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Encyclopedia > Ontario Progressive Conservative Party
Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario
Image:OntPCPartylogo.gif
Active Provincial Party
Founded 1854
Leader John Tory
President Blair McCreadie
Headquarters 2020-120 Adelaide St. West
Toronto, Ontario
M5H 1T1
Political ideology Conservatism
International alignment
Colours Blue
Website http://www.ontariopc.com

The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario, also known as "Tories") is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. It has been in power for a majority of the time since Confederation, and governed without interruption from 1943 to 1985. The Ontario PC party was known for many years as "Ontario's natural governing party". Image File history File links This is the logo of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party, as can be found on thier website. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... John Tory (born May 28, 1954) is a Canadian businessman and leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party. ... Blair McCreadie is the current president of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario. ... For conservatism in the United States and Canada, see Conservatism in North America. ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation) Blue is one of the three primary additive colours; blue light has the shortest wavelength range (about 420-490 nanometres) of the three primary colours. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Loyal it began, loyal it remains) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Area 1,076,395 km² (4th)  - Land 917,741 km²  - Water 158,654 km² (14. ... Canadian Confederation, or the Confederation of Canada, was the process that ultimately brought together a union among the provinces, colonies and territories of British North America to form the Dominion of Canada, a Dominion of the British Empire, which today is the federal nation state called Canada. ... 1943 is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


Origins

The first Conservative Party in Upper Canada was made up of United Empire Loyalists and supporters of the wealthy Family Compact that ruled the colony and opposed responsible government. Once responsible government was granted in response to the 1837 Rebellions, the Tories re-emerged as moderate reformers who opposed the radical policies of the Reformers and then the Clear Grits. Upper Canada Village in Morrisburg, Ontario Upper Canada is an early name for the land at the upstream end of the Saint Lawrence River in early North America – the territory south of Lake Nipissing and north of the St. ... United Empire Loyalists is the name given to the portion of British Loyalists who resettled in the future Canada when they were forced to leave the United States after the British defeat in the American War of Independence. ... The Family Compact was the informal name for the wealthy, conservative elite of Upper Canada in the early 19th century. ... Responsible government is a system of government that embodies the principle of parliamentary accountability which is the foundation of the Westminster system of parliamentary democracy. ... (Redirected from 1837 Rebellions) The Rebellions of 1837 were a pair of Canadian armed uprisings that occurred in 1837 in response to frustrations in political reform and ethnic conflict. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The Reform movement, sometimes referred to as the Reform Party, began in the 1830s as the movement in the English speaking parts of British North America (Canada). ... Clear Grits were Upper Canadian reformers with support concentrated among southwestern Ontario farmers, who were frustrated and disillusioned by the 1849 Reform government of Robert Baldwin and Louis_Hippolyte Lafontaines lack of radicalism. ...


The modern Conservative Party originated in the Liberal-Conservative coalition founded by Sir John A. Macdonald and George-Étienne Cartier in 1854. It is a variant of this coalition that formed the first government in Ontario with John Sandfield Macdonald as Premier. After losing power in 1871, this Conservative coalition began to dissolve. What was originally a party that included Catholics and Protestants, became an almost exclusively English and Protestant party, more and more dependent on the protestant Orange Order for support, and even for its leadership. The party became opposed to funding for Separate (Catholic) schools, opposed to language rights for French-Canadians and distrustful of immigrants. Paradoxically, an element of the party gained a reputation for being pro-labour as a result of links between the Orange Order and the labour movement. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Right Honourable Sir John Alexander Macdonald, KCMG, GCB, QC, PC (January 11, 1815 – June 6, 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada from July 1, 1867 – November 5, 1873 and October 17, 1878 – June 6, 1891. ... George-Étienne Cartier The Honourable Sir George-Étienne Cartier, KBE, PC (September 6, 1814 – May 20, 1873) was a French-Canadian statesman and Father of Confederation. ... John Sandfield Macdonald The Honourable John Sandfield Macdonald (December 12, 1812-June 1, 1872) was the first Premier of the Canadian province of Ontario after the province was created as a result of the confederation of Canada in 1867. ... A premier is an executive official of government. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Orange Order is a Protestant fraternal organisation largely based in the Ulster region of Ireland and in western Scotland but which has a worldwide membership. ... A separate school is a publicly funded school which includes religious education in its curriculum, as opposed to a private school or public school. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... The labor movement (or labour movement) is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments. ...


