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Encyclopedia > One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church
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In Christian theology, One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church is a phrase describing the nature of the Christian community and/or Christian Church, in the various meanings it has. It appears in the Nicene Creed (μίαν, ἁγίαν, καθολικὴν καὶ ἀποστολικὴν Ἐκκλησίαν) and appears partly in the Apostles' Creed ("the holy catholic church", sanctam ecclesiam catholicam). It indicates the Four Marks of the Christian Church — unity, holiness, universality, and apostolicity — and is based on the premise that all true Christians (irrespective of race, nationality or sex) form a single united group, the body of Christ (cf. Corinthians 12:27), founded by the apostles and innately holy. While there is general agreement on the meaning of holy, there is less agreement on the definition of the one Church, and the meanings of catholic and apostolic continue to be debated. Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus as recounted in the New Testament. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... The Apostles Creed (in Latin, Symbolum Apostolorum), is an early statement of Christian belief, possibly from the first or second century, but more likely post-Nicene Creed in the early 4th Century AD. The theological specifics of the creed appear to be a refutation of Gnosticism, an early heresy. ... // Mark can refer to the following: A mark is a point typically used within the context of a measurement. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus as recounted in the New Testament. ... The term Christian Church expresses the idea that organised Christianity (the Christian religion) is seen as an institution. ... The Twelve Apostles (in Koine Greek απόστολος apostolos [1], someone sent forth/sent out, an emissary) were probably Galilean Jewish men (10 names are Aramaic, 4 names are Greek) chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth by Jesus of Nazareth to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles...


Conflicting boundaries and definitions

The Roman Catholic Church, comprising particular Churches, both of Western and Eastern Rites, that form a single Church, claims to be the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. The Eastern Orthodox Church, comprising about 16 mutually recognizing autocephalous hierarchical Churches, similarly claims to be the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. Before the Great Schism, both sides saw themselves as belonging to the same One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catholicism. ... A Particular Church , in Roman Catholic theology and canon law, is any of the individual constituent ecclesial communities in full communion with the Church of Rome and thus make up the Catholic Communion. ... Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article (The Latin Rite), is a term by which documents of the Catholic Church designate the particular Church, distinct from the Eastern Rite Churches, that developed in western Europe and northern Africa, where Latin was the language of... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... Pentecost is considered in Eastern Orthodoxy to be the birth of the Church. ... In hierarchical Christian churches, especially Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches, autocephaly is the status of a hierarchical church whose head bishop does not report to any higher-ranking bishop. ... Great Schism redirects here. ...


Both the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church believe that the term "one" in the Nicene Creed describes and prescribes a visible institutional unity. Many Anglicans, Lutherans, Old Catholics, and Independent Catholics believe that visible, if not institutional unity subsists in the shared apostolic succession of their episcopacies. Protestant and evangelical Christians insist instead on a less visible unity based on inner faith in Christ. Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Old Catholic Church is not so much a religious denomination, as a community, part of whose member churches split from the Roman Catholic church in 1870. ... Independent Catholic is a term used by many small groups who are not in communion with the Roman Catholic Church or other traditional Episcopally governed Churches such as Eastern and Oriental Orthodox, Anglican or Old Catholic; all of whom function as small (frequently tiny) episcopally-governed Church bodies in many... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor of the Church of the Apostles. ... Protestantism is a movement within Christianity, representing the splitting away from the Roman Catholic Church during the mid-to-late Renaissance in Europe—a period known as the Protestant Reformation. ... The word evangelicalism usually refers to a tendency in diverse branches of conservative Christianity, typified by an emphasis on evangelism, a personal experience of conversion, biblically-oriented faith, and a belief in the relevance of Christian faith to cultural issues. ...


Meaning of the words catholic and apostolic

Catholic

Etymologically, the word "catholic" comes from the Greek adjective καθολικός, formed on the basis of the adverb καθόλου (in general, entirely), which in turn is composed of the elements κατὰ (according to, in keeping with) and ὅλου, neuter genitive of ὅλος (whole). The basic meaning of the word "catholic" is thus "wholeness" (or "fullness") and by extension, "universal". Outside of a religious context, the word "catholic" is commonly used to mean no more than all-embracing in interests, sympathies, ideas and the like.


In contrast, when the word "catholic" or "universal" is applied to the Church, it indicates that the Church is intended by God for the whole human race, all of whose members are called to belong to the Church, which, while remaining one and only one, is to be spread throughout the whole world and to all ages. And, even abstracting from this mission to the whole of humanity, the Church is inwardly catholic or universal in that, being one with Christ, the Church is endowed with all the means of salvation. (These two meanings of the catholicity or universality of the Church are explained at greater length inCatechism of the Catholic Church 830-831.)


