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Encyclopedia > Ontario
Ontario
Flag of Ontario [[Image:|85px|Coat of arms of Ontario]]
Flag Coat of arms
Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet
(Latin: "Loyal she began, loyal she remains")
Map of Canada with Ontario highlighted
Capital Toronto
Largest city Toronto
Official languages English (de facto)
Government
Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley
Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal)
Federal representation in Canadian Parliament
House seats 107
Senate seats 24
Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st)
Area [1] Ranked 4th
Total 1,076,395 km² (415,598 sq mi)
Land 917,741 km² (354,342 sq mi)
Water (%) 158,654 km² (61,257 sq mi) (14.8%)
Population  Ranked 1st
Total (2008) 12,861,940 (est.)[2]
Density 13.9 /km² (36 /sq mi)
GDP  Ranked 1st
Total (2008) C$597.2 billion[3]
Per capita C$43,847 (6th)
Abbreviations
Postal ON
ISO 3166-2 CA-ON
Time zone UTC-5 & -6
Postal code prefix K L M N P
Flower White Trillium
Tree Eastern White Pine
Bird Common Loon
Web site www.ontario.ca
Rankings include all provinces and territories

Ontario (IPA: /ɒnˈtɛɹi.oʊ/) is a province located in the central part of Canada, the largest by population[4] and second largest, after Quebec, in total area.[1] (Nunavut and the Northwest Territories are larger but are not provinces.) Ontario is bordered by the provinces of Manitoba to the west, Quebec to the east, and the (U.S.) states of Michigan, New York, Minnesota, Ohio and Pennsylvania (at Lake Erie). Most of Ontario's borders with the United States are natural, starting at the Lake of the Woods and continuing through the four Great Lakes: Superior, Huron (which includes Georgian Bay), Erie, and Ontario (for which the province is named), then along the Saint Lawrence River near Cornwall. Ontario is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes. In addition to the province of Ontario in Canada, Ontario is also the name of some places in the United States of America: Ontario, California Ontario, New York Ontario, Oregon Ontario County, New York Ontario International Airport Lake Ontario is also one of the Great Lakes on the boundary between... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ontario. ... Ontarios official flag since 1965 The current Flag of Ontario was proclaimed the official flag of the Canadian province of Ontario by the Flag Act on May 21, 1965. ... The Coat of Arms of Ontario, formally The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Ontario, was begun when the shield was granted by Royal Warrant of Queen Victoria in 1868. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The following are the current provincial and territorial capitals of Canada: BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU Capitals of Canadas provinces and territories Category: ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... David C. Onley book Shuttle. ... The Premier of Ontario is the first minister for the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Dalton James Patrick McGuinty, Jr. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a centrist provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... Type Lower House Speaker Peter Milliken, Liberal since January 29, 2001 Leader of the Government in the House of Commons Peter Van Loan, Conservative since January 4, 2007 Opposition House Leader Ralph Goodale, Liberal since January 23, 2006 Members 308 Political groups Conservative Party Liberal Party Bloc Québécois... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Here is a list of Canadian provinces and territories ranked by area. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU This is a list of Canadian provinces and territories by population, based on Statistics Canada estimates as of July 1, 2007. ... BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU This article lists Canadian provinces and territories by gross domestic product. ... BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU This article lists Canadian provinces and territories by gross domestic product. ... This is a list of Canadian provincial and territorial postal abbreviations. ... ISO 3166-2 codes for Canada describe 10 Provinces and 3 Territories. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... ... A Canadian postal code is a string of six characters that forms part of a postal address in Canada. ... Eastern Ontario - 84 FSAs Note: No postal codes yet begin with K3* or K5*. Most populated FSAs Statistics Canada, 2001 Census K0K, 100,202 K0A, 88,384 K0L, 67,817 K0C, 50,698 K1V, 46,082 Least populated FSAs Statistics Canada, 2001 Census K1P, 72 K1A, 100 K8B... Central Ontario - 159 FSAs Categories: Canada Post ... Toronto - 102 FSAs Note: There are no rural FSAs in Toronto, hence no postal codes start with M0x. ... Western Ontario - 119 FSAs Categories: Canada Post ... Northern Ontario - 57 FSAs Most populated FSAs Statistics Canada, 2001 Census P0M, 51,197 P0T, 40,119 P0H, 38,600 P6A, 35,012 P1B, 33,596 Least populated FSAs Statistics Canada, 2001 Census P0Y, 49 P7K, 1,643 P7J, 2,055 P1C, 2,224 P7G, 2,436 Categories... Binomial name Trillium grandiflorum (Michx. ... Binomial name L. Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus) is a large pine native to eastern North America, occurring from Newfoundland west to Minnesota and southeastern Manitoba, and south along the Appalachian Mountains to the extreme north of Georgia. ... Binomial name Gavia immer (Brunnich, 1764) The Great Northern Diver, known in North America as the Common Loon (Gavia immer), is a large member of the loon, or diver, family. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... A province is a territorial unit, almost always a country subdivision. ... Central Canada, defined politically. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... For the Canadian federal electoral district, see Nunavut (electoral district). ... For the former United States territory, see Northwest Territory. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... This article is about the Canadian province. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the state. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Lake of the Woods from space, May 1998 Lake of the Woods. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... Ipperwash Beach, Lake Huron. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... Lake Ontario, bounded on the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south by Ontarios Niagara Peninsula and by New York State, USA, is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. ... a broat veiew of the St LAwrence River, with a Quebec City on a background The Saint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large south west-to-north east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Motto: Pro Patria Location of Cornwall in the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, Ontario Coordinates: , Country Province Founded 1784 Government  - Mayor Bob Kilger Population (2006)  - City 45,965 (Ranked 100)  - Metro 58,485   source: Statistics Canada Time zone EST (UTC-5)  - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4) Website: http... Canada consists of ten provinces and three territories. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ...


The capital of Ontario is Toronto, the largest city in Canada.[5] Ottawa, the capital of Canada, is located in Ontario as well. The 2006 Census counted 12,160,282 residents in Ontario, which accounted for 38.5% of the national population.[6] This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... The Canada 2006 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ...


The province takes its name from Lake Ontario, which is thought to be derived from ontarí:io, a Huron word meaning "great lake",[7] or possibly skanadario which means "beautiful water" in Iroquoian.[8] Along with New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Quebec, Ontario is one of the four original provinces of Canada when the nation was formed on July 1, 1867 by the British North America Act.[9] Lake Ontario, bounded on the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south by Ontarios Niagara Peninsula and by New York State, USA, is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. ... Wyandot is the Iroquoian language traditionally spoken by the people known variously as Wyandot, Wendat, or Huron. ... Iroquoian languages The Iroquoian languages are a Native American language family. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... This article is about the Canadian province. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The British North America Acts 1867–1975 are a series of Acts of the British Parliament dealing with the government of Canada. ...


Ontario is Canada's leading manufacturing province accounting for 52 per cent of the total national manufacturing shipments in 2004.[10]

Contents

Geography

Main article: Geography of Ontario
See also: List of Ontario counties
Evolution of the borders of Ontario

The province consists of four main geographical regions: Ontario is located in East/Central Canada, bordered by the Great Lakes, Hudson Bay and James bay. ... In the Canadian province of Ontario, there are three different types of census divisions: single-tier municipalities, upper-tier municipalities (of which can be regional municipalities or counties) and districts. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x864, 853 KB) Summary An animated GIF of the evolution of Canadas internal borders, from the formation of the dominion to the present. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x864, 853 KB) Summary An animated GIF of the evolution of Canadas internal borders, from the formation of the dominion to the present. ...

  • The thinly populated Canadian Shield in the northwestern and the central portions which covers over half the land area in the province, though mostly infertile land, it is rich in minerals and studded with lakes and rivers; sub-regions are Northwestern Ontario and Northeastern Ontario.
  • The virtually unpopulated Hudson Bay Lowlands in the extreme north and northeast, mainly swampy and sparsely forested; and
  • The temperate, and therefore most populous region, fertile Great Lakes-Saint Lawrence Valley in the south where agriculture and industry are concentrated. Southern Ontario is further sub-divided into four regions; Southwestern Ontario (parts of which formerly referred to as Western Ontario), Golden Horseshoe, Central Ontario (although not actually the province's geographic centre) and Eastern Ontario.

Despite the absence of any mountainous terrain in the province, there are large areas of uplands, particularly within the Canadian Shield which traverses the province from northwest to southeast and also above the Niagara Escarpment which crosses the south. The highest point is Ishpatina Ridge at 693 metres (2,270 ft) above sea level located in Temagami, Northeastern Ontario. Canadian Shield Canadian Shield Landform. ... For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ... Northwestern Ontario is the region within the Canadian province of Ontario which lies north and west of Lake Superior, and west of Hudson Bay and James Bay. ... Northeastern Ontario is the region within the Canadian province of Ontario which lies north and east of the Great Lakes. ... Southern Ontario is the portion of the Canadian province of Ontario lying south of the French River and Algonquin Park. ... Southwestern Ontario is a region of the Canadian province of Ontario, centred on the city of London. ... Hamilton, Ontario Skyline The skyline of Niagara Falls, Ontario side The Golden Horseshoe is a densely populated and industrialized region or urban agglomeration centred around the west end of Lake Ontario in Southern Ontario, Canada. ... Central Ontario is the portion of the Canadian province of Ontario which lies between Georgian Bay and the eastern end of Lake Ontario. ... Eastern Ontario is the region of the Canadian province of Ontario which lies in a wedge-shaped area between the Ottawa and St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 484 KB) Summary The Escarpment at Bruce Peninsula National Park - Photo by Shari Chambers www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 484 KB) Summary The Escarpment at Bruce Peninsula National Park - Photo by Shari Chambers www. ... Map of Southern Ontario showing Bruce Peninsula in red. ... Canadian Shield Canadian Shield Landform. ... Rattlesnake Point near Milton, Ontario. ... The Ishpatina Ridge is the highest point in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The term above mean sea level (AMSL) refers to the elevation (on the ground) or altitude (in the air) of any object, relative to the average sea level. ... Temagami is a town in northeastern Ontario, Canada, in the District of Nipissing on Lake Temagami. ...


The Carolinian forest zone covers most of the southwestern section, its northern extent is part of the Greater Toronto Area at the western end of Lake Ontario. The most well-known geographic feature is Niagara Falls, part of the much more extensive Niagara Escarpment. The Saint Lawrence Seaway allows navigation to and from the Atlantic Ocean as far inland as Thunder Bay in Northwestern Ontario. Northern Ontario occupies roughly 85% of the surface area of the province; conversely Southern Ontario contains 94% of the population (see article Geography of Canada). The Carolinian forest is a life zone in eastern North America characterized primarily by a predominance of deciduous, or broad-leaf trees. ... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... Lake Ontario, bounded on the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south by Ontarios Niagara Peninsula and by New York State, USA, is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... The Eisenhower Locks in Massena, NY. The St. ... Nickname: Motto: Superior by nature Location of Thunder Bay, Ontario Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario Region Northwestern Ontario District Thunder Bay District CMA Thunder Bay Settled 1679 as Fort Caministigoyan See histories of Port Arthur and Fort William Amalgamation 1 January 1970 Government [1][2]  - Type Municipal Government  - Mayor Lynn... Northwestern Ontario is the region within the Canadian province of Ontario which lies north and west of Lake Superior, and west of Hudson Bay and James Bay. ... Southern Ontario is the portion of the Canadian province of Ontario lying south of the French River and Algonquin Park. ... Continent North America Subregion Northern America Geographic coordinates Area  - Total  - Water Ranked 2nd 9,984,670 km² 891,163 km² (8. ...


Point Pelee National Park is a peninsula in southwestern Ontario (near Windsor, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan) that extends into Lake Erie and is the southernmost extent of Canada's mainland. Pelee Island and Middle Island in Lake Erie extend slightly farther. All are south of 42°N – slightly farther south than the northern border of California. Point Pelee National Park is a park in Essex County in southwestern Ontario, Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ... Detroit redirects here. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... Pelee Island. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Demographics

Estimated population of Ontario : 12,541,400 (2005 est) Precentage of National Population : 38. ...

Population of Ontario since 1851

Year Population Five-year
% change
Ten-year
% change
Rank among
provinces
1851 952,004 n/a 208.8 1
1861 1,396,091 n/a 46.6 1
1871 1,620,851 n/a 16.1 1
1881 1,926,922 n/a 18.9 1
1891 2,114,321 n/a 9.7 1
1901 2,182,947 n/a 3.2 1
1911 2,527,292 n/a 15.8 1
1921 2,933,662 n/a 16.1 1
1931 3,431,683 n/a 17.0 1
1941 3,787,655 n/a 10.3 1
1951 4,597,542 n/a 21.4 1
1956 5,404,933 17.6 n/a 1
1961 6,236,092 15.4 35.6 1
1966 6,960,870 11.6 28.8 1
1971 7,703,105 10.7 23.5 1
1976 8,264,465 7.3 18.7 1
1981 8,625,107 4.4 12.0 1
1986 9,101,695 5.5 10.1 1
1991 10,084,885 10.8 16.9 1
1996 10,753,573 6.6 18.1 1
2001 11,410,046 6.1 13.1 1
2006* 12,160,282 6.6 13.1 1

*2006 Census.[6] Source: Statistics Canada[11][12][13] Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ...