The Whitney years

After 33 years in Opposition, the Tories returned to power under James P. Whitney, who led a progressive administration in its development of the province. The Whitney government initiated massive public works projects such as the creation of Ontario Hydro. It also enacted reactionary legislation (such as Regulation 17) against the French-Canadian population in Ontario. The Tories were in power for all but five years from 1905 to 1934. After the death of Whitney in 1914, however, they lacked vision and became complacent. The Tories lost power to the United Farmers of Ontario in the 1919 election but were able to regain office in 1923 election due to the UFO's disintegration and divisions in the Ontario Liberal Party. They were defeated by Mitch Hepburn's Liberals in 1934 due to their inability to cope with the Great Depression. Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... Sir James Pliny Whitney (October 2, 1843-September 25, 1914) was a politician in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The notion of internal improvements or public works is a concept in economics and politics. ... The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario was established in 1906 by the provincial Power Commission Act to build transmission lines to supply municipal utilities with electricity generated by private companies already operating at Niagara Falls. ... Reactionary (sometimes: reactionist; the term Reaction is used as a general term for the informal political grouping of reactionaries) is an epithet often applied to those seen to be on the Right of the political spectrum. ... The United Farmers of Ontario (UFO) were the Ontario section of the nation-wide United Farmers movement that arose in Canada in the early part of the 20th century. ... The Ontario general election, 1919 was the fifteenth general election held in the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario general election, 1923 was the sixteenth general election held in the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a centrist provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... Mitchell Frederick Hepburn (August 12, 1896 - January 5, 1953) was Premier of Ontario from 1934 to 1942. ... 1934 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Great Depression was a massive global economic recession (or depression) that ran from 1929 to 1941. ...


Post-war dynasty

Between 1943 and 1985, the party built up a political apparatus that became known as the Big Blue Machine. During much of this time, the party was very centrist, often running to the left of the Ontario Liberal Party. This reached its height under Bill Davis, a Red Tory who was premier of the province between 1971 and 1985. Bill Davis, Premier of Ontario 1971-1985 This work is copyrighted. ... 1943 is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Big Blue Machine was a nickname for the group of strategists and advisors to the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party in the 1970s and 80s. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a centrist provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... For the actor, professor, and waterskiier, see William B. Davis The Honourable William (Bill) Grenville Davis, PC , CC , O.Ont. ... Red Tory is a nickname given to a political tradition in Canadas conservative political parties. ...


The anti-Catholic, anti-French, anti-immigrant strain of the Tories was evident under George Drew, who embodied all those elements. Anti-Catholicism became an issue again in the 1971 election, when the Tories under campaigned strenuously against a Liberal proposal to extend funding for Catholic separate schools until grade 13. Davis reversed himself in 1985, and enacted the funding extension as one of his last acts before leaving office. The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... French Canadian is a term that has several different connotations. ... Anti-immigrant and anti-immigration are labels often applied to those who are opposed to having significant levels of immigration in their countries. ... Colonel The Honourable George Alexander Drew, PC , CC (May 7, 1894 - January 4, 1973) was a Canadian conservative politician who founded a Progressive Conservative dynasty in Ontario that lasted 42 years. ... The Ontario general election of 1971 was held to elect the 117 members of the Legislative Assembly (Members of Provincial Parliament, or MPPs) of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... A separate school is a publicly funded school which includes religious education in its curriculum, as opposed to a private school or public school. ... The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ...


Following a February 1985 leadership convention, the new party leader and premier, Frank Miller, called an election in which the Conservatives were reduced to a minority. Miller resigned after the Ontario New Democratic Party of Bob Rae reached an agreement with David Peterson's Liberals that allowed the latter to form a minority government with Peterson as Premier. Miller was replaced as leader by Larry Grossman at a second leadership convention. In 1985, the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party held two leadership conventions: one in January, and one in November. ... This article is about Frank Miller, the Canadian politician. ... David Petersons Liberals, with support from Bob Raes New Democrats, form a minority government despite having fewer seats than Frank Millers Progressive Conservatives. ... The Ontario New Democratic Party (formerly known as the Ontario Cooperative Commonwealth Federation) is a social democratic political party in Ontario, Canada. ... The Honourable Robert Keith (Bob) Rae, PC , OC , O.Ont , QC , LL.B , LL.D (born August 2, 1948 in Ottawa, Ontario) was the 21st premier of Ontario, and the first leader of the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) to serve in that capacity. ... The Honourable David Robert Peterson, PC , LL.B , BA (born December 28, 1943 in Toronto, Ontario) was the twentieth Premier of the Province of Ontario, Canada, from June 26, 1985 to October 1, 1990. ... Dalton McGuinty The Premier of Ontario is the first minister for the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Lawrence Larry Sheldon Grossman (born December 2, 1943 in Toronto, Ontario; died June 1997) was a politician in Ontario, Canada, and a noted baseball fan. ... In 1985, the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party held two leadership conventions: one in January, and one in November. ...


