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Encyclopedia > One Ring

The One Ring, also known as the Ruling Ring, the Great Ring of Power, The Ring, or Isildur's Bane, is an artefact from J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional Middle-earth universe. The story of the Quest to destroy the Ring is told in Tolkien's novel The Lord of the Rings, as is most of the Ring's history. This article is about artifacts in fantasy and roleplaying. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ...

Contents

Description

The One Ring was created by the Dark Lord Sauron during the Second Age in order to gain dominion over the free peoples of Middle-earth. In disguise as Annatar, or "Lord of Gifts", he aided the Elven smiths of Eregion and their leader Celebrimbor in the making of the Rings of Power. He then forged the One Ring himself in the fires of Mount Doom. He intended it to be the most powerful of all Rings, able to rule and control the others (as long as their owners wore them). Since the other Rings were extremely powerful, Sauron was obliged to place most of his native power, life force and will into it to effect his purpose. As a side effect of this, as long as the Ring existed, it was impossible to remove him from the mortal plane. The risk to Sauron was that if he were to lose the Ring, he would also lose a great deal of his own power, and if the Ring were to be destroyed, perhaps even his life. For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...  men of Númenórean descent  Northmen  other men  elves  ents  hobbits  dwarves  enslaved peoples (orcs, trolls, dragons etc. ... location of Eregion in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Eregion or Hollin was a kingdom of the Noldorin Elves in Eriador during the Second Age, located near the West Gate of Khazad-dûm under the shadow of the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains). ... Celebrimbor is a fictional character In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... The bearers of the Rings of Power in Peter Jacksons The Fellowship of the Ring The Rings of Power are fictional artifacts from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... Much of the recent sociological debate on power revolves around the issue of the constraining and/or enabling nature of power. ... // For the racing driver, see Will Power. ...


The Ring appeared to be made of simple gold, but due to the vast power within it, it was impervious to damage. It could only be destroyed by throwing it into the pit of the volcanic Mount Doom where it had originally been forged or, as stated in the books, by Dragon fire (although there were no more Dragons left after the death of Smaug). Like the lesser rings forged by the Elves as "essays in the craft" (but unlike the other Rings of Power) it bore no gem, but its identity could be determined by a simple (though little-known) test: when heated, it displayed a fiery Tengwar inscription in the Black Speech of Mordor. The lines were later taken up into a rhyme of lore describing the Rings, but they were evidently part of the spell that imbued the One Ring with power, since the Elves heard Sauron utter the same words during the Ring's creation whereupon they took off their own Rings and foiled his plan. For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... A selection of gemstone pebbles made by tumbling rough rock with abrasive grit, in a rotating drum. ... First article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (in English) The Tengwar are an artificial script which was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Black Speech is the fictional language of Mordor in The Lord of the Rings. ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ...

The ring-inscription appearing to Isildur (top), Frodo (middle), and as the ring is destroyed in Mount Doom in Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy.

When a person wore the Ring, he would be partly "shifted" out of the physical realm into the spiritual realm. There, if he managed to consciously subdue the Ring's will with his own, he could wield all the powers that Sauron had before he lost the ring; especially controlling and enslaving the wills of others. A side effect (but usually the first effect noticed) of the Ring was that it made the wearer invisible to physical beings like living Men but highly visible to spiritual beings like the Nazgûl, dimmed the wearer's sight, and sharpened his hearing. This "spiritual world" was where the Nazgûl were forced to live always, but it was also a world in which the Calaquendi (Elves of Light) held great power: therefore Glorfindel was able to drive off the Witch-king at the Battle of Fornost and later again at the ford of Bruinen at Rivendell. Image File history File linksMetadata Ringinscription. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Ringinscription. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... Frodo Baggins is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961) is a New Zealand filmmaker best known as the director of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, which he, along with Fran Walsh, his long time partner, and Philippa Boyens, adapted from the novels by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action fantasy epic films; The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Nazgûl (from Black Speech Nazg (ring) and Gûl (wraith, spirit); Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black or Dark Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron. ... In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Calaquendi (singular Calaquende) are the Elves of Light, those who had seen the light of the Two Trees in Valinor. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Glorfindel is an Elf, a Noldor who appears in the tales of Middle-earth. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as the Lord of the Nazgûl and the Black Captain among other names, is a fictional character from the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Combatants Army of Gondor under Eärnur, Dúnedain of Arnor, Men of Rhovanion, Elves of Lindon, and (according to Hobbit lore) a company of Hobbit archers from The Shire. ... A ford is a section of water (most commonly a section of a river) that is sufficiently shallow as to be traversable by wading. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the river Bruinen or Loudwater is a river which appears in The Hobbit as well as The Lord of the Rings. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


