FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Omaha (tribe)
Omaha
Total population

6,000 Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Regions with significant populations
United States (Nebraska)
Languages
English, Omaha
Religions
Christianity, other
Related ethnic groups
other Siouan peoples

The Omaha tribe is a Native American tribe that currently reside in northeastern Nebraska and western Iowa, United States. The Omaha Indian Reservation lies primarily in the southern part of Thurston County and northeastern Cuming County, Nebraska, but small parts extend into the northeast corner of Burt County and across the Missouri River into Monona County, Iowa. Its total land area is 796.355 kmĀ² (307.474 sq mi) and a population of 5,194 was recorded in the 2000 census. Its largest community is Pender. Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Pre-contact distribution of the Siouan languages The Siouan (a. ... Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Thurston County is a county located in the state of Nebraska. ... Cuming County is a county located in the state of Nebraska. ... Burt County is a county located in the state of Nebraska. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... Monona County is a county located in the state of Iowa. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Pender is a village located in Thurston County, Nebraska. ...


During the late 1700s and early 1800s, the Omaha were briefly the most powerful Indians on the Great Plains. The tribe was the first in that region to master equestrianism, and developed an extensive trade network with early white explorers and voyageurs. Never known to take up arms against the U.S., members of the tribe assisted the U.S. during the American Civil War. The Great Plains covers much of the central United States, portions of Canada and Mexico. ... A young rider at a horse show in Australia. ... A coureur de bois was an individual who engaged in the fur trade without permission from the French authorities. ... This article is becoming very long. ...


The largest city in Nebraska is named after them.

Contents

Language

The Omaha speak a Siouan language which is very similar to that spoken by the Ponca, who were once a part of the Omaha before splitting off into a separate tribe in the mid 1700s. Pre-contact distribution of the Siouan languages The Siouan (a. ... The Ponca are a Native American tribe originally living around the mouth of the [[Niobrara River],] Nebraska, but was later removed to the Indian Territory. ...


History

The Omaha tribe began as a larger woodland tribe comprising both the Omaha and Quapaw tribes. This original tribe inhabited the area near the Ohio and Wabash rivers around the year 1700.[citation needed] The Quapaw people are a tribe of Native Americans who historically resided on the west side of the Mississippi River in what is now the state of Arkansas. ... The Ohio River is the largest tributary by volume of the Mississippi River. ... The Wabash River at Lafayette, Indiana, showing the Main Street bridge, and the Amtrak station. ...


As the tribe migrated west it split into what became the Omaha tribe and the Quapaw tribe. The Quapaw settled in what is now Arkansas and the Omaha tribe, known as U-Mo'n-Ho'n ("Dwellers on the Bluff").[1] settled near the Missouri River in what is now northwestern Iowa. Conflict with the Sioux and the splitting off of part of the tribe into the Ponca, forced the Omaha tribe to retreat to an area around Bow Creek in northeastern Nebraska in 1775, settling near present day Homer, Nebraska. Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Wahktageli (Gallant Warrior), a Yankton Sioux chief (Karl Bodmer) Funeral scaffold of a Sioux chief (Karl Bodmer) Horse racing of the Sioux Indians (Karl Bodmer) The Sioux (IPA ) are a Native American people. ... Homer is a village located in Dakota County, Nebraska. ...


French fur trappers found the Omaha on the eastern side of the Missouri River in the mid-1700s. The Omaha were believed to have ranged from the Cheyenne River in South Dakota to the Platte River in Nebraska. Lewis and Clark found the tribe on the western side of the Missouri south of present-day Sioux City, Iowa in 1804. A fur trapper is a person who is involved the capture of wild mammals for their fur. ... The Cheyenne River, highlighted in a map of the Missouri River watershed The Cheyenne River is a tributary of the Missouri River in the U.S. states of Wyoming and South Dakota. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... The Platte River, showing the North Platte and South Platte The Platte River is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 310 mi. ... The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806) was the first American overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back. ... Sioux City (IPA: ) is a city located in northwest Iowa in the United States. ...


Chief Blackbird was the leader of the Omaha from the late 1770s until his death during a smallpox epidemic in 1800. Under his leadership, the tribe bacame the most powerful in the region. Chief Blackbird established trade with the Spanish and French and used trade as a security measure to protect his people. The Omaha became the first tribe to master equestrianism on the Great Plains, which gave them a temporary superiority over the Sioux and other larger tribes as far as hunting and movement. Aware they traditionally had a lack of a large population to protect themselves from neighboring tribes, Chief Blackbird believed that fostering good relations with white explorers and trading were the keys to their survival. The village of Tonwantongo was home to Chief Blackbird and another 1,100 people around the year 1795. The Spanish built a fort nearby and traded regularly with the Omaha during this period. In 1800, a smallpox epidemic killed Chief Blackbird and at least 400 more residents in Tonwantongo. When Lewis and Clark visited Tonwantongo in 1804, most of the inhabitants were gone on a buffalo hunt and they ended up meeting with the Oto indians instead, however they were led to Chief Blackbird's gravesite before they continued on their expedition west. Chief Blackbird (Wash-ing-guhsah-ba) (?-1800) was the leader of the Omaha Native American Indian tribe who commanded the trade routes used by Spanish, French, British and later American traders until the late 18th century. ... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a highly contagious disease unique to humans. ... Binomial name Bison bison (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... The Otoe or Oto are a Native American people. ...


