FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Onomatopoeia" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Onomatopoeia
Look up onomatopoeia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Onomatopoeia (occasionally spelled onomateopoeia or onomatopœia, from Greek ονοματοποιία) is a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describing, suggesting its source object, such as "click," "clang," "buzz," or animal noises such as "oink", "quack", "flap", "slurp", or "meow". The word is a synthesis of the Greek words όνομα (onoma, = "name") and ποιέω (poieō, = "I make" or "I do") thus it essentially means "name creation", although it makes more sense combining "name" and "I do", meaning it is named (& spelled) as it sounds (e.g. quack, bang, etc.). Onomatopoeia, from the cover to Green Arrow #13. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... For other uses, see Word (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Variations in onomatopoeia between languages

Onomatopoeic words exist in every language, although they are different in each. For example:


Frog croaking:

Rooster crowing: Beginning of Homers Odyssey The Ancient Greek language is the historical stage of the Greek language[1] as it existed during the Archaic (9th–6th centuries BC) and Classical (5th–4th centuries BC) periods in Ancient Greece. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Rooster (disambiguation). ...


A dog barking: Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

A cat's mewing/crying: Catalan IPA: (català IPA: or []) is a Romance language, the national language of Andorra, and a co-official language in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Catalonia and Valencia, and in the city of LAlguer in the Italian island of Sardinia. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The word mew can refer to: Mew (Pokémon), a video game character Miaow or meow, the noise that cats make. ...

A cannon firing or gun shot: The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

Collision sounds: The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

  • In Gilbertese. beeku: a collision.
  • In Haitian Creole, bip: the sound of a collision (eg. a car crash).
  • In Latin, tuxtax was the equivalent of bam or whack and was meant to imitate the sound of blows landing.

Stuttering: Gilbertese or Kiribati (sometimes Kiribatese, a mixture of both) is a language from the Austronesian family, part of the Oceanian branch and of the Nuclear Micronesian subbranch. ... Haitian Creole (kreyòl ayisyen) is a creole language It is spoken in Haiti by about 8. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ...

  • In Hebrew, bakbook: bottle, and gimgoom: stutter.

Heart beating: Hebrew redirects here. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ...

  • In English thump, thump
  • In Hindi dhadak and Urdu dhakdhak (pronounced /ˈd̪əɖək/): a person's heartbeat, indicative of the sound of one beat.
  • In Japanese, doki doki (ドキドキ): the (speeding up of the) beating of a heart (and thus excitement).

Sneezing: The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Hindi (DevanāgarÄ«: or , IAST: , IPA:  ), an Indo-European language spoken all over India in varying degrees and extensively in northern and central India, is one of the 22 official languages of India and is used, along with English, for central government administrative purposes. ... Urdu ( , , trans. ... For other uses, see Sneeze (disambiguation). ...

Kisses: The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

Crow calling: Malayalam (മലയാളം ) is the language spoken predominantly in the state of Kerala, in southern India. ...

Wind blowing: The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Tamil ( ; IPA ) is a Dravidian language spoken predominantly by Tamils in India and Sri Lanka, with smaller communities of speakers in many other countries. ...

  • In Vietnamese, vi vu: the sound of a gentle breeze, and vù vù: the sound of a strong wind.

Geese calling:

