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Encyclopedia > Omagh bombing
Omagh bombing
Omagh bombing
The red Vauxhall Cavalier carrying the bomb. This photo was taken by a tourist shortly before the explosion, the camera being found in the rubble afterwards.
Location Omagh, Northern Ireland
Target(s) Courthouse[1]
Date August 15, 1998
Attack type Car bomb
Deaths 29
Injured approximately 220
Perpetrator(s) Real IRA (RIRA)

The Omagh bombing was a paramilitary car bomb attack carried out by the Real IRA (RIRA), a splinter group of former Provisional Irish Republican Army members opposed to the Belfast Agreement, on August 15, 1998, in Omagh, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland.[2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... , Omagh (from the Irish: An Ómaigh meaning The Sacred Plain) is the county town of County Tyrone in Northern Ireland, situated where the rivers Drumragh and Camowen meet to form the Strule. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: ) is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... In most counties in the United States the local trial courts conduct their business in a centrally located courthouse which may also house the offices of the county treasurer, clerk and recorder and assessor. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Car bomb (disambiguation). ... The Real Irish Republican Army, otherwise known as the Real IRA (RIRA), is an Irish republican paramilitary organisation founded before the signing of the 1998 Good Friday (Belfast) Agreement by former members of the Provisional IRA who opposed the latters 1997 cease-fire and acquiescence in the Agreement in... For other uses, see Car bomb (disambiguation). ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Organization stubs | Terrorist organizations in Northern Ireland | Rebellion ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (IRA; also referred to as the PIRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA.[2]) is an Irish Republican, left wing[3] paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern... The Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was a major political development in the Northern Ireland peace process. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... , Omagh (from the Irish: An Ómaigh meaning The Sacred Plain) is the county town of County Tyrone in Northern Ireland, situated where the rivers Drumragh and Camowen meet to form the Strule. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Omagh Area: 3,155 km² Population (est. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: ) is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...


Twenty-nine people were killed as a result of the attack, including one woman who was pregnant with twins, and approximately 220 people were injured.[3] The attack was described by the BBC as "Northern Ireland's worst single terrorist atrocity" and by British prime minister Tony Blair as an "appalling act of savagery and evil".[4][5] For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency...


The victims included people of different religions and none, and also included Spanish tourists together with other tourists on a day trip from County Donegal in the Republic of Ireland. Statistics Province: Ulster Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East, Donegal South West County Town: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ...

Contents

Chronology

  • The Vauxhall Cavalier carrying the bomb, was parked outside a clothes shop on Omagh's Market Street at 14:00. It had been stolen in Carrickmacross, County Monaghan a week before, it then had its Republic of Ireland number plates replaced with Northern Ireland plates. The driver and another occupant left the car and walked down Campsie Road.
  • At 14:32 the first warning was received by an employee of UTV in Belfast. After passing the information to the RUC, the employee received another warning one minute later. Another minute later a warning was given to the Coleraine office of the Samaritans.
  • At 15:10 the bomb detonated.

The Vauxhall Cavalier was a large family car sold primarily in the UK by Vauxhall Motors, the British subsidiary of General Motors from 1976 to 1995. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference H837039 Statistics Province: Ulster County: Elevation: 80 m (26 ft) Population (2002)  - Town:  - Rural:   1,964  10,210 Website: www. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Monaghan Code: MN Area: 1,294 km² Population (2006) 55,816 Website: www. ... A number plate for a car registered in 2001 in County Dublin Index marks on Number plates in the Republic of Ireland issued since 1987 have the format YY-CC-SSSSSS where the components are: YY — a 2-digit year (e. ... British car number plates are vehicle registration plates (more commonly known as number plates) which have existed in the United Kingdom since 1904. ... For other uses of the UTV acronym, see UTV (disambiguation) UTV (formerly Ulster Television) is the ITV franchise for Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... For the ethnic group of this name, see Samaritan. ...

Warnings

On the day of the bombing, three warnings were recorded and reported:


Received by Ulster Television at 14:32

"There's a bomb, courthouse, Omagh, main street, 500 pounds, explosion 30 minutes."

Received by Ulster Television at 14:33 For other uses of the UTV acronym see UTV (disambiguation) Ulster Television plc (UTV) is a media company based in Northern Ireland. ...

"Bomb, Omagh town, 15 minutes."

Received by the Coleraine office of the 'Samaritans' charity at 14:34 WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Coleraine Borough UK Parliament: East Londonderry European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Coleraine Postal District(s): BT51, BT52 Population (2001) 24,042 Coleraine (from the Irish: Cúil Raithin meaning Ferny corner) is a large town... Samaritans (until 2002 known as The Samaritans) is a British and Irish-based registered charity aimed at providing emotional support to anyone in distress or at risk of suicide. ...