The enigmatic Tom Bombadil was unaffected by the Ring. This may be explained in many ways. (See the article on Tom Bombadil, which includes some theories.) Tom Bombadil is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


In Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings movie trilogy, the wearer of the Ring is always portrayed as moving to a shadowy realm where everything is distorted. Neither Bilbo Baggins nor Frodo Baggins ever mentioned anything about this while using the Ring, but when Sam puts on the Ring at the end of The Two Towers he does experience something similar to this. This is the only time that this is mentioned in the books and could be attributed to Sauron's power increasing. Sam never wore the Ring on screen in Jackson's movie. The actual Ring for the movies was designed and created by Jens Hansen Gold & Silversmith in Nelson, New Zealand. Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961) is a New Zealand filmmaker best known as the director of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, which he, along with Fran Walsh, his long time partner, and Philippa Boyens, adapted from the novels by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action fantasy epic films; The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Frodo Baggins is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character who is Frodo Bagginss servant and companion on the journey to Mordor. ... The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. ... The City of Nelson is situated very close to the centre of New Zealand. ...


Part of the nature of the Ring was that it slowly but inevitably corrupted its wearer, regardless of any intentions to the contrary. Whether this effect was specifically designed into the Ring's magic or is simply an artefact of its evil origins is unknown. (Sauron might be expected to endow his One Ring with such a property, but he probably never intended anyone besides himself to wear it.) For this reason the Wise, including Gandalf, Elrond and Galadriel, refused to wield it in their own defence, but instead determined that it should be destroyed. It appears that hobbits, being purer of heart than Men and far less powerful than Elves, are the ideal vessels to resist its seductive power. This explains why Frodo and Bilbo bore it for long periods of time with relatively little ill effect, and why Gollum, who bore it for over 500 years, was not completely corrupted (although he was twisted beyond recognition and killed his best friend soon after seeing the Ring). In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Gandalf is a central character in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, where he appears as a fairly archetypal wizard, albeit one as equally at home using a sword as employing magic, taking a key role in the latter books... Elrond Half-elven is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... Gollum is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


History of the Ring

See Timeline of Arda for details. This article includes several timelines relating to J. R. R. Tolkiens fiction. ...


After its original forging (about 1600 S.A.) Sauron wielded the ring and waged war against all who opposed him, specifically the Elves (this is known as the War of the Elves and Sauron). At first the war went well for Sauron and Eregion was destroyed along with Celebrimbor, the maker of the other rings of power. But later (about 1700 S.A.) Tar-Minastir led a great army to Middle-earth and, together with Gil-galad, destroyed Sauron's army, forcing Sauron to return to Mordor. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the War of the Elves and Sauron was a great war fought in the Second Age. ... location of Eregion in Middle-earth marked in red In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Eregion or Hollin was a kingdom of the Noldorin Elves in Eriador during the Second Age, located near the West Gate of Khazad-dûm under the shadow of the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains). ... Celebrimbor is a fictional character In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Tar-Minastir (1474 - 1873 S.A., r. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Ereinion Gil-galad was the son of Orodreth,[1] and his mother was a Sindarin Elf. ...