Ethnic groups

Visible minorities of Ontario in 2001.
Visible minorities of Ontario in 2001.
Ethnic Responses %
Total population 11,285,545 100
Canadian 3,350,275 29.7
English 2,711,485 24
Scottish 1,843,110 16.3
Irish 1,761,280 15.6
French 1,235,765 10.9
German 965,510 8.6
Italian 781,345 6.9
Chinese 518,550 4.6
Dutch (Netherlands) 436,035 3.9
East Indian 413,415 3.7
Polish 386,050 3.4
Ukrainian 290,925 2.6
North American Indian 248,940 2.2
Portuguese 248,265 2.2
Jewish 196,260 1.7
Jamaican 180,810 1.6
Filipino 165,025 1.5
Spanish (Latin America) 147,140 1.3
Welsh 142,740 1.3
Hungarian (Magyar) 128,575 1.1
Greek 120,635 1.0
Russian 106,710 0.9
American (USA) 86,855 0.8
Serbian 78,230 0.7
British, not included
elsewhere
76,415 0.7
Vietnamese 67,450 0.6
Finnish 64,105 0.6
Croatian 62,325 0.6
Métis 60,535 0.5
Lebanese 59,155 0.5

The information regarding ethnicities above is from the 2001 Canadian Census.[14][15] The percentages add to more than 100% because of dual responses (e.g. "French-Canadian" generates an entry in both the category "French" and the category "Canadian"). Groups with greater than 200,000 responses are included. The majority of Ontarians are of British (English, Scottish, Welsh) and Irish ancestry. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (827x636, 14 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (827x636, 14 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Visible minorities are persons who are not of the majority race in a given population. ... Main articles: History of Canada, Timeline of Canadian history Canada has been inhabited by aboriginal peoples (known in Canada as First Nations) for at least 40,000 years. ... English Canadian is a term that usually refers to the English-speaking majority population of Canada, most often contrasted with French Canadian. ... A large portion of the Canadian population are of Scottish ancestry and they have had a large impact on Canadian culture from colonial times. ... Irish Canadians are immigrants and descendants of immigrants who origninated in Ireland. ... Canadiens redirects here. ... German-Canadians are those Canadians of German decent. ... Italian-Canadians are Canadians of Italian descent. ... Dutch Canadians are Canadians of Dutch ancestry. ... // Indo-Canadians are Canadians whose origin traces back to the nation of India. ... if (window. ... A Ukrainian Canadian is a person of Ukrainian descent or origin who was born in or immigrated to Canada. ... First Nations is a term of ethnicity that refers to the indigenous peoples in what is now Canada who are neither Inuit nor Métis people. ... // History of Portuguese in Canada During the 1950s, a large number of immigrants from the Azores, fleeing political conflict with the regime of António de Oliveira Salazar, moved into the area and further west along Dundas Street. ... Canadian Jews constitute the worlds fourth largest Jewish population. ... Spanish speaking minority of Canadian residents, primarily from Argentina, El Salvador , Mexico, and Chile. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Notable Hungarian Canadians People Dan Sandor - candidate for Toronto city council Andrew Telegdi - liberal MP Waterloo 1993- Alanis Morissette - musician Elvira Kurt - comedian Andrew Feldmár - psychologist Lorand Fenyves - violinist Anna Porter George Vari Peter Munk Paul Reichmann George Faludy Robert Lantos George Jonas Categories: | | ... A Greek-Canadian is a citizen of Canada who has significant Greek heritage. ... A Russian Canadian is a citizen or permanent resident of Canada who is from Russia or has Russian descent. ... According to the Canada 2001 Census, 250,005 Canadians reported American as being their ethnicity, at least partially. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Finnish-Canadians are Canadians of Finnish descent, who according to the 2001 census number over 114 000. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mestizo. ... The are some 143,000 Lebanese-Canadians, making them by far the largest group of Arab-Canadians. ... The Canada 2001 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ...


The major religious groups in Ontario, as of 2001, are:[16]

Religion in Ontario in 2001.
Religion in Ontario in 2001.[15]
Religion People %
Total 11,285,535 100
Protestant 3,935,745 34.9
Catholic 3,911,760 34.7
No Religion 1,841,290 16.3
Muslim 352,530 3.1
Other Christians 301,935 2.7
Christian Orthodox 264,055 2.3
Hindu 217,555 1.9
Jewish 190,795 1.7
Buddhist 128,320 1.1
Sikh 104,785 0.9
Eastern Religions 17,780 0.2
Other Religions 18,985 0.2

Source: Statistics Canada[17] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (901x559, 12 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (901x559, 12 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ...


The vast majority of Ontarians are of British or other European descent. Slightly less than five percent of the population of Ontario is Franco-Ontarian, that is those whose native tongue is French, although those with French ancestry account for 11% of the population. Whites redirects here. ... Franco-Ontarians (French: Franco-ontarien) are French Canadian or francophone residents of the Canadian province of Ontario. ...


Immigration is a huge population growth force in Ontario as it has been over the last two centuries, in relation to natural increase or inter-provincial migration. More recent sources of immigrants with already large or growing communities in Ontario include Caribbeans (Jamaicans, Trinidadians, Guyanese), South Asians (for example, Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis and Sri Lankans), East Asians (mostly Chinese and Filipinos), Central/South Americans (such as Colombians, Mexicans, Hondurans, Argentinans, and Ecuadorians), Eastern Europeans such as Russians and Bosnians, and groups from Iran, Somalia and Western Africa. Most groups have settled in the Greater Toronto area. A smaller number have settled in other cities such as London, Kitchener, Hamilton, Windsor, and Ottawa. Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... West Indies redirects here. ... Jamaica is a country in the Caribbean Sea, located south of Cuba and to the west of Hispaniola, on which Haiti and the Dominican Republic are situated. ... Trinidad (Spanish, Trinity) most commonly refers to the larger island of the nation Trinidad and Tobago, the subject of this article. ... The Co-operative Republic of Guyana is a nation along the northern coastline of South America. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... The United Mexican States or Mexico (Spanish: Estados Unidos Mexicanos or México; regarding the use of the variant spelling Méjico, see section The name below) is a country located in North America, bordered to the north by the United States of America, to the southeast by Guatemala and Belize, to... Argentine redirects here. ... Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR... West Africa is the region of western Africa generally considered to include these countries: Benin Burkina Faso Cameroon Côte dIvoire (Ivory Coast) Equatorial Guinea Gabon The Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Republic of the Congo (Congo-Brazzaville) Senegal Sierra Leone Togo Chad, Mauritania, and... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ... , The City of Kitchener (IPA ) is a city in southwestern Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Location in the province of Ontario, Canada Coordinates: , Country Province Incorporated June 9, 1846[1] Government  - Mayor Fred Eisenberger  - City Council Hamilton City Council  - MPs List of MPs Dean Allison Chris Charlton David Christopherson Wayne Marston David Sweet  - MPPs List of MPPs Sophia Aggelonitis Andrea... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ...


Largest Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) by population

Statistics Canada's measure of a "metro area", the Census Metropolitan Area (CMA) roughly bundles together population figures from the core municipality with those from "commuter" municipalities.[18] (See also: Golden Horseshoe and Windsor-Detroit.) Hamilton, Ontario Skyline The skyline of Niagara Falls, Ontario side The Golden Horseshoe is a densely populated and industrialized region or urban agglomeration centred around the west end of Lake Ontario in Southern Ontario, Canada. ... View from Ouellette Avenue in Windsor across the river to Detroits Guardian and Penobscot Building cityscape. ...

CMA (largest other included municipalities in brackets) 2006 2001
Toronto CMA (Region of Peel, Region of York, City of Pickering) 5,813,149 4,682,897
Ottawa–Gatineau CMA (Clarence-Rockland, Russell Township)* 1,130,761* 1,067,800*
Hamilton CMA (Burlington, Grimsby) 692,911 662,401
London CMA (St. Thomas, Strathroy-Caradoc) 457,720 435,600
Kitchener CMA (Cambridge, Waterloo) 451,235 414,284
St. Catharines–Niagara CMA (Niagara Falls, Welland) 390,317 377,009
Oshawa CMA (Whitby, Clarington) 330,594 296,298
Windsor CMA (Lakeshore, LaSalle) 323,342 307,877
Barrie CA (Innisfil, Springwater) 177,061 148,480
Sudbury CMA (Whitefish Lake & Wanapitei Reserves) 158,258 155,601
Kingston CMA 152,358 146,838

*Parts of Quebec (including Gatineau) are included in the Ottawa CMA. The entire population of the Ottawa CMA, in both provinces, is shown. Clarence-Rockland and Russell Township are not the second and third largest municipalities in the entire CMA, they are the largest municipalities in the Ontario section of the CMA. This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Location in the province of Ontario, Canada Coordinates: , Country Province Incorporated June 9, 1846[1] Government  - Mayor Fred Eisenberger  - City Council Hamilton City Council  - MPs List of MPs Dean Allison Chris Charlton David Christopherson Wayne Marston David Sweet  - MPPs List of MPPs Sophia Aggelonitis Andrea... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ... , The City of Kitchener (IPA ) is a city in southwestern Ontario, Canada. ... St. ... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ... For the electoral district, see Barrie (electoral district). ... Nickname: Motto: Aedificemus (Latin for Come, let us build together) Coordinates: , Country Province Established 1893 (as Sudbury)   2001 (as Greater Sudbury) Government  - Mayor John Rodriguez  - Governing Body Greater Sudbury City Council  - MPs Raymond Bonin (LPC), Diane Marleau (LPC)  - MPPs Rick Bartolucci (OLP), Shelley Martel (NDP) Area  - City 3,200 km... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel Kingston, Ontario, the first capital[1] of Canada, is located at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, where the lake runs into the St. ... Motto: Fortunae meae, multorum faber[1] Location of Gatineau in Quebec, Canada Coordinates: , Country  Canada Province  Quebec Administrative Region Outaouais Amalgamated 2002 Government  - Mayor Marc Bureau  - Governing body Gatineau City Council  - MPs Lawrence Cannon, Richard Nadeau, Marcel Proulx  - MNAs Roch Cholette, Stéphanie Vallée, Charlotte LÉcuyer, Norman MacMillan...


Ten largest municipalities by population[6]

Municipality 2006 2001 1996
Toronto (provincial capital) &&&&&&&&02503281.&&&&&02,503,281 &&&&&&&&02481494.&&&&&02,481,494 &&&&&&&&02385421.&&&&&02,385,421
Ottawa (national capital) &&&&&&&&&0812129.&&&&&0812,129 &&&&&&&&&0774072.&&&&&0774,072 &&&&&&&&&0721136.&&&&&0721,136
Mississauga (part of the Greater Toronto Area) &&&&&&&&&0668549.&&&&&0668,549 &&&&&&&&&0612925.&&&&&0612,925 &&&&&&&&&0544382.&&&&&0544,382
Hamilton &&&&&&&&&0504559.&&&&&0504,559 &&&&&&&&&0490268.&&&&&0490,268 &&&&&&&&&0467799.&&&&&0467,799
Brampton (part of the Greater Toronto Area) &&&&&&&&&0433806.&&&&&0433,806 &&&&&&&&&0325428.&&&&&0325,428 &&&&&&&&&0268251.&&&&&0268,251
London &&&&&&&&&0352395.&&&&&0352,395 &&&&&&&&&0336539.&&&&&0336,539 &&&&&&&&&0325669.&&&&&0325,669
Markham (part of the Greater Toronto Area) &&&&&&&&&0261573.&&&&&0261,573 &&&&&&&&&0208615.&&&&&0208,615 &&&&&&&&&0173383.&&&&&0173,383
Vaughan (part of the Greater Toronto Area) &&&&&&&&&0238866.&&&&&0238,866 &&&&&&&&&0182022.&&&&&0182,022 &&&&&&&&&0132549.&&&&&0132,549
Windsor &&&&&&&&&0216473.&&&&&0216,473 &&&&&&&&&0209218.&&&&&0209,218 &&&&&&&&&0197694.&&&&&0197,694
Kitchener &&&&&&&&&0204668.&&&&&0204,668 &&&&&&&&&0190399.&&&&&0190,399 &&&&&&&&&0178420.&&&&&0178,420

This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... For the First Nation, see Mississaugas. ... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Location in the province of Ontario, Canada Coordinates: , Country Province Incorporated June 9, 1846[1] Government  - Mayor Fred Eisenberger  - City Council Hamilton City Council  - MPs List of MPs Dean Allison Chris Charlton David Christopherson Wayne Marston David Sweet  - MPPs List of MPPs Sophia Aggelonitis Andrea... Nickname: Location in the Region of Peel, in the Province of Ontario Coordinates: , Country Province Region Peel Incorporation 1853 (village)   1873 (town)   1974 (city) Government  - Mayor Susan Fennell  - Governing Body Brampton City Council (click for members)  - MPs Navdeep Bains, Colleen Beaumier, Ruby Dhalla, Gurbax Malhi  - MPPs Vic Dhillon, Linda Jeffrey... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ... Map showing Markhams location in York Region Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario Regional Municipality York Region Communities Buttonville, Thornhill, German Mills, Milliken, Unionville Settled 1794 Incorporated 1972 (town) Government  - Mayor Frank Scarpitti  - Deputy Mayor Jim Jones  - Regional Councillors Jack Heath, Tony Wong, Gordon Landon  - MPs Susan Kadis (LPC) - Thornhill... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... Motto: The City above Toronto Vaughans location in York Region. ... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ... , The City of Kitchener (IPA ) is a city in southwestern Ontario, Canada. ...