When the Liberal-NDP Accord expired, an election was held in 1987 in which the Tories were reduced to third place in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario - Grossman was personally defeated in his downtown Toronto riding and resigned immediately. Andy Brandt was the party's interim leader until a leadership election was held in 1990 in which Mike Harris defeated Dianne Cunningham. David Petersons Liberals were returned to power with a large majority. ... The Ontario Legislature Building at Queens Park The Legislative Assembly of Ontario, is the legislature of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... This page refers to a Riding as a unit in local government. ... Andy Brandt is a former Ontario politician and MPP for the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party. ... An interim leader, in Canadian politics, is a party leader who is appointed by the partys legislative caucus or the partys executive to temporarily act as leader when there is a gap between the resignation or death of a party leader and the election of his or her... This page lists the results of leadership conventions within the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario (known as the Conservative Party of Ontario before 1942). ... Michael Deane Harris (born January 23, 1945, in Toronto, Ontario) was the twenty-second Premier of Ontario from June 26, 1995 to April 15, 2002. ... Dianne Cunningham is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ...


The Tories failed to improve their standing in the 1990 election under Harris, while the Peterson government was defeated it was at the hands of the NDP who formed a government with Bob Rae as Premier. As a result of serious scandals, David Petersons Liberal government was defeated by a large protest vote. ...


"Common Sense Revolution"

In the 1995 election, Harris catapulted his party from third place to an election victory, running on a "Common Sense Revolution" platform, a right wing platform that highlighted a number of "wedge issues" and promised significant tax cuts, cuts to welfare, the introduction of workfare, privatization and other neo-conservative measures. Harris went on to win a second majority in 1999 despite the strikes and protests that plagued his first term in office. This image is protected by Crown copyright (unless otherwise indicated), which is held by the Queens Printer for Ontario. ... Bob Raes Ontario New Democratic Party government was defeated by voters, who are angry at the mistakes made by the inexperienced NDP, and frustrated by rising taxes and unemployment. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... Welfare - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Workfare is an alternative model to conventional Social Welfare systems. ... Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ... The Ontario general election of 1999 was held in the Canadian province of Ontario in the late spring of 1999. ...


The Harris government was criticized on issues such as health care, the environment, education, and its tax policies, which critics said created the $5 billion dollar deficit which the Conservative party left in its last year in government.


The slide in Conservative support began in early 2000, according to the Ipsos-Reid polling company (Ipsos-Reid website), when the Tories fell behind the Liberals in the public opinion polls for the first time since the 1999 election, with 36% support of those polled, compared to 42% for the Liberals and 17% for the NDP. Later in 2000, Liberal support rose to about half of those polled, while Conservative support remained in the low 30s. This pattern held through to the 2002 leadership campaign, when Conservative support rose to 37%, while the Liberals retained the support of about half of those polled.


Ernie Eves: Distancing the party from the "Common Sense Revolution"

With the resignation of Mike Harris in 2002, the PCs held a leadership election. Ernie Eves, who had been Harris' Minister of Finance, and who had the backing of almost all PC MPPs, won the campaign. The 2002 Ontario Progressive Conservative leadership election was a leadership convention called in the fall of 2001 when Ontario Progressive Conservative Party Premier Mike Harris announced his intention to resign. ...


Eves' rejection of the "Common Sense Revolution" continued after he became premier. He killed plans to sell off Hydro One when deregulation of energy prices resulted in a dramatic increase in energy rates and threatened a consumer revolt. This led him to re-impose retail price controls on electricity, capping the price at 4.3 cents per kilowatt hour, and vowing to keep it capped until at least 2006. The result was a quickly escalating public debt that made up for shortfalls in the price of electricity.


During the summer after Eves’ election as leader, the Conservatives closed the gap in popular support considerably, placing only two percentage points behind the Liberals in two summer public opinion polls. By the autumn of 2002, however, Eves’ ‘honeymoon’ with the voters was over, and the party fell back in the polls, hovering in the mid-to-high 30s, while the Liberals scored in the mid-to-high 40s.