In the year 3261 S.A., Ar-Pharazôn, the last and most powerful king of Númenor, landed at Umbar at the head of a gigantic army to do battle with Sauron. The sheer size and might of the Númenórean army was enough to cause Sauron's forces to flee. Sauron surrendered to Ar-Pharazôn and was taken back to Númenor as a prisoner. Tolkien, in a letter written in 1958 (#211) wrote that the surrender was both "voluntary and cunning" so he could gain access to Númenor. Despite 1,500 years of war with Sauron, the Elves had not revealed to the Númenóreans the existence of the One Ring or any of the Rings of Power and so Ar-Pharazôn was unaware of it. With it, Sauron was able to use the Númenóreans' fear of death as a way to turn them against the Valar, and toward Melkor-worship and human sacrifice. In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Ar-Pharazôn the Golden (3118–3319 S.A., r. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Arda, a great haven to the far south of Gondor in Middle-earth. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Although Sauron's body was destroyed in the Fall of Númenor his spirit was able to bear the Ring back to Middle-earth and he wielded it in his renewed war against the Last Alliance of Elves and Men in the years 3429 to 3441. Wrote Tolkien "I do not think one need boggle at this spirit carrying off the One Ring, upon which his power of dominating minds now largely depended". (letter #211). Akallabêth is the fourth part of the fictional work The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Combatants Mordor and allies Lindon, Gondor, Arnor and allies Commanders Sauron Gil-galad and Elendil Strength The Hosts of Mordor: Many Orc-hosts. ...


The Ring was cut from Sauron's hand by Isildur at the slopes of Mount Doom, and he in turn lost it in the River Anduin (at the Gladden Fields) just before he was killed in an Orc ambush (year 2 of the Third Age). The Ring remained hidden in the river bed for almost two and a half millennia, until it was discovered on a fishing trip by a Stoor Hobbit named Déagol. He was murdered by his friend and relative Sméagol, who stole the Ring, and was changed by the Ring's influence over many ages into the creature known as Gollum. The Ring, which Sauron had endowed with a will of its own, manipulated Gollum into settling in the Misty Mountains near Mirkwood, where Sauron was beginning to resurface. There he and it remained for nearly five hundred years, until the Ring tired of him and fell off his finger as he was returning from killing a goblin. In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Stoors are one of the three races of Hobbits. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Hobbits are a diminutive race that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... Déagol, from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth, was the Stoor Hobbit who became the third bearer of the One Ring, after Sauron and Isildur when he found the One Ring while diving in the Gladden river (a tributary to the Anduin) with his cousin... Gollum is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Gollum is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... // For the racing driver, see Will Power. ... The Misty Mountains as seen in the prologue to The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001). ... For the game Mirkwood, see Mirkwood (mud). ...


As is told in The Hobbit, Bilbo found the Ring while he was lost in the caverns of the Misty Mountains, near Gollum's lair. When The Hobbit was written, Tolkien had not yet conceived of the Ring's sinister back-story. Thus, in the first edition of The Hobbit, Gollum surrenders the Ring to Bilbo as a reward for winning the Riddle Game. However, as Tolkien was conceiving the nature of the Ring, he realised that the Ring's grip on Gollum would never permit him to give it up willingly. Therefore, Tolkien revised this chapter in the second edition of The Hobbit: after losing the Riddle Game to Bilbo, Gollum went to get his "Precious" (as he always called it) so he could kill and eat him, but flew into a rage when he found it missing. Deducing that Bilbo had it from his last riddle— "What have I got in my pocket?"— Gollum chased him through the caves, not knowing that the Hobbit had discovered the Ring's powers of invisibility and was following him to the cave's exit. Bilbo escaped Gollum and the goblins who inhabited the Misty Mountains by remaining invisible, but left that power out of the story he told the dwarves he was travelling with. In fact, the version of the events that Bilbo told was the version of the first edition of the Hobbit. Gandalf, who was also travelling with the dwarves, later forced the real story out of Bilbo, and was immediately suspicious of the Ring's powers. This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... Alternate meanings: Cave (disambiguation) This article is about natural caves; for artificial caves used as dwellings, such as those in north China, see yaodong. ... A riddle is a statement or question having a double or veiled meaning, put forth as a puzzle to be solved. ... This Tolkien article or section may need to be cleaned up and rewritten because it describes a work of fiction in a primarily in-universe perspective. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ...


Gollum, meanwhile, eventually left the Misty Mountains to track down and reclaim the Ring. He wandered for decades, to be captured and interrogated by Sauron himself, to whom he revealed the existence of Bilbo and the Shire.


In 3001 of the Third Age, following Gandalf's counsel, Bilbo gave the Ring to his nephew and adopted heir Frodo. This first willing sacrifice of the Ring in its history sparks the chain of events which eventually led to its unmaking. It is one example of the frequent interplay between apparent chance and destiny, a ubiquitous theme in The Lord of the Rings. For other uses, see The Third Age. ... Frodo Baggins is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... For other uses of Fate, see Fate Destiny refers to a predetermined course of events. ... In literature, a theme is a broad idea in a story, or a message or lesson conveyed by a work. ...


