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Encyclopedia > Ontario New Democratic Party
Ontario New Democratic Party
Image:Ontndp.jpg
Active Provincial Party
Founded 1932
Leader Howard Hampton
President Sandra Clifford
Headquarters 33 Cecil St
Toronto, Ontario
M5T 1N1
Political ideology Social Democracy /
Democratic Socialism
International alignment Socialist International
Colours Orange & Green
Seats 9
Website http://www.ontariondp.on.ca

The Ontario New Democratic Party (formerly known as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, Ontario Section) is a social democratic political party in Ontario, Canada. It is a section of the federal New Democratic Party. File links The following pages link to this file: Ontario New Democratic Party ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... Ontario NDP Leader Howard Hampton Howard Hampton (born May 17, 1952) is the leader of the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) and a Member of Provincial Parliament from the northern riding of Kenora—Rainy River. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The official symbol of Socialist International The Socialist International is a worldwide organization of social democratic, labor, and democratic socialist political parties. ... The colour orange occurs between red and yellow in the visible spectrum at a wavelength of about 585–620 nanometres. ... Green is a color with many different shades, all within a wavelength of roughly 520–570 nm. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English Flower White Trillium Tree Eastern White Pine Bird Common Loon Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total... The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ...

Contents

Origins

The NDP was founded in 1932 as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF), a democratic socialist political party. The Ontario CCF saw itself as the successor to the 1919-1923 United Farmers of Ontario-Labour coalition that formed the government in Ontario under Ernest C. Drury. The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was a Canadian political party founded in 1932 in Calgary, Alberta, by a number of socialist, farm, co-operative and labour groups, and the League for Social Reconstruction. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The United Farmers of Ontario (UFO) were the Ontario section of the nation-wide United Farmers movement that arose in Canada in the early part of the 20th century. ... Labour Party of Canada is Liberal Social democratic party emerged as an imperative need for all Canadian in the 21st Century. ... A coalition government, or coalition cabinet, is a cabinet in parliamentary government in which several parties cooperate. ... Ernest Charles Drury (January 22, 1878-February 17, 1968) was a farmer, politician and writer who served as Premier of Ontario from 1919 to 1923 as the head of a United Farmers of Ontario - Labour coalition government. ...


While United Farmer Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) joined the Ontario Liberal Party, the United Farmers of Ontario (UFO), as an organization, participated in the formation of the Ontario CCF, and was briefly affiliated with the party. It decided to withdraw in 1935, alleging Communist influence in the new party. Many active members of the UFO remained supporters, including Agnes Macphail, who served as president of the Ontario CCF until 1935 when, as a UFO Member of Parliament (MP), she was forced to officially resign from the CCF when the UFO withdrew from the party. She was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario as a CCF Member of Provincial Parliament (MPP)1 in 1943. A Member of the Legislative Assembly, or MLA, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to the Legislature or legislative assembly of a subnational jurisdiction. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a center-right provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Agnes Campbell Macphail (March 24, 1890 — February 13, 1954) was the first woman to be elected to the Canadian House of Commons, and one of the first two women elected to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... The Ontario Legislature Building at Queens Park The Legislative Assembly of Ontario, is the legislature of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... A Member of Provincial Parliament (MPP) is an elected member of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ...


Other prominent CCFers were Graham Spry who was the Ontario CCF's chairman from 1934 to 1936 and Elmore Philpott, a former Liberal Philpott joined the CCF in 1933 and became president of the Ontario Association of CCF Clubs before resigning from the party and rejoining the Liberals in 1935. Graham Spry (February 20, 1900 - November 24, 1983) was a Canadian intellectual, political activist, business executive and socialist. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Elmore Philpott (May 2, 1896 - December 9, 1964) was a Canadian politician and journalist. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a center-right provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The CCF contested its first Ontario provincial election in 1934. It received 7% of the vote, and won its first seat in the Ontario legislature: Samuel Lawrence was elected in Hamilton East. The Ontario CCF failed to win any seats in the 1937 election. The Ontario general election, 1934 was the nineteenth general election held in the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... Disambiguation: Samuel Lawrence (disambiguation) Sam Lawrence joining a picket line supporting nine hour days for restaurant workers in the 1930s. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Nickname: Ambitious City, Steeltown, The Hammer Area: 1,117. ... The Ontario general election, 1937 was the twentieth general election held in the Province of Ontario, Canada. ...