Climate

Enjoying summer at Sandbanks Provincial Park on Lake Ontario.
Enjoying summer at Sandbanks Provincial Park on Lake Ontario.

Ontario has three main climatic regions. Most of Southwestern Ontario, plus the lower parts of the Golden Horseshoe, has a moderate humid continental climate (Koppen climate classification Dfa), similar to that of the inland Mid-Atlantic States and the lower Great Lakes portion of the U.S. Midwest. The region has hot, humid summers and cold winters. It is considered a temperate climate when compared with most of Canada. In the summer, the air masses often come out of the southern United States, as the stronger the Bermuda High Pressure ridges into the North American continent, the more warm, humid air is drawn northward from the Gulf of Mexico. Throughout the year, but especially in the fall and winter, temperatures are moderated somewhat by the lower Great Lakes, making it considerably milder than the rest of the provinces and allowing for a longer growing season than areas at similar latitudes in the continent's interior. Both spring and fall are generally pleasantly mild, with cool nights. Annual precipitation ranges from 750 mm (30 inches) to 1000 mm (40 inches) and is well distributed throughout the year with a summer peak. Most of this region lies in the lee of the Great Lakes and receive less snow than any other part of Ontario. Image File history File links Lake_Ontario_-_Sandbanks_Provincial_Park_2001. ... Image File history File links Lake_Ontario_-_Sandbanks_Provincial_Park_2001. ... Sandbanks Provincial Park The Sandbanks Provincial Park is a park at the Lake Ontario in Canada. ... Hamilton, Ontario Skyline The skyline of Niagara Falls, Ontario side The Golden Horseshoe is a densely populated and industrialized region or urban agglomeration centred around the west end of Lake Ontario in Southern Ontario, Canada. ... The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ...

The Thames river in London, Ontario.
The Thames river in London, Ontario.

The more northern and windward parts of Southern Ontario, plus all of Central and Eastern Ontario and the southern parts of Northern Ontario, have a more severe humid continental climate (Koppen Dfb). This region has warm to hot summers (although somewhat shorter than in Southwestern Ontario) with cold and somewhat longer winters and a shorter growing season. The southern parts of this region lie at the windward side of the lakes, primarily Lake Huron. The Great Lakes also have a moderating effect for shoreline areas. However, the open lakes frequently result in lake effect snow squalls on the eastern and southern shores of the lakes, that affect much of the Georgian Bay shoreline including Killarney, Parry Sound, Muskoka and Simcoe County; the Lake Huron shore from east of Sarnia northward to the Bruce Peninsula, sometimes reaching London. Wind-whipped snow squalls or lake effect snow can affect areas as far as 100 kilometres (62 miles) or greater from the shore, but the heaviest snows usually occur within 20 kilometres (12 miles) from the shoreline. Some snowbelt areas receive an annual average of well over 300 cm (120 inches) of snow annually. Image File history File linksMetadata LondonOntarioSkyline. ... Image File history File linksMetadata LondonOntarioSkyline. ... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ... Ipperwash Beach, Lake Huron. ... Lake-effect precipitation coming off the Great Lakes, as seen from NEXRAD. Lake effect snow, which can be a type of snowsquall, is produced in the winter when cold, artic dry winds move across long expanses of warmer lake water, picking up water vapor which freezes and is deposited on... Georgian Bay (French: baie Georgienne) is a large bay of Lake Huron, located in Ontario, Canada. ... Killarney, Ontario is a town located on the northern shore of Georgian Bay in the Sudbury District. ... Parry Sound District is a census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The Muskoka District Municipality, more generally referred to as the District of Muskoka, or simply Muskoka (the official name is the District Municipality of Muskoka) is a Regional Municipality located in Central Ontario. ... Simcoe is a county located in central Ontario, originally established as Simcoe District in 1843 by the Legislature of Upper Canada[1]. According to Statistics Canada (2006), the population is 422,204. ... Ipperwash Beach, Lake Huron. ... Sarnia is a city in Southwestern Ontario, Canada (city population 71,419, census area population 88,793, in 2006). ... Map of Southern Ontario showing Bruce Peninsula in red. ... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ...


The northernmost parts of Ontario - primarily north of 50°N - have a subarctic climate (Koppen Dfc) with long, very cold winters and short, warm summers and dramatic temperature changes from time to time. In the summer, hot weather occasionally reaches even the northernmost parts of Ontario, although humidity is generally lower than in the south. With no major mountain ranges blocking Arctic air masses, winters are generally very cold, especially in the far north and northwest where temperatures below -40 °C (-40 °F) are not uncommon. The snow stays on the ground much longer in the region as opposed to any other regions of Ontario; it is not uncommon to see snow on the ground from October to May here. Regions having a subarctic climate (also called boreal climate) are characterized by long, usually very cold winters, and brief, warm summers. ...


Severe thunderstorms peak in frequency in June and July in most of the province, although in Southern Ontario they can occur at any time from March to November due to the collision of colder, Arctic air and warm, often moist Gulf air. In summer they form from convective heating. These storms tend to be more isolated in nature than those associated with frontal activity. Derecho-type thunderstorms can also occur in summer, often nocturnally, bringing severe straight-line winds over wide areas. These storms usually develop along stationary frontal boundaries during hot weather periods and most areas of the province can be struck. Only the Hudson/James Bay Lowlands region rarely experience one. The regions most prone to severe weather are Southwestern and Central Ontario, due to the effect of the localized Lake Breeze Front.[19] London has the most lightning strikes per year in Canada, and is also one of the most active areas in the country for storms. Tornadoes are common throughout the province, especially in the southwestern/south-central parts, although they are rarely destructive (the vast majority are classified as F0 or F1 on the Fujita Scale). In Northern Ontario, some tornadoes go undetected by ground spotters due to the sparse population; they are often discovered after the fact by aircraft pilots, who observe from the air the sections of destroyed forest left by them. A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... A derecho is a widespread and long-lived, violent convectively induced windstorm that is associated with a fast-moving band of severe thunderstorms usually taking the form of a bow echo. ... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... F-scale redirects here. ...


Economy

One London Place, in London, Ontario, is the tallest office tower in Ontario outside of the Greater Toronto Area.
One London Place, in London, Ontario, is the tallest office tower in Ontario outside of the Greater Toronto Area.
The CN Tower in Toronto has the highest public observation level on Earth.
The CN Tower in Toronto has the highest public observation level on Earth.
Main article: Economy of Ontario

Ontario's rivers, including its share of the Niagara River, make it rich in hydroelectric energy.[20] Since the privatization of Ontario Hydro which began in 1999, Ontario Power Generation runs 85% of electricity generated in the province, of which 41% is nuclear, 30% is hydroelectric and 29% is fossil fuel derived. OPG is not however responsible for the transmission of power, which is under the control of Hydro One. Despite its diverse range of power options, problems related to increasing consumption, lack of energy efficiency and aging nuclear reactors, Ontario has been forced in recent years to purchase power from its neighbours, Quebec and Michigan to supplement its power needs during peak consumption periods. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (605x807, 91 KB)One London Place, London, Ontario, photo by Jay Smith Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (605x807, 91 KB)One London Place, London, Ontario, photo by Jay Smith Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... One London Place is an office tower located in London, Ontario, Canada. ... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (533x800, 328 KB) Summary Setting the free standing, land record for the worlds tallest structure, measuring 553. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (533x800, 328 KB) Summary Setting the free standing, land record for the worlds tallest structure, measuring 553. ... This article is about the CN Tower in Toronto. ... The Toronto-Dominion Centre in Toronto The Economy of Ontario is a rich and diversified economy. ... Satellite image of the Niagara River. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario was established in 1906 by the provincial Power Commission Act to build transmission lines to supply municipal utilities with electricity generated by private companies already operating at Niagara Falls. ... Ontario Power Generation (OPG) is a public company whose shares are wholly owned by the Government of Ontario. ... Hydro One Incorporated delivers electricity across the Canadian province of Ontario. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


An abundance of natural resources, excellent transportation links to the American heartland and the inland Great Lakes making ocean access possible via ship containers, have all contributed to making manufacturing the principal industry, found mainly in the Golden Horseshoe region which is the largest industrialized area in Canada. Important products include motor vehicles, iron, steel, food, electrical appliances, machinery, chemicals, and paper. Ontario surpassed Michigan in car production, assembling 2.696 million vehicles in 2004 (see Canada-United States Automotive Agreement). Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... Hamilton, Ontario Skyline The skyline of Niagara Falls, Ontario side The Golden Horseshoe is a densely populated and industrialized region or urban agglomeration centred around the west end of Lake Ontario in Southern Ontario, Canada. ... Vehicles are non-living means of transport. ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... Car redirects here. ... The Canada-United States Automotive Agreement more commonly known as the Auto Pact was an important trade agreement between Canada and the United States. ...


However, as a result of steeply declining sales, on November 21, 2005, General Motors announced massive layoffs at production facilities across North America including two large GM plants in Oshawa and a drive train facility in St. Catharines which by 2008 will result in 8,000 job losses in Ontario alone. Subsequently in January 23, 2006 money losing Ford Motor Co. announced between 25,000 and 30,000 layoffs phased until 2012, Ontario was spared the worst, but job losses were announced for the St. Thomas facility and the Windsor casting plant. However, these losses will be offset by Ford's recent announcement of a hybrid vehicle facility slated to begin production in 2007 at its Oakville plant and GM's re-introduction of the Camaro which will be produced in Oshawa. Toyota also announced plans to build a new plant in Woodstock by 2008, and Honda also has plans to add an engine plant at its facility in Alliston. is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... Nickname: Motto: Industry and Liberality Location of St. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Ford” redirects here. ... St. ... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ... Oakville (2006 population 165,613[2]) is a town on Lake Ontario in southern Ontario, Canada, midway between Toronto (about 31 km or 19 mi away) on its eastern border and Hamilton (about 20 km or 12 mi away) from its western border. ... Modified 1969 Chevrolet Camaro. ... This article is about the automaker. ... Woodstock (2005 population: 34,000) is a city and the county seat of Oxford County in southwestern Ontario, Canada. ... This article is about the Japanese motor corporation. ... Alliston, Ontario is an Ontario community just about 90 kilometers NNW from Toronto, and about 40 km SW of Barrie, about 18 km W of Cookstown, about 10 km N of Tottenham, about 40 km NE of Orangeville and about 30 km E of Shelburne. ...

Toronto: Ontario's capital city and Canada's largest metropolis.
Toronto: Ontario's capital city and Canada's largest metropolis.
Niagara Falls is a major tourist attraction in Ontario as well as a huge supplier of hydroelectric energy for the province.
Niagara Falls is a major tourist attraction in Ontario as well as a huge supplier of hydroelectric energy for the province.