By this time Sauron had begun to regain his power, and the Dark Tower in Mordor had been rebuilt. In order to prevent Sauron from reclaiming his Ring, Frodo and eight other companions set out from Rivendell for Mordor in an attempt to destroy the Ring in the fires of Mount Doom. During the quest, Frodo gradually became more and more susceptible to the Ring's power, and feared that it was going to corrupt him. When he and Sam discovered that Gollum was on their trail and "tamed" him into guiding them to Mordor, he began to feel a strange bond with the wretched, treacherous creature, seeing a possible future of himself that he felt he had to save in order to save himself. Gollum gave in to the Ring's temptation, however, and betrayed them to the spider Shelob. Believing Frodo to be dead, Sam bore the Ring himself for a short time and experienced the temptation it induced, although he never gave in to it. Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. ... Spoiler warning: The Fellowship of the Ring, as described in the first volume of The Lord of the Rings, which bears the same name, is a union of 9 representatives from each of the free peoples in Middle-earth, the number chosen to match the 9 Ringwraiths. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Mount Doom, or Orodruin, is a volcano in Mordor where the One Ring was forged in the Crack of Doom, a fiery chasm within the mountain. ... Shelob is a character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional works of Middle-earth. ...


Sam rescued Frodo from a band of orcs at the Tower of Cirith Ungol and returned the Ring to him but feared that the toll it was taking was too great. It nearly was: although Frodo and Sam, followed by Gollum, eventually arrived at Mount Doom, Frodo was overcome by its corrupting nature and claimed the Ring for himself rather than destroy it. However, he was attacked by Gollum, who bit off the finger holding the Ring before falling into the fires of Mount Doom, finally destroying the Ring. For the US heavy metal band, see Cirith Ungol (band). ...


Appearance

The ring-inscription is a Black Speech inscription in Tengwar upon the One Ring, symbolising the Ring's power to control the other Rings of Power. The Black Speech is the fictional language of Mordor in The Lord of the Rings. ... First article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (in English) The Tengwar are an artificial script which was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The bearers of the Rings of Power in Peter Jacksons The Fellowship of the Ring The Rings of Power are fictional artifacts from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ...


Normally the One Ring appears perfectly plain and featureless, but when heated in a fire the inscription appears in fiery letters inside and outside the Ring. A drawing of the Inscription appears in Book I, Chapter 2 of The Fellowship of the Ring, "The Shadow of the Past". A transliteration appears in Book II, Chapter 2, "The Council of Elrond", where the inscription is read by Gandalf: The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, the Council of Elrond is a fictional secret council called by Elrond in Rivendell in order to decide what should be done with the One Ring. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Gandalf is a central character in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, where he appears as a fairly archetypal wizard, albeit one as equally at home using a sword as employing magic, taking a key role in the latter books...

Ash nazg durbatulûk, ash nazg gimbatul, ash nazg thrakatulûk, agh burzum-ishi krimpatul. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1033x309, 27 KB)One Ring inscription, scanned, File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Hearing these words causes everyone in the Council to tremble. The Elves also put their hands over their ears, either due to their hatred of Sauron, or else due to actual pain the words bring. Celeborn (portrayed by Marton Csokas), an Elf in Peter Jacksons adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring. ...

The change in the wizard's voice was astounding. Suddenly it became menacing, powerful, harsh as stone. A shadow seemed to pass over the high sun, and the porch for a moment grew dark. All trembled, and the Elves stopped their ears.

Roughly translated, the words mean:

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them

When the Ring was first forged, Sauron spoke these words aloud, and Celebrimbor, maker of the Three Rings of the Elves, heard him from afar and was aware of his now-revealed purposes. Celebrimbor is a fictional character In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Three Rings of the Elves of Eregion are fictional magical artifacts. ...


The inscription uses Elvish lettering because all forms of writing Tolkien describes at that time were invented by the Elves.