Saint Ignatius of Antioch, the earliest known writer to use the phrase "the Catholic Church", excluded from it heterodox groups whose teaching and practice conflicted with those of the bishops of the Catholic Church. In keeping with this idea, the Roman Catholic Church sees as not part of the Catholic Church all the groups that it judges to be in a state of heresy or schism. Others have, since the Protestant Reformation, used the word "Catholic" to designate instead adherence to the doctrines and essential practices of the historical institutional Churches, in contrast to those propounded by the Reformers. In all the senses indicated in this paragraph, Catholic tends to be written with an upper-case 'C'. Icon of Ignatius being eaten by lions St. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the Catholic or Orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catholicism. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the Catholic or Orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... The word schism (IPA: or ), from the Greek σχισμα, schisma (from σχιζω, schizo, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement in the 16th century to reform the Catholic Church in Western Europe. ...


The Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Oriental Orthodox Churches all see themselves as fully, and indeed exclusively, "catholic" in all the foregoing senses. Some Anglicans see their Communion as a component part of the Catholic Church, albeit not subject to the Holy See of Rome, and maintain beliefs and practices akin to those of the Roman Catholic Church. Pentecost is considered in Eastern Orthodoxy to be the birth of the Church. ... The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the communion of Eastern Christian Churches that recognize only the first three ecumenical councils — the First Council of Nicaea, the First Council of Constantinople and the Council of Ephesus — and rejected the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon. ... The term Anglican (from Anglia, the Latin name for England) describes the people, institutions, and churches that adhere the religious traditions developed by the established Church of England. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC (mythical), early 1st millennium BC (archaeological) Region Latium Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ...


Most Protestant denominations interpret "catholic", especially in its credal context, as referring to the concept of a mystical, universal Church, which they see referenced in Corinthians 12:27's "body of Christ" and Hebrews 12:1's "great cloud of witnesses." They view this understanding of "catholic" as necessarily distinct from any concrete expression in an institutional Church. In this last sense, catholic tends to be written with a lower-case 'c'. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Body of Christ is a term used by Christians to describe believers in Christ. ...


Apostolic

(1) The Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Churches, and the Anglican Communion interpret the adjective "apostolic" as referring not only to the Church's origin from Christ's Apostles and their teaching, but also the Church's structure around bishops who have succeeded to the Apostles by unbroken Apostolic Succession transmitted by episcopal ordination ("laying on of hands"). In their view, Christian communities that lack this mark (i.e. unbroken hierarchical structure) are not Churches in the full sense. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catholicism. ... Pentecost is considered in Eastern Orthodoxy to be the birth of the Church. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... Alternate meaning: See Apostle (Mormonism) The Christian Apostles were Jewish men chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth (as indicated by the Greek word απόστολος apostolos= messenger), by Jesus to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles, across the world. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor of the Church of the Apostles. ... Episcopalian government in the church is rule by a hierarchy of bishops (Greek: episcopoi). ...

(1.a) A modern variant of this interpretation, held by many in the non-trinitarian "Apostolic church movement", including some Pentecostal groups, is that Apostolic refers to the charismatic gift of apostleship, which they claim continues to be granted by the Spirit to the faithful Church today. Being Apostolic for these people means being lead and taught by modern Apostles. In their view, Christian communities that lack this mark (i.e. charismatic hierarchical structure) are not Churches in the full sense.

(2) On the other hand, Protestant Evangelical Christians hold that the Apostolic Church of the Creed corresponds to no one Christian denomination, but is instead the aggregate of all "true" Christians, regardless of denominational allegiance, who hold the faith of the Apostles (as preserved in Apostolic Scripture) and who further the mission of the Apostles (making disciples, baptising and teaching (Matthew 28:20)). In their view, Christian communities that lack this mark (i.e. holding to and proclaiming the Apostolic gospel of divine grace) are not Churches in the full sense. The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... The word evangelicalism usually refers to a tendency in diverse branches of conservative Christianity, typified by an emphasis on evangelism, a personal experience of conversion, biblically-oriented faith, and a belief in the relevance of Christian faith to cultural issues. ... A Denomination in the Christian sense is an identifiable religious body, organization under a common name, structure, and/or theology. ... See New Covenant for the concept translated as New Testament in the KJV. The New Testament (Καινή Διαθήκη), sometimes called the Greek Testament or Greek Scriptures, and sometimes also New Covenant, is the name given to the part of the Christian Bible that was written by various authors c. ... Divine grace is believed by Christians to be the sovereign favor of God exercised in the bestowment of blessings upon those who do not merit them. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (829 words)
The Roman Catholic Church, comprising particular Churches, both of Western and Eastern Rites, that form a single Church, claims to be the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church.
Etymologically, the word "catholic" comes from the Greek adjective καθολικός, formed on the basis of the adverb καθόλου (in general, entirely), which in turn is composed of the elements κατὰ (according to, in keeping with) and ὅλου, neuter genitive of ὅλος (whole).
In keeping with this idea, the Roman Catholic Church sees as not part of the Catholic Church all the groups that it judges to be in a state of heresy or schism.
Roman Catholic Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (9588 words)
For Catholics, the Pope is the Apostle's successor.
Reformers within the Catholic Church launched the Counter Reformation, a period of doctrinal clarification, reform of the clergy and the liturgy and re-evangelization begun by the Council of Trent.
Byzantine Church of the Eparchy of Križevci (Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro)
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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