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Encyclopedia > Omnipresence

Omnipresence is the ability to be present in every place at any, and/or every, time; unbounded or universal presence. It is related to the concept of ubiquity, the ability to be everywhere at a certain point in time.[citation needed] Image File history File links Wiki_letter_w. ...


This characteristic is most commonly used in a religious context, as most doctrines bestow the trait of omnipresence unto a superior, usually a deity commonly referred to as a god or goddess by monotheists. This idea differs from Pantheism in that an Omnipresent Divine is implied to be more aware and engaged whereas the Pantheistic Divine is literally the essence with which creation is made.[citation needed] Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ... Look up deity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture A goddess is a female deity, in contrast with a male deity known as a god. Many cultures have goddesses. ... Pantheism (Greek: πάν ( pan ) = all and θεός ( theos ) = God) literally means God is All and All is God. It is the view that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent abstract God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. ...


Brahmanism, and other religions that derive from it, incorporate the theory of transcendental omnipresence which differs greatly from the traditional meaning of the word. This theory defines a universal and fundamental substance, which is the source of all physical existence, but which is unrelated to the fact that we exist. If a being ceases to exist, the structure of the world remains unchanged, but if the "it" somehow ceases to exist, existence as a whole would end in the traditional sense of the word, but the transcendental existence would remain.[citation needed] Brahmanism, also Brahminism, is the name given to Hinduism by some authors in the 19th century CE.[1] The term is considered derogatory by many Hindus. ... In philosophy, transcendental/transcendence, has three different but related primary meanings, all of them derived from the words literal meaning (from Latin), of climbing or going beyond: one that originated in Ancient philosophy, one in Medieval philosophy and one in modern philosophy. ...


Some argue that omnipresence is a derived characteristic: an omniscient and omnipotent deity knows every thing and can be and act every where, simultaneously. Others propound a deity as having the "Three O's", including omnipresence as a unique characteristic of the deity. Most Christian denominations — following theology standardized by the Nicene Creed — expand upon the concept of omnipresence in the form of the Trinity, by having a single deity made up of three omnipresent 'substances' or 'persons' (each infinite) that are said to be Three in One.[citation needed] Omniscience is the capacity to know everything, or at least everything that can be known. ... Omnipotence (literally, all power) is the power to do absolutely anything. ... List of Christian denominations ordered by historical and doctrinal relationships. ... At Wikiversity you can learn more and teach others about Theology at: The School of Theology Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... For other uses, see Trinity (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Historical origins

A common misconception is that the ancient Israelites worshipped an omnipresent deity. The Torah states that, 'Heavenly Father sees all' (a novel concept at the time), but also portrays the deity in a bodily form, such as when the deity has supper with Abraham, or Jonah tries to flee from the deity. As late as the Book of Ezekiel (550 BCE), the Lord of Hosts comes from the Heavens in a Chariot of Fire. One of the largest historical conundrums in the Judeo-Christian dialogue was that the Jews of the 1st Century BC had no concept of an omnipresent deity. Through the concept of the Trinity, the ancient, Judaic, localized deity morphs into an omnipresent one by the inclusion of the Holy Spirit. Ancient Christians demonstrate their Vedic roots, as the Vedic religion of the 1st Century was the only predominant omnipresent religion in the entire Old World, through the adoption of the deity's omnipresence. This connection may come from the Essenes, a mysterious cult that some claim is intimately connected with John the Baptist.[citation needed] An Israelite is a member of the Twelve Tribes of Israel, descended from the twelve sons of the Biblical patriarch Jacob who was renamed Israel by God in the book of Genesis, 32:28 The Israelites were a group of Hebrews, as described in the Bible. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Yunus redirects here. ... Ezekiel the Prophet of the Hebrew Scriptures is depicted on a 1510 Sistine Chapel fresco by Michelangelo. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 600s BC - 590s BC - 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC Events and Trends Carthage conquers Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica 559 BC - King Cambyses I of Anshan dies... A conundrum is a puzzling question. ... The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Trinity (disambiguation). ... In Christian religions that trace their roots to belief in the Nicene Creed, the Holy Spirit (Hebrew: Ruah haqodesh; Greek: ; Latin: ; also called the Holy Ghost) is the third consubstantial Person of the Holy Trinity or the Godhead. ... The Essenes (sg. ... This article is becoming very long. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ...