Water dripping: The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

Reasons for variations

Sometimes onomatopoeic words can seem to have a tenuous relationship with the object they describe. Native speakers of a given language may never question the relationship, but because words for the same basic sound can differ considerably between languages, non-native speakers might be confused by the idiomatic words of another language. For example, the sound a dog makes  is bow-wow (or woof-woof) in English, wau-wau in German, uau-uau in Interlingua, ouaf-ouaf in French, gaf-gaf in Russian, hav-hav in Hebrew, wan-wan or bau-bau in Japanese, ão-ão in Portuguese, guau-guau in Spanish, bau-bau in Italian, vov-vov in Danish, woef woef [as English woof] or waf waf in Dutch, wou wou in Cantonese, voff-voff in Icelandic, hau-hau in Finnish and Polish, haf-haf in Czech, hav-hav (pronounced like English how-how) in Slovak, guk guk in Indonesian, bub bub in Catalan, ghav-ghav in Modern Greek, wou wou in Teso, gâu gâu in Vietnamese, vaL vaL in Tamil, wang wang' in Mandarin, meong meong in Korean, and "hong hong" in Thai. Image File history File links Sound-of-dog. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the auxiliary language created by the International Auxiliary Language Association. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... This article is on all of the Yue dialects. ... Catalan IPA: (català IPA: or []) is a Romance language, the national language of Andorra, and a co-official language in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Catalonia and Valencia, and in the city of LAlguer in the Italian island of Sardinia. ... Main article: Greek language Modern Greek (Νέα Ελληνικά or Νεοελληνική, lit. ... TESO was a famous hacker group, which originated in Austria and quickly became international. ...


In the case of frog croaking, the spelling can vary because species of frog found in another area may make another noise: Ancient Greek brekekekex koax koax for probably Rana ridibunda; English ribbit for species of frog found in North America; English verb "croak" for Rana temporaria. Distribution of frogs (in black) Suborders Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia - List of Anuran families The frogness babe is an amphibian in the order Anura (meaning tail-less from Greek an-, without + oura, tail), formerly referred to as Salientia (Latin saltare, to jump). ... Beginning of Homers Odyssey The Ancient Greek language is the historical stage of the Greek language[1] as it existed during the Archaic (9th–6th centuries BC) and Classical (5th–4th centuries BC) periods in Ancient Greece. ... Binomial name Rana ridibunda Pallas, 1771 The Marsh Frog (Rana ridibunda) is the largest European frog. ... Frogs are amphibians in the Order Anura, which includes frogs and toads. ... Binomial name Rana temporaria Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Frog, Rana temporaria also known as the European Common Frog or European Common Brown Frog is found throughout much of Europe as far north as the Arctic Circle and as far east as the Urals, except for most of Iberia, southern Italy...


Uses of onomatopoeia

Some other very common English-language examples include hiccup, bang, beep, and splash. Machines and their sounds are also often described with onomatopoeia, as in honk or beep-beep for the horn of an automobile, and vroom or brum for the engine. In Science fiction the sounds made by laser weapons are often described as "zaps" . For animal sounds, words like quack (duck), bark (dog), roar (lion) and meow (cat) are typically used in English. Some of these words are used both as nouns and as verbs. This article is about devices that perform tasks. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies Dendrocygninae Oxyurinae Anatinae Aythyinae Merginae Duck is the common name for a number of species in the Anatidae family of birds. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ...


Agglutinative languages or synthetic languages flexibly integrate onomatopoeic words into their structure. This may evolve into a new word, up to the point that it is no longer recognized as onomatopoeia. One example is English "bleat" for the sheep noise: in medieval times it was pronounced approximately as "blairt" (but without an R-component), or "blet" with the vowel drawled, which is much more accurate as onomatopoeia than the modern pronunciation. It has been suggested that Agglutination be merged into this article or section. ... Bleat is a noun describing the baa vocal noise made by several woolly ruminant quadrupeds, most commonly the Domestic Sheep (Ovis aries), which probably descends from the wild urial of south-central and south-west Asia. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ...


An example of the opposite case is "cuckoo", which, due to continuous familiarity with the bird noise down the centuries, has kept approximately the same pronunciation as in Anglo-Saxon times and has not changed to having its vowels as in "furrow". Genera See text. ... Old English redirects here. ...


Verbum dicendi is a method of integrating onomatopoeia and ideophones into grammar. A verbum dicendi (or declaratory word) is a word that expresses speech, introduces a quotation, or marks a transition to non-standard or non-grammatical speech. ... Contents // Categories: Linguistics | Stub ...