Some recent editions of The Fellowship of the Ring accidentally omit the first two clauses of this phrase from Chapter 2, an error which was corrected by the time of the 50th Anniversary editions. The first four lines of the verse introduce three of the races inhabiting Middle-earth, as well as the eponymous title character, the Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings by the English author J. R. R. Tolkien. ...

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

Gandalf first learned of the Ring-inscription when he read the account that Isildur had written before marching north to his death and the loss of the Ring. When Isildur had cut the Ring from Sauron's hand, it was burning hot, and so Isildur was able to transcribe the inscription before it faded. In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Three Rings of the Elves of Eregion are fictional magical artifacts. ... Celeborn (portrayed by Marton Csokas), an Elf in Peter Jacksons adaptation of The Fellowship of the Ring. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... Combatants Army of Arnor Unknown number of Orcs Commanders Isildur, (High-King of Arnor and Gondor) Elendur (Heir to the Throne) Uruks of Mordor Strength 200 Knights and Soldiers less than 20 archers Unknown Casualties Isildur Elendur Aratan Ciryon 217 men of Arnor Serious casualties The Disater of the Gladden...


When Gandalf subsequently heated the ring that Bilbo Baggins had found and passed on to Frodo the inscription appeared, the wizard had no doubt that it was the One Ring. Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Frodo Baggins is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


In adaptations

In the 1981 BBC Radio serial of The Lord of the Rings, the Nazgûl chant the Ring-inscription. Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ... In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Nazgûl (from Black Speech Nazg (ring) and Gûl (wraith, spirit); Ringwraiths, sometimes written Ring-wraiths), also known as the Nine Riders or Black or Dark Riders (or simply the Nine), are evil servants of Sauron. ...


In Peter Jackson's 2001 film of The Fellowship of the Ring, Gandalf (Ian McKellen) pronounces the Ring-inscription in a slightly different manner. Peter Jackson CNZM (born October 31, 1961) is a New Zealand filmmaker best known as the director of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, which he, along with Fran Walsh, his long time partner, and Philippa Boyens, adapted from the novels by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey The year 2001 in film involved some significant events. ... Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CBE (born May 25, 1939) is an English stage and screen actor, the recipient of a Tony Award and two Oscar nominations. ...


Powers

The power of the One Ring was foremost the power to preserve one's life force and willpower against entropy and the decay of time. Wearing the Ring, even briefly, would curse a mortal with an indefinitely long lifespan. (The Ring cannot impart immortality, as Death is a gift of Eru Ilúvatar, the higher power in Tolkien's world.) Ice melting - classic example of entropy increasing[1] described in 1862 by Rudolf Clausius as an increase in the disgregation of the molecules of the body of ice. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916, wearing his British Army uniform in a photograph from the middle years of WW1. ...


The Ring also had the ability to render the one who wore it effectively invisible, except to Sauron and perhaps anyone able to fully utilise its power. Tom Bombadil also remained visible while wearing it and was unaffected by its evil influence. Tom Bombadil is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


The Ring also amplified the power of command, and allowed the Ring-bearer to impose his own will upon others, especially orcs and Gollum. Ironically, this is also the least accessible power of the Ring. In addition, the ring granted the wearer increased hearing at the expense of the quality of their eyesight, and the ability to understand languages not known to the wearer. Even though the Ring could not grant the wielder the physical power to control or destroy beings of divine origin such as Sauron or the Valar, it would still be a very useful tool to aid in world domination. Gollum is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... The Valar (singular Vala) are characters in J.R.R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


The One Ring could also perform other functions beyond mind control. It could amplify any inherent power its owner possessed. It also might have given the wielder the ability to read people's minds, as Galadriel suggested to Frodo when asked if he could learn to communicate telepathically like she did. Finally, the One Ring had 'mastery over the powers of all the other Rings.' Whether Tolkien meant the Ring could reproduce their powers or he was just reiterating the Ring's ability to control others who wore the linked Rings of Power is unknown.


Last but not least, the portion of Sauron's power that passed into the Ring during its creation endowed it with a malevolent sentience of sorts — while separated from Sauron, the Ring would forever strive to return to him, both by compelling its bearer to seek out Sauron or his servants and by directly influencing events toward this end (for example, by slipping off Gollum's finger when the time was right for it to be brought back into the world at large). Frodo Baggins claimed that he wore it on a chain due to its tendency to expand and fall off a finger while being worn.