"Am I through to Omagh? This is a bomb warning. It's going to go off in 30 minutes." The caller then stated the bomb was placed on Main Street, 200 yards from the courthouse.[6]

There has been considerable debate about the subject of these warnings, the tapes of some warnings have not been released to the public, and some information about the location of the bomb may have been recorded incorrectly or ignored. One warning mentioned that the bomb was 200 yards away from the courthouse, the actual bombing was between 300-400 yards from the Courthouse.


Responsibility

After the attack the Real IRA claimed responsibility and apologised for bombing the courthouse at Omagh[7] and on 14 December 2001 released a statement claiming the organisation had "minimal involvement" and that two MI5 agents were largely responsible for the bombing.[8] is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... MI5 Logo. ...


The BBC's Panorama programme, Who Bombed Omagh?, shown in 2000, gave the names of the prime suspects as Séamus McKenna, Michael McKevitt, Liam Campbell, Colm Murphy, and Seamus Daly. Police believe that the bombing of BBC Television Centre in London was a revenge attack for the broadcast.[9] For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Panorama is a long-running current affairs documentary series on BBC television, launched on 11 November 1953 and focusing on investigative journalism. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Michael McKevitt (b. ... Liam Campbell (Irish: Liam Mac Cathmhaoil) is an Irish Republican from Dundalk, County Louth, Republic of Ireland. ... Colm Murphy (Irish: Colm Ó Murchú) born 18 August 1952, Belleeks, County Armagh[1][2]) is an Irish publican and building contractor who was the first person to be convicted in connection with the Omagh bombing, but whose conviction was overturned on appeal. ... Seamus Daly Irish: Séamus Ó Dálaigh) is an Irish Republican from County Monaghan. ... BBC News coverage revealed the extent of the damage to the front of the building from the bomb. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Builder and publican Colm Murphy, from County Louth, was charged and convicted in 2001 by the Republic's Special Criminal Court for "conspiracy to cause an explosion likely to endanger life or cause injury". He was sentenced to fourteen years. In January 2005, Murphy's conviction was quashed and a retrial ordered by the Court of Criminal Appeal, on the grounds that two Gardaí had falsified interview notes, and that Murphy's previous convictions were improperly taken into account by the trial judges.[10] This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Dundalk Code: LH Area: 820 km² Population (2006) 110,894 Website: www. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Anthem The Soldiers Song Republic of Ireland() – on the European continent() – in the European Union() Capital (and largest city) Dublin Official languages Irish, English Demonym Irish Government Republic and Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Mary McAleese  -  Taoiseach Bertie Ahern, TD Independence from the United Kingdom   -  Declared 24 April 1916   -  Ratified 21... The Special Criminal Court is a juryless criminal court in the Republic of Ireland which tries terrorist and organized crime cases. ... The Court of Criminal Appeal was an English appellate court for criminal cases established by the Judicature Act 1873. ... A member of the motorcycle unit of the Garda Síochána. ...


Many of the others were later sued in a civil action by the relatives of people killed in the bombing, including the families of James Barker, 12, Samantha McFarland, 17, Lorraine Wilson, 15, and 20-month-old Breda Devine.

On September 6, 2006 Sean Hoey, an electrician from Jonesborough, County Armagh went on trial accused of 29 counts of murder, as well as terrorism and explosives charges.[11] Hoey's trial has been completed, but a verdict has not yet been reached.[12] Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kilnasaggart inscribed stone Jonesborough is a small village in County Armagh, Northern Ireland, less than a mile from the border with County Louth in the Republic of Ireland in the Ring of Gullion. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Armagh Area: 1,254 km² Population (est. ...


Police Ombudsman Report

The Police Ombudsman, Nuala O'Loan, strongly criticised the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) (Now the PSNI) over their handling of the investigation. Her report stated that RUC officers had ignored previous warnings about a bomb and had failed to act on crucial intelligence. She went on to say that officers had been uncooperative and defensive during her inquiry into the investigation. RUC officers had been seen moving people towards the bomb, which they claimed was because the warnings had been for the Courthouse.[13] On 24 February 2006, it was alleged that an agent paid by MI5 and the FBI, knew of the plan to bomb Omagh, but that MI5 never passed this information to police.[14] In 2006 Hugh Orde stated that the senior officer in charge of the case believed that MI5 did not withhold information.[15] The Northern Ireland Police Ombudsman provides an independent, impartial police complaints system for the people and police under the Police (Northern Ireland) Act 1998 and 2000. ... Nuala OLoan the Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland Nuala OLoan is the first Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland. ... The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) was name of the police force in Northern Ireland from 1922 to 2001. ... The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) is the police service that covers Northern Ireland. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... MI5 Logo. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ...


The Mirror report that initially, the Police Association, which represents senior officers and rank and file members of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI), went to court to try to block the release of the O'Loan report, but dropped their efforts after being given more time to review the report before its release to the public.


However Chief Constable Ronnie Flanagan stated that the multiple warnings were given to cause confusion and ultimately a greater loss of life.[16] Sir Ronnie Flanagan GBE (born March 25, 1949) was the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland since its creation in 2001 to 2002, and had been Chief Constable of its predecessor, the Royal Ulster Constabulary, since 1996. ...


