney, in the East End of London that allows him to travel back to the Second World War. ... Bulman was a Granada TV series which ran from 1985-1987 and followed the fortunes of the major character from the earlier XYY Man and Strangers series. ... It has been suggested that Channel 3 (UK) be merged into this article or section. ... Strangers was a UK police drama that appeared on ITV between 1978 and 1982. ... Sue Johnston (born 7 December 1943) is an English actress. ... For other uses, see Brookside (disambiguation). ...


Onslow, a character from Keeping up Appearances, watches Open University programming on television from time to time. Onslow played by actor Geoffrey Hughes Onslow is a comical fictional character in the British comedy television series Keeping Up Appearances portrayed by actor Geoffrey Hughes. ... Keeping Up Appearances is a British sitcom starring Patricia Routledge as social snob Hyacinth Bucket. ...


In Autumn 2006, Lenny Henry was a star in Slings and Arrows, a one-off BBC television drama which he also wrote, about someone who falls in love while on an OU English Literature course. (Henry has himself completed an OU degree in English.[15]) Lenworth George Henry, CBE, better known as Lenny Henry (born 29 August 1958), is an English entertainer. ... Cathy Come Home, a 1966 entry into The Wednesday Play anthology series, voted the best drama and second highest programme overall in the British Film Institutes 2000 survey of the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes of the 20th century. ...


See also

This is a partial list of alumni of the Open University. ... Open2. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... // Distance Education is a field of expertise exploring situations in which the learner and the teacher are separated in time, space or both. ... The Open University Press is the publishing branch of the the United Kingdoms Open University a distance learning academic institution. ... Moodle is a free software e-learning platform (also known as a Course Management System (CMS), or Learning Management Systems (LMS), or Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)). It has a significant user base with 18,204 registered sites with 7,270,260 users in 712,531 courses (as of November 15...

References

  1. ^ Open University (03 Oct 2006). The Lord Puttnam is appointed Chancellor of The Open University. Press release. Retrieved on 2006-10-08.
  2. ^ How the OU is organised: The Vice Chancellor. Retrieved on 2006-10-08.
  3. ^ a b c Table 0a - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study, gender and domicile 2005/06. Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  4. ^ Brief history of the OU. Retrieved on 2006-10-08.
  5. ^ Becoming a Student:Study outside the UK. Retrieved on 2006-11-17.
  6. ^ a b About the OU: The purpose of the OU. open.ac.uk. Retrieved on 2006-10-08.
  7. ^ "Students rate university courses", BBC News, 21 September 2005. Retrieved on 2006-10-08. 
  8. ^ "Student satisfaction survey results", BBC News, 23 August 2006. Retrieved on 2006-10-08. 
  9. ^ "OU sees rise in younger students", BBC News, 2 August 2005. Retrieved on 2006-10-08. 
  10. ^ http://www3.open.ac.uk/sesame/archive2.aspx?m=12&y=2006
  11. ^ [1] Sesame, July 2002, "OU ranks ninth in University League Table"
  12. ^ The university does offer some courses which are assessed purely through course work, but these are generally level one courses which do not contribute to honours or postgraduate courses.
  13. ^ OU regulations 8.5.2 stipulating limit on maximum concurrent courses. Retrieved on 2006-10-08.
  14. ^ [2]
  15. ^ a b "OU to feature in new TV drama" (Print and online), Sesame, Autumn 2006 Issue 231, p. 5. Retrieved on 2006-10-08. 
  16. ^ "Obituary: Myra Hindley", BBC News, 15 November, 2002. Retrieved on 2006-11-21. 
  17. ^ Biography: HE Meles Zenawi. Retrieved on 2006-11-21.

A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (282nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (282nd in leap years). ... The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was set up in 1993 by the UK government as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in Britain. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (282nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (282nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (282nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (282nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (282nd in leap years). ... The honours system of the United Kingdom is a means of rewarding personal bravery, achievement or service to the country. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (282nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (282nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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