2003 election defeat

Despite his attempt to recast the Tory government as a moderate one, Eves was unable to reverse the slide in the polls the Tories had suffered in the last years of Harris' tenure.


Eves asked Flaherty's campaign chairman, Jamie Watt, to co-manage the Conservative election campaign, along with the rest of the "Whiz Kids" team that had previously worked for Harris. Only Tom Long, the central organizer in Harris' campaigns, refused to work for Eves. Tom Long (born 1959) is a Canadian political strategist. ...


The "Whiz Kids" reputation for competence was marred by publicity stunts such as handing down his government's second budget at the headquarters of Magna International instead of in the provincial legislature. Voter backlash against this break with parliamentary tradition forced the delay of a planned spring election in 2003. Magna International Inc. ...


In May of 2003, Eves released the party's platform, dubbed "the Road Ahead". The document promoted an aggressive hard-right agenda, and was closer in spirit to Flaherty's leadership campaign than to Eves' own. In releasing this document, Eves reversed his earlier positions on banning teacher's strikes, jailing the homeless, private school tax credits and same-sex marriage. The platform also called for mortgage interest deductability.


The Conservative election campaign was riddled with mistakes and miscues, and Eves appeared uncomfortable trying to sell a platform he had previously criticised. Conservative television ads which attacked Liberal leader Dalton McGuinty as "still not up to the job" were received poorly by the voting public, and allowed the Liberal campaign to portray the Tories as needlessly confrontational. The Honourable Dalton James Patrick McGuinty Jr. ...


A critical point in the campaign was when members of the Eves team jokingly referred to Liberal leader Dalton McGuinty as an "evil reptilian kitten-eater from another planet", a comment that made the Conservatives appear desperate to vilify their opponents. In the final days leading up to the vote, Eves was further criticized for saying that McGuinty just says "whatever comes into his pointy little head". On election day, the Conservatives were defeated and reduced to 25 seats in the Legislature. The Honourable Dalton James Patrick McGuinty Jr. ... Dalton McGuinty A kitten On September 12, 2003, during the provincial election campaign in Ontario, Canada, a press release disseminated by the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party contained a line at the end that referred to rival Ontario Liberal Party leader Dalton McGuinty as an evil reptilian kitten-eater from another...


2004: Eves steps down

In early 2004, Eves announced his intention to step down as leader. A leadership convention to replace him was called for the fall.


Jim Flaherty was the first to enter the race, campaigning on the same hard-right platform as in 2002. He was soon opposed by John Tory, a former executive with Rogers Cable and a Toronto mayoral candidate in 2003, sometimes viewed as a Red Tory due to his association to former Ontario Premier Bill Davis. Member of Provincial Parliament Frank Klees, the third candidate in the race, was a supporter of the Common Sense Revolution and the only candidate to advocate a parallel private health care system. James (Jim) Michael Flaherty (born December 30, 1949) is a politician in Ontario, Canada, and the current Member of Provincial Parliament for Whitby—Ajax, representing the Progressive Conservative Party. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Tory (born May 28, 1954) is a Canadian businessman and leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party. ... Rogers Communications Inc. ... Motto: Diversity Our Strength Map of Ontario Counties, Toronto being red Area: 641 sq. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Red Tory is a nickname given to a political tradition in Canadas conservative political parties. ... For the actor, professor, and waterskiier, see William B. Davis The Honourable William (Bill) Grenville Davis, PC , CC , O.Ont. ... A Member of Provincial Parliament (MPP) is an elected member of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... Frank Klees (born March 6, 1951 in Stuttgart, West Germany) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... The phrase Common Sense Revolution was used as a political slogan to describe common sense conservative platforms in New Jersey, Ontario and Australia in the 1990s. ...


The 2004 leadership election was held on September 18, 2004, electing John Tory as the party's new leader. Tory, a longtime associate of the PC Party, was elected to the Ontario legislature in a by-election in March, 2005, in the seat that Eves held. On January 23, 2004, Ontario Progressive Conservative Party leader Ernie Eves announced his intention to step down as leader before the fall of 2004. ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Tory (born May 28, 1954) is a Canadian businessman and leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party. ...