Toronto, the capital of Ontario, is the centre of Canada's financial services and banking industry. Suburban cities in the Greater Toronto Area like Brampton, Mississauga and Vaughan are large product distribution centres, in addition to having manufacturing industries. The information technology sector is also important, particularly in Markham, Waterloo and Ottawa. Hamilton is the largest steel manufacturing city in Canada and Sarnia is a centre for petrochemical production. Construction employs at least 7% of the work force, but due to undocumented workers, the figure is likely over 10%. This sector has thrived over the last ten years due to steadily increasing new house and condominium construction combined with low mortgage rates and climbing prices, particularly in the Greater Toronto area. Mining and the forest products industry, notably pulp and paper, are vital to the economy of Northern Ontario. More than any other region, tourism contributes heavily to the economy of Central Ontario, peaking during the summer months owing to the abundance of fresh water recreation and wilderness found there in reasonable proximity to the major urban centres. At other times of the year, hunting, skiing and snowmobiling are among the out of high-season draws. This region has some of the most vibrant fall colour displays anywhere on the continent and tours directed at overseas visitors are organized to see them. Tourism also plays a key role in border cities with large casinos, among them Windsor, Rama, and Niagara Falls which attract many US visitors. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 606 KB) Toronto Downtown Core, at nite from CN Tower Author: Scott Wilkinson Date: 2004/10/04 File links The following pages link to this file: Ontario Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 606 KB) Toronto Downtown Core, at nite from CN Tower Author: Scott Wilkinson Date: 2004/10/04 File links The following pages link to this file: Ontario Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x750, 321 KB) Summary An aerial overview of Niagara Falls taken from 3,500 ft. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x750, 321 KB) Summary An aerial overview of Niagara Falls taken from 3,500 ft. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... Nickname: Location in the Region of Peel, in the Province of Ontario Coordinates: , Country Province Region Peel Incorporation 1853 (village)   1873 (town)   1974 (city) Government  - Mayor Susan Fennell  - Governing Body Brampton City Council (click for members)  - MPs Navdeep Bains, Colleen Beaumier, Ruby Dhalla, Gurbax Malhi  - MPPs Vic Dhillon, Linda Jeffrey... Motto: Pride in our past, Faith in our future Area: 288. ... Motto: The City above Toronto Vaughans location in York Region. ... Information and communication technology spending in 2005 Information technology (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), is the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. ... Map showing Markhams location in York Region Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario Regional Municipality York Region Communities Buttonville, Thornhill, German Mills, Milliken, Unionville Settled 1794 Incorporated 1972 (town) Government  - Mayor Frank Scarpitti  - Deputy Mayor Jim Jones  - Regional Councillors Jack Heath, Tony Wong, Gordon Landon  - MPs Susan Kadis (LPC) - Thornhill... , Waterloo, Ontario, Canada is the smallest of the three cities in the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, and is adjacent to the larger city of Kitchener. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Location in the province of Ontario, Canada Coordinates: , Country Province Incorporated June 9, 1846[1] Government  - Mayor Fred Eisenberger  - City Council Hamilton City Council  - MPs List of MPs Dean Allison Chris Charlton David Christopherson Wayne Marston David Sweet  - MPPs List of MPPs Sophia Aggelonitis Andrea... Sarnia is a city in Southwestern Ontario, Canada (city population 71,419, census area population 88,793, in 2006). ... For other uses, see Construction (disambiguation). ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... The pulp and paper industry is one of the most important in Canada. ... Northern Ontario is the part of the province of Ontario, Canada, which lies north of Lake Huron, Georgian Bay, the French River and Lake Nipissing. ... Central Ontario is the portion of the Canadian province of Ontario which lies between Georgian Bay and the eastern end of Lake Ontario. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... A snowmobile tour at Yellowstone National Park (NPS Photo) A snowmobile is a land vehicle propelled by one or two rubber tracks, with skis for steering. ... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ... Rama is the Ontario, Canada home of the Chippewas of Rama Mnjikaning First Nation and Casino Rama. ... Skyline of Niagara Falls, Canada, as seen from Niagara Falls State Park across the river. ...


Further economic information on the provincial economy can be found at Ontario Facts.[21]


Agriculture

Once the dominant industry, agriculture occupies a small percentage of the population. The number of farms has decreased from 68,633 in 1991 to 59,728 in 2001, but farms have increased in average size and many are becoming more mechanized. Cattle, small grains and dairy were the common types of farms in the 2001 census. The fruit, grape and vegetable growing industry is located primarily on the Niagara Peninsula and along Lake Erie, where tobacco farms are also situated. Tobacco production has decreased leading to an increase in some other new crop alternatives gaining popularity, such as Hazelnuts and Ginseng. The Ontario origins of Massey-Ferguson Ltd., once one of the largest farm implement manufacturers in the world, indicate the importance agriculture once had to the Canadian economy (see Geography of Canada for more detail). "Southern Ontario 's limited supply of agricultural land is going out of production at an increasing rate. Urban sprawl and farmland severances contribute to the loss of thousands of acres of productive agricultural land in Ontario each year. Over 2000 farms and 150,000 acres (610 km²) of farmland in the GTA alone were lost to production in the two decades between 1976 and 1996. This loss represented approximately 18% of Ontario 's Class 1 farmland being converted to urban purposes. In addition, increasing rural severances provide ever-greater interference with agricultural production". A dairy farm near Oxford, New York in the United States. ... Map of Southern Ontario showing Niagara Peninsula in red The Niagara Peninsula is the portion of Ontario, Canada lying on the south shore of Lake Ontario. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... Binomial name Corylus avellana L. The Common Hazel (Corylus avellana) is a shrub native to Europe and Asia. ... Species Subgenus Panax Section Panax Series Notoginseng Panax notoginseng Series Panax Panax bipinnatifidus Panax ginseng Panax japonicus Panax quinquefolius Panax vietnamensis Panax wangianus Panax zingiberensis Section Pseudoginseng Panax pseudoginseng Panax stipuleanatus Subgenus Trifolius Panax trifolius Ginseng field in Wisconsin Ginseng refers to species within Panax, a genus of 11 species... A Massey Ferguson MF 135. ... Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... Continent North America Subregion Northern America Geographic coordinates Area  - Total  - Water Ranked 2nd 9,984,670 km² 891,163 km² (8. ...


Transportation

Historically, the province has used two major east-west routes, both starting from Montreal in the neighbouring province of Quebec. The northerly route, which was pioneered by early French-speaking fur traders, travels northwest from Montreal along the Ottawa River, then continues westward towards Manitoba. Major cities on or near the route include Ottawa, North Bay, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, and Thunder Bay. The much more heavily travelled southerly route, which was driven by growth in predominantly English-speaking settlements originated by the United Empire Loyalists and later other European immigrants, travels southwest from Montreal along the St. Lawrence River, Lake Ontario, and Lake Erie before entering the United States in Michigan. Major cities on or near the route include Kingston, Oshawa, Toronto, Mississauga, Kitchener/Waterloo, London, Sarnia, and Windsor. Most of Ontario's major transportation infrastructure is oriented east-west and roughly follows one of these two original routes. Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This is about the river in Canada. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... North Bay (, time zone EST) is a city in Northeastern Ontario, Canada (2006 population 53,966). ... Greater Sudbury (2001 census population 155,219) is a city in Northern Ontario. ... Nickname: Motto: Naturally Gifted Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario District Algoma District Incorporated 1887 (town), 1912 (city) Government  - City Mayor John Rowswell  - Governing body The Corporation of the City of Sault Sainte Marie  - MPs Tony Martin  - MPPs David Orazietti Area  - City  276 sq mi (715 km²) Elevation  630 ft (192... Nickname: Motto: Superior by nature Location of Thunder Bay, Ontario Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario Region Northwestern Ontario District Thunder Bay District CMA Thunder Bay Settled 1679 as Fort Caministigoyan See histories of Port Arthur and Fort William Amalgamation 1 January 1970 Government [1][2]  - Type Municipal Government  - Mayor Lynn... The name United Empire Loyalists is given to those American Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies as an act of fealty to King George III after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War. ... The European peoples are the various nations and ethnic groups of Europe. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Lake Ontario, bounded on the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south by Ontarios Niagara Peninsula and by New York State, USA, is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel Kingston, Ontario, the first capital[1] of Canada, is located at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, where the lake runs into the St. ... Oshawa (estimated 2004 population 150 000; metropolitan population 296 298) is a city on Lake Ontario located approximately 60 km east of downtown Toronto in Ontario, Canada. ... For the First Nation, see Mississaugas. ... , The City of Kitchener (IPA ) is a city in southwestern Ontario, Canada. ... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ... Sarnia is a city in Southwestern Ontario, Canada (city population 71,419, census area population 88,793, in 2006). ... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ...


Road transportation

Highway 401, running 817.9 km east/northeast from Windsor to the Quebec border is one of the busiest highways in the world.
Highway 401, running 817.9 km east/northeast from Windsor to the Quebec border is one of the busiest highways in the world.[22][23]

400-Series Highways make up the primary vehicular network in the south of province and they connect to numerous border crossings with the US, the busiest being the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel and Ambassador Bridge (via Highway 401) and the Blue Water Bridge (via Highway 402). The primary highway along the southern route is Highway 401, the busiest highway in North America[22][23] and the backbone of Ontario's road network, tourism, and economy,[22][23] while the primary highway across the northern route is Highway 417 /Highway 17, part of the Trans-Canada Highway. Highway 400/Highway 69 connects Toronto to Northern Ontario. Other provincial highways and regional roads inter-connect the remainder of the province. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x771, 78 KB)Highway 401 west of the Don Valley Parkway/Highway 404 junction. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x771, 78 KB)Highway 401 west of the Don Valley Parkway/Highway 404 junction. ... This article is about the Ontario 400-series highway. ... The 400-series Highway network in Southern Ontario. ... The Detroit-Windsor Tunnel connects Detroit, Michigan in the United States, with Windsor, Ontario in Canada. ... The Ambassador Bridge is a privately owned suspension bridge that connects Detroit, Michigan, in the United States, with Windsor, Ontario, in Canada. ... This article is about the Ontario 400-series highway. ... The newer Blue Water Bridge is in the foreground, the older bridge is behind. ... Highway 402 as part of the 400-series network Highway 402 is a 400-Series Highway in southwestern Ontario, Canada that runs 103 km (64 miles) from the Blue Water Bridge in Point Edward (a suburb of Sarnia) and Highway 401 in London. ... Highway 401 redirects here. ... Highway 417 is a 400-series highway in Ontario. ... Highway 17 is a route of the Trans-Canada Highway through Ontario, Canada. ... For the Boards of Canada record, see Trans Canada Highway (EP). ... The Kings Highway 400, more commonly known as Highway 400 or the 400, is a key north-south 400-Series Highway in the Canadian province of Ontario that links the city of Toronto to the central and northern sections of the province. ... Highway 69 is a major north-south highway in Central and Northern Ontario, linking Sudbury with Highway 400 in Parry Sound. ... This is a list of provincial highways in Ontario, Canada. ...


Water transportation

The St. Lawrence Seaway, which extends across most of the southern portion of the province and connects to the Atlantic Ocean, is the primary water transportation route for cargo, particularly iron ore and grain. In the past, the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River were also a major passenger transportation route, but over the past half century they have been nearly totally supplanted by vehicle, rail, and air travel. There was previously a ferry connecting Toronto with Rochester, New York. The Saint Lawrence Seaway in its broadest sense (see Great Lakes Waterway) is the system of canals that permits ocean-going vessels to travel from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes as far as Lake Superior. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ...


Rail transportation

The O-Train, Ottawa's light rail train system (LRT).
The O-Train, Ottawa's light rail train system (LRT).

Via Rail operates the inter-regional passenger train service on the Quebec City-Windsor Corridor, along with "The Canadian", a transcontinental rail service from Toronto to Vancouver. Additionally, Amtrak rail connects Ontario with key New York cities including Buffalo, Albany, and New York. Ontario Northland provides rail service to destinations as far north as Moosonee near James Bay, connecting them with the south. Freight rail is dominated by the founding cross-country CN and CP rail companies, which during the 1990s sold many short rail lines from their vast network to private companies operating mostly in the south. Regional Commuter rail is limited to the provincially owned GO Transit, which serves a train/bus network spanning the Golden Horseshoe region, its hub in Toronto. The TTC in Toronto operates the province's only subway and streetcar system, one of the busiest in North America. Outside of Toronto, the O-Train LRT line operates in Ottawa with expansion of the line and proposals for additional lines. O-train File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... O-train File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The O-Train at Carleton University. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... VIA Rails trains travelling by Highway 401 near Brockville, Ontario. ... The 1,150-kilometre Quebec City-Windsor Corridor is the most densely-populated and heavily-industrialised region of Canada. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... See Buffalo for other places with this name. ... New York State Capitol Building, completed in 1899 at a cost of $25 million was the most expensive government building of its time. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... A pair of ON diesels work Hearst, ON, in 2003 Ontario Northland Railway (ONR, AAR reporting marks ONT, ONTA) is a Canadian railway and provincial Crown corporation. ... Coordinates: , Country Province District Cochrane Settled 1903 Incorporated 2000 Government  - Mayor Wayne Taipale  - Councillors Robert Gravel, Clifford Trapper, Melody McComb-Uiselt, Richard Grom  - MP Charlie Angus  - MPP Gilles Bisson Population  - Town 2,006 or approx. ... James Bay in summer 2000 James Bay (French, Baie James) is a large body of water on the southern end of Hudson Bay in Canada. ... An electric container freight train Freight wagons filled with limestone await unloading, at sidings in Rugby, England An SP freight train west of Chicago in 1992. ... The Canadian National Railway (CN; AAR reporting marks CN, CNA, CNIS) is a Canadian Class I railway operated by the Canadian National Railway Company headquartered in Montreal, Quebec. ... The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR; AAR reporting marks CP, CPAA, CPI), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway that is operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. ... A short line is an independent railroad company that operates over a relatively short distance. ... A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... // GO Transit (AAR reporting marks GOT), officially known as the Greater Toronto Transit Authority (GTTA), is Canadas first, and Ontarios only, interregional public transit system, established to link Toronto with the surrounding regions of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). ... Hamilton, Ontario Skyline The skyline of Niagara Falls, Ontario side The Golden Horseshoe is a densely populated and industrialized region or urban agglomeration centred around the west end of Lake Ontario in Southern Ontario, Canada. ... The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) is a public transport authority that operates buses, streetcars, subways, and rapid transit lines in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The O-Train at Carleton University. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ...


