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Encyclopedia > Ontario Court of Appeal

The Ontario Court of Appeal is headquartered in downtown Toronto, in historic Osgoode Hall. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Central business district. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ...


The Court is composed of 22 judges who hear over 1 500 civil and criminal appeals in Ontario each year. These appeals are of various issues such as criminal, administrative, family, and civil law matters, along with principals of Charter, litigation, sentencing and the rules of evidence. The Court also hears various young offender proceedings in addition to appeals argued by unrepresented inmates. In ninety-eight percent of cases, the Court of Appeal is the last avenue of appeal for litigants in the province. In 2003, the court legalized same-sex marriage in the province. A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English (de facto) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total)  Ranked 4th 1,076... The Charter, signed by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1981. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ... A province is a territorial unit, almost always a country subdivision. ... Flag of Ontario Same-sex marriage was legalized in Ontario in 2003 after the Ontario Court of Appeal upheld a lower court ruling which declared that defining marriage in heterosexual-only terms violated the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. ...

Contents

Current Justices

Position Name appointed prior position
Chief Justice of Ontario R. Roy McMurtry 1996
Associate Chief Justice of Ontario Dennis O'Connor 1998/2001
Justice Robert P. Armstrong January 25, 2002
Justice Robert A. Blair November 5, 2003
Justice Stephen Borins 1997
Justice James J. Carthy
Justice Marvin A. Catzman 1988
Justice Eleanore A. Cronk July 31, 2001
Justice David H. Doherty June 11, 1998
Justice Kathryn N. Feldman
Justice Eileen E. Gillese 2002
Justice Stephen T. Goudge
Justice Russell G. Juriansz March 12, 2004
Justice Jean-Marc Labrosse July 30, 1990
Justice Harry S. Laforme November 2004
Justice Susan E. Lang 2004
Justice John I. Laskin January 1994
Justice Jean L. MacFarland
Justice James C. MacPherson 1999
Justice Michael J. Moldaver December 1995
Justice Marc Rosenberg December 1995
Justice Paul Rouleau
Justice Robert J. Sharpe 1999
Justice Janet M. Simmons August 2000
Justice Karen M. Weiler March 12, 1992

Roy McMurtry (right) accompanied by his wife, daughter, and a sample of his art work Roland Roy McMurtry (born May 31, 1932) is a judge and former politician in Ontario, Canada. ... There are several notable people named Dennis OConnor: Dennis OConnor (judge) J. Dennis OConnor Dennis OConnor (priest) Category: ...

Past Justices

The Hon. ... Louise Arbour (born February 10, 1947 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada) is the current UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and a former Supreme Court of Canada Justice. ... Justice Walter Surma Tarnopolsky (1932 – 15 September, 1993) was a Canadian judge, legal scholar, and pioneer in the development of human rights law and civil liberties in Canada. ... The Honourable Peter deCarteret Cory, B.A., LL.B., LL.D. (born October 25, 1925) was a puisne judge of the Supreme Court of Canada from 1989 to 1999. ... Bertha Wilson (born September 18, 1923) is a retired Canadian jurist and was a Puisne Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. ... Goldwyn Arthur Martin CC, QC, BA, LL.D (1913 - 26 February 2001) was a justice of the Ontario Court of Appeal and one of the most prominent experts in criminal law in Canada. ... The Right Honourable Bora Laskin, PC , CC , LL.M. , LL.B. , MA , FRSC (October 5, 1912 – March 17, 1984) was a Canadian jurist, who served on the Supreme Court of Canada for fourteen years, including a decade as its Chief Justice. ... The Honourable Mr. ... The Honourable Henry Hague Davis (September 10, 1885 – June 30, 1944) was a Canadian lawyer and Puisne Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada. ... Newton Wesley Rowell (November 1, 1867-November 22, 1941) was a Canadian lawyer and politician and leading lay figure in the Methodist church. ... The Right Honourable Sir William Mulock (January 19, 1844 - October 1, 1944) was a Canadian politician and cabinet member. ... The Honourable John Douglas Armour (May 4, 1830 – July 11, 1903) was a Canadian Puisne judge of the Supreme Court of Canada. ... Robert Alexander Harrison Source: Library and Archives Canada Robert Alexander Harrison (August 3, 1833 – November 1, 1878) was an Ontario lawyer, judge and political figure. ...

Chief Justice of Upper Canada

William Osgoode (March 1754-January 17, 1824) was the first Chief Justice of Ontario, Canada. ... Henry Allcock (baptised January 26, 1759 – February 22, 1808) was a judge and political figure in Upper and Lower Canada. ... Thomas Scott (baptised 18 October 1746 – July 29, 1824) was a judge and political figure in Upper Canada. ... William Dummer Powell (November 5, 1755-September 6, 1834) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Upper Canada. ... Sir William Campbell (2 August 1758 – 18 January 1834) was Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Upper Canada and a resident of Toronto. ... Sir John Beverley Robinson, 1st Baronet CB (July 26, 1791-January 31, 1863) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Upper Canada. ... William Henry Draper (March 11, 1801-November 3, 1877) was a lawyer, judge and political figure in Upper Canada and Canada West. ...