However, to fully master all of these abilities, the person wearing Sauron's Ring would have to already have had an extremely disciplined and well-trained mind and high spiritual development. As a result, weaker minds, such as hobbits and men, would have gained very little benefit from the Ring (let alone realise its full potential) initially. It might have been possible for lesser minds to acquire a higher level of mastery of the Ring's powers over time and through training and practice, provided they had the strength of will to prevent the Ring from dominating them instead. However, beings that were powerful in their own right, such as Maiar and the more powerful among the Elves, would have had a greater control over the ring from the outset, possibly even enough to successfully use the ring to overthrow Sauron; yet in the end, the Ring's inherent corruption would have gradually twisted its bearer into another Dark Lord as evil as Sauron was, or worse. Ultimately, though the One Ring could be claimed by any being of great power and used in great works of good or evil, the books constantly reiterated the greatest threat to be Sauron reuniting with his Ring and reclaiming that part of his power he had embedded within it during its forging.


Note that Sauron, while wielding the One Ring, was defeated twice: first by Tar-Minastir in the year 1700 of the Second Age and again by the Last Alliance at the very end of the Second Age. The Last Alliance of Elves and Men that defeated Sauron and took his Ring at the end of the Second Age was made up of legendary heroes of great strength and divine blood. Even so, the war lasted several years and saw the deaths of many great heroes before it was finally over. (In his letters, Tolkien stated that Ar-Pharazôn did not defeat Sauron, he defeated Sauron's followers. Sauron surrendered to the King as a stratagem, in order to be taken to Númenor, corrupt it, and mislead the King into attacking Valinor, leading to the destruction of Númenor. Then the disembodied Sauron fled back to Middle-earth, and recovered his strength in a new corporeal body, before he was attacked by the armies of the Last Alliance.) In the book Tolkien strongly suggests that this would not have been possible during the waning years of the Third Age when the strength of the free peoples were greatly diminished. At the end of the Third Age, the strength of the Elves was fading and they were departing en masse to the Blessed Realm of Aman, the Dwarves had been driven out of Moria and were strong only in a few locations, and the kingdoms of Men were disorganised with some actively supporting Sauron. In this environment, Sauron wielding the One Ring would have been able to conquer the entire continent with ease. In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Tar-Minastir (1474 - 1873 S.A., r. ... The Last Alliance of Elves and Men is an episode in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Aman (blessed realm) is a continent that lies to the west of Middle-earth (although it lay in another dimension during the time of The Lord of the Rings), across the great ocean Belegaer. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through...


Nevertheless, despite its dangerous reputation, the Ring was not omnipotent, nor its power over other people's minds absolute.


Symbolism

Tolkien wrote the following about the idea behind the One Ring: "I should say that it was a mythical way of representing the truth that potency (or perhaps potentiality) if it is to be exercised, and produce results, has to be externalised and so as it were passes, to a greater or lesser degree, out of one's direct control." (Letter #211, 1958).


Tolkien always strongly held that his works should not be seen as an allegory, especially not of the political events of his time (for instance World War II or the Cold War). Many people have nevertheless been inclined to view the One Ring as a symbol or metaphor. The notion of a power too great for humans to wield safely is an evocative one, and already in the 1930s there were plenty of technologies available to make people think of that idea. By the time the work was published, atomic power and the atomic bomb were common knowledge, and the Ring was often taken as symbolic of them. (Since Tolkien's authorship of his work was completed before either was known to the public, this cannot have been his intent.) Another possible interpretation is that the Ring represents the lust for power, which in Tolkien's view always corrupts. The lure and effect of the Ring and its physical and spiritual after-effects on Bilbo and Frodo are obsessions that can be compared with drug addiction, for which the Ring can serve as a powerful metaphor. Actor Andy Serkis who played Gollum in the film trilogy cited drug addiction as an inspiration for his performance. Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Switzerland. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Drug addiction, or dependency is the compulsive use of drugs, to the point where the user has no effective choice but to continue use. ... This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... Andy Serkis (born 20 April 1964) is an English actor and director. ... Gollum is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