Ontario PC Shadow Cabinet

The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Opposition Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster System of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose... John Tory (born May 28, 1954) is a Canadian businessman and leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party. ... The Leader of the Opposition in Ontario is usually leader of the largest party in the Ontario legislature which is not the government. ... Elizabeth Witmer (born October 16, 1946 in Schiedam, The Netherlands) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Theodore Calvin (Ted) Arnott (born April 8, 1963 in Fergus, Ontario) is a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario representing the district of Waterloo—Wellington. ... John Baird (born May 26, 1969 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ... In Canada each political party with representation in the House of Commons has a House Leader who is a front bench MP and an expert in parliamentary procedure. ... Toby Barrett (born November 3, 1945 in Port Dover, Ontario) is a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario representing the district of Haldimand—Norfolk—Brant for the Progressive Conservative Party. ... Ted Chudleigh is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Garfield Dunlop is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... James (Jim) Michael Flaherty (born December 30, 1949) is a politician in Ontario, Canada, and the current Member of Provincial Parliament for Whitby—Ajax, representing the Progressive Conservative Party. ... Ernie Hardeman is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Tim Hudak is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Cameron (Cam) Jackson (born February 27, 1951 in Hamilton, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Frank Klees (born March 6, 1951 in Stuttgart, West Germany) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Gerry Martiniuk is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Norm Miller (born in 1956) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Julia Munro is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... John OToole is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Jerry Ouellette (born January 30, 1959 in Oshawa, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Bob Runciman (born in Brockville, Ontario) is a veteran Canadian politician. ... In Canada each political party with representation in the House of Commons has a House Leader who is a front bench MP and an expert in parliamentary procedure. ... Laurie Scott is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Norman W. Sterling (born February 19, 1942 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Joseph Tascona (born October 9, 1951 in Barrie, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Jim Wilson (born April 4, 1963 in Alliston, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... John Yakabuski is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ...

Leaders of the Conservative Party of Canada West (pre-Confederation)

+ Shared role with Sir John A. Macdonald as joint premiers of the Province of Canada representing Canada West (Ontario). The Right Honourable Sir John Alexander Macdonald, KCMG, GCB, QC, PC (January 11, 1815 – June 6, 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada from July 1, 1867 – November 5, 1873 and October 17, 1878 – June 6, 1891. ... John Sandfield Macdonald The Honourable John Sandfield Macdonald (December 12, 1812-June 1, 1872) was the first Premier of the Canadian province of Ontario after the province was created as a result of the confederation of Canada in 1867. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Loyal it began, loyal it remains) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Area 1,076,395 km² (4th)  - Land 917,741 km²  - Water 158,654 km² (14. ...


Leaders of the Conservative Party of Ontario

John Sandfield Macdonald The Honourable John Sandfield Macdonald (December 12, 1812-June 1, 1872) was the first Premier of the Canadian province of Ontario after the province was created as a result of the confederation of Canada in 1867. ... Matthew Crooks Cameron (1822-1887) was a politician in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Sir William Ralph Meredith (1840-1923) was a politician in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... George Frederick Marter was a politician in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Sir James Pliny Whitney (October 2, 1843-September 25, 1914) was a politician in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The name William Hearst can refer to: William Hearst (Ontario premier) - Premier of Ontario, Canada, 1914 - 1919. ... George Howard Ferguson (June 18, 1870-February 21, 1946) was a Conservative politician and Premier of Ontario, Canada, from 1923 to 1930. ... The Honourable George Stewart Henry (July 16, 1871-September 2, 1953) was a farmer, businessman and politician in Ontario, Canada. ... The Honourable William Earl Rowe, PC (May 13, 1894 - February 9, 1984), was a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Colonel The Honourable George Alexander Drew, PC , CC (May 7, 1894 - January 4, 1973) was a Canadian conservative politician who founded a Progressive Conservative dynasty in Ontario that lasted 42 years. ...