1 In 1938, Members of the Ontario Legislative Assembly (MLAs) passed a motion to adopt the title "Members of Provincial Parliament" (MPP).


Breakthrough

The party achieved a major breakthrough under its first leader, Ted Jolliffe, in the 1943 election, forming the Official Opposition with 32% of the vote and 34 seats. The CCF was just four seats short of George Drew's Progressive Conservatives ("Tories"), who formed a minority government. Edward (Ted) Bigelow Jolliffe (1909-1998) was a Canadian politician and lawyer and was the first leader of the Ontario Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. ... The Ontario general election of 1943 was held on August 4, 1943, to elect the 90 Members of the Legislative Assembly (Members of Provincial Parliament, or MPPs) of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... The Leader of the Opposition is a title traditionally held by the leader of the largest party not in government in a Westminster System of parliamentary government. ... Colonel The Honourable George Alexander Drew, PC , CC , QC (May 7, 1894 - January 4, 1973) was a Canadian conservative politician who founded a Progressive Conservative dynasty in Ontario that lasted 42 years. ... The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario, also known as Tories) is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. ... A minority government or a minority cabinet is a cabinet of a parliamentary system formed when no political party has won a majority of seats in the parliament, typically by the party that does have a plurality. ...


The Tories remained in government for 42 years. The prosperity of the 1950s, combined with the anti-Communist hysteria of the Cold War, caused the CCF's fortunes to decline in the 1950s. The party lost its position as the Official Opposition in the 1951 election to the Liberal Party, and was reduced to just two seats. Anti-communism is opposition to communist ideology, organization, or government, on either a theoretical or practical level. ... For other uses, please see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The Ontario general election of 1951 was held to elect the 90 members of the Legislative Assembly (Members of Provincial Parliament, or MPPs) of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ...


Dog days

Donald C. MacDonald became leader in 1953, and spent the next fifteen years rebuilding the party. The CCF changed its name to the New Democratic Party in 1961, when it formed a formal alliance with the labour movement. Donald MacDonald at Queens Park. ... The labour movement (or labor movement) is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments, in particular through the implementation of specific laws governing labor relations. ...


The Ontario NDP gradually picked up seats through the 1960s. It achieved a breakthrough in the 1967 election, when its popular vote rose from 15% to 26%. The party increased its presence in the legislature from 8 to 20 seats. The Ontario general election of 1967 was held to elect the 117 members of the Legislative Assembly (Members of Provincial Parliament, or MPPs) of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ...


Revival

Stephen Lewis took over the party's leadership in 1970, and the NDP's popularity continued to grow. With the 1975 provincial election, the governing Conservatives were reduced to a minority government for the first time in thirty years. The NDP became the Official Opposition with 38 seats and 29% of the vote as the result of a brilliant election campaign that forced the Tories to promise to implement the NDP's rent control policies. Stephen Lewis at a public speaking engagement on April 25, 2001. ... The Ontario general election of 1975 was held to elect the 125 members of the Legislative Assembly (Members of Provincial Parliament, or MPPs) of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... Rent control refers to laws or ordinances that set price controls on residential housing. ...


Hopes were high that the NDP was on the verge of taking power, but in the 1977 election, the Tories under Bill Davis again won a minority government. The NDP lost five seats, and slipped into third place behind the Liberals. The Ontario general election of 1977 was held to elect the 125 members of the Legislative Assembly (Members of Provincial Parliament, or MPPs) of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... For the actor, professor, and waterskiier, see William B. Davis The Honourable William (Bill) Grenville Davis, PC , CC , O.Ont. ...