Air transportation

Lester B. Pearson International Airport is the nation's busiest and the world's 29th busiest, handling over 30 million passengers per year. Other important airports include Ottawa International Airport and Hamilton's John C. Munro International Airport, which is an important courier and freight aviation centre. Toronto/Pearson and Ottawa/Macdonald-Cartier form two of the three points in Air Canada's Rapidair triangle, Canada's busiest set of air routes (the third point is Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport). WestJet also operates many flights in the triangle. A third and new airline, Porter Airlines will be joining in the triangle making Toronto City Centre Airport their hub beginning late 2006 to early 2007. Toronto Pearson International Airport, located in Mississauga, Ontario, immediately west of Toronto, is Canadas busiest and largest airport. ... Canadas busiest airport by aircraft movements and number of passengers served is Toronto Pearson International Airport, which is also the only Canadian airport ranked in the top 30 airports in the world (by number of passengers). ... John C. Munro International Airport or Hamilton International Airport (ICAO identifier CYHM) is a Canadian international airport located 11 km southwest of the city of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. ... Air Canada (TSX: AC.A, TSX: AC.B) is Canadas largest airline and flag carrier. ... Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport (IATA: YUL, ICAO: CYUL) (French: Aéroport international Pierre-Elliott-Trudeau de Montréal) or Montréal-Trudeau, formerly known as Montréal-Dorval International Airport, is located in the city of Dorval, on the Island of Montreal and is 20 kilometres (12... A WestJet Boeing 737-700 WestJet Airlines Ltd. ... Porter Airlines Bombardier Dash-8 Q 400 at Ottawa International Airport, Canada. ... Toronto/City Centre Airport, (IATA: YTZ, ICAO: CYTZ), in Toronto, Ontario, Canada is a regional airport located on the Toronto Islands. ...


Most Ontario cities have regional airports, many of which have scheduled commuter flights from Air Canada Jazz or smaller airlines and charter companies — flights from the larger cities such as Thunder Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Sudbury, North Bay, Timmins, Windsor, London, and Kingston feed directly into Toronto Pearson. Bearskin Airlines also runs flights along the northerly east-west route, connecting Ottawa, North Bay, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, and Thunder Bay directly without requiring connections at Toronto Pearson. Jazz Air LP (Air Canada Jazz) is a Canadian regional airline based in the Halifax Regional Municipality, at the Halifax Stanfield International Airport in Enfield, Nova Scotia. ... Nickname: Motto: Superior by nature Location of Thunder Bay, Ontario Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario Region Northwestern Ontario District Thunder Bay District CMA Thunder Bay Settled 1679 as Fort Caministigoyan See histories of Port Arthur and Fort William Amalgamation 1 January 1970 Government [1][2]  - Type Municipal Government  - Mayor Lynn... Nickname: Motto: Naturally Gifted Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario District Algoma District Incorporated 1887 (town), 1912 (city) Government  - City Mayor John Rowswell  - Governing body The Corporation of the City of Sault Sainte Marie  - MPs Tony Martin  - MPPs David Orazietti Area  - City  276 sq mi (715 km²) Elevation  630 ft (192... Greater Sudbury (2001 census population 155,219) is a city in Northern Ontario. ... North Bay (, time zone EST) is a city in Northeastern Ontario, Canada (2006 population 53,966). ... This article is about city in Ontario, Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel Kingston, Ontario, the first capital[1] of Canada, is located at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, where the lake runs into the St. ... Bearskin Airlines is a small Canadian airline providing regional service to various locations to and from northern Ontario and Manitoba. ...


Isolated towns and settlements in the northern areas of the province rely partly or entirely on air service for travel, goods, and even ambulance services, since much of the far northern area of the province cannot be reached by road or rail. A general aviation scene at Kemble Airfield, England. ...


Professional sports

The Province of Ontario, Canada, has professional sports teams in a wide variety of sports: Minor League Baseball Toronto Maple Leafs National Hockey League Ottawa Senators (original) (moved to St. ...

History

Pre-1867

Before the arrival of the Europeans, the region was inhabited both by Algonquian (Ojibwa, Cree and Algonquin) and Iroquoian (Iroquois and Huron) tribes.[24] The French explorer Étienne Brûlé explored part of the area in 1610-12.[25] The English explorer Henry Hudson sailed into Hudson Bay in 1611 and claimed the area for England, but Samuel de Champlain reached Lake Huron in 1615 and French missionaries began to establish posts along the Great Lakes. French settlement was hampered by their hostilities with the Iroquois, who would ally themselves with the British.[26] The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... This article is about the native North American people. ... For other uses, see Cree (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... The Iroquoian languages are a Native American language family. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... This article is about the First Nations people, the Wyandot, also known as the Huron. ... Étienne Brûlé (c. ... No portrait of Hudson is known to be in existence. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Statue symbolizing Samuel de Champlain in Ottawa. ...


The British established trading posts on Hudson Bay in the late 17th century and began a struggle for domination of Ontario. The 1763 Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years' War by awarding nearly all of France's North American possessions (New France) to Britain.[27] The region was annexed to Quebec in 1774.[28] From 1783 to 1796, the United Kingdom granted United Empire Loyalists leaving the United States following the American Revolution 200 acres (0.8 km²) of land and other items with which to rebuild their lives.[26] This measure substantially increased the population of Canada west of the St. Lawrence-Ottawa River confluence during this period, a fact recognized by the Constitutional Act of 1791, which split Quebec into The Canadas: Upper Canada southwest of the St. Lawrence-Ottawa River confluence, and Lower Canada east of it. John Graves Simcoe was appointed Upper Canada's first Lieutenant-Governor in 1793.[29] The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... For the 1563–1570 war, see Northern Seven Years War. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... This article is about the Canadian province. ... The name United Empire Loyalists is given to those American Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies as an act of fealty to King George III after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The Canadas were two British colonies, Upper Canada and Lower Canada, part of modern-day Canada. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ... John Graves Simcoe (February 25, 1752 – October 26, 1806) was the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada (modern-day southern Ontario plus the watersheds of Georgian Bay and Lake Superior) from 1791-1796. ... A Lieutenant Governor or Lieutenant-Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ...


American troops in the War of 1812 invaded Upper Canada across the Niagara River and the Detroit River but were successfully defeated and pushed back by British regulars, Canadian militias, and First Nations warriors. The Americans gained control of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, however, and during the Battle of York occupied the Town of York (later named Toronto) in 1813. The Americans looted the town and burned the Parliament Buildings, but were soon forced to leave. This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Landsat satellite photo, showing Lake Saint Clair, as well as St. ... First Nations is a common title used in Canada to describe the various societies of indigenous peoples of North America located in what is now Canada, who are not of Inuit or Métis descent. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... Lake Ontario, bounded on the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south by Ontarios Niagara Peninsula and by New York State, USA, is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. ... The Battle of York was a battle of the War of 1812 on April 27, 1813, at York, Upper Canada, which was later to become Toronto, Ontario. ... York was the name of Toronto, Ontario, between 1793 and 1834 and second captial of Upper Canada. ...


After the War of 1812, relative stability allowed for increasing numbers of immigrants to arrive from Britain and Ireland rather than from the United States. As was the case in the previous decades, this deliberate immigration shift was encouraged by the colonial leaders. Despite affordable and often free land, many arriving newcomers from Europe (mostly from Britain and Ireland) found frontier life with the harsh climate difficult, and some of those with the means eventually returned home or went south. However, population growth far exceeded emigration in the decades that would follow. Still, a mostly agrarian-based society, canal projects and a new network of plank roads spurred greater trade within the colony and with the United States, thereby improving relations over time.


Meanwhile, Ontario's numerous waterways aided travel and transportation into the interior and supplied water power for development. As the population increased, so did the industries and transportation networks, which in turn led to further development. By the end of the century, Ontario vied with Quebec as the nation's leader in terms of growth in population, industry, arts and communications.[30]


Many in the colony, however, began to chafe against the aristocratic Family Compact that governed while benefiting economically from the regions resources, and who did not allow elected bodies the power to effect change (much as the Château Clique ruled Lower Canada). This resentment spurred republican ideals and sowed the seeds for early Canadian nationalism. Accordingly, rebellion in favour of responsible government rose in both regions; Louis-Joseph Papineau led the Lower Canada Rebellion and William Lyon Mackenzie led the Upper Canada Rebellion. For more on the rebellions of 1837, see History of Canada. The Family Compact was the informal name for the wealthy, conservative elite of Upper Canada in the early 19th century. ... The Château Clique was a group of wealthy families in Lower Canada in the early 19th century. ... Responsible government is a conception of a system of government that embodies the principle of parliamentary accountability which is the foundation of the Westminster system of parliamentary democracy. ... Portrait of Louis-Joseph Papineau. ... Flag used by the Patriotes between 1832 and 1838 The Lower Canada Rebellion is the name given to the armed conflict between the rebels of Lower Canada (now Quebec) and the British colonial power of that province. ... William Lyon Mackenzie (March 12, 1795 – August 28, 1861) was a Scottish-Canadian journalist, politician, and leader of an unsuccessful rebellion. ... The Republic of Canadas flag - the two stars represent Upper and Lower Canada. ... Canada is a country of 32 million inhabitants that occupies the northern portion of the North American continent, and is the worlds second largest country in area. ...


Although both rebellions were put down in short order, the British government sent Lord Durham to investigate the causes of the unrest. He recommended that self-government be granted and that Lower and Upper Canada be re-joined in an attempt to assimilate the French Canadians. Accordingly, the two colonies were merged into the Province of Canada by the Act of Union (1840), with the capital at Kingston, and Upper Canada becoming known as Canada West. Parliamentary self-government was granted in 1848. Due to heavy waves of immigration in the 1840s, the population of Canada West more than doubled by 1851 over the previous decade, and as a result for the first time the English-speaking population of Canada West surpassed the French-speaking population of Canada East, tilting the representative balance of power. John George Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (also known as Radical Jack) GCB PC (London 12 April 1792 – 28 July 1840 Cowes), was a British Whig statesman and colonial administrator, Governor General and high commissioner of British North America. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Act of Union passed in July 1840 and proclaimed February 10, 1841, abolished the legislatures of Lower Canada and Upper Canada and established a new political entity the Province of Canada to replace them. ... Canada West was the western portion of the former Province of Canada from 1841 to 1867. ... The House of Representatives Chamber of the Parliament of Australia in Canberra. ... Self-governance is an abstract concept that refers to several scales of organization. ...


An economic boom in the 1850s coincided with railway expansion across the province further increasing the economic strength of Central Canada.


A political stalemate between the French- and English-speaking legislators, as well as fear of aggression from the United States during the American Civil War, led the political elite to hold a series of conferences in the 1860s to effect a broader federal union of all British North American colonies. The British North America Act took effect on July 1, 1867, establishing the Dominion of Canada, initially with four provinces: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec and Ontario. The Province of Canada was divided at this point into Ontario and Quebec so that each linguistic group would have its own province. Both Quebec and Ontario were required by section 93 of the BNA Act to safeguard existing educational rights and privileges of the Protestant and Catholic minorities. Thus, separate Catholic schools and school boards were permitted in Ontario. However, neither province had a constitutional requirement to protect its French- or English-speaking minority. Toronto was formally established as Ontario's provincial capital at this time. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The British North America Acts 1867–1975 are a series of Acts of the British Parliament dealing with the government of Canada. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A board of education or a school board or school committee is the title of the board of directors of a school, local school district or higher administrative level. ...