Victim's Support Group

The families of the victims of the bomb created the Omagh Support and Self Help Group after the bombing. Their website provides newsletters, references and news archives regarding the bombing. The group also provides support to victims of other bombings in Ireland, as well other terrorist bombings, such as the 2004 Madrid train bombings.[17] The 2004 Madrid train bombings (also known as 3/11 and -in Spanish- as 11-M [1]) consisted of a series of coordinated bombings against the Cercanías (commuter train) system of Madrid, Spain on the morning of 11 March 2004 (three days before Spains general elections), killing 191...


Memorials

The bombing inspired the song "Paper Sun", by rock group Def Leppard, as noted in the commentary of their album Rock of Ages: The Definitive Collection. Def Leppard are an English hard rock band from Sheffield who formed in 1977 as part of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal. ...


Another song inspired by the bombings was "Peace on Earth", by rock group U2, and includes the line "They're reading names out over the radio. All the folks the rest of us won't get to know. Sean and Julia, Gareth, Ann, and Breda." The 5 names mentioned are five of the victims from this attack. Another Line, "She never got to say goodbye, To see the colour in his eyes, now he's in the dirt", was about how James Barker, a victim, was remembered by his mother Donna Maria Barker in an article in the Irish Times after the bombing in Omagh. Peace On Earth is the eighth track from U2s 2000 album, All That You Cant Leave Behind. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... The Irish Times is Irelands newspaper of record, launched in the late 1850s. ...


Omagh maintains a memorial garden in the town centre, however, a memorial stone is still to be erected.[18]


See also

  • Omagh, a 2004 TV movie dealing with the bombing

This article is about the film Omagh. ...

Notes

  1. ^ John Mooney & Michael O'Toole (2004). Black Operations: The Secret War Against the Real IRA. Maverick House, pp. 211-212. ISBN 0-9542945-9-9. 
  2. ^ "Bomb Atrocity Rocks Northern Ireland", BBC News, 1998-08-16. Retrieved on 2007-09-11. 
  3. ^ "Omagh bombing kills 28", BBC News, 1998-08-16. Retrieved on 2007-03-14. 
  4. ^ "Bravery awards for bomb helpers", BBC News, 1999-11-17. Retrieved on 2007-03-14. 
  5. ^ The Omagh Bomb - Main Events
  6. ^ Omagh bomb warnings released, BBC News
  7. ^ Real IRA apologises for Omagh bomb, BBC News
  8. ^ 14 December 2001 Real IRA Statement in Full
  9. ^ Ealing Bomb: The Real IRA, Independent 4 August, 2001
  10. ^ "Relatives disappointed with Omagh ruling", RTÉ News, 2005-01-21. Retrieved on 2007-03-14. 
  11. ^ "Sickness halts Omagh trial", The Guardian, 2006-09-06. Retrieved on 2007-03-14. 
  12. ^ "O'Loan stands over report on Omagh bomb", Ulster Herald, 2007-07-05. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  13. ^ Statement by the Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland on her Investigation of matters relating to the Omagh Bomb on August 15, 1998 (2001-12-12). Retrieved on 2007-03-14.
  14. ^ "MI5 withheld intelligence ahead of Omagh", RTÉ News, 2006-02-24. Retrieved on 2007-03-14. 
  15. ^ MI5 "did not retain Omagh advice" BBC News
  16. ^ Johnston, Wesley. Appendix B: Police Press Releases on the Omagh Bomb. Retrieved on 2007-03-14.
  17. ^ Omagh Support and Self Help Group
  18. ^ BBC News

BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... This article is about the year. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RTÉ News and Current Affairs is a major division of Radio Telefís Éireann responsible for news programming on television, radio and online within the Republic of Ireland. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ulster Herald is a newspaper based in Omagh, Co Tyrone, Northern Ireland. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... RTÉ News and Current Affairs is a major division of Radio Telefís Éireann responsible for news programming on television, radio and online within the Republic of Ireland. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
CNN.com - Two arrested over Omagh bomb - Sep. 2, 2003 (398 words)
Omagh was the worst atrocity in 30 years of Northern Ireland violence.
The bombing, carried out by the Real IRA in a shopping area of Omagh, County Tyrone, in August 1998 was the worst single incident in more than 30 years of Northern Ireland violence.
Colm Murphy, a father of four, was convicted in 2002 plotting the Omagh bombing and sentenced to 14 years in jail.
Omagh bombing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (500 words)
The Omagh bombing was a car bomb attack carried out by the Real IRA on August 15, 1998, against civilians in Omagh, Northern Ireland.
It is believed that the bombing of BBC Television Centre in London was a revenge attack for the broadcast.
The timing of the bombing, and the initial false warning calls served to magnify, not limit, the number of deaths caused by the bomb.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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