The NDP declined further in the 1981 election under Michael Cassidy, but the party's fortunes turned around under the leadership of Bob Rae. William Daviss Progressive Conservatives finally won a majority government after winning only minorities in the 1975 and 1977 elections. ... Michael Morris Cassidy (born 1937) is a Canadian politician. ... Robert Keith Rae, PC , OC, O.Ont , QC , B.A., LL.B, B.Phi. ...


The Rae years

Bob Rae was the first NDP Premier of Ontario.
Enlarge
Bob Rae was the first NDP Premier of Ontario.

The 1985 election resulted in a minority legislature: the Tories under Premier Frank Miller won 52 seats, the Liberals won 48, and the NDP 25. The New Democrats entered negotiations with both the Tories and the Liberals. The NDP signed a two-year accord with the Liberals, in which the Liberals would form government with the NDP's support in exchange for the implementation of a number of NDP policies. Image File history File links Bobrae-premier. ... Image File history File links Bobrae-premier. ... David Petersons Liberals, with support from Bob Raes New Democrats, form a minority government despite having fewer seats than Frank Millers Progressive Conservatives. ... A premier is an executive official of government. ... This article is about Frank Miller, the Canadian politician. ...


Miller resigned, opening the way for Liberal leader David Peterson to form a government. This was not a coalition government as the NDP declined an offer to sit in Cabinet, preferring to remain in opposition. The Honourable David Robert Peterson, PC , LL.B , BA (born December 28, 1943 in Toronto, Ontario) was the twentieth Premier of the Province of Ontario, Canada, from June 26, 1985 to October 1, 1990. ... A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ...


When the accord expired in 1987, the Liberals called an election and were re-elected with a majority. The NDP returned as the second largest party with Bob Rae becoming Leader of the Opposition. Map of the 1987 election, showing the ridings and their popular vote The Ontario general election of 1987 was held on September 10, 1987, to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... The Leader of the Opposition is a title traditionally held by the leader of the largest party not in government in a Westminster System of parliamentary government. ...


In the general election of 1990, the party won power for the first time by heavily defeating the Liberal government. Most of the party's own supporters hadn't expected to win. However, Peterson's popularity tailed off dramatically between 1987 and 1990. With the Tories in considerable upheaval, the NDP was able to take advantage of the situation. Although the NDP finished only three percentage points ahead of the Liberals, they managed to take many seats in the GTA away from the Liberals. As a result, the NDP won a strong majority government with 74 seats while the Liberals suffered the worst defeat in their history. As a result of serious scandals, David Petersons Liberal government was defeated by a large protest vote. ...


Bob Rae became Premier of Ontario during the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. In government, the NDP disappointed supporters by abandoning much of its ambitious program, including the promise to institute a public auto insurance system. As the recession worsened, the NDP implemented what it called the Social Contract — which represented a shift to the right that echoed that of Tony Blair's Labour Party in the United Kingdom. This was a package of austerity measures that; Dalton McGuinty The Premier of Ontario is the first minister for the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The Great Depression an economic downturn which started in 1929 (although its effects were not fully felt until late 1930) and lasted through most of the 1930s. ... A recession is usually defined in macroeconomics as a fall of a countrys real Gross Domestic Product in two or more successive quarters of a year. ... Social contract theory (or contractarianism) is a concept used in philosophy, political science, and sociology to denote an implicit agreement within a state regarding the rights and responsibilities of the state and its citizens, or more generally a similar concord between a group and its members, or between individuals. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in North East England. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ...

  • reopened the collective bargaining agreements of public sector unions;
  • implemented a wage freeze for public servants; and
  • imposed Rae Days, which were a schedule of days in which government workers were given days off without pay.