From 1867 to 1896

Once constituted as a province, Ontario proceeded to assert its economic and legislative power. In 1872, the lawyer Oliver Mowat became premier, and remained as premier until 1896. He fought for provincial rights, weakening the power of the federal government in provincial matters, usually through well-argued appeals to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. His battles with the federal government greatly decentralized Canada, giving the provinces far more power than John A. Macdonald had intended. He consolidated and expanded Ontario's educational and provincial institutions, created districts in Northern Ontario, and fought tenaciously to ensure that those parts of Northwestern Ontario not historically part of Upper Canada (the vast areas north and west of the Lake Superior-Hudson Bay watershed, known as the District of Keewatin) would become part of Ontario, a victory embodied in the Canada (Ontario Boundary) Act, 1889. He also presided over the emergence of the province into the economic powerhouse of Canada. Mowat was the creator of what is often called Empire Ontario. The Honourable Sir Oliver Mowat, QC (July 22, 1820 – 19 April 1903) was a Canadian politician, and premier of Ontario from 1872 to 1896. ... The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council is one of the highest courts in the United Kingdom. ... For other persons named John Alexander Macdonald, see John Alexander Macdonald (disambiguation). ... Northern Ontario is the part of the province of Ontario, Canada, which lies north of Lake Huron, Georgian Bay, the French River and Lake Nipissing. ... Northwestern Ontario is the region within the Canadian province of Ontario which lies north and west of Lake Superior, and west of Hudson Bay and James Bay. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... For the the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... New York Harbor, the outflow for Hudson River, is sometimes called Hudsons Bay. Hudson Bay, Canada. ... The District of Keewatin was a distinct entity from Keewatin Region, Northwest Territories, although much of their territory overlapped. ...


Beginning with Sir John A. Macdonald's the National Policy (1879) and the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway (1875-1885) through Northern Ontario and the Prairies to British Columbia, Ontario manufacturing and industry flourished. However, population increase slowed after a large recession hit the province in 1893, thus slowing growth drastically but only for a few short years. Many newly arrived immigrants and others moved west along the railroad to the Prairie Provinces and British Columbia. For other persons named John Alexander Macdonald, see John Alexander Macdonald (disambiguation). ... An eastbound CPR freight at Stoney Creek Bridge in Rogers Pass. ... Northern Ontario is the part of the province of Ontario, Canada, which lies north of Lake Huron, Georgian Bay, the French River and Lake Nipissing. ... A prairie is an area of land of low topographic relief that principally supports grasses and herbs, with few trees, and is generally of a mesic (moderate or temperate) climate. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Map of the Canadian Prairie provinces, which include boreal forests, taiga, and mountains as well as the prairies (proper). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944...


From 1896 to the present

Mineral exploitation accelerated in the late 19th century, leading to the rise of important mining centres in the northeast like Sudbury, Cobalt and Timmins. The province harnessed its water power to generate hydro-electric power, and created the state-controlled Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, later Ontario Hydro. The availability of cheap electric power further facilitated the development of industry. The Ford Motor Company of Canada was established in 1904. General Motors of Canada Ltd. was formed in 1918. The motor vehicle industry would go on to become the most lucrative industry for the Ontario economy. For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Aedificemus (Latin for Come, let us build together) Coordinates: , Country Province Established 1893 (as Sudbury)   2001 (as Greater Sudbury) Government  - Mayor John Rodriguez  - Governing Body Greater Sudbury City Council  - MPs Raymond Bonin (LPC), Diane Marleau (LPC)  - MPPs Rick Bartolucci (OLP), Shelley Martel (NDP) Area  - City 3,200 km... Cobalt is a town in the district of Timiskaming, province of Ontario, Canada, with a population of 1,221, and an area of 2. ... This article is about city in Ontario, Canada. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario was established in 1906 by the provincial Power Commission Act to build transmission lines to supply municipal utilities with electricity generated by private companies already operating at Niagara Falls. ... The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario was established in 1906 by the provincial Power Commission Act to build transmission lines to supply municipal utilities with electricity generated by private companies already operating at Niagara Falls. ... “Ford” redirects here. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ...


In July 1912, the Conservative government of Sir James P. Whitney issued Regulation 17 which severely limited the availability of French-language schooling to the province's French-speaking minority. French-Canadians reacted with outrage, journalist Henri Bourassa denouncing the "Prussians of Ontario". It was eventually repealed in 1927. Sir James Pliny Whitney (October 2, 1843-September 25, 1914) was a politician in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Henri Bourassa Joseph-Napoléon-Henri Bourassa (September 1, 1868- August 30, 1952) was a French Canadian political leader and publisher. ...


Influenced by events in the United States, the government of Sir William Hearst introduced prohibition of alcoholic drinks in 1916 with the passing of the Ontario Temperance Act. However, residents could distill and retain their own personal supply and liquor producers could continue distillation and export for sale, which allowed Ontario to become a hotbed for the illegal smuggling of liquor into the United States, which was under complete prohibition. Prohibition came to an end in 1927 with the establishment of the Liquor Control Board of Ontario by the government of George Howard Ferguson. The sale and consumption of liquor, wine, and beer are still controlled by some of the most extreme laws in North America to ensure that strict community standards and revenue generation from the alcohol retail monopoly are upheld. In April 2007, Ontario Member of Provincial Parliament Kim Craitor suggested that local brewers should be able to sell their beer in local corner stores, however, the motion was quickly rejected by Premier Dalton McGuinty. Sir William Howard Hearst, K.C.M.G. (February 15, 1864–September 29, 1941) was the Conservative premier of the Canadian province of Ontario from 1914 to 1919. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Ontario Temperance Act is a law passed in Ontario in 1916 to prohibit the sale of alcohol, a period known as Prohibition. ... The Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO) is a provincial Crown corporation established in 1927 by Premier Howard Ferguson to sell liquor, wine, and beer in Ontario through a chain of retail stores. ... George Howard Ferguson (June 18, 1870-February 21, 1946) was a Conservative politician and Premier of Ontario, Canada, from 1923 to 1930. ... Kim Craitor is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... Dalton James Patrick McGuinty, Jr. ...


The post-World War II period was one of exceptional prosperity and growth. Ontario, and the Greater Toronto Area in particular, have been the recipients of most immigration to Canada, largely immigrants from war-torn Europe in the 1950s and 1960s and after changes in federal immigration law, a massive influx of non-Europeans since the 1970s. From a largely ethnically British province, Ontario has rapidly become very culturally diverse. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... Immigration law refers to national government policies which control the phenomenon of immigration to their country. ... This article or section should be merged with ethnic group Ethnicity is the cultural characteristics that connect a particular group or groups of people to each other. ...


The nationalist movement in Quebec, particularly after the election of the Parti Québécois in 1976, contributed to driving many businesses and English-speaking people out of Quebec to Ontario, and as a result Toronto surpassed Montreal as the largest city and economic centre of Canada. Depressed economic conditions in the Maritime Provinces have also resulted in de-population of those provinces in the 20th century, with heavy migration into Ontario. The Parti Québécois [PQ] (translation: Quebecker Party) is a separatist political party that advocates national sovereignty for the Canadian province of Quebec and secession from Canada, as well as social democratic policies and has traditionally had support from the labour movement. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... HI Eric u suck!!!!!!!!!!!!! from,Trevor and Dalton ...


Ontario has no official language, but English is considered the de facto language. Numerous French language services are available under the French Language Services Act of 1990 in designated areas where sizable francophone populations exist. The French Language Services Act is law in the province of Ontario, Canada and is intended to protect the right of French speaking people in the province. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

See also: Timeline of Ontario history

Ontario came into being as a province of Canada in 1867. ...

Government

The wordmark of the Government of Ontario, featuring a stylized version of the provincial flower, the trillium. This wordmark was introduced in late 2007.
The previous wordmark of the Government of Ontario, which was in use from the late-1960s until 2007 (not counting the lettering used here).
The previous wordmark of the Government of Ontario, which was in use from the late-1960s until 2007 (not counting the lettering used here).
The Ontario Legislature Building at Queen's Park.
The Ontario Legislature Building at Queen's Park.

The British North America Act 1867 section 69 stipulated "There shall be a Legislature for Ontario consisting of the Lieutenant Governor and of One House, styled the Legislative Assembly of Ontario." The assembly has 107 seats representing ridings elected in a first-past-the-post system across the province. The legislative buildings at Queen's Park in Toronto are the seat of government. Following the Westminster system, the leader of the party holding the most seats in the assembly is known as the "Premier and President of the Council" (Executive Council Act R.S.O. 1990). The Premier chooses the cabinet or Executive Council whose members are deemed "ministers of the Crown." Although the Legislative Assembly Act (R.S.O. 1990) refers to members of the assembly, the legislators are now commonly called MPPs (Members of the Provincial Parliament) in English and députés de l'Assemblée législative in French, but they have also been called MLAs (Members of the Legislative Assembly), and both are acceptable. The title of Prime Minister of Ontario, while permissible in English and correct in French (le Premier ministre), is generally avoided in favour of "Premier" to avoid confusion with the Prime Minister of Canada. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1863x2502, 669 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ontario Toronto Queens Park, Toronto Richardsonian Romanesque Legislative Assembly of Ontario Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1863x2502, 669 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ontario Toronto Queens Park, Toronto Richardsonian Romanesque Legislative Assembly of Ontario Metadata This file contains... The British North America Acts 1867–1975 are a series of Acts of the British Parliament dealing with the government of Canada. ... In Canada, the lieutenant-governor (often without a hyphen[1], pronounced ), in French lieutenant-gouverneur/lieutenant-gouverneure (always with a hyphen), is the Canadian Monarchs, or Crowns, representative in a province, much as the Governor General is her representative at the national level. ... The Provincial Parliament of Ontario, is the legislature of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... An electoral district is a geographically-based constituency upon which Canadas representative democracy is based. ... The first-past-the-post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called first-past-the-post (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority. ... Queens Park is an historic green space in central Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The Houses of Parliament, also known as the Palace of Westminster, in London. ... The Premier of Ontario is the first minister for the Canadian province of Ontario. ... This article is about the governmental body. ... The Executive Council of Ontario (informally and more commonly, the Cabinet of Ontario) is the cabinet of the Canadian province of Ontario. ...

Further information: Monarchy in Ontario and Executive Council of Ontario

Legislative Legislatures Politics of: AB | BC | MB | NB | NL | NT | NS | NU | ON | PE | QC | SK | YT Elections Elections in: AB | BC | MB | NB | NL | NT | NS | NU | ON | PE | QC | SK | YT Federal Politics of Canada General Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Monarchy... The Executive Council of Ontario (informally and more commonly, the Cabinet of Ontario) is the cabinet of the Canadian province of Ontario. ...

Politics

Main article: Politics of Ontario

Ontario has traditionally operated under a three-party system. In the last few decades the liberal Ontario Liberal Party, conservative Ontario Progressive Conservative Party, and social-democratic Ontario New Democratic Party have all ruled the province at different times. The Province of Ontario is governed by a unicameral legislature, the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, which operates in the Westminster system of government. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a centrist provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario Progressive Conservative Party (PC Party of Ontario, also known as Tories) is a right-of-centre political party in Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario New Democratic Party (formerly known as the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, Ontario Section) is a social democratic political party in Ontario, Canada. ...


Ontario is currently under a Liberal government headed by Premier Dalton McGuinty. The present government, first elected in 2003, was re-elected on 10 October, 2007 (see Ontario general election, 2007). The Ontario Liberal Party is a centrist provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... Dalton James Patrick McGuinty, Jr. ... The Ontario general election of 2007 was held on October 10, 2007 to elect members (MPPs) of the 39th Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario, Canada. ...


Federally, Ontario is known as being the province that offers the strongest support for the Liberal Party of Canada. The majority of the party's present 106 seats in the Canadian House of Commons represent Ontario ridings. As the province has the most seats of any province in Canada, earning support from Ontario voters is considered a crucial matter for any party hoping to win a Canadian federal election. The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... Type Lower House Speaker Peter Milliken, Liberal since January 29, 2001 Leader of the Government in the House of Commons Peter Van Loan, Conservative since January 4, 2007 Opposition House Leader Ralph Goodale, Liberal since January 23, 2006 Members 308 Political groups Conservative Party Liberal Party Bloc Québécois... Elections in Canada gives information on election and election results in Canada. ...


Territorial evolution 1788-1899

Land was not legally subdivided into administrative units until a treaty had been concluded with the native peoples ceding the land (see Royal Proclamation of 1763). In 1788, while part of the Province of Quebec (1763-1791), southern Ontario was divided into four districts: Hesse, Lunenburg, Mecklenburg, and Nassau. A portion of eastern North America; the 1763 Proclamation line is the border between the red and the pink areas. ... Province of Quebec (COLONIAL PERIOD, 1763-1791) Great Britain acquired Canada by the Treaty of Paris (1763) when King Louis XV of France and his advisors chose to keep the territory of Guadeloupe for its valuable sugar crops instead of New France, which was viewed as a vast, frozen wasteland... Districts are a form of local government in several countries. ... Western District was one of four districts of Upper Canada created in 1788. ... Eastern District was one of four districts of Upper Canada created in 1788. ... The Midland District was a historic district in Upper Canada which existed until 1849. ... The Home District was one of four districts of Upper Canada created in 1792. ...