Occasionally, words for things are created from representations of the sounds these objects make. In English, for example, there is the universal fastener which is named for the onomatopoeic of the sound it makes: the zip (in the UK) or zipper (in the U.S.). Many birds are named from the onomatopoetic link with the calls they make, such as the Bobwhite quail, the killdeer, chickadee, the cuckoo, the chiffchaff, the whooping crane and the whip-poor-will. In Tamil and Malayalam, the word for crow is kaakaa. This practice is especially common in certain languages such as Māori and, therefore, in names of animals borrowed from these languages. Zipper slider brings together the two sides A zipper (British English: zip fastener or zip) is a popular device for temporarily joining two edges of fabric. ... Zipper slider brings together the two sides A zipper (British English: zip fastener or zip) is a popular device for temporarily joining two edges of fabric. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Colinus virginianus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Bobwhite Quail or Northern Bobwhite, Colinus virginianus, is a ground-dwelling bird native to North America. ... Binomial name Charadrius vociferus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus) is a medium-sized plover. ... Genera See text. ... Binomial name Cuculus canorus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Common Cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) is a member of the cuckoo order of birds, the Cuculiformes, which also includes the roadrunners, the anis, the coucals, and the Hoatzin. ... Binomial name Phylloscopus collybita (Vieillot, 1817) The Common Chiffchaff or simply Chiffchaff, Phylloscopus collybita, is a common and widespread leaf warbler which breeds throughout northern and temperate Europe and Asia. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 as of 2007 The Whooping Crane (Grus americana), named for its whooping call, is a very large and endangered crane. ... Binomial name Wilson, 1812 The Whip-poor-will or whippoorwill, Caprimulgus vociferus, is a medium-sized (22-27 cm) nightjar, a type of nocturnal bird. ... For other uses, see Crow (disambiguation). ... Māori or Te Reo Māori,[1] commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) functions as one of the official languages of New Zealand. ...


Advertising uses onomatopoeia as a mnemonic, so consumers will remember their products, as in Rice Krispies (US and UK) and Rice Bubbles (AU) which make a "snap, crackle, pop" when one pours on milk; or in road safety advertisements: "clunk click, every trip" (click the seatbelt on after clunking the car door closed; UK campaign) or "click, clack, front and back" (click, clack of connecting the seatbelts; AU campaign) or "click it or ticket" (click of the connecting seatbelt; US DOT campaign). // Advert redirects here. ... For other uses, see Mnemonic (disambiguation). ... A Rice Krispies box Rice Krispies (known as Rice Bubbles in Australia) is a brand of breakfast cereal that has been produced by Kelloggs since 1928. ... Categories: Food and drink stubs | Breakfast cereals ...


Manner imitation

Main article: Ideophone

In many of the world's languages, onomatopoeia-like words are used to describe phenomena apart from the purely auditive. Japanese often utilizes such words to describe feelings or figurative expressions about objects or concepts. For instance, Japanese barabara is used to reflect an object's state of disarray or separation, and shiiin is the onomatopoetic form of absolute silence (used at the time an English speaker might expect to hear the sound of crickets chirping or a pin dropping in a silent room). It is used in English as well with terms like bling, which describes the shine on things like gold, chrome or precious stones. Contents // Categories: Linguistics | Stub ... A tree cricket sitting on a leaf. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