The Social Contract resulted in a major breach in the NDP's alliance with the labour movement as several unions turned against the party. At one point, the NDP fell to a low of 6 percent support in polling. An ominous sign for the party came in the 1993 federal election, in which all of the NDP's Ontario MPs lost their seats. It was obvious by the 1995 election that Rae would not win another term. In this election, the NDP was heavily defeated by the Tories under Mike Harris. The NDP fell to 17 seats, third place in the Legislative Assembly. Rae Days were a nickname for a 1993 initiative by Ontario Premier Bob Rae that forced civil servants to take unpaid days of leave. ... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... The Ontario general election of 1995 was held on June 8, 1995, to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the province of Ontario, Canada. ... Michael Deane Harris (born January 23, 1945, in Toronto, Ontario) was the twenty-second Premier of Ontario from June 26, 1995 to April 15, 2002. ...


After Rae

Rae resigned a few months after the election and was succeeded by Howard Hampton, a longtime rival. Rae has since joined the Liberal Party of Canada and was an unsuccessful candidate for party leadership in December 2006. Ontario NDP Leader Howard Hampton Howard Hampton (born May 17, 1952) is the leader of the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) and a Member of Provincial Parliament from the northern riding of Kenora—Rainy River. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned at the centre of the political spectrum, combining a progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Wikinews has news related to: Ignatieff tops first ballot in Canadian Liberal convention Canadian Liberal vote heads to third ballot Dion leads Ignatieff heading into final ballot of Canadian Liberal vote Dion wins Canadian Liberal leadership on fourth ballot Wikinews has news related to: Liberal Party of Canada leadership, 2006...


Under Hampton, the party has largely repudiated Rae's policies and renewed its commitment to a moderate form of socialism. Shortly after the 1999 election, Hampton cited the Swedish model of social democracy as closely reflecting his own beliefs. However, the party has never really healed the breach with organized labor that resulted from the Social Contract. It has also never approached the popularity it enjoyed in the late 1980s. Map of Ontarios ridings and their popular vote for their party elected The Ontario Legislature after the 1999 election. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ...


NDP support fell even further in the 1999 election, leaving the party with just 9 seats. However, this was largely due to NDP voters voting Liberal in hopes of removing Harris and the Tories from power. As a result, Hampton was not blamed for this severe defeat and stayed on as leader. Map of Ontarios ridings and their popular vote for their party elected The Ontario Legislature after the 1999 election. ...


Under the rules of the Legislative Assembly, a party would receive "official party status", and the resources and privileges accorded to officially-recognized parties, if it had 12 or more seats; thus, the NDP would lose caucus funding and the ability to ask questions in the House. However, the governing Conservatives changed the rules after the election to lower the threshold for party status from 12 seats to 8. The Tories argued that since Ontario's provincial ridings now had the same boundaries as the federal ones, the threshold should be lowered to accommodate the smaller legislature. Others argued that the Tories were only helping the NDP so they could continue to split the vote with the Liberals. This article or section should be merged with Spoiler effect A split vote, or vote splitting, occurs in an election when the existence of two or more candidates that represent relatively similar viewpoints among voters reduces the votes received by each of them, reducing the chances of any one of...