In 1792, the four districts were renamed: Hesse became the Western District, Lunenburg became the Eastern District, Mecklenburg became the Midland District, and Nassau became the Home District. Counties were created within the districts.


By 1798, there were eight districts: Eastern, Home, Johnstown, London, Midland, Newcastle, Niagara, and Western.


By 1826, there were eleven districts: Bathurst, Eastern, Gore, Home, Johnstown, London, Midland, Newcastle, Niagara, Ottawa, and Western.


By 1838, there were twenty districts: Bathurst, Brock, Colbourne, Dalhousie, Eastern, Gore, Home, Huron, Johnstown, London, Midland, Newcastle, Niagara, Ottawa, Prince Edward, Simcoe, Talbot, Victoria, Wellington, and Western. Simcoe is a county located in central Ontario, originally established as Simcoe District in 1843 by the Legislature of Upper Canada[1]. According to Statistics Canada (2006), the population is 422,204. ...


In 1849, the districts of southern Ontario were abolished by the Province of Canada and county governments took over certain municipal responsibilities. The Province of Canada also began creating districts in sparsely populated Northern Ontario with the establishment of Algoma District and Nipissing District in 1858. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Northern Ontario is the part of the province of Ontario, Canada, which lies north of Lake Huron, Georgian Bay, the French River and Lake Nipissing. ... Algoma District is a district and census division in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Categories: Stub | Ontario districts ...


The northern and western boundaries of Ontario were in dispute after Confederation. Ontario's right to Northwestern Ontario was determined by the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in 1884 and confirmed by the Canada (Ontario Boundary) Act, 1889 of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. By 1899, there were seven northern districts: Algoma, Manitoulin, Muskoka, Nipissing, Parry Sound, Rainy River, and Thunder Bay. Four more northern districts were created between 1907 and 1912: Cochrane, Kenora, Sudbury and Timiskaming. A confederation is an association of sovereign states or communities, usually created by treaty but often later adopting a common constitution. ... Northwestern Ontario is the region within the Canadian province of Ontario which lies north and west of Lake Superior, and west of Hudson Bay and James Bay. ... The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council is one of the highest courts in the United Kingdom. ...

  • Early Districts and Counties 1788-1899[31]

In the Canadian province of Ontario, there are three different types of census divisions: single-tier municipalities, upper-tier municipalities (of which can be regional municipalities or counties) and districts. ...

Slogans, etc.

In 1967, in conjunction with the celebration of Canada's centennial, the song "A Place to Stand" was introduced at the inauguration of Ontario's pavillion at the Expo 67 World's Fair, and became the background for the province's advertising for decades. Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The Expo 67 site on le Sainte-H ne and le Notre-Dame The Canadian Centennial was a year long celebration held in 1967 when Canada celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Canadian Confederation. ... The 1967 International and Universal Exposition, or simply Expo 67 was the General Exhibition Category 1 Worlds Fair held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from April 27 to October 29, 1967. ... The 1967 International and Universal Exposition, or simply Expo 67 was the General Exhibition Category 1 Worlds Fair held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from April 27 to October 29, 1967. ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ...


In 1973. the first slogan to appear on license plates in Ontario was "Keep It Beautiful." This was replaced by "Yours to Discover" in 1982[32], apparently inspired by a tourism slogan, "Discover Ontario," dating back to 1927.[33] (From 1988 to 1990,[34] "Ontario Incredible"[35] gave "Yours to Discover" a brief respite.) For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Sample Iowa License Plate In the United States and Canada, license plates[1] are issued by an agency of the state or provincial government (or its equivalent, for example, the District of Columbia). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ...


In 2007, a new song replaced A Place to Stand after four decades. "There's No Place Like This" (Un Endroit Sans Pareil) is featured in current television advertising, performed by Ontario artists including Molly Johnson, Brian Byrne, Tomi Swick (from Hamilton) and Keshia Chante (born in Ottawa). [36] Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... A Place to Stand 45rpm record cover A Place to Stand, A Place to Grow (Ontari-ari-ari-o!) is an unofficial anthem of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... From the earliest days of the medium, television has been used as a vehicle for advertising in some countries. ... Molly Johnson is a Canadian pop and jazz vocalist and songwriter. ... Brian Byrne, Canadian musician, was born January 13, 1975 in Steadybrook, Newfoundland. ... Tomi Swick is a new Canadian artist signed to Warner Music Canada. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Location in the province of Ontario, Canada Coordinates: , Country Province Incorporated June 9, 1846[1] Government  - Mayor Fred Eisenberger  - City Council Hamilton City Council  - MPs List of MPs Dean Allison Chris Charlton David Christopherson Wayne Marston David Sweet  - MPPs List of MPPs Sophia Aggelonitis Andrea... Keshia Chanté is a Canadian singer of urban and R&B music. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ...


Famous Ontarians

The singer-songwriter, guitarist, and film director Neil Young was born in Toronto and spent part of his childhood in Omemee, a town he memorialized in his song "Helpless" (written for Young's band Crazy Horse but most famously recorded on the Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young album Déjà Vu). The first lines of the song read, "There is a town in north Ontario / With dream comfort memory to spare / And in my mind I still need a place to go / All my changes were there." This article is about the musician. ... Omemee is a community within the City of Kawartha Lakes, Ontario, Canada, formerly known as Victoria County. ... For other uses, see Helpless. ... For other uses, see Crazy Horse (disambiguation). ... Crosby, Stills, & Nash (sometimes known as Crosby, Stills, Nash, & Young) is a pioneering folk rock/rock supergroup that formed out of the remnants of three 1960s bands the Buffalo Springfield, the Byrds, and the Hollies. ... Déjà Vu is the second album by folk-rock band Crosby, Stills & Nash, and their first as Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, released on March 11, 1970. ...


Other famous artists originating from Ontario include musician Avril Lavigne (Napanee), Rush (Toronto), Sum 41 (Ajax), Billy Talent (Toronto), Our Lady Peace (Toronto), Alexisonfire (St. Catharines), The Tragically Hip, (Kingston), Three Days Grace (Toronto), singers Paul Anka, Keisha Chante, and Alanis Morissette (all from Ottawa), Gordon Lightfoot (Orillia), musician Shania Twain (Timmins), comics Jim Carrey (Newmarket). John Candy, Russell Peters, Mike Myers, music band Barenaked Ladies, and rapper Kardinal Offishall were all either raised or at one time resided in Scarborough, formerly an incorporated city which now makes up the eastern section of Toronto. Avril Lavigne Whibley,[7] better known by her birth name of Avril Lavigne (IPA: ), (born September 27, 1984) is a Canadian rock/punk-pop singer, musician and actress. ... Greater Napanee (2001 population 15,132) is a town in Lennox and Addington County in eastern Ontario, Canada approximately 40 kilometres west of Kingston. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band originally formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario; presently comprised of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... Sum 41 is a Canadian rock band from Ajax, Ontario. ... // Ajax may refer to: Ajax the Great as a well known hero from the Trojan war and son of Telamon Ajax the Lesser son of the king of Locris, and another hero in the Trojan war Ajax (missionary), Arian missionary who converted the pagan Suevi c. ... Billy Talent is a Canadian alternative band formed in 1993 in Mississauga, Ontario. ... Our Lady Peace, abbreviated as OLP, is a Canadian alternative rock band consisting of Raine Maida (vocals), Duncan Coutts (bass), Jeremy Taggart (drums), and Steve Mazur (guitar). ... For the Adult Film actress, see Alexis Fire. ... St. ... The Tragically Hip is a Canadian rock band from Kingston, Ontario, consisting of Gordon Downie (lead vocals and occasional acoustic guitar), Paul Langlois (guitar), Rob Baker (guitar), Gord Sinclair (bass) and Johnny Fay (drums). ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel Kingston, Ontario, the first capital[1] of Canada, is located at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, where the lake runs into the St. ... Three Days Grace (also known as 3DG or TDG) is a Christian rock band formed in 1997. ... Paul Albert Anka, OC (born July 30, 1941, in Ottawa, Ontario) is a Canadian singer, songwriter and actor. ... Keshia Chanté (born as Keshia Harper on June 28, 1988) is a Canadian pop singer. ... Alanis redirects here. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Gordon Meredith Lightfoot Jr. ... Orillia (2001 population 29,121) is a city on in south-central Ontario, Canada on Lake Couchiching, where it flows from Lake Simcoe, in Simcoe County towards Georgian Bay (Lake Huron). ... Shania Twain, IPA: OC (born Eilleen Regina Edwards, August 28, 1965, Windsor, Ontario) is a Canadian singer and songwriter in the country and pop music genres. ... Timmins, with a population of 43,686 (2001), is a city in northeastern Ontario, Canada on the Mattagami River. ... James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... Newmarket (2006 Population 74,295) is a town located approximately 45 km north of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian comedian and actor. ... Not to be confused with Russell Peterson or Peter Russell. ... For other persons of the same name, see Michael Myers. ... Barenaked Ladies (often abbreviated BNL or occasionally BnL) is a Canadian alternative rock band currently composed of Jim Creeggan, Kevin Hearn, Steven Page, Ed Robertson, Tyler Stewart, and formerly Andy Creeggan. ... Kardinal Offishall (born Jason Harrow on May 21, 1976 in Scarborough, Ontario) is a Canadian hip-hop MC and producer of Jamaican descent. ... Country Canada Province Ontario Established 1 January 1850 (township)   1 January 1967 (borough) Incorporated Amalgamation June 1983 (city) 1 January 1998 Government  - Mayor David Miller (Toronto Mayor)  - Governing Body Toronto City Council  - MPs John Cannis, Jim Karygiannis, Derek Lee, John McKay, Dan McTeague, Tom Wappel  - MPPs Bas Balkissoon, Lorenzo Berardinetti...


See also

The Great Seal of Ontario was authorized by an Order-in-Council and has been used since January 1, 1870. ... Franco-Ontarians (French: Franco-ontarien) are French Canadian or francophone residents of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... This is a list of Ontario-related topics. ... The Provincial Parliament of Ontario, is the legislature of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The flag of the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario This is a list of lieutenant-governors of the Canadian province of Ontario, before and during Confederation in 1867. ... // List Of Arboreta and Botanical Gardens of Canada Alberta Alberta Horticultural Research Center Route 1 Brooks Alberta Calgary Zoological Gardens St. ... This is a list of the premiers of the province of Ontario, Canada, since Confederation (1867). ... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Milton Acorn Joanne Arnott Margaret Atwood Derek R. Audette Margaret Avison B Ken Babstock Chris Banks Gary Barwin Shaunt Basmajian Bill Bauer Nancy... Communities of the Province of Ontario, Canada Note: this is a list of communities, and are not necessarily organized municipalities. ... In the Canadian province of Ontario, there are three different types of census divisions: single-tier municipalities, upper-tier municipalities (which can be regional municipalities or counties) and districts. ... This is a list of incorporated cities of Canada in alphabetical order by province. ... This is a complete list of airports, water aerodromes and heliports in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The Coat of Arms of Ontario, formally The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Ontario, was begun when the shield was granted by Royal Warrant of Queen Victoria in 1868. ... Ontarios official flag since 1965 The current Flag of Ontario was proclaimed the official flag of the Canadian province of Ontario by the Flag Act on May 21, 1965. ... The province of Ontario, Canada is home to the following universities: * - Enrollment numbers may not be the most recent, and include part-time students. ... The Ontario Academic Credit (OAC) is part of the curriculum(s) codified by the Ontario Ministry of Education in Ontario Schools:  Intermediate and Senior (OS:IS, oh-sis) and its revisions. ... This is a list of the symbols of Canadian provinces and territories. ... The province of Ontario, in Canada, has two types of community colleges: Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology and Institutes of Technology and Advanced Learning. ... Legislative Legislatures Politics of: AB | BC | MB | NB | NL | NT | NS | NU | ON | PE | QC | SK | YT Elections Elections in: AB | BC | MB | NB | NL | NT | NS | NU | ON | PE | QC | SK | YT Federal Politics of Canada General Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Monarchy... Eastern Ontario is the region of the Canadian province of Ontario which lies in a wedge-shaped area between the Ottawa and St. ... Northern Ontario is the part of the province of Ontario, Canada, which lies north of Lake Huron, Georgian Bay, the French River and Lake Nipissing. ... Northwestern Ontario is the region within the Canadian province of Ontario which lies north and west of Lake Superior, and west of Hudson Bay and James Bay. ... Southern Ontario is the portion of the Canadian province of Ontario lying south of the French River and Algonquin Park. ... Southwestern Ontario is a region of the Canadian province of Ontario, centred on the city of London. ... The Ontario Court of Appeal is headquartered in downtown Toronto, in historic Osgoode Hall. ... // Superior Court of Justice (Ontario) The Superior Court of Justice for Ontario, Canada is the successor to the former Ontario Court of Justice (General Division), and was created on April 19, 1999. ... The Order of Ontario is an award given in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... It has been suggested that 129th Toronto Scouting Group be merged into this article or section. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Ontario Provincial Police (O.P.P.) is the provincial police force for the province of Ontario, Canada. ...

