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Encyclopedia > Omikuji
Tying omikuji at Kasuga Shrine in Nara
Tying omikuji at Kasuga Shrine in Nara

Omikuji (おみくじ) are random fortunes written on strips of paper at Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples in Japan. Kasuga Shrine Shinto Shrine Nara, Nara Nara prefecture Kansai Honshu Japan UNESCO World Heritage Site Fortune-telling Omikuji I took this photograph and contribute it to the public domain. ... Kasuga Shrine Shinto Shrine Nara, Nara Nara prefecture Kansai Honshu Japan UNESCO World Heritage Site Fortune-telling Omikuji I took this photograph and contribute it to the public domain. ... Kasuga Shrine The Kasuga Shrine (春日大社, Kasuga Taisha) is a Shinto shrine in the city of Nara, in Nara Prefecture, Japan. ... Nara (奈良市; -shi) is the capital city of Nara Prefecture in the Kansai region of Japan, near Kyoto. ... A torii at Itsukushima Shrine Shinto (神道 shintō) is a native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ... Statues of Buddha such as this, the Tian Tan Buddha statue in Hong Kong, remind followers to practice right living. ... Kihryuzan Senjo-ji Temple, by Toyota Kokai (1780-1850) The word temple has different meanings in the fields of architecture, religion, geography, anatomy, and education. ...


Literally "looking-lottery", these are usually received by pulling one out randomly from a box that one shakes, hoping for the resulting fortune to be good. The o-mikuji falls out of a small hole, scrolled up. (Nowadays, these are often coin-slot machines.) Unrolling the piece of paper reveals the fortune written on it, which can be any one of the following: Great blessing (dai-kichi, 大吉), Middle blessing (chū-kichi, 中吉), Small blessing (shō-kichi, 小吉), Blessing (kichi, 吉), Half-blessing (han-kichi, 半吉), Near-blessing (sue-kichi, 末吉), Near-small-blessing (sue-shō-kichi, 末小吉), Curse (kyō, 凶), Small curse (shō-kyō, 小凶), Half-curse (han-kyō, 半凶), Near-curse (sue-kyō, 末凶), Great curse (dai-kyō, 大凶). A lottery is a popular form of gambling which involves the drawing of lots for a prize. ...


The o-mikuji predicts the person's chances of his or her hopes coming true, of finding a good match, or generally matters of health, fortune, life, etc. When the prediction is bad, it is a custom to fold up the strip of paper and attach it to a pine tree in the temple grounds. A purported reason for this custom is a pun on the word for pine tree (松 matsu) and the verb 'to wait' (待つ matsu), the idea being that the bad luck will wait by the tree rather than attach itself to the bearer. In the event of the fortune being good, the bearer should keep it. Though nowadays, this custom seems more of a children's amusement, o-mikuji are available at most shrines, and remain one of the traditional activities related to shrine-going, if lesser.


Compare perhaps the custom of writing a prayer on a specially-prepared wooden block, which is then tied to an ad hoc scaffold.


In the film Lost in Translation, it's an o-mikuji strip that the character Charlotte ties to a tree when she visits a Kyoto temple. Lost in Translation is a (2003) motion picture. ... This page is about the city Kyoto. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Omikuji - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (301 words)
Omikuji (御御籤, 御神籤, or おみくじ) are random fortunes written on strips of paper at Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples in Japan.
Though nowadays, this custom seems more of a children's amusement, omikuji are available at most shrines, and remain one of the traditional activities related to shrine-going, if lesser.
In the film Lost in Translation, it's an omikuji strip that the character Charlotte ties to a tree when she visits a Kyoto temple.
favorite places in Japan 2 (690 words)
Omikuji are fortunes written on slips of paper,sold at temples and shrines all over Japan.
Omikuji is said to have been imported from China in ancient times, and used as a message medium of the gods on such important occasions as business transactions and marriage.
Omikuji sold at Sensoji temple have English explanations as well as Japanese on the back, but that is very unusual.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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