Many ancient people, such as the "advanced" cultures such as Babylon, Greece and Rome did not worship an omnipresent being, while most paleolithic Native Americans, the Indian Vedics, and early Christians did. These all arise from a particular worldview not shared among mono-local deity cultures: All omnipresent religions see the whole of Existence as a manifestation of the deity. There are two predominant viewpoints here: pantheism, deity is the summation of Existence; and panentheism, deity is an emergent property of Existence. The first is closest to the Native Americans' worldview, the latter resembles the Judeo-Christian/Vedic outlooks, most accurately portrayed through Colossians 1:17 and 18:[citation needed] Babylon (in Arabic: بابل; in Syriac: ܒܒܙܠ in Hebrew:בבל) was an ancient city in Mesopotamia (modern Al Hillah, Iraq), the ruins of which can be found in present-day Babil Province, about 50 miles (80 km) south of Baghdad. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... A Hupa man. ... Pantheism (Greek: πάν ( pan ) = all and θεός ( theos ) = God) literally means God is All and All is God. It is the view that everything is of an all-encompassing immanent abstract God; or that the universe, or nature, and God are equivalent. ... Panentheism (from Greek: πάν (‘pan’ ) = all, en = in, and theos = God; all-in-God) is the theological position that God is immanent within the Universe, but also transcends it. ...

 17 he [Jesus] is before all things, and in him all things consist. (ASV) 18 And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence.[citation needed] 

Panentheistic beliefs tend to universally have omnipresent deities because if the deity is everything, then the deity is everywhere by default.[citation needed]


A major issue

While the majority of Christians consider their deity omnipresent, some find difficulty pondering the absoluteness of their deity's omnipresence because Hell is both a place and is also the absolute separation from God ("The Lord Jesus shall be revealed from Heaven with His mighty angels, In flaming fire taking Vengeance on them that know not God, and that obey not the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ: Who shall be punished with everlasting destruction from the Presence of the Lord, and from the Glory of his Power" (2 Thessalonians 1:7-9)), presenting a paradox. Can a deity be both omnipresent and absent from Hell? Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) Hell, according to many religious beliefs, is an afterlife of suffering where the wicked or unrighteous dead are punished. ... Look up paradox in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


If a deity is in all places, then that deity must be part of all things. At the very least, the emptiness that makes up the vast majority of space in atoms and particles. In trying to rectify such paradoxes, Christian apologists of the Middle Ages found even more paradoxes, the most important being Associated Consent; how a deity that was omnipresent could simultaneously be wholly good; as they would of necessity be part of what is evil as well, such as Hell. Thomas Aquinas solved the issue for most people when he stated, evil cannot have an essential cause, or rather that no one commits an evil act for a purely evil motive: there is always some good to be aimed for, even if one's goals are selfish. This good, no matter how small or short-sighted, is where the deity resides in any given act.[citation needed] Properties In chemistry and physics, an atom (Greek ἄτομος or átomos meaning indivisible) is the smallest particle still characterizing a chemical element. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... In religion and ethics, evil refers to the morally or ethically objectionable behaviour or thought; behavior or thought which is hateful, cruel, excessively sexual, or violent, devoid of conscience. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas (also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ...


One view describes hell as not a place, but the psychical torment of a deity-hating soul finding itself in an afterlife where the deity's omnipresence is more clearly perceived than when the soul was bound within a body.[citation needed] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Another views simply states that God's wrath is fully present in hell. [1]


Noteworthy exceptions

Changes in religious demographics globally and through history have essentially replaced personal localised deities with religion based on omnipresent deities. However not all modern religions ascribe omnipresent attributes to their deity, for example:[citation needed]