Notes

References

  1. ^ a b Canada's provinces and territories total area, land area and water area.. Statistics Canada. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  2. ^ Statistics Canada. Canada's population estimates 2008-03-27. Retrieved on 2008-04-05.
  3. ^ Ontario Budget 2007: Chapter II
  4. ^ Ontario is the largest province in the country by population. Statistics Canada. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  5. ^ Toronto is Canada's largest metropolitan area. Statistics Canada. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  6. ^ a b c Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data. Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population (2007-03-13). Retrieved on 2007-03-13.
  7. ^ Mithun, Marianne (2000). The Languages of Native North America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 312. 
  8. ^ About Canada // Ontario. Study Canada Last Paragraph-second last sentence. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. “Ontario's name is thought to come form the Iroquois word "Skanadario" which means "beautiful water"”
  9. ^ The British North American act of 1867. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  10. ^ Government of Ontario. Ontario Facts: Overview. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  11. ^ Population urban and rural, by province and territory (Ontario). Statistics Canada (2005-09-01). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  12. ^ Canada's population. The Daily. Statistics Canada (2006-09-27). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  13. ^ Selected Ethnic Origins1, for Canada, Provinces and Territories - 20% Sample Data. Statistics Canada. Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  14. ^ Statistics Canada Population by selected ethnic origins, by province and territory (2001 Census) (Ontario). Statistics Canada (2005-01-25). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  15. ^ a b Statistics Canada 2001 Community Profiles. Statistics Canada (2006-12-14). Retrieved on 2007-01-12.
  16. ^ Population by religion, by province and territory (2001 Census) (Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan). Statistics Canada (2005-01-25). Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  17. ^ |Religious diversity information for Ontario
  18. ^ Statistics Canada Population of census metropolitan areas (2001 Census boundaries) (number). Statistics Canada (2006-06-12). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  19. ^ Heidorn, Keith C. (2005-11-01). Lake Breeze Weather. The Weather Doctor. Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  20. ^ Ontario is rich in hydroelectricity, especially areas near the Niagara River. Ontario Facts. Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  21. ^ Ontario. Ministry of Economic Development and Trade. Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  22. ^ a b c Ministry of Transportation (Ontario) (6 August 2002). Ontario government investing $401 million to upgrade Highway 401. Retrieved on 2006-12-20.
  23. ^ a b c Brian Gray (2004-04-10). GTA Economy Dinged by Every Crash on the 401 - North America's Busiest Freeway. Toronto Sun, transcribed at Urban Planet. Retrieved on 2007-03-18. “The "phenomenal" number of vehicles on Hwy. 401 as it cuts through Toronto makes it the busiest freeway in North America...”
  24. ^ About Ontario; History: Government of Ontario. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  25. ^ Étienne Brûlé's article on Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  26. ^ a b About Ontario; History; French and British Struggle for Domination. Government of Ontario. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  27. ^ The Treaty of Paris (1763). Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  28. ^ The Quebec Act of 1774. Retrieved on 2007-01-15.
  29. ^ The Constitutional Act of 1791. Retrieved on 2007-01-15.
  30. ^ Virtual Vault, an online exhibition of Canadian historical art at Library and Archives Canada
  31. ^ Early Districts and Counties 1788-1899. Archives of Ontario (2006-09-05). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  32. ^ Ontario
  33. ^ | Library | University of Waterloo
  34. ^ Official Ontario Road Maps Produced -1971 - 2006
  35. ^ Measuring the Returns to Tourism Advertising - Butterfield et al. 37 (1): 12 - Journal of Travel Research
  36. ^ There's more to discover in Ontario

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Toronto Sun is an English language daily newspaper published in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources

  • Michael Sletcher, 'Ottawa', in James Ciment, ed., Colonial America: An Encyclopedia of Social, Political, Cultural, and Economic History, (5 vols., M. E. Sharpe, New York, 2006).
  • Virtual Vault, an online exhibition of Canadian historical art at Library and Archives Canada

External links

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Coordinates: 50°42′N 86°3′W / 50.7, -86.05 (Ontario) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ontario. ... Eastern Ontario is the region of the Canadian province of Ontario which lies in a wedge-shaped area between the Ottawa and St. ... Central Ontario is the portion of the Canadian province of Ontario which lies between Georgian Bay and the eastern end of Lake Ontario. ... Hamilton, Ontario Skyline The skyline of Niagara Falls, Ontario side The Golden Horseshoe is a densely populated and industrialized region or urban agglomeration centred around the west end of Lake Ontario in Southern Ontario, Canada. ... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... Southwestern Ontario is a region of the Canadian province of Ontario, centred on the city of London. ... Northern Ontario is the part of the province of Ontario, Canada, which lies north of Lake Huron, Georgian Bay, the French River and Lake Nipissing. ... Northeastern Ontario is the region within the Canadian province of Ontario which lies north and east of the Great Lakes. ... Northwestern Ontario is the region within the Canadian province of Ontario which lies north and west of Lake Superior, and west of Hudson Bay and James Bay. ... Southern Ontario is the portion of the Canadian province of Ontario lying south of the French River and Algonquin Park. ... In the Canadian province of Ontario, there are three different types of census divisions: single-tier municipalities, upper-tier municipalities (which can be regional municipalities or counties) and districts. ... Bruce County is a county in western Ontario, Canada, and includes the Bruce Peninsula. ... Categories: Stub | Ontario counties and regions ... Elgin County is a county and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Essex County covers the area at the very tip of Southwestern Ontario. ... Categories: Stub | Ontario counties and regions ... Categories: Stub | Ontario counties and regions ... Haliburton is a county of Ontario, Canada, known as a tourist and cottage industry area, for its scenery and for its resident artists. ... Categories: Stub | Ontario counties and regions ... Categories: Stub | Ontario counties and regions ... Lambton County, Ontario is a census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Lanark County is a county located in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The United Counties of Leeds and Grenville are located in Southeastern Ontario, Canada. ... Categories: Stub | Ontario counties and regions ... Middlesex County is a census division located in Western Ontario. ... Northumberland County is situated on the north shore of Lake Ontario, in east-central Ontario, Canada. ... Perth County, Ontario is a census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Peterborough County is located in Ontario, Canada. ... The United Counties of Prescott and Russell are consolidated counties located in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Renfrew is a county in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Simcoe is a county located in central Ontario, originally established as Simcoe District in 1843 by the Legislature of Upper Canada[1]. According to Statistics Canada (2006), the population is 422,204. ... Categories: Stub | Ontario counties and regions ... Wellington County (population 75,000) is a county located in Ontario, Canada. ... Districts are a form of local government in several countries. ... Algoma District is a district and census division in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Cochrane District, Ontario is a district and census division in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Categories: Stub | Ontario districts ... The Manitoulin District is a district in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Categories: Stub | Ontario districts ... Parry Sound District is a census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Rainy River District is a district and census division in Northwestern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The Sudbury District is a district in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Thunder Bay District is a district and census division in Northwestern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Timiskaming is a district and census division in Northeastern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... A regional municipality (or region) is a type of Canadian municipal government which works much like a county; the method of government depends on how it is defined. ... The Regional Municipality of Durham, commonly called Durham Region (2003 population 525,000), is a regional political area located east of Toronto, Ontario. ... The Regional Municipality of Halton, or Halton Region, is located in Ontario, Canada, and is located in the southwest portion of the Greater Toronto Area and until 1974 was known as Halton County. ... The Muskoka District Municipality, more generally referred to as the District of Muskoka, or simply Muskoka (the official name is the District Municipality of Muskoka) is a Regional Municipality located in Central Ontario. ... Heraldic Motto: Unity, Responsibility, Loyalty Corporate Motto: Building Communities, Building Lives Location of the Niagara Region within Ontario Area: 1,852 sq. ... Oxford County, Ontario is a regional municipality and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Mottos: Working for you Area: 1,241. ... The Regional Municipality of Waterloo is a regional municipality located in Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: Ontarios Rising Star Map of York Region and the municipalities it includes. ... There are currently 445 municipalities in Ontario. ... The city of Brant (or County of Brant) is a single-tier municipality and a census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Province Established May 31, 1877 Government  - City Mayor Mike Hancock  - Governing Body Brantford City Council  - MP Lloyd St. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Province County none–Single-tier municipality Established 1998 Government  - City Mayor Randy Hope  - Governing body Chatham-Kent Council  - MPs Bev Shipley (CPC) Dave Van Kesteren (CPC)  - MPPs Pat Hoy (OLP) Maria Van Bommel (OLP) Area  - City 2,458 km² (949 sq mi) Elevation 198 m (650 ft... Nickname: Motto: Aedificemus (Latin for Come, let us build together) Coordinates: , Country Province Established 1893 (as Sudbury)   2001 (as Greater Sudbury) Government  - Mayor John Rodriguez  - Governing Body Greater Sudbury City Council  - MPs Raymond Bonin (LPC), Diane Marleau (LPC)  - MPPs Rick Bartolucci (OLP), Shelley Martel (NDP) Area  - City 3,200 km... Haldimand is a single-tier municipality (but called a county) on the Niagara Peninsula in southern Ontario, on Lake Erie, and on the Grand River. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Location in the province of Ontario, Canada Coordinates: , Country Province Incorporated June 9, 1846[1] Government  - Mayor Fred Eisenberger  - City Council Hamilton City Council  - MPs List of MPs Dean Allison Chris Charlton David Christopherson Wayne Marston David Sweet  - MPPs List of MPPs Sophia Aggelonitis Andrea... Location of Kawartha Lakes in Ontario The City of Kawartha Lakes is a city in east-central Ontario, Canada. ... Norfolk County (pronounced IPA: ) is a city-status single-tier municipal government on the north shore of Lake Erie in southwestern Ontario. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... The Corporation of the County of Prince Edward is a single-tier municipality and a census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... In the Canadian province of Ontario, municipalities operate in various hierarchies. ... For the electoral district, see Barrie (electoral district). ... Belleville (2006 population 48,821, metropolitan population 91,518)[1] is a city located at the mouth of the Moira River on the Bay of Quinte in southeastern Ontario, Canada, in the Quebec City-Windsor Corridor. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Province Established May 31, 1877 Government  - City Mayor Mike Hancock  - Governing Body Brantford City Council  - MP Lloyd St. ... Brockville is located in the Thousand Islands region on the St. ... Gananoque is a town in Leeds and Grenville County, Ontario, located at 44°1955 North 76°944 West. ... Nickname: Motto: Faith, Fidelity and Progress Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario County Wellington County City Wards There are 6 Wards Founded April 23, 1827 Incorporated April 23, 1879 Government  - Mayor Karen Farbridge (elected November 2006)  - Governing Body Guelph City Council  - MPs Brenda Chamberlain (LPC)  - MPPs Liz Sandals (OLP) Area  - City... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel Kingston, Ontario, the first capital[1] of Canada, is located at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, where the lake runs into the St. ... For other places with the same name, see London (disambiguation). ... The Welcome sign to Orillia Orillia, pronounced ōrÄ­lÄ“É™, is a city located in Simcoe County in south-central Ontario, Canada, on Lake Couchiching. ... Pembroke (population 13,490 in the 2001 Canadian census) is a city at the confluence of the Muskrat River and the Ottawa River in the Ottawa Valley in eastern Ontario, Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: Dat natura, elaborant artes (Nature Provides, Industry Develops) Map of Ontario with Peterborough indicated with a red dot Coordinates: , Country Province County Peterborough County Established 1819 - Scotts Plains Incorporated as town 1850 - Peterborough Incorporated as city July 1, 1905 Government  - Mayor Paul Ayotte  - MP Dean Del Mastro... Prescott is a town of approximately 4,200 people on the north shore of the Saint Lawrence River in Ontario, Canada, directly across from Ogdensburg, New York. ... Quinte West is a municipality in central eastern Ontario, Canada. ... Smiths Falls (2001 population 9,977) is a town in Ontario, Canada. ... St. ... St. ... Stratford is a city on the Avon River in Perth County in southwestern Ontario, Canada with a population of 30,461, according to the 2006 census. ... Nickname: Motto: The river and the land sustain us. ... Communities of the Province of Ontario, Canada Note: this is a list of communities, and are not necessarily organized municipalities. ... There are currently 445 municipalities in Ontario. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 11 Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the Canadian territory. ... For the former United States territory, see Northwest Territory. ... For the Canadian federal electoral district, see Nunavut (electoral district). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



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