Leaders of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario

See: Ontario Progressive Conservative leadership conventions Colonel The Honourable George Alexander Drew, PC , CC (May 7, 1894 - January 4, 1973) was a Canadian conservative politician who founded a Progressive Conservative dynasty in Ontario that lasted 42 years. ... Thomas Laird Kennedy (August 15, 1878-February 13, 1959) was a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... An interim leader, in Canadian politics, is a party leader who is appointed by the partys legislative caucus or the partys executive to temporarily act as leader when there is a gap between the resignation or death of a party leader and the election of his or her... The Honourable Leslie Miscampbell Frost, PC , CC (September 20, 1895-May 4, 1973) was a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... For the recipient of the Victoria Cross see John Robarts (VC). ... William (Bill) Grenville Davis (born July 30, 1929 in Brampton, Ontario) was the Progressive Conservative Premier of Ontario from 1971 to 1985. ... This article is about Frank Miller, the Canadian politician. ... Lawrence Larry Sheldon Grossman (born December 2, 1943 in Toronto, Ontario; died June 1997) was a politician in Ontario, Canada, and a noted baseball fan. ... Andy Brandt is a former Ontario politician and MPP for the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party. ... An interim leader, in Canadian politics, is a party leader who is appointed by the partys legislative caucus or the partys executive to temporarily act as leader when there is a gap between the resignation or death of a party leader and the election of his or her... Michael Deane Harris (born January 23, 1945, in Toronto, Ontario) was the twenty-second Premier of Ontario from June 26, 1995 to April 15, 2002. ... The Honourable Ernest Eves (born June 17, 1946) was the twenty-third Premier of the province of Ontario, Canada, from April 15, 2002, to October 23, 2003. ... John Tory (born May 28, 1954) is a Canadian businessman and leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party. ... This page lists the results of leadership conventions within the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario (known as the Conservative Party of Ontario before 1942). ...


Recent election results

Year of election Candidates elected # of seats available # of votes % of popular vote
1985 52 125 1,343,044 37.0%
1987 16 130 931,473 24.7%
1990 20 130 944,564 23.5%
1995 82 129 1,870,110 44.8%
1999 59 103 1,978,059 45.1%
2003 24 103 1,559,181 34.7%

See also

Beginning with the 2003 election, Ontario elections are held every 4 years in October. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The name which emphasised a revitalised National Policy and links to Britain. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right wing political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... This is a list of the premiers of the province of Ontario, Canada, since Confederation (1867). ... A list of parliamentary opposition leaders in the Canadian province of Ontario, from 1867 to the present. ... This article lists political parties in Canada. ...

Other Conservative Parties

Major conservative parties in Canada: image:cpcsmall.jpg
Parties forming the government:
PC Party of Alberta - PC Party of New Brunswick - PC Party of Newfoundland & Labrador
PC Party of Nova Scotia - PC Party of Prince Edward Island - Yukon Party
Parties forming the official opposition:
Conservative Party of Canada
PC Manitoba - Ontario PC Party - Saskatchewan Party
Other conservative parties represented in legislatures:
Action démocratique du Québec - Alberta Alliance
Other conservative parties not represented in legislatures:
BC Conservative Party -

PC Party of Saskatchewan There are a number of conservative parties in Canada, a country which has traditionally been dominated by two political parties, one liberal and one conservative. ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The Alberta Progressive Conservative Association is a provincial right-of-centre party in the Canadian province of Alberta. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of New Brunswick is a political party in New Brunswick, Canada. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Newfoundland and Labrador is a centre-right political party in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. ... The Nova Scotia Progressive Conservative Party is a centre-right political party in Nova Scotia, Canada. ... The PEI Progressive Conservative Party is one of two major political parties on Prince Edward Island. ... The Yukon Party is a conservative political party that was founded in 1978 as the Yukon Territorial Progressive Conservative Party and was elected as the territorys first party-based government in 1979 under Chris Pearson. ... The Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right wing political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario) is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. ... The Saskatchewan Party is a conservative political party in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. ... The Action démocratique du Québec (ADQ) is a fiscally right-wing political party in Quebec, Canada. ... The Alberta Alliance is a right wing political party in Alberta. ... The British Columbia Conservative Party (also known as the Tories) is a conservative political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Saskatchewan is a political party in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. ...

External link

  • Ontario PC Party

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ontario Progressive Conservative leadership conventions, 1985 - Biocrawler (478 words)
In 1985, the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party held two leadership conventions: one in January, and one in November.
The January convention was held in Toronto to choose a replacement for William Davis, who had served as Ontario PC leader and Premier of the province of Ontario since 1971.
Although the Tories had won the largest number of seats in the Ontario Legislative Assembly, the Ontario Liberal Party gained the support of the third party, the Ontario New Democratic Party, and formed the government, putting the Conservatives into opposition for the first time in 44 years.
Politics of Ontario - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1910 words)
Ontario's primary political parties are the centre-right Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party), the centrist Ontario Liberal Party and the social democratic Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP).
Thousands of party members resigned from the NDP and it became evident that the party was headed for a defeat in the 1995 election.
In general, Ontario is a mixed bag in terms of political trends, despite the fact that the federal Liberals dominated from 1993 to 2004 due to a 'divided right' between the moderate Progressive Conservative party and strongly conservative Canadian Alliance, the united right of the federal Conservatives has reduced the dominance.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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