Onomatopoeia in pop culture

Whaam! (1963) by Roy Lichtenstein.
Whaam! (1963) by Roy Lichtenstein.
  • Whaam! (1963) by Roy Lichtenstein is an early example of pop art, featuring fighter aircraft being struck by rockets with dazzling red and yellow explosions.
  • Marvel Comics have trademarked two words of their own invention: thwip! , the sound of Spider-Man's web shooter, and snikt! the switchblade-sound of Wolverine's claws locking into place (which was replaced with the lesser-known schlikt during the period he was left without the adamantium covering on his bones). Marvel also uses the sound effect "bamf" to signify Nightcrawler's teleportation.
  • In Doctor Who comic strips, the sound of the Tardis is represented as vworp! vworp!
  • In the Garfield comic strip and television series, there is a running gag about a "splut," which is usually the sound of a pie hitting someone in the face.
    • For example, Garfield once kicked Odie, but instead of 'kick' it said 'blagoonga', with Garfield remarking to Jon that Odie needs to be tuned
  • In the 1960s TV series “Batman”, comic book style onomatopoeias such as wgam!, pow! and crunch appear onscreen during fight scenes. This is often the subject of parody, for example in the Simpsons episode "Radioactive Man" where the onomatopoeic words are replaced with snuh!, newt! and mint! which are references to other Simpsons episodes.
  • Ubisoft's XIII employed the use of comic book onomatopoeias such as bam!, boom and noooo! during gameplay for gunshots, explosions and kills, respectively. The comic-book style is apparent throughout the game and is a core theme, as the game is an adaptation of a comic book of the same name.
  • The onomatopoeia that is said to be heard at a typical Disco Biscuits (a popular jamband) show is untz. This description seems to have originated from an interview with Bob Dylan, who said "I kept hearing this, untz..untz..untz..untz..(sound in the background of all the music)...fun time, though... lots of young kids with dilated pupils."
  • In Jonathan Swift's novel Gulliver's Travels, the name of the Houyhnhnm's is an onomatopoeia for the whinny of a horse.
  • Todd Rundgren wrote a humorous song "Onomatopoeia" which uses many examples in this "Love Song". Examples in the song start out reasonable and start to get more ludicrous as the song goes on.
  • The comic strip For Better or For Worse is notorious for using non-onomatopoeic verbs as onomatopoeias, such as "Scrape," to indicate a person shaving, or "Tie," to illustrate someone tying a string around a package.
  • A well-known rhetorical question is "Why doesn't onomatopoeia sound like what it is?". Ian M. Banks references this in his novel Use Of Weapons, when a character claims that the word onomatopoeia is spelled "just the way it sounds!".
  • Brian Preston, a popular Quizzo night host in Philadelphia used words like crash, boom, and fart to describe onomatopoeia. Unfortunately, fart is a non-onomatopoeia (although its Proto-Indo-European language ancestor perd- (compare Greek περδομαι and Avestic prd) is more realistic).
  • "Kerplunk" was used in the video game Final Fantasy VIII as the name of one of the Guardian Force Cactuar's attacks. For the Guardian Force Tonberry, the humorously out of place onomatopoeia of doink! is written on-screen during its powerful knife stab attack.
  • In the video game Brave Story: New Traveler, an onomatopoeia appears wherever an attack hits its target.
  • The fictional Vorpal blade from the poem "Jabberwocky" by Lewis Carrol goes "snicker-snack" when used.
  • The January 8, 2008 comic of Ozy and Millie featured a panel in which Millie repeats the word "Splorsh" and Ozy quips "I've noticed you find Onomatopoeia extremely distracting."
  • "Uhn Tiss Uhn Tiss Uhn Tiss", recorded by The Bloodhound Gang in 2005 for their "Hefty Fine" album simulated the driving beat of most popular House and Rave music styles.
  • In one Captain America comic, the accidental use of the word "wank" was found hilarious by many teenagers.
  • The marble game KerPlunk is an onomatopoeia for the sound of the marbles dropping when one too many sticks has been removed.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Roy_Lichtenstein_Whaam. ... Image File history File links Roy_Lichtenstein_Whaam. ... Roy Lichtenstein (27 October 1923–29 September 1997) was a prominent American pop artist, whose work borrowed heavily from popular advertising and comic book styles, which he himself described as being as artificial as possible. // Roy Lichtenstein was born on 27 October 1923 into an upper-middle-class family in... Roy Lichtenstein (27 October 1923–29 September 1997) was a prominent American pop artist, whose work borrowed heavily from popular advertising and comic book styles, which he himself described as being as artificial as possible. // Roy Lichtenstein was born on 27 October 1923 into an upper-middle-class family in... This article is about the comic book company. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... This article is about a term in the Marvel Universe. ... This article is about the comic character. ... This article is about the television series. ... The current TARDIS prop. ... This article is about the comic strip. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... This article is about the 1960s television series. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Radioactive Man is the second episode of The Simpsons seventh season which originally aired September 24, 1995. ... Ubisoft Entertainment (formerly Ubi Soft) is a computer and video game publisher and developer with headquarters in Montreuil-sous-Bois, France. ... XIII (pronounced: Thirteen) is a first-person shooter video game released for PlayStation 2, GameCube, Xbox, Mac and the PC, and based on the Belgian XIII comic series. ... (code) XIII Original Title XIII Series Title Code XIII Writer(s) Jean Van Hamme Artist(s) William Vance Publisher Dargaud First published 1984 Publication frequency Yearly Pages 19 albums (44pg each) XIII (Thirteen) is a Franco-Belgian comics series written by the Belgian Jean Van Hamme and drawn by the... The Disco Biscuits are a trance fusion jam band from Philadelphia. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... For other uses, see Gullivers Travels (disambiguation). ... For Better or For Worse is a comic strip by Lynn Johnston that began in September 1979. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... This article is about the word fart itself. ... This article is about the word fart itself. ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages, spoken by the Proto-Indo-Europeans. ... Avestan is an Eastern Old Iranian language that was used to compose the hymns of the Zoroastrian holy book, the Avesta. ... Final Fantasy VIII ) is a console and computer role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... In the Square Enixs (formerly Square Co. ... Categories: | | ... A Tonberry is a mysterious creature from the Final Fantasy series. ... For the plasma physics software, see VORPAL. Jabberwocky illustration by John Tenniel. ... For other uses, see Jabberwocky (disambiguation). ... Photograph of Lewis Carroll taken by himself, with assistance Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll, was a British author, mathematician, Anglican clergyman, logician, and amateur photographer. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the original comic book character named Captain America. ... A version of KerPlunk KerPlunk is a game first marketed by Ideal in 1967. ... Hand-made marbles from West Africa Different glass marbles from a glass-mill For other uses, see Marbles (disambiguation). ...