Cursed rings, such as those described by both Plato in his Republic (the Ring of Gyges), and in Richard Wagner's Ring Cycle operas, have a long history in literature. Although Tolkien strongly denied any connection, it is possible that the One Ring was inspired by the Andvarinaut of the Volsunga saga, the central artefact of Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), without being meant to "symbolise" it. A recent philosophical interpretation has been built around the literary device of the Cursed Ring by Danish author Peter Kjærulff. PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... The Republic is an influential dialogue by Plato, written in the first half of the 4th century BC. This Socratic dialogue mainly is about political philosophy and ethics. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gyges of Lydia. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... Der Ring des Nibelungen, commonly called in English by its translated title The Ring of the Nibelung, is a cycle of four epic music dramas. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... In Norse mythology, Andvarinaut was a magical ring, first owned by Andvari. ... The Ramsund carving in Sweden depicts 1) how Sigurd is sitting naked in front of the fire preparing the dragon heart, from Fafnir, for his foster-father Regin, who is Fafnirs brother. ... The Cursed Ring is a structure of ideas which Danish author Peter Kjaerulff has found to be behind Platos The Ring of Gyges (mentioned in Platos Republic), Richard Wagners Der Ring des Nibelungen and J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings. The following is... Peter Kjærulff (b. ...


In the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford there is a collection of English "Posy Rings" dating from the 17th and 18th centuries, which bear a striking resemblance to the One Ring. The rings, all in gold have short rhyming inscriptions on their inside, typically messages of love. The collection was presented to the museum in 1933 by Dr Joan Evans. It seems likely that Tolkien was aware of the existence of these rings at that date. A photograph of the collection is up on flickr. Ashmolean Museum main entrance. ... Joan Evans was a film actress who appeared in three movies with actor Farley Granger. ...


Times the One Ring was worn

The One Ring was worn by several people at different points in The Lord of the Rings, and The Hobbit books:

  • Sauron wore the ring at the battle of the Last Alliance, and many times before that.
  • Isildur put the Ring on near the Gladden Fields to escape the mob of Orcs, while escaping the Ring fell off his finger exposing him to the orcs.
  • Sméagol took the Ring from his cousin, Déagol.
  • Bilbo used the ring numerous times in The Hobbit:
    • He used the Ring to evade an encounter with the Sackvile-Bagginses in the Shire.
    • He used the Ring after his speech at his "eleventy-first" (111th) birthday party.
  • Tom Bombadil put the Ring on. It had no effect on him. Frodo tried on the Ring shortly after this to see if it still worked, yet Tom Bombadil could still see him. This revealed (to Frodo as well as the reader) that Tom Bombadil was a particularly different sort of being.
  • Frodo accidentally put the Ring on at Bree as he fell off a table while performing a song in the common room of the inn.
    • He put the Ring on during the Nazgûl attack on Weathertop.
    • He used the Ring to evade Boromir on the slopes of Amon Hen.
    • He used it a second time shortly afterwards to take one of the boats and row across the river Anduin unseen, but Sam spotted the boat.
    • He put the Ring on for the final time at the Crack of Doom, where it was bitten off his finger by Gollum and subsequently destroyed.
  • Sam put the Ring on to stay hidden from an orc company at Cirith Ungol.
    • He used it briefly a second time at the cleft of Cirith Ungol.

  Results from FactBites:
 
One Ring - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2878 words)
The Ring remained hidden in the river bed for almost two millennia, until it was discovered on a fishing trip by a Stoor Hobbit named Déagol.
A recent interpretation by Danish author Peter Kjaerulff is that the Ring symbolises The Cursed Ring, a device described by both Plato in his Republic (the Ring of Gyges), and in Richard Wagner's The Ring of the Nibelung operas, besides Tolkien.
Frodo uses the ring to escape Boromir on the slopes of Amon Hen.
The One Ring - Tolkien Gateway (1978 words)
The One Ring was created by the Dark Lord Sauron during the Second Age in order to enlarge his own might by combining it with the power of the Elven Smiths, and thus to give him control over the other Rings of Power, which had been made by Celebrimbor and his people with Sauron's influence.
The One Ring was forged secretly in the fires of Mount Doom.
Unlike the lesser Rings, it bore no gem, but its identity could be determined by a simple (though little-known) test: when heated in a fire, it displayed in fiery Tengwar letters in the Black Speech of Mordor a section of poetry from part of its lore - the Ring-inscription.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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