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Encyclopedia > Omnibenevolence

Omnibenevolence is sometimes used to describe the property of being perfectly or absolutely good. The word does not appear in any popular dictionary. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Contents

Etymology

Omnibenevolence was first coined by George H. Smith, in June 1980, in his book Atheism: The Case Against God. There does not appear to be any historical usage of this word before this date. George H. Smith is a libertarian author. ...


Controversy

Omnibenevolence is a controversial term. It was used by Smith along with omnipotence, omnipresence and omniscience. Smith called it one of the main properties attributed to God. However Smith did not give any reference or citation for its usage outside of his own. He may be the first writer to use this word in the English language. There does not appear to be any Church usage for it. Omnipotence (literally, all power) is power with no limits or inexhaustible, in other words, unlimited power. ... Omnipresence is the ability to be present in every place at any, and/or every, time; unbounded or universal presence. ... Omniscience is the capacity to know everything infinitely, or at least everything that can be known about a characters including thoughts, feelings, life and the universe etc. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


Philosophical perspectives

The term is patterned on, and often accompanied by, the terms "omniscience" and "omnipotence", typically to refer to conceptions of an "all-good, all-knowing, all-powerful" deity. Philosophers and theologians in the past have either used phrases like "completely good", or the term "benevolenece", as do most writers today. The word "omnibenevolence" may be interpreted to mean perfectly just, all-loving, fully merciful, or any number of other qualities, depending on precisely what "good" is understood as meaning. As such, there is little agreement over how an "omnibenevolent" being would behave. Omniscience is the capacity to know everything infinitely, or at least everything that can be known about a characters including thoughts, feelings, life and the universe etc. ... Omnipotence (literally, all power) is power with no limits or inexhaustible, in other words, unlimited power. ...


The notion of an omnibenevolent, infinitely compassionate deity has often been attacked based on the problem of evil and the problem of hell. In the philosophy of religion and theology, the problem of evil is the problem of reconciling the existence of evil or suffering in the world with the existence of an omniscient, omnipotent, omnibenevolent god or gods. ... The problem of Hell is a variant of the problem of evil, applying specifically to religions which hold both that: An omnipotent (all-powerful), omniscient (all-knowing), and omnibenevolent (all-loving) God exists. ...


A benevolent being will protect the majority in the detriment of the minority. An omnibenevolent being will protect everyone in his detriment. (God is a benevolent being since He created Hell and punished Lucifer and the other angels who betrayed Him).


Religious perspectives

The idea of God's omnibenevolence in Christianity is based on Psalms 18:30, "As for God, his way is perfect: the word of the LORD is tried: he is a buckler to all those that trust in him." It is also supported by Ps.19:7, "The law of the LORD is perfect, converting the soul: the testimony of the LORD is sure, making wise the simple." Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh. ...


However, the above are contradicted by Hebrews.8:6-7: "But now hath he obtained a more excellent ministry, by how much also he is the mediator of a better covenant, which was established upon better promises. For if that first covenant had been faultless, then should no place have been sought for the second." The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbr. ...


Omnibenevolence also plays a prominent role in Islam: the second of the 99 Names of God is Al Rahman, meaning "all beneficent" or "most compassionate". Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ... // The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 attributes of Allah (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), are the names of God revealed to man in the Quran;[1] even though His names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran. ...


See also

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Omnipotence (literally, all power) is power with no limits or inexhaustible, in other words, unlimited power. ... Omniscience is the capacity to know everything infinitely, or at least everything that can be known about a characters including thoughts, feelings, life and the universe etc. ... Omnipresence is the ability to be present in every place at any, and/or every, time; unbounded or universal presence. ... In the philosophy of religion and theology, the problem of evil is the problem of reconciling the existence of evil or suffering in the world with the existence of an omniscient, omnipotent, omnibenevolent god or gods. ... Benevolence characterizes the true goodness of the mind and spirit, the unbiased kindness to do good. ...

References

  • Smith, George H. "Atheism: The Case Against God'" (Skeptic's Bookshelf) Prometheus Books (June 1980).
  • Basinger, David. "In what sense must God be omnibenevolent?" International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, Vol. 14, No. 1 (March 1983), pp. 3-15.
  • Bruch, George Bosworth. Early Medieval Philosophy, King's Crown, 1951. pp. 73-77.
  • Flemming, Arthur. "Omnibenevolence and evil." Ethics, Vol. 96, No. 2 (Jan. 1986) , pp. 261-281.
  • Gale, Richard M. "Atheology and the Nature of God", Chapter 1 in On the Nature and Existence of God, Cambridge University Press, 1991, pp. 23-26, and 97, 231.
  • Wierenga, Edward. "Intrinsic maxima and omnibenevolence." International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, Vol. 10, No. 1 (March 1984), pp. 41-50.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Omnibenevolence (450 words)
Omnibenevolence is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as "unlimited or infinite benevolence".
The notion of an omnibenevolent, infinitely compassionate deity, has raised certain atheological objections, such as the problem of evil and the problem of hell.
Omnibenevolence also plays a prominent role in Islam: the second of the 99 Names of God is Al Rahman, meaning "all beneficent" or "most compassionate".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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