In the 2003 election, the party alienated some traditional supporters with an over-reliance on photo ops. It won over some new supporters by emphasizing a few key issues, primarily "public" hospitals and "public" electricity. Despite a slight increase in raw vote, the party lost two seats, once again losing official party status and the concommitant speaking privileges and funding. The newly elected Liberal government refused to change the rules as the Tories had done. However, the NDP regained party status when Andrea Horwath won a massive victory a by-election in Hamilton East on May 13, 2004. Map of Ontarios ridings and their popular vote for their party elected The Ontario general election of 2003 was held on October 2, 2003, to elect the 103 members of the Legislative Assembly (Members of Provincial Parliament, or MPPs) of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... Ontario NDP MPP Andrea Horwath Andrea Horwath is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Hamilton East is provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The NDP's representation in the Legislature was again reduced to seven seats when Marilyn Churley resigned her seat to run in the 2006 federal election. However, the Liberals reversed their position and declared that the NDP would retain party status even if they lost the upcoming Toronto—Danforth by-election. Some opposition sources believed the Liberals, mindful of their humiliating defeat to Horwath, had loosened their interpretation of the rules so that whomever ran for the NDP in Toronto-Danforth couldn't use the threat of lost status in a campaign. This issue became moot when Peter Tabuns won the seat for the NDP comfortably by 9% over the Liberals' Ben Chin. Prominent Ontario NDP member Marilyn Churley Marilyn Churley (born May 7, 1948 in Old Perlican, Newfoundland) is a Canadian politician, who represents the riding of Toronto—Danforth in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... Toronto—Danforth in relation to the other Toronto ridings Toronto—Danforth (formerly Broadview—Greenwood) is a federal and provincial electoral district in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1979, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1999. ... Peter Tabuns Peter Tabuns is a Canadian politician and environmentalist, who was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario in the Toronto—Danforth provincial by-election on March 30, 2006. ... Ben Chin, or Byun Kyu Chin (born Geneva, Switzerland in 1964) is a Canadian politician, political aide and former television journalist. ...


2007 Ontario general election

Ontario is scheduled to hold its next general election on October 4, 2007, its first fixed date election. The Ontario NDP has reason to expect significant gains in this forthcoming vote. A July, 2006, Environics poll showed the party with 27% popular support, it's highest level recorded since March, 1992, when Bob Rae's government was still in power.[1] In this poll, however, the NDP still trailed the governing Liberals who received 35% support and the Opposition Progressive Conservatives who led with 36%. Also, subsequent polls have shown the NDP with support in the 20-23% range, further behind the two frontrunning parties but still well ahead of the Party's 2003 election result.[2] The Ontario general election of 2007 is scheduled to be held on October 4, 2007 to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Fixed-term election is an election that occurs on a set date, and cannot be changed by the incumbent politician. ...


Still, a recent byelection in the provincial riding of Parkdale—High Park may offer an early indication of the NDP's ability to capitalize on its rising public standing. On Thursday, September 14, 2006, less than thirteen months before the forthcoming general election, well-known local United Church minister Cheri DiNovo, representing the NDP, was elected the riding's new MPP. She defeated Liberal candidate and incumbent Toronto city councillor Sylvia Watson by a 41% to 33% margin. [3]. DiNovo replaces former Liberal MPP Gerard Kennedy, who resigned earlier in 2006 to seek the Liberal Party of Canada leadership. Although Kennedy had previously held parts of this riding for the provincial Liberals for the past ten years, the NDP also had a long history of support in the area, with Peggy Nash winning the corresponding federal riding for the NDP in 2006. DiNovo's victory in Parkdale High Park increases the provincial NDP caucus to nine members and may be a harbinger of future gains for the party in other ridings not presently held by the provincial NDP, but where the federal party has recently performed well. Parkdale—High Park in relation to the other Toronto ridings Parkdale—High Park is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1979, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1999. ... The United Church can refer to a number of churches. ... The Rev. ... Sylvia Watson is a Canadian politician. ... Gerard Kennedy, (born 1960 in The Pas, Manitoba) is a Canadian politician. ... Peggy Nash is a federal Canadian politician with the New Democratic Party. ...


Leaders of the Ontario CCF/NDP

2 The Ontario CCF became the Ontario NDP in 1961. Edward (Ted) Bigelow Jolliffe (1909-1998) was a Canadian politician and lawyer and was the first leader of the Ontario Co-operative Commonwealth Federation. ... Donald MacDonald at Queens Park. ... Stephen Lewis at a public speaking engagement on April 25, 2001. ... Michael Morris Cassidy (born 1937) is a Canadian politician. ... Robert Keith Rae, PC , OC, O.Ont , QC , B.A., LL.B, B.Phi. ... Ontario NDP Leader Howard Hampton Howard Hampton (born May 17, 1952) is the leader of the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP) and a Member of Provincial Parliament from the northern riding of Kenora—Rainy River. ...