  • Islam — Belief in an omnipresent Allah (the deity in Islam) was arguably lost in the mid-800s because of the positioning of its apologists in their philosophical dissertations in opposition to the Christian Trinity[citation needed]. However, this is probably a misconception because theologians see that deity as being "not part of the universe" (i.e: not bound by space or time) and also as nearer to the person than his jugular vein. An excerpt from Islamic concept of God article is like this:[citation needed]
God is omnipotent, omnipresent, and omniscient, while at the same time above and outside of all creation. He is said to be "in Heaven" (Qur'an 67:16) and "in the heavens and the earth" (Qur'an 66:3), but also said to be "nearer to him [man] than his jugular vein" (Qur'an 50:16); He constantly watches all that goes on in the world, and knows all things.[citation needed]
  • The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — While Christianity almost universally ascribes omnipresence to both Jesus Christ (Son) and God (Father) as laid out at the First Council of Nicaea (325 CE), when the doctrine of the Trinity was first formalized in the Nicene Creed, the LDS philosophy is that the Father and Son have very corporeal, and thus localized, bodies. They reside in the Celestial Kingdom. In keeping with ancient Judeo-Christian philosophies, the Holy Spirit is, however, non-corporeal and thus, while also localized, has an omnipresent effect on all life (in accordance with Colossians 1:17). In short, it is a mechanism for the same things that a Trinity would accomplish through physical non-locality.[citation needed]

Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... Events December 25, Rome, coronation of Charles the Great (Charlemagne) as emperor by Pope Leo III. Celtic monks begin work on the Book of Kells on the Island of Iona. ... Apologetics is the field of study concerned with the systematic defense of a position. ... Theology is literally rational discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, rational discourse). By extension, it also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Omnipotence (literally, all power) is power with no limits or inexhaustible, in other words, unlimited power. ... Omniscience is the capacity to know everything infinitely, or at least everything that can be known about a character including thoughts, feelings, life and the universe, etc. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... The jugular veins are veins that bring deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart via the superior vena cava. ... This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ... The First Council of Nicaea, held in Nicea in Bithynia (in present-day Turkey), convoked by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in 325, was the first ecumenical[1] conference of bishops of the Catholic Church, and most significantly resulted in the first uniform Christian doctrine, called the Nicene Creed. ... Events May 20 - First Council of Nicaea - first Ecumenical Council of the Christian Church: The Nicene Creed is formulated, the date of Easter is discussed. ... For other uses, see Trinity (disambiguation). ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... The Celestial Kingdom refers to a division of heaven and was coined by the controversial Swedish theologian Emanuel Swedenborg in his 1758 book entitled Heaven and Hell. ...

See also

Look up omnipresence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (from wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Omniscience is the capacity to know everything infinitely, or at least everything that can be known about a character including thoughts, feelings, life and the universe, etc. ... Omnipotence (literally, all power) is power with no limits or inexhaustible, in other words, unlimited power. ... Panentheism (from Greek: πάν (‘pan’ ) = all, en = in, and theos = God; all-in-God) is the theological position that God is immanent within the Universe, but also transcends it. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Omnipresence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1020 words)
This characteristic is most commonly used in a religious context, as most doctrines bestow the trait of omnipresence unto a superior, usually referred to as a god or goddess.
A common misconception is that the ancient Israelites worshipped an omnipresent deity.
An omnipresent deity by all intents and purposes appears to be evolutionarily superior to the localized deities, in so far as that far more peoples and cultures have converted to an omnipresent framework than vice versa.
Omnipresence (International Standard Bible Encyclopedia) :: Bible Tools (1404 words)
Although sometimes it speaks of God's omnipresence with reference to the pervasive immanence of His being, it frequently contents itself with affirming the universal extent of God's power and knowledge (Deuteronomy 4:39; Deuteronomy 10:14; Psalms 139:6-16; Proverbs 15:3; Jeremiah 23:23-24; Amos 9:2).
That no denial of the omnipresence of being is intended may be seen from Jeremiah 23:24, where in the former half of the verse the omnipresence of Jeremiah 23:23 is expressed in terms of omniscience, while in the latter half the idea finds ontological expression.
Omnipresence being the correlate of monotheism, the presence of the idea in the earlier parts of the Old Testament is denied by all those who assign the development of monotheism in the Old Testament religion to the prophetic period from the 8th century onward.
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