Omaha villages were established and lasted from 8 to 15 years. Eventually, disease and Sioux aggression forced the tribe to move south. Villages were established near what is now Bellevue, Nebraska and along Papillion Creek between 1819 and 1856. In 1856, the Omaha sold their land near the Platte River and agreed to move to their present reservation to the north in Thurston County, Nebraska. By the 1870s the buffalo was fast disappearing from the plains and the Omaha had to increasingly rely upon the United States Government and its new culture. Bellevue is a city in Sarpy County, Nebraska, United States. ... Thurston County is a county located in the state of Nebraska. ... The government of the United States, established by the United States Constitution, is a federal republic of 50 states, a few territories and some protectorates. ...


The Omaha never took up arms against the U.S., and several members of the tribe fought for the Union during the American Civil War. In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... This article is becoming very long. ...


Culture

In pre-settlement times, the Omaha had a very intricately developed social structure that was closely tied to the people's concept of an inseparable union between sky and earth. This union was viewed as critical to perpetuation of all living forms and pervaded Omaha culture. The tribe was divided into two moieties, Sky and Earth people. Sky people were responsible for the tribe's spiritual needs and Earth people for the tribe's physical welfare. Each moiety was composed of five clans.


Earth Lodges

Omaha beliefs were symbolized in their dwelling structures. During most of the year Omaha Indians lived in earth lodges, ingenious structures with a timber frame and a thick soil covering. At the center of the lodge was a fireplace that recalled their creation myth. The earthlodge entrance faced east, to catch the rising sun and remind the people of their origin and migration upriver. The circular layout of tribal villages reflected the tribe's beliefs. Sky people lived in the north half of the village, the area that symbolized the heavens. Earth people lived in the south half which represented the earth. Within each half of the village, individual clans were carefully located based on their member's tribal duties and relationship to other clans. Earth lodges were as large as 60 feet in diameter and might hold several families, even their horses.


As the tribe migrated westward from the Ohio River region, the woodland custom of bark lodges was replaced with tipis (borrowed from the Sioux) and earth lodges (borrowed from the Pawnee). Tipis were used primarily during buffalo hunts and when relocating from one village area to another. They would sleep in lodges during the winter. A tipi of the Nez Perce tribe. ... Earth houses are old architectural style for eco-friendly housing. ... Pawnee The Pawnee (also Paneassa, Pari, Pariki) are a Native American tribe that historically lived along the Platte River in what is now Nebraska. ...


Communities

Bancroft is a village located in Cuming County, Nebraska. ... Macy is a census-designated place located in Thurston County, Nebraska. ... Pender is a village located in Thurston County, Nebraska. ... Rosalie is a village located in Thurston County, Nebraska. ... Walthill is a village located in Thurston County, Nebraska. ...

References

  1. ^ *John Joseph Mathews, The Osages: Children of the Middle Waters (University of Oklahoma Press 1961), pages 110, 128, 140, 282
  • Omaha Reservation, Nebraska/Iowa United States Census Bureau

External links

  • Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. Mainpage. Retrieved on 2006-07-13.
  • Omaha Tribe of Nebraska. Blackbird Scenic Overlook. Retrieved on 2006-07-13.
  • Reinhard, Karl J., Dennis Hastings. Introduction. Learning From the Ancestors. Retrieved on 2006-07-13.
  • Irving, Washington. Washington Irving's Astoria. Astoria or Anecdotes of an Enterprise Beyond the Rocky Mountains. Retrieved on 2006-07-13.
  • National Park Service. Lewis and Clark Historical Background. Retrieved on 2006-07-13.
  • Campbell, Paulette W.. Ancestral Bones Reinterpreting the Past of the Omaha. Retrieved on 2006-07-13.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Omaha, Nebraska - encyclopedia article about Omaha, Nebraska. (4765 words)
Omaha is the center city of the Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area The Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area is a metropolitan area comprised of the cities of Omaha, Nebraska, Council Bluffs, Iowa, and surrounding areas.
Omaha's growth was accelerated in the 1880s by the rapid development of the meatpacking industry in South Omaha South Omaha is a neighbourhood of Omaha, Nebraska.
Omaha is home to the Omaha Community Playhouse, one of the most famous and best-endowed community theaters in the United States, and to Girls and Boys Town; its Henry Doorly Zoo is widely considered one of the premier zoos in the world.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m