3 Bud Wildman was interim leader of the NDP in the Ontario legislature from Rae's resignation as an MPP to Howard Hampton's election as party leader. Charles Bud Wildman (born 1952) is a Canadian politician. ... An interim leader, in Canadian politics, is a party leader who is appointed by the partys legislative caucus or the partys executive to temporarily act as leader when there is a gap between the resignation or death of a party leader and the election of his or her...


See also: Ontario CCF/NDP Leadership Conventions Leadership conventions and leadership challenges in the Ontario New Democratic Party (previously known as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, Ontario Section). ...


Election results

Year of election Candidates elected # of seats available # of votes % of popular vote
1934 1 90 na 7.0%
1937 0 90 na 5.6%
1943 34 90 na 31.7%
1945 8 90 na 22.4%
1948 21 90 na 27.0%
1951 2 90 na 19.1%
1955 3 98 na 16.5%
1959 25 98 na 16.7%
1963 7 108 na 15.5%
1967 20 117 na 25.9%
1971 19 117 na 27.1%
1975 38 125 na 28.9%
1977 33 125 na 28.0%
1981 21 125 na 21.2%
1985 25 125 865,507 23.8%
1987 19 130 970,813 25.7%
1990 74 130 1,509,506 37.6%
1995 17 129 854,163 20.6%
1999 9 103 551,009 12.6%
2003 7 103 660,730 14.7%

See also

This is a list of articles about members of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) and its successor, the Ontario New Democratic Party (NDP), social democratic political parties in Ontario, Canada. ... Leadership conventions and leadership challenges in the Ontario New Democratic Party (previously known as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, Ontario Section). ... Beginning with the 2003 election, Ontario elections are held every 4 years in October. ... This is a list of the premiers of the province of Ontario, Canada, since Confederation (1867). ... This article lists political parties in Canada. ... The United Farmers of Ontario (UFO) were the Ontario section of the nation-wide United Farmers movement that arose in Canada in the early part of the 20th century. ... The Progressive Party of Canada was a political party in Canada in the 1920s and 1930s. ... Labour Party of Canada is Liberal Social democratic party emerged as an imperative need for all Canadian in the 21st Century. ... The Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) was a Canadian political party founded in 1932 in Calgary, Alberta, by a number of socialist, farm, co-operative and labour groups, and the League for Social Reconstruction. ... The Metro New Democratic Party was a political party in Metropolitan Toronto, Ontario, Canada, that supported candidates for election to the municipal councils and school boards of the six municipalities that made up Metro Toronto. ... Ontario New Democratic Youth (ONDY) (in French: Jeunes Néo-Démocrates de lOntario, JNDO) - is the youth wing of the Ontario New Democratic Party. ... The New Democratic Party of Ontario is one of three major political parties in Ontario, Canada. ...

External links

  • Ontario NDP
  • Ontario NDP Caucus
  • Ontario New Democratic Youth
Ontario Political Parties
Represented in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario:
PC Liberal NDP
Other parties recognized by Elections Ontario:
Green Freedom COR Family Communist Libertarian

Provincial Elections
New Democratic Party Regional Wings
In Government: Saskatchewan - Manitoba
Forming the Official Opposition: British Columbia - Nova Scotia
Forming Third Party Electoral Representation: Yukon - Alberta - Ontario - Newfoundland and Labrador
No Current Electoral Representation: New Brunswick - Prince Edward Island

  Results from FactBites:
 
Howard Hampton, Leader of the Ontario New Democratic Party (193 words)
Howard Hampton, Leader of the Ontario New Democratic Party
Howard Hampton was elected Leader of the Ontario New Democratic Party at a provincial convention in Hamilton, Ontario on June 22, 1996.
He is the Member of Provincial Parliament for Rainy River and has been the Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs critic for the NDP Caucus since 1995.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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