See also

Sound symbolism or phonosemantics is a branch of linguistics and refers to the idea that vocal sounds have meaning. ... Below is a list of appropriate verbs corresponding to the sounds made by various animals. ... This article describes sound symbolic or mimetic words in the Japanese language. ...

References

  • Crystal, David (1997) The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language, Second Edition ISBN 0-521-55967-7
  • Smyth, Herbert Weir (1920). Greek Grammar. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, p. 680. ISBN 0-674-36250-0. 

Professor David Crystal, OBE (born 1941 in Lisburn, Northern Ireland, UK) is a linguist, academic and author. ...

External links

  • Derek Abbott's Animal Noise Page
  • Tutorial on Drawing Onomatopoeia for Comics and Cartoons (using fonts)
  • Article on using onomatopeia and sound to enchance writing and poetry.
  • WrittenSound, onomatopoeic word list

  Results from FactBites:
 
Japanese Language Onomatopoeia (405 words)
Onomatopoeia is "the naming of a thing or action by a vocal imitation of the sound associated with it" or "the use of words whose sound suggests the sense" (yourDictionary.com Quick Lookup).
In addition to those onomatopoeia which imitate the sounds of nature, called gisei-go in Japanese, Japanese recognizes two additional types of onomatopoeia: one that basically suggests states of the external world (gitai-go), and another that basically names internal mental conditions and sensations (gijoo-go).
The fact that whole dictionaries consisting of so-called Japanese onomatopoeia, gisei-go, gitai-go, and gijoo-go, exist testifies to the fact that many of these expressions are equally opaque and require interpretation to the Japanese themselves.
What is Onomatopoeia? (497 words)
As such, onomatopoeia is a rhetorical device: a language technique or device used to create an effect in or for the reader.
Onomatopoeia differs from cacophony, the intentional use of harsh sound for effect, as well as from euphony, the use of harmonious sounds, also for effect, although onomatopoeia may, depending on the item or action being imitated, fit into either of those categories.
Some musical onomatopoeia is associated with specific music instruments — the twang of a banjo or guitar, for example, or oompah for a tuba, or plunk for a keyboard.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m