See also

The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ...

External links

  • Ontario Court of Appeal official site


The Province of Ontario is governed by a unicameral legislature, the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, which operates in the Westminster system of government. ... In Canada, the lieutenant-governor (often without a hyphen[1], pronounced ), in French lieutenant-gouverneur/lieutenant-gouverneure (always with a hyphen), is the Canadian Monarchs, or Crowns, representative in a province, much as the Governor General is her representative at the national level. ... His Honour The Honourable James Karl Bartleman, O.Ont , BA (born 24 December 1939, in Orillia, Ontario), is a Canadian diplomat, author, and the 27th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. ... The flag of the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario This is a list of lieutenant-governors of the Canadian province of Ontario, before and during Confederation in 1867. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ontario. ... Image:Mcguinty77. ... Dalton James Patrick McGuinty Jr. ... This is a list of the premiers of the province of Ontario, Canada, since Confederation (1867). ... This is a list of Premier of Ontario in order of time served in office as Premier of Ontario up to and including March 6, 2007. ... The Leader of the Opposition (French: Chef de lOpposition) in Canada is the Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ... John Tory John H. Tory, LL.B, BA, MPP (born May 28, 1954) is a Canadian businessman and leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party. ... The Leader of the Opposition in Ontario is usually leader of the largest party in the Ontario legislature which is not the government. ... The Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario is the presiding officer of the provincial legislature. ... Michael A. Brown (born April 18, 1950 in Sarnia, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... The Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario is the presiding officer of the provincial legislature. ... The Provincial Parliament of Ontario, is the legislature of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The 38th Legislative Assembly of Ontario is the current legislature of the government of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario Legislature Building at Queens Park This is a list of the Ontario Legislative Assemblies, also called Ontario Parliaments of the province of Ontario, Canada, since Confederation in 1867. ... The Executive Council of Ontario (informally and more commonly, the Cabinet of Ontario) is the cabinet of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... This article lists political parties in Canada. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a center-right provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario, also known as Tories) is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario New Democratic Party (formerly known as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, Ontario Section) is a social democratic political party in Ontario, Canada. ... This is a list of Ontario political parties in order of time in power, since confederation. ... Beginning with the 2003 election, Ontario elections are held every 4 years in October. ... Map of Ontarios ridings and their popular vote for their party elected The Ontario Legislature after the 2003 election. ... Beginning with the 2003 election, Ontario elections are held every 4 years in October. ... Equalization payments are cash payments made in some federal systems of government from the federal government to state or provincial governments with the objective of offsetting differences in available revenue (commonly referred to as fiscal disparities) or in the cost of providing services. ... The Ontario general election of 2007 is scheduled to be held on October 4, 2007 to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ... Prior to 1903, there were no political parties in British Columbia, Canada, other than at the federal level. ... Albertas first Legislature, Edmonton, 1906 The politics of Alberta are centred on a provincial government resembling that of the other Canadian provinces. ... The Politics of Saskatchewan are part of the Canadian federal political system along with the other Canadian provinces. ... The Canadian province of Manitoba is governed by a unicameral legislature, the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba, which operates under the Westminster system of government. ... The Province of Ontario is governed by a unicameral legislature, the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, which operates in the Westminster system of government. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... New Brunswick has a unicameral legislature with 55 seats. ... Nova Scotia is a parliamentary democracy. ... The politics of Prince Edward Island are centred on a provincial government resembling that of the other Canadian provinces. ... The politics of Northwest Territories have been centered around the struggle for responsible government and provincial rights. ...

Courts of Canada (edit)
Supreme Court: Supreme Court of Canada
Federal Courts: Tax Court of Canada |Federal Court |Federal Court of Appeal
Courts of Appeal of the Provinces and Territories: BC | AB | SASK | MAN | ONT | QC | NB | NS | PEI | NL | YK | NWT | NU
Superior Courts of the Provinces and Territories: BC | AB | SASK | MAN | ONT | QC | NB | NS | PEI | NL | YK | NWT | NU
Provincial Courts of the Provinces and Territories: BC | AB | SASK | MAN | ONT | QC | NB | NS | PEI | NL | YK | NWT | NU
Military Court: Court Martial Appeal Court
Canadian Courts History in the Provinces and Territories: SASK

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ontario Court of Appeal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (222 words)
The Ontario Court of Appeal is headquartered in downtown Toronto, in historic Osgoode Hall.
In ninety-eight percent of cases, the Court of Appeal is the last avenue of appeal for litigants in the province.
Courts of Appeal of the Provinces and Territories:
Same-sex marriage in Ontario - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (580 words)
On June 10, 2003, the Ontario Court of Appeal confirmed that current Canadian law on marriage violated the equality provisions in Section Fifteen of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in being restricted to heterosexual couples.
The appeals court struck down the stay of judgment given in the 2002 ruling, thereby causing the judgment to come into effect immediately.
The court also ruled that two couples who had previously attempted to marry using an ancient common-law procedure called reading the banns would be considered legally married.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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